Page 2

C

No fluke that IKEA in Älmhult are driving Kalmar machines.......................................3

No fluke that

Kalmar challenges expectations with powerful new series of precision light fork-lift trucks ..........4

O

Heavy handling solutions .......................................6

Record-breaking gantry crane order ......................8

Global trends present great opportunities for container handling specialists

Five-year service offering swings Interforest STS deal ................................................8

N Winning customers over with the personal touch .......................................10

“Terminal tractors were the most environmentally porter needs. And when it comes to reachstackers, we

Peinemann bakes a cake for RSC.........................11

the US and becoming more common in Europe. This creates again more traffic flows and new logistics needs. In Europe, most forecasters are anticipating a mini version of the China syndrome coming with the expansion of the EU from 15 to 25 countries. Many larger companies are switching production capacity to Eastern Europe and the process is expected to accelerate as these ten new countries join up. This all results in changes to logistics routes and shipping services that are taking place at the moment creating new needs. The impact on those involved in container handling, be they ports, inland rail or barge terminals, or suppliers of services and equipment to the industry, is vast. What added value can partnership with Kalmar offer our customers when they find ways to cope with the changing business environment? They can be sure that high quality, reliable equipment from our comprehensive product portfolio will be available. They also can be confident that full servicing capabilities exist, no matter where the operating location may be. Santos or Shanghai, Montreal or Mumbai, Kalmar is there. Operating worldwide gives Kalmar extensive knowledge of what is happening in the industry and allows us to predict with reasonable certainty its future needs. Our customers know that our continuous R&D efforts guarantee models that suit their specific needs. Kalmar is itself a global company, it is well-positioned to work with the largest container terminal operators that may have facilities located all around the world. Working with a single office that has global purchasing responsibilities is routine for Kalmar. Consequently, I am confident in saying that Kalmar customers, large and small and wherever they are located, have a reliable partner in facing the challenges of today and tomorrow when they work closely with Kalmar.

had no choice if we wanted to be efficient.”

T

Hassle-free handling of high-value kit..................14

Keeping it fresh! ...................................................15

E

Kumport goes from strength to strength ............16

Terminal tractors triumph in Esbjerg ...................18

N Good service breeds close co-operation ..............20

GreenSeas Trust....................................................22

A Box for Europe...................................................23

T

100th Kalmar straddle carrier delivered in France A bon voyage for French container handling ..................................24

RTGs get HIGHER at Gdynia ..................................24

Jan Helgesson is in charge of purchasing at IKEA’s large centralized warehousing facility, Centrallager Syd, in Älmhult, Sweden. And what IKEA doesn’t know about low costs and efficiency is not worth knowing! IKEA – that thoroughly Swedish enterprise that has come to virtually symbolize efficiency and low costs and whose founder, Ingvar Kamprad, continues to fly economy-class. Those penny-pinching Smålanders People from the Swedish province of Småland – Smålanders, as they’re known – are generally regarded as being rather stingy. But Smålanders aren’t really mean; they’re cost-conscious! That’s something which is very much reflected at IKEA too. They used to use ordinary tow cars to move trailers, semitrailers and containers around

IKEA’s gigantic storage facility immediately outside Älmhult. A facility covering an area of 240,000 square metres and 180,000 cubic metres of warehousing space, handling 700,000 cubic metres of goods every year. Efficiency is a must “It goes without saying that we have to be efficient,” Jan Helgesson says, “and Kalmar’s terminal tractors and reachstackers are more cost-effective.” “Much of the freight arriving at IKEA’s central stores in Älmhult reaches us in containers and requires reloading before being sent out to the individual superstores. But a large proportion of the goods also arrives by lorry (approximately 100 trucks a day) or by rail.” At the multimodal terminal adjacent to the stores, two reachstackers work to unload goods from trains for ongoing transportation to the warehouse by tow car or terminal tractor.

Little option

Flexible and clean

“Since things are so cramped at the combi-terminal, we really didn’t have any alternative to reachstackers if we wanted to be efficient,” Jan Helgesson explains. “Especially as we need to store containers two-deep to make room for all the goods.” The two reachstackers in the service of IKEA are each in operation for about 1,500 hours and perform more than 20,000 lifts a year. “To all intents and purposes, servicing and maintenance are performed by our own in-house service shop in Älmhult, which has been given basic reachstacker training at Kalmar’s factory in Lidhult, Sweden.” “Our reachstackers not only give us efficiency, but flexibility as well,” says Jan Helgesson. “They can be used to lift both containers and trailers.”

Within the warehouse area, the two terminal tractors operate about 1,500 hours a year in two shifts. A large part of the goodsmoving operations has been carried out using the terminal tractors. “They’re flexible and more efficient than the old tow cars we used to use, as well as meeting the environmental requirements we have for vehicle engines,” Jan Helgesson relates. “And what’s more, they’re cheaper to run!”

S

The so-called China syndrome, whereby production is being transferred from wealthy countries to those with much lower labour costs, is a widely discussed topic today. China’s already huge export volumes continue to increase – 2003 saw containerized exports increase 32.9% – and we already see that seven of China’s ports (plus Hong Kong) are now ranked in the world’s top 30. Even if forecasters are right and the rate of increase in China’s exports will decrease to ‘only’ 15% in 2004, that is still a lot of extra containers that need to be handled. Ships outbound from Asia for Europe and North America have been sailing full for over a year and Drewry Shipping Consultants estimated that at the end of 2003, there were almost 500 post-Panamax container ships aggregating three million TEU in service or on order. Ports are somehow expected to cope with this size increase by building bigger berths and dredging deeper approach channels. Inevitably, there is a downside too, especially for the carriers. The deepsea trades out of Asia are becoming imbalanced, requiring hundreds of thousands of containers to be shipped back as empties, and factors such as the US removing quotas on imported apparel and textile products at the end of 2004, will further exacerbate this problem. For terminals, of course, every box, empty or full, has to be handled and so even this growing imbalance means new business opportunities. For the time being, at least, the major areas of consumption stay in Europe and the US. Imports from manufacturing areas lead to the development of bigger logistics centers which are very common already in

in Älmhult are driving Kalmar machines friendly and cost-effective way for us to meet our trans-

Moving the monster Airbus..................................12 Big changes to logistics routes and shipping services are taking place at the moment. Companies involved in the international transportation of goods by land and sea are facing challenges as they are working to meet demand for their services in the growing business environment with more materials moving and more container traffic.

IKEA

world Kalmar around the

Christer Granskog President and CEO Kalmar Industries

2

Publisher: Benoît Passard Kalmar Industries PO Box 878, Kungsgatan 70 SE-101 37 Stockholm Tel + 46 8 700 51 40 benoit.passard@kalmarind.com

Editor: Aija Kalander Kalmar Industries P.O.Box 387 FIN-33101 Tampere Tel +358 3 2658 111 aija.kalander@kalmarind.com

Layout: imageneering | worldwide partners, Tampere, Finland

PRINTED BY: Offset Ulonen Oy, Tampere, Finland, 2004

More information: Jan Ohlsson Tel +46 8 445 3800 Fax +46 8 445 3838 jan.ohlsson@kalmarind.com

3

Kalmar Around the World, issue 1/2004  

Cargotec's customer magazine for Kalmar branded products. Issue 1/2004