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Since I was a boy I have always longed to hear poems spoken to a harp, as I imagined Homer to have spoken his, for it is not natural to enjoy an art only when one is by oneself. Whenever one finds a fine verse one wants to read it to somebody, and it would be much less trouble and much pleasanter if we could all listen, friend by friend, lover by beloved. Images used to rise up before me, as I am sure they have arisen before nearly everybody else who cares for poetry, of wild-eyed men speaking harmoniously to murmuring wires

A Portfolio of Faces

Set to words by W.B. Yeats


“Since I was a boy I have always long


ged to hear poems spoken to a harp


as I imagined

Homer to have spoken his, for

it is not natural to enjoy an art

only when one is by oneself.


Whenever one finds a fine verse


o


one wants to share it with somebody,


and it would be much less trouble and


much pleasanter if we could all listen,


friend by friend,


love by beloved.


Images used to rise up before me,


as I am sure they have arisen before nearly everybody else who cares for poetry,


of wild-eye


ed men speaking harmoniously


to murmuring wires


while audiences


in many-coloured robes


listened,


hushed


and excited.�


- W.B Yeats, the Poet.


a poem, THE LAKE ISLE OF INNISFREE


I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree, And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made: Nine bean rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee, And live alone in the bee-loud glade.


And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow, Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings; There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow, And evening full of the linnet’s wings.


I will arise and go now, for always night and day I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore; While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements gray, I hear it in the deep heart’s core. -w.b. yeats.



The People Book