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the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013 A1


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the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013

numbers Canadian Tire Cariboo Aesthetic Laser Clinic Cariboo Bowling Churches Davidson Financial Don Buchanan Donna Barnett Dr Rudy Wassenaar Heartland Toyota Hear Clear Johnston Meier Louisiana Hayride Memorial Complex Quick Lane Save On Foods Raymond James Retirement Concept Royal Canadian Legion Walmart Pharmacist Williams Lake Seniors Village Woodland Tinnitus WLDCU WL Physiotherapy

important numbers

Ambulance ...................... 911 City Hall ........... 250-392-2311 CRD................... 250-392-3351 Library ............. 250-392-3630 Cariboo Health Services........... 250-392-8202 Cariboo Memorial Hospital ........... 250-392-4411 Gateway Crisis 250-392-8261 Home and Community Care.................. 250-305-4060 Home Support . 250-392-8256 Public Health... 250-302-5000 Death Certificates...... 250-952-2681 Family Violence ........1-800-563-0808 Pharmacare . 1-800-663-7100 Senior Supplement .......................1-866-866-0800 Shelter Aid for Elderly Renters .........1-800-257-7756 Health and Seniors Information .. 1-800-456-4911 Pensions .......1-800-277-9914 Veterans Affairs .......................1-866-522-2122

The great Cariboo Gold Rush

T

he great Cariboo gold rush is often perceived to be an independent and lengthy event, where thousands of gold seekers came into the country and became incredibly rich.  In fact, very little of that is true. Here’s what happened: The gold rush was a long, protracted happening which began in California in 1848. However, in each area it touched, the gold was quickly gathered, and the prospectors moved on, ever northward, in search of the big strike. Thus they moved from creek to creek, checking for evidence of gold. These were placer miners, first using gold pans to check out the gravel, and then, if “colour” was found, setting up sluice boxes, rockers, and flumes to wash the gold out of the gravel.  By 1858 these gold seekers had started up the Fraser River, where they were working on the many sand and gravel bars when the water was low. But gold had

Photo courtesy of the Museum of the Cariboo Chilcotin

A bird's eyeview shows the thriving community of Quesnel Forks during the Cariboo Gold Rush.

been discovered long before that by the First Nations people who had found many creeks and rivers in the Interior where “yellow rocks” could be seen in the gravel. Records show that Chief Trader, Donald McLean of the Hudson’s Bay Company at Fort Kamloops was buying gold from the local people as early as 1852. By 1857, many of the Nicomen Band were recovering gold nuggets and trading it to the HBC. By February 1858, the Fort Kamloops HBC had over 800 ounces of gold. This was a dilemma for the company. They knew that the promise of gold would bring a hoard of would be miners into the area, and the fun trade would be ruined. But gold was gold, so it was sent off to San Francisco to be mined.   Of course,

word got out and on April 25, 1858 the paddlewheel steamer Commodore docked at Victoria with 450 eager gold seekers aboard. At the time the white population of Victoria was just 400.   thus began the gold rush of 1858. Within the next eight months more than 30,000 more miners flocked into the colony of New Caledonia. Meanwhile, mass gold mining had begun on the sand bars of the Fraser River.   A group of men camped on one of the bars north of Hope.   One of the men noticed particles of gold in the moss that was growing on the rocks.  He washed a pan of the moss and found many flakes of gold.   The rest of the party began to pan the gravel and found even more gold.   The bar was named Hill’s Bar after the man who first noticed the gold.  Hill’s

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Bar would ultimately yield $2 million in gold. Even today, when you travel through the Fraser Canyon names like Boston Bar, China Bar, Kanaka Bar, Sailor’s Bar and Emory’s Bar are reminders of the mad dash to find gold along the Fraser River in 1858. By 1859, a group of men, consisting of Peter Dunlevy, Thomas Manifee, Tom Moffatt, Jim Sellers, Ira Crow, and John MacLean had reached the mouth of the Chilcotin River. There they had made camp and were panning the gravel, finding traces of gold. A young native lad suddenly appeared and asked for food. He was a runner and guide for the HBC, and was from the Fort Kamloops area.   The boy stayed for a couple of days and watched the men work.   On the second day, he told them that he knew of a place where “the gold is round and heavier” than that which Dunlevy and his group were panning. That place was on a small river northwest of Lac La Hache.   The men arranged to meet the runner in a fortnight (14 days) on the HBC fur brigade trail at the southeast end of Lac La Hache. Two weeks later, the six gold seekers were at the appointed meeting place.   Sure enough, the native lad showed up.  He told them that he couldn’t take them to the river where the gold was, but he had brought along his cousin to take them there.   The men travelled overland past what are now called Eagle Lake, McIntosh Lake, Moffatt Lake, and then down Moffatt Creek to the Horsefly River.   There they found coarse gold nuggets the size

of wheat and larger.   It was the middle of June, 1859.   Within a few hours, another group of men arrived in the area.   When gold is found word travels fast! Although much gold was found in the Horsefly River, the gold seekers continued to search for more, pushing further north, from one stream to the next.   By 1860 they were at Quesnelle Forks, where the Cariboo and Quesnel Rivers join, and later that year, they had moved up river to Keithley Creek.   In 1861 they had moved up over Yank’s Peak to Antler Creek, Lightning Creek and Barkerville.   The great Cariboo gold rush was in full swing! But, by 1864, it was all but over.   All the creeks, streams and rivers, as well as the lands around them had been staked.   The placer miners had moved on, looking for other gold bearing areas.  The rush moved further north, to the Omineca area, then even further, culminating in the Klondike Gold Rush of 1898. The truth is that for any particular region, like the Cariboo, the gold rush lasted only a short time two or three years at the most before the gold was cleaned out, except for the hard rock underground miners which remained.   Thousands and tens of thousands of gold seekers flooded the areas, but less than one in twenty actually struck it rich.  Many returned home empty handed, but a few stayed on the open up our province and to establish the roots which grew and blossomed into the B.C. we know today. Next Time:   The Packers


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The King and Queen of the Williams Lake Stampede Angie Mindus SMART 55 With a past steeped in rodeo and ranching traditions, it’s no wonder Fred and Paddie Thomas are the reigning King and Queen of the Williams Lake Stampede. Well okay, maybe they’re not officially the “king and queen,” but with a lifetime of Stampedes under their cowboy belts, (including the last twenty years as President of the Stampede Association for Fred) the two just as well be. “We love it,” says Paddy from behind the Stampede office counter of the annual rodeo, where she and a core group of volunteers work countless hours to make the Stampede happen. “When you’re raised with it, it’s a part of you. I’ve been coming (to the Stampede) forever.” Paddy is the oldest of three siblings born to well known cowboy and former Alkali Lake Ranch manager Bill Twan. Bill was working as a young ranch hand when he met Paddy’s mom, Margaret Flockheart, who was from Scotland and came to the area to work as a nanny at Alkali Lake Ranch. The couple worked the ranch their whole lives and raised their children there; Paddy Thomas, Bucky Larden and Bronc Twan. The siblings never strayed too far from home. Paddy and Bucky are neighbours in Chimney Valley while Bronc and his wife Liz (a well known rodeo and ranching photojournalist) have carried on the family tradition of managing Alkali Lake Ranch. Paddy says she still remembers when her

dad competed as a bronc rider and roman racer at the Williams Lake Stampede, back in the day when families came in by wagon and fields of tents popped up where there is now the grandstand and back parking lot. “It was really neat. And racing was a big part of it back then.” As a young man, Fred had big dreams of his own but they didn’t involve the cowboy lifestyle before he met Paddy. “My ambition in life was to be a professional hockey player,” recalls Fred, who instead played hockey for the Stampeders and was introduced to team roping at the Alkali Lake Ranch by Paddy and her family. “It was something I enjoyed,” Fred said of learning roping. “It’s more of an individual sport, it’s you against a stop watch. It was kind of addictive, a neat thing to do.” Fred made a name for himself as a competitive roper and also worked for more than thirty years at Telus while Paddy worked at court registry.  He and Paddy have been married 48 years now and have raised two sons, Owen and Brad, who also appreciate hockey and competitive roping. And though they are both retired, one could hardly tell, considering the two work around the clock as volunteers for the Stampede Association. “The Stampede is not just a four-day operation,” Fred says of the year-round commitment to putting on the event. But he loves the work. “There are a lot of great people here. I get to meet and work with

Angie Mindus photos

As Stampede President, Fred Thomas fosters a love for rodeoing in youth.

people from all walks of life,” Fred says of the rewards of volunteering with the Stampede. “My philosophy is if you’re not having fun, don’t be here.” In the months leading up to Stampede, work is so demanding Fred doesn’t even have time to go fishing, but he refuses to give up his golf. “Come hell or high water, Tuesdays and Thursdays at 1 o’clock I’m golfing.” In his time as Association president, Fred says he has achieved his own personal goals of

Working at the Stampede is a family affair for Paddy Thomas and her husband Fred, the current Williams Lake Stampede Association President. The couple's grandson Colton worked cleaning up ticket area and Let R Buck Saloon recently before the crowds arrived for the weekend. seeing rodeo attendance surpass 15,000 fans and making improvements to the Stampede Grounds every year. The couple admit though, they are eyeing up the possibility of reducing their roles in the Stampede. “Maybe it’s time for someone younger to take it on,” Fred said of the demanding role of Stampede President. “We’re thinking about it.” But in the meantime the two will continue to enjoy the rodeo, and all of their friends and family who help them celebrate the tradition every year.

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the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Lifelong Seniors 50+ to Computers Lifelong learninglearning for Seniors 50+forIntroduction Course fees vary between $15 and $80.

Begins Monday March 11th, 10 am – 12 noon Course Description: We all have to start somewhere. This course is designed for those who are brand Greenhouse Gardening in the Cariboo new to the computer, or who have no computer exBegins Thurs. April 4th, 10:00 am – 12 noon perience. It willcommitted help you to to understand Cariboo Chilcotin Elder College is a volunteer organization meetinghow thea comCourse Description: This course is a must for puter works, and provide you with a good beginning. learning and educational of older adults Lake andtosurrounding those whoneeds have built, or who are interests contemplatThere will in be Williams lots of opportunity ask questions, ing building theirCollege own greenhouse. topics to learning areas. Elder will provideThea relaxed, environment without or you will and you will be shown all the grades basic skills be covered include: basic greenhouse design and need to to improve your Elder computer proficiency. A laptop exams, based on a curriculum of particular interest members. College seeks various design options to produce optimum growing computer will be provided for you to work on.to meet its mission by recognizing theandunique conditions; basic propagating techniques plant- experiences and capabilities of its members. ing cycles; variousissoil to maximize NextinStep Elder College affitypes liatedand withhow Thompson RiversComputers University and- The operates accordance soil nutrition; cultivation and harvest dates for variwith the policies and procedures of TRU under the guidance of the Elder College Begins Thursday March 7, 9:30 am – 12 noon ous types of greenhouse plants; and developing a Executive Board regime for your greenhouse. Course Description: This is not an introductory year round planning for computer users. Rather, it is intended to Whether starting Chilcotin out, or are Elder a seasoned Contactyouusare at:justCariboo College,course Thompson Rivers University expand your computer knowledge in a number of gardening enthusiast, this course will provide you 1250 Western Ave., Williams Lake, V2G 1H7 general areas: with practical, useful tips on the botanical secrets •e-mails and attachments 250-392-8180 | E-mail: admin@wleldercollege.ca ofTelephone: the greenhouse. •word processing •working with files and folders A Day on the Williams Lake River •safely downloading programs and software Valley Trail •setting up various program features •computer security The AGM was &held on10:00 November 14th. Audrey Dye and Brenda McKeown Begins May 24th 25th, am – 4:00 pm Ken Grieve, •fine tuning your computer using shortcuts to variCourse Description: Join local field naturalists volunteered and were elected to sit on the Executive Board. We are pleased to have Anna Roberts and Ordell Steen on a day’s hike ous programs them join us. •burning all types of images/data to CD’s and through the mid and lower Williams Lake River ValDVD’s This donation made Seniors’ Activity Centre for use of their ley. Theyear trek awill begin at of the$1,200 mid-valleywas parking lot to the •using hard drives (below W.L.excellent landfill areacooperation in Glendale). The group from facility.theThe we receive theportable Manager, Glenda Winger, is most will explore the ponds, look at the geology of the val- •troubleshooting common computer problems helpful and appreciated. This is a hands on course for those who are already ley, do some bird watching, identify tree and plant comfortablebursaries with the Windows 7 operating system. We were able to donate total ofspring two $1,000.00 to graduating species, andalso generally enjoy a nicea guided Participants students are encouraged to bring along their walk for aboutschool 5 km. down to theinFraser River.Lake. You Graduating secondary students Williams who have an Elder own laptop computers to use during the sessions, will need toaffi beliation able toare walkeligible at a reasonable to bursary. College to applypace for this or if you prefer, a laptop will be provided for you. enjoy this hike, and it would be advantageous if you As you may be aware volunteers are needed have purchased a copy of Ordell and Anna’s guide if we are to continue to provide the current Furniture Reupholstery tolevel the trail entitledCollege “Stepping Into Nature” Bring your of Elder services to seniors in the community. The future of Elder College Begins Tuesday March 5, 9:30 am – 11:30 am own lunch and hydration fluids, and dress for the was discussed. Various suggestions were made; however, the bottom line is that we Course Description: This course will teach the parweather. need more volunteers to share the work, or it may be necessary to consider ticipants the basic steps involved inhiring reupholstering Intermediate or Beginners small piece of furniture (e.g. small armless chairs, someone to take on some of Bridge the administrativea tasks. footstools, dining chairs and some automotive seats All of the suggestions presented willpm be discussed by the Curriculum Committee and the Begins Monday April 15, 1:00 pm – 3:30 etc.) Each participant will be expected to bring INTERMEDIATE GROUP – This course is for those Executive Board in an effort to come up with the besta small possible forand all. to provide his/ along item solution to work on, continuing on from Don’s group from the spring of her own tools. The instructor will demonstrate the 2012. It is also open to players wishing to review the techniques involved in laying out and measuring content in the lessons below. Five lessons will cover fabric, cutting to size, and recovering the piece of the following topics: furniture. This course is not designed for those who Les son 1 Review all opening one bids and PlanRegistration: wish to take on a large reupholstery project. A list ning the Play. Competitive bidding “opening of required toolson youaneed bring Please note If the course is full and your name is placed wait tolist, thiswillis be an supplied doubles” and–responses. on sign-up. Les son 2 - TheofStrong 2 Club bid and reexpression interest onlyopening – it is not a registration. The wait list allows us to fill a sponses.and Blackwood convention. Beginners’ Spanish vacancy to determine whether the course should be offered in a subsequent Lesson 3 - Opening Weak 2 bids and responses Begins Wednesday March 13. 1pm – 3pm semester. Lesson 4 - Preemptive bidding and responses Course Description: This is basic Spanish Members should register for mini themselves whenever possible. Should a amember havecourse Les son 5 - Putting it all together-a tournament designed for people who have little or no prior covering all course content. to be away on registration day the member canknowledge ask another register their like to of themember language,tobut who would BEGINNERS GROUP:forThis courseOnly is forone those con-per learn. Students willallowed. work in a Mail relaxed atmosphere, class or classes them. proxy member will be course tinuing on fromwill Linda’s group from the spring of with a focus on learning simple terms and how to registrations not be accepted. 2012. It is also open to new players with minimal use them in a conversation. The instructor uses Course Feesbackground. are $30, all computer courses (regardless of theincluding numberhand of sessions arecards, bridge playing many methods, outs, flash Five lessons will cover the to following $35.00). Exceptions this feetopics: structure may apply. Fees have been established music, videos, and repetition to provide by youthe with Les son 1 - Review bids in awith major a basic of the language and how to Executive Board,ofinopening consultation theand Finance and understanding Curriculum Committees. responses make yourself understood. Cancellation Feesbids of in10% of the fee shall be levied to cover administrative costs Les son 2 - Opening a minor and course responses Ken’s Cooking if notice cancelOneis No given at and leastresponses seven (7) days priorCountry to the beginning of the course. Les son 3 - to Opening Trump Les son 4 -- IfThe Staymen Convention over a 1NT Begins Aprilfees 10, 10am – 12 Refund notice of cancellation is less than seven (7)Wednesday days, course will not benoon opening bid Course Description: Come and join Ken Wilson of refunded Lesson 5-Defensive leads against a suit contract Ken’s Country Cooking fame for 3 sessions of tips, Scent Free –a The Boardcontact. of Directors of Elder College has demonstration passed a motion as much and against No Trump recipes and as hethat, prepares some interesting and unique as possible, all of our meetings and classes should be scent free. dishes. PleaseThe do focus what will yoube on CARIBOO ChILCOTIN Oriental East Asian cuisine.scents. Ken’s knowledge can to respect theELDER needsCOLLEGE of those members that have and allergies to various Thompson Rivers University and enthusiasm will give you some great pointers Financial Assistance If you need financial assistance a course fee, contact 1250 Western Ave., WL -Telephone: 250-392-8180 for tryingwith out some new ideas at home. Bernie

CaribooChilcotinElderCollege – Mission Statement

The recent Aboriginal Day Parade held in Williams Lake was a great chance for First Nations men and women of every age to enjoy a celebration of their culture. Traditional pow wows take place throughout the summer months and are another opportunity to take in First Nations traditions. Angie Mindus photo

REPORT ON ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

POLICIES AND PROCEDURES OF ELDER COLLEGE

Kromhout, Elder College Treasurer at (250) 392-7880, for further information.

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Spinach Salad with Orange Sesame Dressing This salad is a nice change from lettuce and tomato. If you are saving a portion for the next day, save the dressing separately. SERVES: 2 CALORIES: 82, PROTEIN: 2 G, FAT: 5 G, CARBOHYDRATE: 7 G, FIBRE: 2 G, SODIUM: 36 MG, CALCIUM: 62 MG.

chopped onion.       4. Make the dressing by adding all remaining ingredients to the orange rind     injar or cup. Shake or whisk together.     5. When ready to serve, pour dressing on top of the spinach and orange slices     and sprinkle with sesame seeds.   Thanks to Trudi Stevenson of Courtenay, B.C.

VARIATION: In strawberry season, use 1 cup sliced fresh strawberries instead of the orange and do not use the orange rind. Substitute 1 tbsp red wine INGREDIENTS: vinegar for the orange juice and 1 tsp poppy • 2 cups (500 mL) chopped fresh spinach    seeds for the sesame seeds. • 1 orange     • 1 tbsp (15 mL) chopped red or green onion DRESSING INGREDIENTS:     • 1½ tsp (7 mL) olive oil or canola oil     INSTRUCTIONS: • ½ tsp (2 mL) sesame oil (optional)     • ¼ tsp    1. Wash and dry spinach. Tear or chop it (1 mL) honey or sugar     • 1 pinch powdered into bite-sized pieces and place in     a serving ginger     • 1 pinch pepper     • ½ tsp (2 mL) bowl.     2. Finely grate a small amount of peel orange rind     • 1 tbsp (15 mL) orange juice     from the orange and put it in a small     jar or • 1 tsp (5 mL) sesame seeds, toasted cup.       3. Peel the orange, slice it into bitesized pieces and add it to the spinach.     Add PREPARATION AND COOKING TIME: 20-30 MINUTES

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the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013

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Mountain biking  offers adrenaline rush Angie Mindus SMART 55 When he and his family moved from South Africa to Canada a decade ago, outdoor enthusiast Charles Newsberry and his wife Melissa traded in their surf boards and sail boats for skis

and a pair of mountain bikes. “Melissa and I have always done outdoors stuff,” Charles says of his attraction to the adrenaline pumping sport of mountain biking.  “The first thing we did

when we moved to Canada was take up (downhill) skiing, then we heard about mountain biking.” So, at least a couple times a week for the last decade Charles has hit the local trails and mountain biking festivals to challenge himself with the sport. “It gets you out in nature. That’s what really drew me to it,” he said. That, and the thrill that biking up and down mountains, over roots and rocks, can bring. “We’ve always done things that give us a little bit of an adrenaline kick. It’s what keeps me sane.” Charles, who is the human resources manager at the Williams Lake and District Credit Union, says he and Melissa plan to keep biking “as long as we can” and says there’s no better place to do so than just out their back door on the trails around Williams Lake.

June Winner is Luz Wells WIN $100 CANADIAN TIRE DOLLARS

TOP: Charles Newberry competes in the last Pedal by the Puddle enduro Angie race in June. Mindus photo

ABOVE RIGHT: Charles Newberry, Sean Donahue and Ivor McMahen stand in the winner's circle as the top three times in their age category during the recent Peel Out mountain bike festival in Williams Lake.

July 3rd-July 28th

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Melissa Newberry photo

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RIGHT: Charles and Melissa Newberry enjoy mountain bikAngie ing together.

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Mindus photo

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the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013

2013 BC Cowboy Hall Of Fame Inductees Pat Skoblanuik Museum of the Cariboo-Chilcotin Frank Teer 2013 BC Cowboy Hall Of Fame Ranching Pioneer

Frank Teer carved a ranch out of the wilderness and spent his whole life around cattle and horses. Frank embraced the challenges of the hard cowboy life and loved living the lifestyle. Frank was born in 1916 in Big River Saskatchewan to Sam

and Lucy Teer, the youngest of eight children. He was only six when his father died, so Frank helped his mother on the homestead where they maintained a herd of 40 head of shorthorns. Frank married Aldythe while ranching in Clinton and spent his life ranching in Clinton, and later in North Western B.C. Frank was dedicated to ranching, his family and taught his children,

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grandchildren and great grandchildren the cowboy way of life. He was always available to help a neighbour with a sick animal. After a hip replacement in 1990, Frank spent much of his time with his grandchildren coaching and encouraging them as they learned to ride and rope and promoting the ranch life style. Frank died in 1999 after suffering a heart attack a year earlier. He is buried in the Old Heritage Cemetery in Clinton beside his wife Aldythe and their two infant children. JOHN DODD 2013 BC COWBOY HALL OF FAME WORKING COWBOY

John Dodd was a lifelong working cowboy and decorated soldier. He was born July 25,1915, in Spuzzum B.C. When he started out working on his own, John was still very young. He worked as a ranch hand until he enlisted in the Canadian Scottish Regiment in September 4, 1940 and served overseas until April 8, 1946. He was awarded a military medal for bravery.

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Four area cowboys got some help celebrating the honour of being inducted into the Cowboy Hall of Fame this spring at the Williams Lake Indoor Rodeo. Pictured are: Back row - Miss Rodeo Canada Gillian Shields, Dale Teer, Archie Williams, Larry Ramstad, Mike Dodd, 2012 Williams Lake Stampede Princess, Terris Billyboy and 2012 Williams Lake Stampede Queen, Alexis Forseille. Front row - Miss Ashcroft Rodeo Princess (and Archie Williams' granddaughter), Harley Antoine, 2013 Williams Lake Stampede contestants - Miss Rotary Club of Williams Lake, Karina Sukert, Miss M.H. King Excavating, Kyra Stuart, Miss Daybreak Rotary, Rachel Abrahamse (named Williams Lake's 2013 Stampede Queen last Angie Mindus photo week). Returning to his home after the war, John continued his cowboy career. He loved the cowboy way of life, riding the open range. He worked on many of the big ranches in the Cariboo Chilcotin areas including the Gang Ranch and the Circle S. His cowboy skills did not go un-noticed and soon John was hired as general manager at Chilco Ranch and was later manager of the River Ranch. John was a mentor to many youngsters and helped them with their horses and also helped with 4-H. He was an active member in the BC Cattlemen’s Association and worked at the Williams Lake Stock Yards for several years. Although he didn’t compete in rodeo, John was always ready to help with repairs and maintenance of the Williams Lake stampede grounds. He was dedicated to his children and was always there with encouragement and help. Two of John’s sons, Mike and David ride in rough stock events in the rodeo. John worked for a brief period in Alberta and returned to work at the Gang Ranch until his retirement. When he was ready to retire, John settled at Riske Creek where he kept a few saddle horses. He died September 16, 1995 at the age of 80. John is buried

in the Williams Lake Cemetery. ARCHIE WILLIAMS 2013 BC COWBOY HALL OF FAME COMPETITIVE

He has been called ‘a one-of-a-kind’ cowboy, perhaps born 100 years too late, but in these modern times, makes the best of riding, roping and telling stories of the ol’ days. Archie Williams, well known and respected rodeo competitor, has never lived very far from his roots. He was born and raised on the Bonaparte Reserve at Cache Creek in 1944. He spent a lot of working and riding his uncle Dave Perry who encouraged him to pursue a career in rodeo. Dave and Joan Perry had a ranch at Cache Creek and were well known rodeo competitors and stock contractors. Archie began competing at the age of 14 and still competes today, well into his late 60s. He is a horseman and competed mostly in timed events such as calf roping, cow penning, barrel racing and team roping. He tried steer wrestling and spent many years riding as a pick-up man in the bucking events. In 1974, Archie made history as the first pickup man for the CNFR chosen by the cowboys themselves. From that time on he was sure to be chosen every time he submitted his name as a

candidate. Team roping is Archie’s favourite competition. Twice he attended Camarillo Team Roping Schools just so he could get it right. He won his first team roping championship with partner Herb Reeder and over the years has roped with several cowboys. Archie is a five-time BC Team Roping Association champion. His roping partner for over 15 years was his good friend Fred Stevenson. He often partnered with the late Diane White and Doug White and more recently with his son Neal. Today Archie is still roping but now his partners are his grandsons, each of them taking turns throughout the rodeo circuit. His granddaughters are learning to rope and will soon be competing with their grandfather. Archie spends a lot of time with his grandchildren and whenever he is babysitting he takes them out riding in the arena or somewhere in the mountains and teaching them the cowboy ways. Archie was chosen by the BC Rodeo Association ‘Rodeo Person of the Year’in 2010. LARRY RAMSTAD 2013 BC COWBOY HALL OF FAME WORKING COWBOY/HORSEMAN

Larry Ramstad, legendary manager of the

million-plus acre Gang Ranch since 1990, has always made his living horseback around cows. He has worked on ranches with horses and cattle all his life. Larry was raised on the family farm in Valleyview, Alberta and after graduating from agricultural college came to the Nicola Valley to work on the Guichon Ranch. Ramstad spent one year working on remote ranches in New Zealand and Australia before returning to British Columbia. Back again, in the Nicola Valley, Larry cowboyed at Quilchena Cattle Co. under experienced cow boss Ken Knapp, who taught him well. During his time working there, Larry met Beverly Twan and they were married in 1969. Beverly was well used to ranch life as she had grown up at Quilchena and was managing the ranch store at the time she and Larry met. They have two children, Larry Dean and Lori and two granddaughters, Braidyn and Courtney. After six years at Quilchena, the family moved to the Chilcotin and Larry worked on the Cotton Ranch at Riske Creek. He was the cow boss there for three years. Another ranch in the area, the River Ranch, had been sold to people from See HALL OF FAME on Page 7


the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013 A7

Heat stress in the elderly something to watch for Signs and Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

Warning signs vary but may include the following: Heavy sweating Paleness Muscle Cramps Tiredness Weakness Dizziness Headache Nausea or vomiting Fainting Skin: may be cool and moist Pulse rate: fast and weak Breathing: fast and shallow What You Can Do to Protect Yourself

You can follow these prevention tips to protect yourself from heatrelated stress: Drink cool, nonalcoholic beverages. Rest. Take a cool show-

er, bath, or sponge bath. If possible, seek an air-conditioned environment. Wear lightweight clothing. If possible, remain indoors in the heat of the day. Do not engage in strenuous activities. What You Can Do to Help Protect Elderly Relatives and Neighbors

If you have elderly relatives or neighbors, you can help them protect themselves from heat-related stress: Visit older adults at risk at least twice a day and watch them for signs of heat exhaustion or heat stroke. Encourage them to increase their fluid intake by drinking cool, nonalcoholic beverages regardless of their activity level.

Warning: If their doctor generally

limits the amount of fluid they drink or they are on water pills, they will need to ask their doctor how much they should drink while the weather is hot. Take them to airconditioned locations if they have transportation problems. What You Can Do for Someone With Heat Stress

If you see any signs of severe heat stress, you may be dealing with a life-threatening emergency. Have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the affected person. Do the following: Get the person to a shady area

Cool the person rapidly, using whatever methods you can. For example, immerse the

Take steps to avoid mosquito bites and West Nile virus detected in B.C. in the South Okanagan during the summer of 2009.  To date there have been three human cases of WNv acquired in our province -  all of which have been in the Okanagan.  Last year, several parts of the Canada and the U.S. saw significant increases in West Nile virus activity. “We would like to remind residents to take steps both here at

home and when travelling to avoid mosquito bites this summer,” said Jennifer Jeyes, Communicable Disease Specialist with Interior Health. “While the risk of becoming seriously ill from WNv infection is low for many people, it is higher for some such as the elderly and those with compromised immune systems. It is important to remember there

are preventative steps that everyone can take in order to reduce the risk of infection.”  Jeyes offers the following tips: Use mosquito repellent. Wear protective clothing. Avoid outdoor activities at dusk and dawn. Install screens on windows. Prevent mosquito breeding around your home. B.C. and Interior Health are on the watch for West Nile

BC Cowboy Hall of Fame Continued from Page 6

mitted. The Ramstads toughed it out and worked hard over the years to improve the livestock and ranch until it was a successful operation. All of the money generated by the ranch goes back into improvements, employee’s wages and goods and services from local suppliers, adding to the economy of the area. Larry and Bev have been on the ranch for over two decades now, longer than any other owner or manager. Larry is well liked by his peers and has a reputation of being very honest and respectful in his dealings with other people. For many years Larry has had Ray Hunt put

on horsemanship and colt starting clinics at the ranch to improve the cowboys skills and the horses. Larry is himself, an expert horseman. Larry is an avid supporter of ranch rodeo and Gang Ranch cowboys are regular competitors. He was recently honoured at the Nanton rodeo in Alberta for upholding the western tradition and cowboy lifestyle as all the cattle work on the Gang Ranch is done on horseback. Larry Ramstad is a cattleman, horseman and ‘cowboy for all seasons’. He is most deserving of a place in the BC Cowboy Hall of Fame.

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cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101°–102°F If emergency medi-

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Italy. Larry was hired by former owner Bob Lee to manage the ranch for the new absentee owners. The ranch was badly run down, but with a lot of hard work and good management, Ramstad turned it into a successful operation in two years time. Unassuming, levelheaded, level-speaking Larry soon gained a reputation as an excellent ranch manager. Guy Rose, the owner of Quilchena, wanted Larry back to manage the ranch and try to turn it around. He got the job done in short order and stayed on as manager at Quilchena for twelve years. From Quilchena,

Larry went to Gang Ranch on the south west side of the Fraser River. The new owner, Sheik Ibraham Afandi of Saudi Arabia advertised for a manager and of the 98 applicants for the position, Larry was chosen. The ranch had passed through many owners and managers in the previous years and was in a sorry state. Corrals, buildings and irrigation systems were in disrepair. The hay grounds needed attention and the cowherd was in bad shape. Larry knew it would be a difficult job but he first hired cowboys and a ranch crew and got to work improving the cattle’s welfare and did other ranch improvements when time per-

virus. Surveillance programs include reporting dead birds from the corvid family (crows, ravens, magpies, and jays). These birds are more likely than others to die from West Nile virus. Members of the public are encouraged to report dead corvid birds using the BC Centre for Disease Control Dead Bird Reporting page: http:// westnile.bccdc.org/. 

✃ ✃

Summer is here and so are the mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are more than a nuisance; some carry West Nile virus, a disease that is spread from infected birds to humans through mosquito bites.  Any activity that prevents mosquitoes from biting or breeding can help to reduce the risk of becoming infected with West Nile virus.   West Nile virus (WNv) was first

person in a tub of cool water; place the person in a cool shower; spray the person with cool water from a garden hose; sponge the person with cool water; or if the humidity is low, wrap the person in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously. Monitor body temperature and continue

fluids.

is unable to cool down. Body temperatures rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided. Signs and Symptoms of Heat Strokemay include the following symptoms: An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F) Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating) Rapid, strong pulse Throbbing headache Dizziness Nausea Heat Exhaustion Heat exhaustion is a milder form of heatrelated illness that can develop after several days of exposure to high temperatures and inadequate or unbalanced replacement of

Center for Disease Control Elderly people are more prone to heat stress than younger people for several reasons: Elderly people do not adjust as well as young people to sudden changes in temperature. They are more likely to have a chronic medical condition that changes normal body responses to heat. They are more likely to take prescription medicines that impair the body’s ability to regulate its temperature or that inhibit perspiration. Heat stroke is the most serious heatrelated illness. It occurs when the body becomes unable to control its temperature: the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the body loses its ability to sweat, and it

SUMMER HOURS: Monday-Thursday 9am-4:30pm | Friday 9am-12:30pm CLOSED FOR LUNCH 12:30PM-1:30PM We will be closed for Summer Holidays starting Friday, August 2 Open Monday, August 19 @ 9am

Lindsay Satchell IAT, ILE-HIS, BC-HIS Hearing Instrument Specialist

145 4th Avenue South, Williams Lake, BC Atwood/Yorston Medical Clinic – Lower Level

Phone: 250-392-2922 Fax: 250-392-2947 Toll Free: 1-866-327-8678 woodlandtinnitus@shaw.ca


A8

the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Residents of the Williams Lake Senior's Village are all smiles as they are treated to an annual barbecue and wagon rides courtesy of the Cariboo Draft Horse and Angie Mindus photos Driving Club last month.

A battery is a battery is a battery- correct? Not for hearing aids! By Lindsay Satchell So you have decided to get hearing aids and with the help of your competent hearing health care provider, you have decided on a style. That’s great! But just like your car or truck needs, oil changes and maintenance and your horse needs shoeing, a hearing aid needs care and maintenance to provide you with quality of life improvements for hearing.

One of the largest costs associated with hearing aids is battery use. There are basically four sizes of hearing aid batteries ranging from the smallest (size # 10- with 2-4 Days of life) to the largest # 675 with approx. 21 days of life. If you have small ear canals and are getting a small CIC (completely in the canal) aid you may have no choice except to get the smaller battery.

You should keep in mind that this will increase your yearly costs with aids and can be somewhat annoying since these batteries require frequent changes. You can save yourself money by opening the hearing aid battery doors at night and keeping your hearing aids free from moisture which increases battery use, by opting to purchase a hearing aid drier ranging in price

Do you have an event that we should know about?

Smart Seniors want to know.

Call: 250-398-5516 Fax: Attention Seniors 250-398-5855

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Deadline for our next edition: July 25, 2013

from $22 for a basic jar option to $200 for a sterilizer/ drier combo. A very easy to use and functional electric drier with virtually no maintenance can be purchased for under $100.00. Some companies are also offering rechargeable batteries and recharging units which can also save money. Hearing aid batteries may look like watch batteries but their chemical makeup is far different. They are called Zinc-Air and come with a small tap covering tiny air holes on the battery. Once this tab is pulled and air inters the battery, the battery is draining. Even if the tab is put back over the holes quickly, the battery is still draining and will die so never

Lindsay Satchell remove the tab until you are ready to use the battery right away! This is why a hearing aid may have a live battery when last used but the battery will be inoperative when next inserted into the ear. Unlike a flash light battery which begins to get dimmer and Seniors’ Drop-Ins Every Tuesday 1-3pm $10 - 3 Games Tuesday 1pm to 5pm Wednesday 3pm to 9pm Thursday 3pm to 9pm Friday 3pm to 10pm Cosmic Bowling 6pm to 10pm

Saturday 1pm to 5pm and 7pm to 10pm

Cariboo Bowling Lanes 250.392.5526 www.cariboobowl.com 204 - 1st Ave. N.

dimmer as it weakens until the flashlight no longer works, hearing aid batteries operate at 100% and then generally go down close to zero power very quickly! Here are a few quick tips related to hearing aid batteries If you are not planning on using your hearing aids for an extended period of time remove the batteries completely from hearing aids To protect hearing aid batteries from discharging, keep them away from metal objects such as coins and keys Avoid storing hear-

ing aid batteries in extreme temperatures (in car glove boxes or freezer). Batteries should be stored at room temperatures out of direct sunlight Wash your hands before changing your batteries as dirt and oils will contaminate the battery and may damage your hearing aid Remove dead batteries from hearing aids immediately as they can swell, begin to corrode and become difficult to remove from aid or damage aid electronics Match the (+) of the battery to the (+) of the aid door Keep batteries safely out of the reach of children and pets and away from medications to reduce the risk of accidentally swallowing of batteries Always carry spare batteries to replace them as needed. With a little care you can get the most out of your hearing aid batteries and your hearing aids and you can experience a quality of life improvement which only hearing aid can provide!


the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013 A9

Enjoying the benefits of the Cariboo sun Cameron Johnston, Pastor and Lifestyle Consultant Everyone enjoys sunshine and we look forward to summer when the sun has more heat and improves our moods. Today, the benefits of sunshine is often overshadowed and not fully appreciated because of fears that are both real and

imagined. It is well known that too much exposure to direct sunlight especially in the middle of the day without proper protection does put us at risk of sunburn which damages skin cells and blood vessels. Repeated sun damage causes the skin to look dry, wrinkled, discolored, and leath-

ery which can increase the risk of developing skin cancer. These dangers can largely be avoided when sunbathing or working out in the sun for long periods by use of good sunscreen protection or wearing proper clothing. However, one could get the impression, mainly from advertising that every

Win Gooding Member of the O.A.P.O. Branch 93 Senior Activity Centre Summer certainly came in with a royal bang this year. Through a more terrifying experience of thunder, lightening and torrential downpour of hail and rain. It sure did a number of flattening my flowers and the local gardens in the area. Let's hope that July will bring us some relief and sunshine before summer is over. Seniors and persons interested in the B.C. Old Age Pensioners Convention in the Princeton/ Similkameen Branch of the OAPO on June 11-13 was very well attend with 12 B.C. OAPO board members, 40 delegates and 32 non-voting visitors. Jennifer Coleman was selected as President for 2 years as well as Betty Bolton, Secretary and Marg Seward on Finance. Keynote speakers on Tuesday, Alice Edge, Member of Council

of Senior Citizens Organisation COSCO, spoke on Addiction of Seniors regarding abuse of alcohol and misuse of prescription drugs and gambling addiction and treatment of these abuses. A workshop was held later. On Wednesday speaker Sylvia Phifer of COSCO gave workshops on Pensions, Tax Options and Involuntary Separation of Seniors. A form ISO-1811 for involuntary separation is available at the local Service Canada office. In the afternoon guest speaker, Dr. Mary Ann Murphy from the Gerontology Department of University of B.C. She empathized how important it is to have well trained nurses taking care of the aging population in our hospitals and care facilities. Each year our local OAPO Branch 93 provides a bursary to a local student taking training in the field of Gerontology Nursing. Next year the local branch of the OAPO Branch 93 will host the

BC OAP Convention in June 2014. In 2014 the local OAPO Branch 93 will celebrate its 40th year. This years convention in Princeton/ Similkameen was great and our delegates came away with a letter of understanding of how important it is to attend these conventions and represent our OAPO Branch 93 for our local community as a whole. There will be no monthly meetings for the OAPO Branch 93 in July and August. The next meeting will be on Thursday September 12, at 2pm at the Seniors Centre. New members are always welcome to attend so hope to see some new faces at the September meeting. Please note that the Seniors Centre will be closed for 2 weeks in mid-August. The volunteers need a much deserved rest. Until next time remember; our lives begin to end when we remain silent on issues that really matter. Martin Luther King.

Seniors news

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Deadline for our July edition: July 25, 2013

exposure to the sun is dangerous and a person could conclude that it is best to never have exposure to the sun. In reality, moderate exposure is safe and very beneficial to good health. Dr. Oz recently encouraged his television viewers to sit out in the sun for 15 minutes a day without sunscreen in order to receive the benefits of sun exposure. Researchers and doctors are now beginning to appreciate some of the ways that the sun

can actually be good for you. It is unlikely that 30 to 60 minutes a day would be harmful and would bring more benefits than risks. Here are a few reasons why getting out in the sun is good for you. Exposure to sunshine helps you get an adequate supply of Vitamin D which promotes bone health, boosts immune function, reduces inflammation, improves neuro-muscular function and even protects against some forms of

cancer. Sun exposure helps you produce more serotonin, endorphins, and melatonin in your brain. These natural chemicals are linked with feeling good and helping you sleep better. Experts have also found that the sun helps you produce more white blood cells, which enhances immunity and more red blood cells which means more oxygen in your blood, thus more energy.

Sunlight, a natural antiseptic, actually kills viruses, bacteria, molds, yeast and fungi that may be found on your skin or in our homes. So open up the windows and let the sunshine in and disinfect your home. Like all natural health resources sun exposure in moderation is very beneficial. Use good judgment and balance and get out this summer, fall, winter, spring and enjoy some good Cariboo sunshine every day you can.

COMMUNITY EVENTS IN THE CARIBOO CHILCOTIN

The Memorial Hospital Auxiliary holds their monthly meetings the 2nd Wednesday of every month @7pm in the Board Room, main floor. New members welcome

“Grieving Together” support group for persons experiencing bereavement. Call the Central Cariboo Hospice Palliative Care Society 250-392-5430 for more info The Alzheimer Resource Centre offers a lending library of Books & Videos with information on Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia. The Alzheimer Resource Centre is located in the Seniors Activity Centre. Office hours are Tues and Thurs. 1pm to 3pm. Call 250-305-0573 or 250-3925337 for more info The Red Cross Health Equipment Loans Program is located at Deni House 250-398-6803 Mon., Wed., Thurs. and Fri. 10 11:30am Tues 1-2:30pm. Red Cross will require a referral for all loans. Narcotics Anonymous. Want to quit drugs or affected by someone’s drug use? Meetings at Health Centre 555 Cedar. Mon & Fri 7;30PM. Local # 250791-5287 & Kamloops Help Line 250-320-5032 Overeaters Anonymous. Mondays at 5:30 @ Deni House board room. Phone Pat 250-392-7145 or Peggy 250-392-5398 Co-Dependence Anonymous - a 12 Step fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is to develop healthy relationships. Mondays 6:30 Deni House Sunshine room. For

more info 250-392-7394 Drop In Traditional rug hooking. Free every Thursday. Call Sharon at 250296-4432 The Caribou Brain Injury Society provides weekly support groups and one-toone support for survivors of acquired brain injury (ABI). If you or someone you know has suffered an ABI, please phone 250392-7772 to get more and info and support NAR-ANON Family Group. Are you affected by someone else’s drug addiction? The Nar-Anon Family Groups are for those affected by someone else’s addiction. As a Twelve Step program, we offer our help by sharing our experience, strength and hope with each other. Meetings in Williams Lake Wednesdays 6-7pm, New Location: Sunshine Meeting Room - Deni House. For more info call Trish 250-398-2673 Abrahams Lodge & Care Society meet every month, last Thursday of each month at 4pm 505 Wotzke Dr. WL. Donations are welcome of any kind. Please send cash donations to Abrahams Lodge & Care Society. PO Box 4272 Station Main. Williams Lake, BC. V2G 2V3. 250-3983307 The Williams Lake Garden Club meets on Thursday, July 4th at 7 pm in the Arts Centre (old Fire Hall). The guest speaker will be Brianne van de Wijngaard from Puddle Produce and her topic is Composting. New members are always welcome. Drop-in fee is $2. For more information call Charlene at 392-2699.

To post your community event Email: classifieds@caribooadvisor.com Please include: Event, date, time, location and contact number

Alliance Church

Services Sunday 10:30am

Sunday School for Children’s Preschool and Grades, Nursery Available. Blended Worship Style.

Chris Harder 250-392-4280

Evangelical Free Church

Sunday Worship 10am Sermon 10:30am

1100-11th Ave. N. Williams Lake

250-392-2843

Sunday Morning Service at 10am KidsStreet at 10:30am Ages 2-11 Lead Pastor: Corwin Smid Youth Pastor: Steve Pederson

Affiliated with PAOCC

St. Andrews United Church 1000 Huckvale Place (just off Midnight)

SERVICES AT 10am SUNDAY

Rev. Jenny Carter 250-398-6745

Sacred Heart Catholic Church Priests: Father Derrick Cameron Father Clinton Pendleton

Sunday Mass 9:30 and 7:00 pm Saturdays 5:00 pm anticipated for Sunday 450 Pigeon Ave Williams Lake Phone: 250-398-6806 sacredheartwl.org

Advertise your church here! Contact us at 250-398-5516 Next Deadline: April 25, 2013


A10

Smart Word Search walkers

the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013

SMART LIVING

Angie Mindus photo

Else and Pete Wijma enjoy a walk at Scout Island recently. The couple say they try to walk daily to keep in good health.

55 Sudoku 55 plus

Birthdays and Anniversaries

Whether it’s Health and Dental Insurance, Life Insurance, Travel Insurance or Critical Illness Insurance or Estate Planning, we have you covered! • Long Term Care Insurance • GICs • Annuities Bill Davidson 299-C - 2nd Avenue North, Williams Lake Email: invest06@shaw.ca

Toll Free 888-581-1042 • 250-398-8330

Debbie Shawara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 2 Joanne Laird . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 5 Bernie Inscho . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 6 Gwen Holmes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 6 Gordon Bremner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 8 Gladys Paulson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 9 Tom Essery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 9 Joe Yochman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 10 Midori Kozuki . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 10 Chris Hicks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 12 Kate Moffat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 13 Peter Sarnowski . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 14 Paul Briggs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 16 Mike Straza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 17 Agnes Collins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 18 Larry Toews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 18 Beverly Butcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 19 Edna Telford. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 21 Lillian Haines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 22 Peggy Buchanan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 22 Karel Stadel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 23 Alvin Gregory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 24 Reid Thelma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 24 Maureen Veitch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 26 Jeannine Morgan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 28 Bill Reid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 22 Diane Bland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 1 Penny Forseille . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 4 Douglas McRae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 5 Rick Hitchcock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 12 Marlys McRae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 14 Peggy Buchanan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 22 Theresa Person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 23 Thelma Schmidt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 24 Ina Boxeur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 26 Ramesh Varma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 30


55 Calendar of Events

the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013 A11

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Seniors’ Maintaining Active Retirement Today

Beg. Bridge 1:00pm Senior Advocate 1:00pm

CANADA DAY Centre Closed 10:30 Catholic Mass 11:00 Drama Club 2:00 Busy Bees

9:45 Bible Study 11:00 Fitness 1:30 Grocery Bank Run 2:30 Herb's Harmony Hour

Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm

Beg. Bridge 1:00pm Senior Advocate 1:00pm

10:30 Catholic Mass 11:00 Drama Club 2:00 Busy Bees

9:45 Bible Study 11:00 Fitness 1:30 Grocery Bank Run 2:30 Herb's Harmony Hour

Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm

Painting 10:00 am Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm 3pm - Happy Hour 6:30 Movie Time

11am - Fitness with Judy

2pm - Bingo

Gentle Fit 10:00am Bridge 12:30pm 11am - Fitness with Judy

3pm - Happy Hour 6:30 Movie Time

9:45am - Bible Study 11am - Fitness 1:30pm - Grocery & Bank Run 2:30 Herb's Harmony Hour

Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm

Walking Group 9:00am Cribbage 7:00 pm

Painting 10:00 am Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm

Beg. Bridge 1:00pm Senior Advocate 1:00pm

10:30am - Catholic Mass 11am - Drama Club 2pm - Busy Bees

Gentle Fit 10:00am Bridge 12:30pm

Beg. Bridge 1:00pm Senior Advocate 1:00pm

10:30am - Catholic Mass 11am - Drama Club 2pm - Busy Bees

9:45am - Bible Study 11am - Fitness 1:30pm - Grocery & Bank Run 2:30pm - Herb's Harmony

Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm Cribbage 1:00

Beg. Bridge 1:00pm Senior Advocate 1:00pm

10:30am - Catholic Mass 11am - Drama Club 2pm - Busy Bees

9:45am - Bible Study 11am - Fitness 1:30pm - Grocery & Bank Run 2:30pm - Herb's Harmony

Painting 10:00 am Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm

Gentle Fit 10:00am Bridge 12:30pm 11am - Fitness with Judy

Walking Group 9:00am Cribbage 7:00 pm

Bingo Doors open 11:00am Starts: 12:00pm

Bingo Doors open 11:00am Starts: 12:00pm

2pm - Bingo

Walking Group 9:00am Cribbage 7:00 pm

Bingo Doors open 11:00am Starts: 12:00pm

2pm - Bingo

3pm - Happy Hour 6:30pm - Movie Time

Painting 10:00 am Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm

Gentle Fit 10:00am Bridge 12:30pm

Walking Group 9:00am Cribbage 7:00 pm

11am - Fitness with Judy

2pm - Bingo

Exercises 10:30 Bridge 12:30

Elderberry Jam 10:00 Walking Group 9:00 Tia Chi 11:00 Cribbage 7:00

Bingo Doors open 11:00am Starts: 12:00pm

3pm - Happy Hour 6:30pm - Movie Time

Painting 10:00 am Walking Group 9:00am Carpet Bowling 1:00pm

11am - Fitness with Judy

3pm - Happy Hour 6:30pm - Movie Time

Doors open 11:00am Starts: 12:00pm

2pm - Bingo

$9.95 OILGrand Opening CHANGEONSLY! ! SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 ! ST

SATURDAY

R ON ALL PASSENGE V SU & CARS, TRUCKS Do you have an event happening GAS ENGINES ONLY

SENIORS ACTIVITY CENTRE 1776 North 4th Avenue, Williams Lake Phone 250-398-7946

catering to seniors?

WILLIAMS LAKE SENIORS VILLAGE

BBQ

COLOULake S! Western PRIZE1455 RIN GIVE Avenue, Williams CONTEST G Phone 250-305-3318 S! PRIZE AWAYS! CFHOILRDTRHEE * BYDONATION PRIZES! DONATION *BY CHIL N

Phone 250-398-5516 to have your event added to the July calendar.

DREN

SENIORS DISCOUNTS EVERYDAY! MAINTENANCE OIL & FILTER

Don’t Forget We’ll Store Your Tires For You... Ask us For Details!

TIRES & BRAKES ALIGNMENT

THE WORKS

Package Includes: SUSPENSION Motorcraft Premium Oil & Motorcraft BATTERIES Filter Change STUDDED Rotate ED And Inspect 4 Tires TRUCK STUDUpDTEToR 87 Point Inspection STUDDED Including: WIN ES TIRES SUV TIRES FROM components FROM T•IRFRSteering and suspension OM $ 99 W $ 99 ED hoses 99 LIbelts MITand HIL $• Check E M TI and report on Sfindings UPPLIEES • Battery test R OFFElevels LAST • Check fluid

Fuel Economy Package When performed with regularly scheduled maintenance, this package could pay for itself with potential annual fuel savings of up to $350!

OUR SERVICE

Whatever your service needs, we offer many options, including appointment-free service in our Quick Lane Centres, and regular scheduled maintenance and light repair service in our Genuine Parts & Service departments. The convenience oof prepaid maintenance and the peace of mind of extended sservice plans are also available to you.

SENIORS COST

99

49

$5400

* RECEIVE: Q QUICK LANE CUSTOMERS

P PERSONALIZED CARE TTalk to our friendly and knowledgeable team about your sservice needs, then relax and watch as we take care of your vvehicle. QUALITY YOU CAN TRUST Q REGULAR We provide quality automotive services for most makes and W models, backed by Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited. m WHILE YOU WAIT SERVICE W Quick Lane offers vehicle maintenance and light repairs at Q pprices you can afford, with no appointment necessary!

149 $ 99* 59

* You Could Win Your Tire Purchase!

SERVING ALL MAKES AND MODELS! S

*Gas vehicles only.

V V I S I TT OOUURR QFUAISCTK LL AA N N EE, LL OOCCAAT TE DE DA TA: T : E

AM

EN

NU

AD

RO

E AV NA ME

E AM

.N WY

PK

TIRE & AUTO CENTRE

E

AM

ST

RE

N ET

HOMETOWN LAKE CITY FORD FORD

1234 STREET, PROVINCE 715 OLIVER STREET,CITY, WILLIAMS LAKE

250-392-7700 • 1-800-668-3994 (123) 456-7890

Mount and Balance Store your tires with us!* ONLY

$10.00 PER SET OF 4

SHUTTLE SERVICE AVAILABLE

HOURS: HOURS OF OPERATION: MON-FRI 8:00AM-8:00PM MONDAY to SATURDAY SAT8:00 8:00AM-6:00PM 8:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M. A.M. - 5:00 P.M. Proud Member SUNDAY CLOSED of the Ford Family

MAINTENANCE• OIL & FILTER • TIRES • BRAKES • ALIGNMENT • SUSPENSION

15.00 Per Tire

$

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES AND MODELS - NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY


the Cariboo Advisor Wednesday, July 3, 2013

0

50

Morice Mor ice Lake

40

Tahtsa Lake

Houston Housto

Burns La Lake ke

François Fr ançois La Lake ke

Ootsa Lake

16

Endako Endako

27

Nech ako Rive r Vanderhoof Vanderhoof

ilako Rive

Naltesby Lake

Ch

r

O

97

26

Mt. Murray 1989m

14 13

Mt. Agnes 1983m

WEST TWIN PROVINCIAL PARK & PROTECTED AREA

16

www.landwithoutlimits.com

BOWRON LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK

Bowron Lakes

Mitchell Lake

O

U

R

N

az

TA

iver ko R

Fraser

n es Qu

IN

Murtle Lake

S

Ri

GRAY

O

ve

r

PARK

PROVINCIAL

A S

Clearwater

th So u

nc

i

5

M

Little Fort

T

O

rm kA

U N T A

Sun Peaks Ski Resort

I

n akli Klin

To Banff/ Calgary

N S

ier lac iG lt mu Tu

B

97C

To Kelowna

5A

KAMLOOPS

Kamloops Lake

Mt. Robson 3954m

To Jasper/ Edmonton

Tête Jaune Cache

WELLS

Clearwater Lake

Azure Lake

Hobson Lake

Mahood Lake

Crooked Lake

Eureka Peak 2426m

Horsefly Mountain 1793m

Seasonal gravel road from Likely to Barkerville

Hen Ingram Lake

Keithley Creek

Barkerville CARIBOO MTNS. PROVINCIAL PARK

12

Yanks Peak

Quesnelle

Quesnel

16

Horsefly

Big Timothy 2157m

Canim Lake

CARIBO C ARI ARIBOO RIBOO OO O O

Bootjack Lake

Dugan Lake

150 Mile House

4

Timothy Lake

Mt. Timothy Ski Hill

Spring Lake

Canim Lake Forest Grove

24

TAWEEL PROVINCIAL PARK

Lake Deka Lake Bridge Lake

Sulphurous

Lone Butte

Loon Lake

3

1

5

Logan Lake

To Vancouver

Merritt

8

Spences Bridge

Ashcroft

Cache Creek

1

1

T

Bonaparte Lake

Watch Sheridan Bridge Lake Lake Lake

Green Lake

70 Mile House

Clinton

CHASM PROVINCIAL PARK

5

Lac la Hache

108 Mile Ranch

Springhouse

Horsefly Black Lake Creek

Likely Lake

el Forks River

2

Big Tyee Lake Lake Xat’sull (Soda Creek)

McLeese Lake

Wells

Troll Mtn. Ski Hill

Dragon Lake

Quesnel

Hixon

Stoner

PRINCE GEORGE

FRASER RIVER PROVINCIAL PARK

Blackwater

Cinema

Ten Mile Lake

Puntchesakut Lake

Bouchie Lake

r ater Rive kw

Puntataenkut Lake

Tzenzaicut Lake

Owen Lake Fir Lake

6

Williams Lake

n River

k

Big Bar Lake

MARBLE RANGE PROV. PARK

Hat Creek Ranch

Lillooet

99

Pavilion

17

97

MOOSE VALLEY Alkali PROVINCIAL PARK 100 Lake Snag Lake Mile House

Dog Creek

7

FLAT LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK

9

Jesmond

Big Bar

11

r Lytton

STEIN VALLEY NLAKA’PAMUX 12 HERITAGE PARK

EDGE HILLS PROVINCIAL PARK

Gold Bridge Bralorne Seton Portage

Tyaughton Lake Carpenter Lake

Black Dome

CHURN CREEK PROTECTED AREA

Gang Ranch

GE

Seasonal Road

BIRKENHEAD LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK

D’Arcy

Lillooet Lake

Y

N

Nazko

U

NAZKO Stum Lake LAKE

PARK WHITE PELICAN PROVINCIAL PARK

lco ti

BIG CREEK PROVINCIAL

rid ge Ri r ve

JUNCTION SHEEP RANGE PARK

Till Lake Alexis Creek Raven Lake Hanceville (Lee’s Corner) Riske Creek

Ch

BULL CANYON PROVINCIAL PARK

a

SOUTH CHILCOTIN MOUNTAIN PARK

CHI L C PARK O T IN RAN

Gl

2833m

Taseko Lakes

ree Big Creek C NUNSTI PROVINCIAL PARK

oet

Birken Mount Pemberton Currie

99

1

M

R

C

Chaunigan Lake

Tsuniah Lake

Lillo

ci

er

TS’YL-OS PROVINCIAL PARK Mt. Warner

Chilko Lake

Nemiah Valley

et

GARIBALDI PARK

K

P

T

Marmot Lake

A

Fishpot Lake

KLUSKOIL LAKE PROVINCIAL PARK

I

Batnuni Lake

Hanham Boat Lake Lake

FINGER-TATUK

Tatuk Lake

FingerPROVINCIAL PARK Lake

Fraser Lake Lake

Kenny Dam

Tatelkuz Lake

er Riv Euchiniko ad Ro Tsacha Lake Lakes

Kuyakuz Lake

t Wes

L

E

A

Nazko Lakes

i oR

Chilanko Forks

Redstone

Chezacut

CH C CHILCO HILCOTIN H HILCO IILCOT IL TIN

Nuxalk-Carrier Grease/ Alexander Mackenzie Heritage Trail ITCHA ILGACHUZ PROVINCIAL PARK

Puntzi Lake

20

Eagle Lake Choelquoit Lake

Tatla Lake Horn Lake

Tatlayoko Lake

Inl

Mt. Queen Bess 3313m

Homathko Icefield

a Tob

Whistler

C

Moose Lake

De an Anahim Peak 1876m

Charlotte Lake

Clearwater Lake

Sapeye Lake Bluff Lake

Mt. Waddington 4016m (Highest Mountain in B.C.)

UPPER KLINAKLINI PROTECTED Middle AREA Lake

K

To Victoria

Tatla Lake

Nimpo Lake

Anahim Lake

60 km of gravel surfaced road from Anahim Lake to the bottom of the Hill

15

ENTIAKO PROVINCIAL PARK & PROTECTED AREA

Tetachuck Lake

TWEEDSMUIR PROVINCIAL PARK

R A I R A NN B O W GE

G

lac ier

Strait

Kleena Kleene

Nimpo Lake

Heckman Pass 1524m 20

Stuie Turner Lakes

Hunlen Falls

Firvale

Mt. Saugstad 2908m

Monarch Mountain 3533m

River

n

Rivers Inlet

Silverthorne Mountain 2896m

Johnsto ne

E

a ha

Bella Coola Bella

Be nti

18 10 River la C oo Hagensborg

DEAN RIVER ESTUARY PROTECTED AREA

Whitesail Lake

De

Kimsquit

KITLOPE HERITAGE CONSERVANCY PROTECTED AREA

d

Eutsuk Lake

Cariboo Chilcotin Coast

N 20

30

British Columbia, Canada

10 Kilometres

FIORDLAND RECREATION AREA

n sla

Rivers Inlet

Kingcome Inlet

19

To Vancouver

photos: Michael Wigle, Graham Osborne, Brad Kasselman/coast photo.com, Thomas Drasdauskis, Doug Neasloss/Spirit Bear Lodge

THE CARIBOO CHILCOTIN COAST DELIVERS

THIS SUMMER DISCOVER THE BEAUTY OF OUR OWN BACKYARD!

www.youtube.com/theCCCTA

RO

Butedale

Princess Royal Island

Klemtu

gI

SIR ALEXANDER MACKENZIE PROVINCIAL MARINE PARK

r Bu

e

e

ott

Str ait

ND

Port McNeill

n C ha rl

I

Port Hardy

Qu e

Dawsons Landing

Namu

Shearwater

Denny Island

Ocean Falls

8

Kin

CO C OA O OAS AS A S ST T Campbell Island

N

V

ER

SL A

T

und

Price Island

ilb M

und Hakai Pass

und

Calvert Island

h So Smit

VA

CO U

Discovery Coast Passage Ferry Route (seasonal)

s So

HAKAI LUXVBALIS CONSERVANCY AREA

n Quee

Hunter Island

Waglisla (Bella Bella)

Swindle Island

KITASOO SPIRIT BEAR CONSERVANCY

Aristazabal Island

o So

Gil Island Campania Island

añ Caam

Queen Charlotte do re Lo

Advertiser’s Index

Floatplane Base

Airport

Ferry Routes

Railways

Main Road Secondary Roads

Main Highway

Sound

# Visitor Centre Info Booth Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Region Parks

British Columbia Circle Routes Heritage Discovery Coast Cariboo Lakes & Trails Ranchlands & Rivers

Gold Rush Trail

Photos (left to right): Roland Hemmi, Kim Culbert/www.kimculbert.com, Thomas Drasdauskis, Brad Kasselman/Coastphoto.com, Michael Wigle, Brad Kasselman/Coastphoto.com

@CarChiCoa

N.Thomp n River so

l ne

Blac r ve Taseko River

n

C

www.facebook.com/CaribooChilcotinCoast

River

s on

ho mp

Big

lk

Chi

ha n nel

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Map courtesy of the Cariboo Chilcotin Coast Tourism Association.

Riv e

Ste in

Inlet Bu te

Klina klini River

n ig ht I nlet

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d un So

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A12

Scan to


Smart July Edition