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JOHNS HOPKINS CAREY BUSINESS SCHOOL

SPRING 2020 MAGAZINE

CAREY AND COVID-19

Coronavirus pandemic has major impact on Carey and Johns Hopkins University.

ENDURING LESSONS Meet four women who overcame challenges on climb to career success


CAREY BUSINESS JOHNS HOPKINS CAREY BUSINESS SCHOOL

SPRING 2020

FEATURES After COVID-19, the world took on an unfamiliar and unsettling look and feel, as in this scene of a masked cyclist pedaling along a near-deserted street in New York. See pages 2, 3, 6, and 7 for coverage and commentary about the pandemic’s effect on the Carey and JHU communities.

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CAREY AND COVID-19

A round-up of news about the coronavirus pandemic’s impact on the Carey Business School community. 10 ENDURING LESSONS

To mark the Year of the Woman and the centennial of women’s suffrage in the United States, we asked three prominent Carey alumnae and one distinguished faculty member to describe the challenges they faced, and overcame, on their way to leadership positions in their respective fields. By Joan Katherine Cramer 16 BY THE NUMBERS: A SHRINKING GAP

The wage gap between men and women in the American workplace has narrowed over the past four decades, but, as Carey Assistant Professor Colleen Stuart notes, the gap is not going away. By Sue De Pasquale 18 SPEAKING FROM EXPERIENCE

The Office of Experiential Learning creates innovative, immersive projects to provide Carey students with the real-world business skills that employers increasingly seek in B-school graduates. By Annie Brackemyre

DEPARTMENTS 2 DEAN’S MESSAGE Resilience and humanity, amid crisis. 3

EDITOR’S NOTE

An opportunity for major positive change. 3

CAREY IN THE NEWS

Coverage in The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, TIME, Forbes, The Washington Post, The New York Times, Bloomberg News, PBS News Hour, Reuters, The Baltimore Sun, Miami Herald, Harvard Business Review, The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Poets & Quants, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, National Public Radio, ABC News, and more.

C O V E R I L L U S T R AT I O N : H A N N A B A R C Z Y K

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PERSPECTIVES Leaders know their words’ worth; and Carey did OK by this Oklahoman.

24 RESEARCH Reports on recent studies by researchers on the Carey Business School faculty. 28 OTHER BUSINESS New gift from the W. P. Carey Foundation, Ge Bai testifies before House committee, students sponsor Africa Business Conference held at Carey, and Sharon Trivino named director of DAR. 31 ALUMNI NEWS Updates about graduates of the Carey Business School.


DE AN ’ S ME SSAGE

E DITOR ’S NOTE

A WATERSHED MOMENT

THINK OF THE POSSIBILITIES

None of us has witnessed anything like the COVID-19 crisis. Since emerging late last year, the coronavirus pandemic has besieged every corner of the world. We’ll always remember this watershed moment in the world’s history, just as our grandparents and great-grandparents always carried memories of the 20th century’s two world wars and the Great Depression. And we’ll remember it not just as a health crisis of perhaps unprecedented scale, but also as an immense economic calamity. The pandemic’s impact on the global economy, though of far less concern than the effects on public health, is nonetheless not to be downplayed. A sickly economy inflicts its own brand of pain and misery. The awful truth is that a full financial recovery may take many years. Yet there’s at least one positive takeaway, in that valuable lessons for the future should be available more immediately. People talk, usually in grim tones, about the post-COVID world. But we should also consider that this ordeal will present us with ways to better conduct ourselves as members of society and as business people. And I imagine these valuable lessons will echo many of the findings that the Carey Business School’s faculty experts have offered for years in their research projects and classroom instruction. They have long championed, for example, crisis management that anticipates and prepares for an emergency, and doesn’t merely react to it after the fact; leadership that makes use of diverse views from across an entire organization, and doesn’t play the blame game; and communication methods that are clear, honest, and unafraid of harsh facts. Additionally, as COVID-19 has become the story around the world, Carey faculty members have brought their expertise to the national media, addressing the impact of the crisis from various business perspectives. Topics they have touched on include the flexibility and resilience of supply chains, the response of financial

markets to economic crises, the stockpiling of retail goods by anxious consumers, and the ways in which we can learn from the impact of the 1918 flu pandemic and other major global crises on businesses and the economy. Yes, we seem surrounded by challenges, but I have been inspired by the resilience of the entire Carey Business School community. In early March, we acted swiftly to move all courses online, and we began making contingency plans for online instruction in future semesters, should that prove necessary. Unfortunately, the situation demanded that we change our May graduation to a virtual ceremony. That’s one of many big disappointments we have had to endure. Still I’m grateful to everyone in the Carey community – faculty, students, alumni, and staff – for adapting rapidly to our new reality. Among Carey’s stated values – relentless advancement, boundless curiosity, collaborative leadership, and unwavering humanity – it is perhaps the last one we should be most conscious of at this time. “Unwavering humanity” reminds us that we are all in this together, and that we must all do our part to keep ourselves and our communities healthy and safe, especially bearing in mind those who are most vulnerable and most at risk. To our alumni, I wish you the best during this difficult time, and I invite you to stay connected with your fellow alums and our school.

WE SHOULD CONSIDER THAT THIS ORDEAL WILL PRESENT US WITH WAYS TO BETTER CONDUCT OURSELVES AS MEMBERS OF SOCIETY AND AS BUSINESS PEOPLE.

The contents of alumni magazines such as Carey Business are usually completed several weeks before publication. That way, we have ample time for design, editing, proofing, and delivery preparation, among other important steps. Around March 1 of this year, we thought we were mostly finished with the contents and layout of our spring issue. But soon enough we realized some changes had to be made. We needed to acknowledge the global event that was in the process of dividing the lives of just about everyone in the world into two distinctly different eras. As New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman put it in mid-March: “There is the world B.C. – Before Corona – and the world A.C. – After Corona.” You remember the world before the COVID19 coronavirus. Instead of self-isolating at home, people would gather in restaurants and bars, shake hands (hug, even), walk down the street together less than six feet apart, huddle at movie houses, high-five at sporting events. Then it stopped. In the darkest moments of a crisis, it can be all too easy to belly-flop into pessimism. But as many people have suggested – including Carey Dean Alexander Triantis in his message for this issue of Carey Business – the wrenching nature of this historic moment may produce positive changes that otherwise could have taken years to occur, if ever. As I write this at my home in early April, I can think of at least one obvious possibility that might be relatively easy to implement: allowing workers with telecommuting capability to do so on a more regular basis. Research has shown that people are more productive when working from home. Then throw in the considerable benefit of fewer cars on the roads, with a resulting decrease in air pollution, traffic congestion, and road rage. Pages 6 and 7 of this issue include articles describing some of the ways COVID-19 has affected the Carey community. We had just enough time in our production schedule to provide a twopage recognition of the pandemic. Odds are our next issue, and probably issues to follow, will have more to say about this world-changing event. – PE

Alexander Triantis Dean, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

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CAREY IN THE

More on page 4 >

NEWS

A DEGREE OF DIFFERENCE A headline in the January 22 Wall Street Journal announced, “Johns Hopkins University Reimagines the M.B.A.” Set against the backdrop of declining applications to MBA programs throughout the United States, the article noted that the Carey full-time MBA, scheduled to launch this fall, aims to differentiate itself by taking “a hard turn toward health, with a particularly heavy focus on quant skills, from exposure to coding to data analysis.” Dean Alexander Triantis was quoted extensively in the piece, at one point noting that more employers have been expressing the desire to see business school graduates who can combine science, technology, and math skills with other skills such as leadership ability.

CAREY BUSINESS Associate Dean for Global Marketing and Communications: Kiera Hynninen Executive Director of Strategic Communications: Kanika Watson Director of Communications: Tim Parsons Writer/Editor: Patrick Ercolano Consulting Editor: Sue De Pasquale Staff Contributor: Andrew Blumberg Design: Skelton Sprouls Administrative Support: Kelly Cumberledge

Carey Business is published available intwice a print a edition and online year by theatCarey careybusiness.carey.jhu.edu. Business School Office Please of Global direct Marketing all correspondence and Communications. to Editor, Carey Please direct Business all correspondence magazine,to carey. Johns Hopkins Carey Business communications@jhu.edu or Editor, School, Carey 100 International Business, Johns Hopkins Drive, 6th Carey Floor,Business Baltimore School, 100 MDInternational 21202-1099, Drive, or call 6th Floor, 410-234-9290. Baltimore MD 21202-1099. To submit a To class submit note,a write to class note, the write abovetoaddress the above or email address or carey.communications@jhu.edu. email carey.communications@jhu.edu. (By submitting (By submitting a note, a note, you you givegive Johns Johns Hopkins UniversityUniversity Hopkins permission permission to edit and to publish edit and your information publish your information. in the print Thank magazine you.) and the online edition. Thank you.)

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CAREY IN THE NEWS

QUICK HITS

CALL OF THE WILD Assistant Professor Christopher Myers and Mike Doyle, director of experiential learning at Carey, co-authored a February article in the Harvard Business Review on wilderness adventure expeditions as a good way to teach leadership. They wrote: “By forcing people to work collaboratively, develop new skills, and take control of their decisions and outcomes, the austere environment can help expose key facets of leadership and team interaction that might otherwise be overlooked in ‘normal’ settings.” (For more on Carey’s experiential learning initiatives, see “Speaking from Experience” on page 18.)

HAIL? NO Phillip Phan, the Alonzo and Virginia Decker Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, was quoted in articles on two divergent topics – the Washington Redskins and starting a part-time business while in retirement. In a WTOP News piece on the struggling Redskins and the claims that they have long been mismanaged by owner Daniel Snyder, Phan said, “The corporate landscape is littered with the carcasses of corporations that started off very well, that had great resources, but because of poor leadership at the top, they ended up failing.” And in a Forbes article, Phan said it’s sensible to remain working full time while researching whether a part-time retirement business would fly. “It’s great to see if there is a market for your business while not depending on it for an income,” he noted. The piece also appeared on the Market Watch and Next Avenue websites.

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FORTUNE

TECHNICAL.LY BALTIMORE

“3 Lessons for Today’s Economy from Former Fed Chair Paul Volcker’s Long and Storied Career,” December 10, 2019. Lecturer Kathleen Day commented in this piece on the career and contributions of former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker, who died December 8 and who was, in Day’s view, a reliable source of reason and common sense.

“Girls in CS Summit offered… an intro to tech – and the women who build it,” February 26, 2020. As this article noted, the studentled Carey organization Women in Business helped to organize an event at the Harbor East campus in which 75 female students from grades six through 12 in Baltimore schools were introduced to the world of computer science.

GLOBAL HEALTH NOW

THE JHU HUB

“Saving the Future Through the Art of the Knife,” January 21, 2020. For this news and information website operated by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, MBA/ Master of Public Health candidate Dominique Vervoort penned an opinion piece calling attention to the fact that “1.3 billion children around the world lack access to surgical and anesthesia care.”

“First-year dean shares his vision for Carey Business School,” February 26, 2020. Jack Hirsch, a member of Carey’s first fulltime MBA class in 2012 and senior director of product management at Box, a cloud content management and file sharing company based in Silicon Valley, conducted an extensive Q&A with Dean Alexander Triantis for the news website of Johns Hopkins University.

HEALTH NEWS DIGEST

EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE NEWS

“Top Doctors Limit Number of Tests They Order to Signal Diagnostic Prowess to Peers,” January 28, 2020. This piece described a new study by Associate Professors Tinglong Dai and Shubhranshu Singh, which finds that some expert medical diagnosticians may order fewer patient tests as a way to indicate a high level of competence to their peers. (See additional article in “Research,” page 25.) THE BALTIMORE SUN

“My son and the coronavirus,” January 29, 2020. In this op-ed, Associate Professor Toby Gordon wrote about a nerve-wracking several days she experienced while she was home in Baltimore trying to keep tabs on her son as he traveled in China at the start of the coronavirus outbreak.

“How Death and Disaster Followed the Shale Gas Boom in Appalachia,” February 27, 2020. This article on a website of the American Geophysical Union described a study that considered the negative and positive impacts of fracking. Bloomberg Distinguished Professor Paul Ferraro (who was not involved in the study) is quoted, noting, “The study’s findings do not refute claims that natural gas is a viable ‘bridge fuel’ to move the world onto a more sustainable energy path.” For pandemic-related media mentions of Carey experts, see the article on page 6.

“THE IMPORTS MAY BE GOOD NEWS FOR BALTIMORE IN THE SHORT TERM, AND WE SHOULD BE HAPPY ABOUT THAT. BUT IT WON’T MAKE A DIFFERENCE FOR THE INDUSTRY LONG TERM.” ALESSANDRO REBUCCI, IN SUN ARTICLE ON HIGHER PRODUCTION AT DOMINO

MISTAKES ARE MADE Bloomberg Distinguished Professor Kathleen Sutcliffe wrote an op-ed in November for TIME magazine, titled “The Health Care Industry Needs to Be More Honest About Medical Errors.” The article coincided with the publication of the book Sutcliffe co-authored with Robert Wears, Still Not Safe: Patient Safety and the Middle-Managing of American Medicine (Oxford University Press). In TIME, Sutcliffe wrote, “By being bolder and more comprehensive in its goal setting, and by embracing the acumen of experts from outside the medical profession, the health care industry could make patient safety the great social movement it deserves to be.”

GIFT THAT KEEPS GIVING BITTERSWEET NEWS A January 26, 2020, front-page feature in The Baltimore Sun on increased production at the Domino sugar plant – just a sugar cube’s throw across the water from Harbor East – quoted Associate Professor Alessandro Rebucci. Production using raw sugar imports from Mexico has been up because of weatherdamaged harvests in the United States, a result some have attributed to climate changerelated harsh weather. Rebucci

suggested that government and industry devise a longterm plan for dealing with such interruptions. “What’s here to stay is climate change,” he told The Sun. “Both business and government need to come up with solutions because this will get worse and worse.” The article was picked up by The Associated Press, The Washington Post, The Charlotte Observer, Miami Herald, and other outlets.

GO-TO SOURCE Associate Professor Ge Bai continues to build on her reputation as a go-to media source on excessive costs of health care. A sampling of the media outlets that have quoted Bai in recent reports includes The New York Times, Bloomberg News, PBS News Hour, Reuters, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, National Public Radio, ABC News, Kaiser Health News, and Crain’s New York Business. (See page 29 for a report on Bai’s testimony about pharmaceutical costs to the U.S. House Ways and Means Committee.)

The W. P. Carey Foundation’s $25 million gift to the Carey Business School was announced in February and received coverage in The Chronicle of Philanthropy, Poets & Quants, both the Baltimore and Washington Business Journal weeklies, WTOP News,

Philanthropy News Digest, The Daily Record, and Becker’s Hospital Review. Contributions from Johns Hopkins University and other donors will match the Carey gift, bringing the total to $50 million. (For more on the gift, see the article on page 28.)

KIDNEY ECONOMICS The research of Associate Professor Mario Macis was cited in a February report in The Economist on how easing regulations on kidney donations would increase the supply of the organs for transplant. “For many patients,” the article stated, “a kidney transplant is a much better option than several years of dialysis before death–life expectancy is much longer, and that life is of higher quality. It also saves money for the taxpayer, notes Mario Macis of Johns Hopkins University. ‘The math is such that every kidney transplant generates savings for Medicare of about $150,000,’ says Mr. Macis.”

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PAN D E M I C I M PAC T For more information, including the latest updates, please visit the COVID-19 pages on the Carey website, at carey.jhu.edu/covid-19updates and carey.jhu.edu/ covid19-business-implications.

CAREY AND THE COVID-19 CRISIS March 2020 saw the first major impact of the coronavirus pandemic on the operations of Johns Hopkins University, including the day-to-day activities of the Carey Business School.

Most of the university work force – with the exception of essential personnel such as health care workers – was instructed by mid-month to begin working at home. Students were informed that all courses and exams would be conducted remotely for the remainder of the spring term. Routine access to campus facilities was halted, but student services would continue to be offered in virtual form. One of the more unfortunate effects on the entire JHU community, particularly on students about to earn their degrees, was the decision to cancel all in-person commencement ceremonies scheduled for May. Instead they would become virtual events. Indeed, all in-person, university events were suspended, including tours, admissions events, and alumni events. Carey faculty who were new to online instruction gamely adapted to the new reality. Meanwhile, Carey faculty members, like many of their colleagues across the university, suddenly began fielding an inordinately high number of interview requests from media members who sought to cover every angle of the biggest story in many years. In addition to doing Q&As on various subjects related to their respective areas of expertise (which appeared on the Carey website and The JHU Hub news site), Carey faculty members were quoted in COVID-19-related articles for publications and platforms including USA Today, Slate, Bloomberg TV and Radio, Yahoo! News, Fortune, Marketplace, The Baltimore Sun, The Orlando Sentinel, Futurity, Phys.Org, Business Insider, Baltimore Magazine, The Hill, and Health Affairs.

Throughout the crisis, Dean Alexander Triantis checked in with periodic emails to members of the Carey community. At the end of March, as lockdown conditions looked increasingly likely to last for more than a few weeks, the dean wrote to students, faculty, and staff, “You are not in this alone. Every nation, every person, is affected by COVID-19. It does not recognize international borders and it does not care about your nationality, or whether you are young or old, or rich or poor. This is a human problem and we must all work together to solve it. Working together, we will continue to do our part to keep ourselves and our community healthy and safe.”

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“YOU ARE NOT IN THIS ALONE. EVERY NATION, EVERY PERSON, IS AFFECTED BY COVID-19. IT DOES NOT RECOGNIZE INTERNATIONAL BORDERS AND IT DOES NOT CARE ABOUT YOUR NATIONALITY, OR WHETHER YOU ARE YOUNG OR OLD, OR RICH OR POOR.” DEAN ALEXANDER TRIANTIS

STUDENTS STAND BY HARD-HIT BUSINESSES By Andrew Blumberg

Three Carey Business School students launched an effort to support small businesses throughout the city during the economic upheaval and mandatory closures caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. Stand By Baltimore, as the effort was dubbed, enables participating businesses throughout Baltimore City to sell gift cards to area residents who can redeem them either immediately (if the business is open) or once the crisis has resolved. It was launched by Carey students Rie Tai, Michael Yong, and Priyanka Mysore.

FACULTY, ALUMNI RAISE FUNDS, SEND AID TO CHINA By February 1, the COVID-19 virus outbreak in China had already resulted in 14,000 confirmed cases and 260 deaths – numbers that would pale alongside those to come in the next few weeks. A small team of Carey Business School faculty members determined to do something to help. Carey alumni in China had reported severe shortages of protective equipment for medical workers. So the faculty team – Associate Professors Xian Sun, Tinglong Dai, and Jian Ni, and Professor Philip Phan – decided to raise funds to buy protective medical gear that would be delivered to the workers in China. The team reached out to Carey faculty members, and over the next two days they pitched in $17,256. Working with a Maryland medical supply company, the team bought 1,225 sets of DuPont protective coveralls and shipped them

Helpful information is also available on the The JHU Hub’s COVID-19 site: hub.jhu.edu/novelcoronavirus-information.

“When restaurants and businesses had to close down indefinitely, we wanted to find a way to support our favorite local places,” Tai said in mid-March. “[There was] a pre-meal ordering initiative in Japan which I thought we could adapt to our community. We then talked with several business owners about developing a platform that would best suit their needs as well, and developed Stand By Baltimore.” Those businesses, in turn, promoted the effort among members of their Small Business Community on Facebook. In all, more than 50 businesses – including restaurants, clothing stores, hair salons, and gift shops – are listed on the website www.standbybaltimore.com, with links to the

to Huaxi Hospital in Chengdu, the capital of southwestern China’s Sichuan province. The hospital “was identified by our contacts in China as a key provider of medical personnel and material into Hubei Province [the outbreak’s epicenter],” explains Phan, the Alonzo and Virginia Decker Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, in an email to the faculty after the shipment. “They have sent multiple medical teams into Hubei to help with the relief efforts and faced their own shortages. They will receive and transport our supplies to the cities of Wuhan and Huangshi in Hubei province with their many medical teams.”

THE TEAM BOUGHT 1,225 SETS OF DUPONT PROTECTIVE COVERALLS AND SHIPPED THEM TO HUAXI HOSPITAL IN CHENGDU, THE CAPITAL OF SICHUAN PROVINCE.

businesses’ websites and options to purchase gift cards. The platform supports businesses throughout Baltimore’s thriving and diverse neighborhoods, including Canton, Fells Point, Federal Hill, Riverside, Hampden, Charles Village, and Mount Washington. “We’re constantly thinking of ways to improve what the platform can offer,” said Mysore. “We’d like Stand By Baltimore to evolve as the needs of small business and their customers shift over the duration of the COVID-19 pandemic. For now, buying multiple gift cards or buying them every week is one way to ensure that your favorite restaurant or store receives sustainable cash flow.” Added Yong: “Next steps are to promote Stand By Baltimore even further and collect more restaurant and store listings.”

Once the price of shipping was added to the cost of the coveralls, the faculty fund was still about $850 short. But Carey alumni in China, led by Hao Yu (MBA ’12), president of Carey’s Beijing alumni club and a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council, quickly assembled a fund of their own to cover the deficit. Phan adds, “The material was received in good order and acknowledged by the Huaxi Hospital on March 18. The gear was distributed immediately and put to use.” The team of organizers emphasizes that the effort was strictly an independent initiative of the Carey faculty, with no official involvement by the business school or Johns Hopkins University. As the organizers wrote in the mid-February fund request emailed to the faculty: “Our Chinese students, faculty, and their families have been a part of Carey’s DNA as long as she has been in existence. Every day, we are given the opportunity to live and demonstrate our values and beliefs. Our Chinese family need to know that we stand with them in this hour of crisis.”

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PERSPECTIVES

SMART LEADERS KNOW THEIR WORDS’ WORTH

Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. He started successive paragraphs with that same refrain. It’s a powerful example of using repetition to make an idea resonate. Another one I like is tricolon, the rule of three. Think “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.” It’s important for leaders to stick with three key messages in any speech or presentation. This approach focuses listeners on the key ideas you want them to remember.

In Q&A, Carey faculty expert explains the effective uses of language and rhetoric By Tim Parsons

I’ll share one more technique commonly used in political speeches – antimetabole. It’s where you repeat words in reverse order in the second half of a sentence. Here’s a famous example from John F. Kennedy’s inaugural address: “Ask not what your country can do for you – ask what you can do for your country.” Imagine if Kennedy had said, “Your country has given you a lot. Now it’s your turn to give back.” This sentence makes the same point as the original, but it is far less memorable.

Language and rhetoric are powerful tools for leaders who want to inspire their listeners to take action. Carey Business School Associate Professor Steven D. Cohen helps leaders communicate with confidence, influence, and authority. An experienced trainer, he has created custom courses and leadership development programs for Fortune 500 companies and government agencies. In this interview, Cohen shares his insights on how leaders in arenas such as business and politics can inspire others. Why is the ability to inspire others vital to leadership? It’s not enough anymore for leaders just to be visionaries. They have to be effective rhetoricians. They have to be able to harness the power of language to motivate and mobilize large groups of people to tackle challenges that seem unachievable. It’s important for leaders to talk about goals, but focusing on revenue growth or profitability isn’t inspiring. We need leaders who talk about revolutionizing the way the world works, how products and services can change minds and hearts and change society. Language and communication elevate messages and help leaders frame their ideas in more provocative, meaningful ways. What are some of the tools of inspiration? The first ingredient is vision. Leaders need to have a clear and compelling vision about what they want to achieve. They have to know where they’re headed and why they’re headed in that direction. Can you envision a CEO saying, “Let’s all commit to doing our routine tasks better”? An inspiring vision should stretch expectations. It should motivate listeners to do something extraordinary.

LEADERS NEED TO HAVE A CLEAR AND COMPELLING VISION ABOUT WHAT THEY WANT TO ACHIEVE. THEY HAVE TO KNOW WHERE THEY’RE HEADED AND WHY THEY’RE HEADED IN THAT DIRECTION. The second ingredient is passion. Steve Jobs wasn’t passionate about building iPads and laptops. He was passionate about revolutionizing the world of computers and, ultimately, the way the world worked. He was passionate about creating products that help people discover and harness their creativity.

company is facing a difficult quarter, a good leader will acknowledge that. The key is not to dwell on the current situation. Leaders should discuss the situation in an honest and transparent manner but then quickly pivot to the specific reasons the audience should remain hopeful. For example, if quarterly earnings are down, acknowledge the situation but then offer specific evidence that points to a more hopeful future. Don’t say, “Trust me because I have a five-point plan.” Instead, explain that we have the best people, the best strategy, and the best product. Then back up these statements with evidence, and people will believe in you and follow you.

The last ingredient is language. Language elevates the message. It makes the message linger and resonate in listeners’ minds.

Another technique is to embrace the power of vulnerability. We no longer expect leaders to be polished and perfect. We want leaders who talk openly about times they’ve struggled. These types of stories humanize them and make them more real and relatable.

What are some of the rhetorical techniques that leaders use?

What are some other language techniques that inspiring leaders use?

The first technique is called holding out hope. When times are tough, leaders need to use upbeat, hopeful language. If a

Anaphora is the repetition of key words or phrases at the beginning of successive clauses or sentences. Think of Martin

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ILLUSTRATION: MIKEL CASAL

This is an election year in America. Candidates across the political spectrum are trying to inspire us and persuade us to vote for them. Do you have any insights for candidates? Candidates often talk about how they have specific plans for each of their ideas. But here’s the thing: Plans are persuasive; genuine emotion is inspirational. It’s not enough for voters to read the plans; they have to believe in the plans. They have to feel the impact those plans will have on their lives. To create that feeling, candidates have to back up their messages with vulnerability and authenticity. But candidates also have to make voters believe that their plans are achievable. Candidates don’t have to tell us exactly how they will get from point A to point B, but they do need to break their plan into logical steps. Once candidates pivot from general ideas to specific steps, voters start to feel as though the plan is achievable. Read the full version of this interview at carey.jhu.edu/articles/research/leadershipand-power-inspiration

AFTER OKLAHOMA, LIFE AT CAREY MORE THAN OK For dual-degree major, East Coast experience has been a life changer By Anna Mayer Two years ago, as I hauled my belongings halfway across the country to Baltimore, I was excited about what to expect. But also a little nervous. I had spent my life in the Southwest – born and raised in Oklahoma – accustomed to seeing friendly faces and driving hours past large fields to get from one city to another. I even attended college in Norman, Oklahoma, where a wild Friday night is spending time with everyone in town at an evening football game. While I loved my time there, I was ready to push my comfort zone and try something new. That motivation led me to pursue a graduate business program in Baltimore, at Carey. Now, on the brink of graduating with two degrees from Carey, I look back and it’s surprising how I’ve changed in the past few years since unpacking a new life in Baltimore. From the beginning, despite knowing some of the negative aspects of Baltimore’s reputation, I was enthralled by the city. During my first semester here, I would pass hours exploring new places – from taking runs around the Inner Harbor and up Federal Hill for the view, to visiting the Walters Art Museum multiple times to make sure I saw every exhibit. And there were many days when I walked all the way from downtown to Dooby’s in Mount Vernon, just to secure a perfect spot where I could write my marketing reports and peoplewatch at the same time.

bodega. In the midst of such moments, I would pause to make sure it all sunk in. Slowly, I felt myself adjusting to the East Coast way of life. However, none of that would have been as impactful if it weren’t for the friends I’ve made in Baltimore, especially at Carey. The city is packed with high-caliber men and women from around the world who come to Baltimore to attend Johns Hopkins or to explore professional opportunities. My friends now range from doctors to mathematicians to artists. I’ve found that the key to Baltimore is being courageous enough to introduce yourself and being prepared to have your assumptions challenged. It’s funny how that nervous young woman from Oklahoma found a new and entirely different kind of comfort zone in Baltimore. There was the time, for example, a group of us students stayed up late one night talking about our international backgrounds, the future of business, our plans for our post-graduation lives. After conversations such as that one, I’m absolutely certain that those are friends I will always be able to call on. Two years go by quickly, and you don’t notice yourself changing until you’re only a few months away from graduation and you suddenly realize you’ve developed into a different person. I’m still Anna, the girl you’ll find cheering loudly at a football stadium on Friday night, but with new opinions and outlooks on life and business that have come from my experiences here. I’ll always value the influence that Baltimore, Carey, and all the people I’ve encountered have had on me, just as much as I’ll value my two degrees. Anna Mayer is on track to complete the dual-degree program at the Carey Business School in May 2020, earning her MBA a year after getting her MS in Marketing.

I was changed by the endless possibilities provided not only by Baltimore but also by other nearby cities on the East Coast. With Washington, D.C., a short train ride away and New York just three hours away by car, I spent many weekends in those places. It felt surreal at times, walking up the Lincoln Memorial steps at night with a group of Carey friends and seeing the Capitol building all lit up across the National Mall, or reading a case for class under a tree in Central Park with a bagel from a local

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F E AT U R E | W O M E N L E A D E R S

ENDURING LESSONS MEET FOUR WOMEN WHO OVERCAME CHALLENGES ON THEIR CLIMB TO CAREER SUCCESS.

BY J O A N K AT H E R I N E C R A M E R

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I L L U S T R AT I O N : H A N N A B A R C Z Y K

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ENDURING LESSONS

KATHLEEN M. SUTCLIFFE, PhD.:

Speak Loudly

Be Fearless

JHU Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Business and Medicine and expert on organization theory and organizational behavior.

“One thing I’ll never forget is one of my doctoral advisors telling me I’d gotten really bad career advice because my previous degrees and work experience were completely unrelated to my current work in organizational behavior, and therefore completely counterproductive. And I thought, ‘Oh, really?’ Because everything I’d learned about interviewing people, both as an undergraduate and in nursing school, about being attentive to people in order to understand what was going on with them in a health care or medical context, was critical, I think, to my ability to be a great researcher. “Only a long time later did I realize that even my master’s Kathleen Sutcliffe thesis on the factors that EDUCATION : contribute to accurate nursing • PhD, Organization Theory diagnoses and my doctoral and Organizational Behavior, University of Texas at Austin dissertation on the factors that • MN, University of Washington contribute to top management • BS, University of Alaska teams’ accurate perceptions • BA, University of Michigan of their industry environment FORMERLY: • Gilbert and Ruth Whitaker were actually both looking at Professor of Business the same kind of phenomena. Administration, “Also invaluable to my career University of Michigan, Ross School of Business was all of the manual labor I got to do in Alaska [after colSutcliffe has published numerous articles, co-authored seven lege], working in a crab fishery books, and lectured all over and as a laborer on the pipeline, the world on how organizations because it taught me there are a and their members cope with lot of smart people in the world uncertainty, and how organizations can be designed to be and they don’t all have PhDs. more resilient and reliable. Understanding that good ideas come from all over the place, from every member of a team, “WOMEN STILL has been extremely useful. FACE OBSTACLES “We are beginning to understand that expertise is context TO BEING dependent. Just because you’re PROMOTED TO a doctor, for instance, doesn’t mean you can solve every kind TOP LEADER- of problem. There is emerging SHIP ROLES.”

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“I TELL YOUNG PEOPLE, WOMEN, OTHER IMMIGRANTS, TO NETWORK, NETWORK, NETWORK– I CALL IT HAPHAZARD NETWORKING– AND TO PAY IT FORWARD.”

CHRISTINA BUI, MBA ’00:

Chief Revenue Officer and Senior Vice President for Business Development at the financial consulting firm Kranz & Associates; Board of Directors at Siembra Mobile (education technology) and Omni Bev (Vietnamese cold brew coffee company); Advisory Board at 3ToZen (customized skincare)

“When you start from scratch, as my family did, you have to be fearless. All of the things that make people successful in business – the willingness to take risks, to think outside the box, to keep going no matter the obstacles – are the things we learn as immigrants when we lose our countries, our language, our old identities, and have to start over. “In the spring of 1975, when I was nine, Saigon was under siege. My father was in Washington, D.C. A high-ranking officer who presided successfully over ‘Vietnamization,’ he had been rewarded by the U.S. Navy with a full scholarship to American University, where he earned two master’s degrees and a PhD. “[In Vietnam], we lived a privileged existence, with lots of servants, and chauffeurs who drove me every day to my private French immersion school. But the North Vietnamese were closing in, dropping bombs everywhere, so somehow my mother found a woman, a complete stranger, who for $40,000 in gold research suggesting that organizations tend to perform better when they operate with the understanding that, even when they have a formal leader, every member of the organization is functionally a leader at different times and in different contexts. “It’s true that women still face formidable obstacles when it comes to being promoted to top leadership roles. The frames through which we view one another are persistent and powerful.

But one reason for optimism is that it is at least now widely understood that we need structural changes to remedy the situation. “I have, of course, faced sexism, though I think I was mostly oblivious, which helped. I am also a small person and had to learn early on to speak loudly, and repeat myself, if necessary, to make myself heard, which actually gave me a lot of confidence and made me stronger. “I also learned persistence, to just keep showing up to do what has to be done, and to let things go — not grasp anything, whether a structure or an idea, too strongly. I think a lot these days about impermanence, how things are always in flux, and that, above all, we need to take ourselves less seriously.”

“ALL OF THE THINGS THAT MAKE PEOPLE SUCCESSFUL IN BUSINESS– THE WILLINGNESS TO TAKE RISKS, TO THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX, TO KEEP GOING NO MATTER THE OBSTACLES– ARE THE THINGS WE LEARN AS IMMIGRANTS.”

their lives in “re-education camps,” and who looked so EDUCATION : malnourished and beaten • MBA, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School down. • BA, University of Virginia “I have spent years workFORMERLY: ing in senior management in • Vice President, Client male-dominated industries, Solutions, Robert Half helping some of the country’s • Associate Managing Partner, Tatum Executive Services top engineers, chief financial would say we were her rela• Vice President, Market officers, and other profestives and get us on an AmeriDevelopment, Transportation sionals learn to network with can transport plane. We left Group/Northwest Region, Parsons Corporation clients, to present their work the day before they bombed • Vice President, Business in a compelling and accesthe airport. If we’d stayed Development, Manna Consultants sible way, and I have done another day, we could have • Associate, Encore Capital Management, LLC very well. But the glass ceiling been one of the ‘boat people.’ • Legislative Associate, persists, and I now believe If we’d stayed permanently, Corporate Government Affairs, that if women and minoriwe would have been imprisJohnson & Johnson ties are to succeed at the very oned or worse. So we were Twice named one of the “Most highest levels, they have to Influential Women in Bay Area very, very lucky. Business” by the San Francisco start their own companies, “As soon as we arrived in Business Times, Bui is a chambecome their own CEOs. Washington, D.C., our parpion of women and Vietnamese“I tell young people, ents made us go to school American entrepreneurs. In Vietnam, she has worked on women, other immigrants, – it was full immersion since venture capital projects, helped to network, network, we spoke no English. Then launch a school, and in 2000 network – I call it haphazard they sent us off on a bus to helped host Bill Clinton’s delegation when he became the networking – and to pay it summer camp. I cried and first American president to visit forward. The thread that cried, but they were smart. Vietnam since the war. has run through my life is Within a year I was speaking wanting to help solve other English without an accent. people’s problems, perhaps because I have “I studied French and foreign affairs at the always had people in my life who were there University of Virginia, because I wanted to to help me. The rewards are exponential, be an ambassador to Vietnam. Everything because people who have poured heart and was pointing me there. I went back for soul into their companies know they can the first time in 1994 when I was working trust you absolutely, that your only goal is to for Johnson & Johnson and realized how help them realize their dreams.” Americanized I had become. People saw me as American, and I was shocked to see my cousins, who had spent the best years of Christina Bui

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ENDURING LESSONS

KAREN HORTING, MBA ’00:

Interrupt Biases Executive Director and CEO, Society of Women Engineers

It certainly changed the attitude of the other guys, who said, ‘It’s about time somebody stood up to him.’ “Things have changed for women, but not nearly enough. Women are only about 13 percent of the engineering workforce, for instance, and we’re at least half the population, and all of the research shows that the best innovation comes out of diversity. “Working in the paint industry, I experienced firsthand the stifling impact on business of doing things the same way, perpetuating the same old-boy network and the same old ideas, year after year. Karen Horting The second company I EDUCATION : worked for had very gener• MBA, Johns Hopkins Carey ous education benefits and Business School • BS, Biology, Northern Illinois made it possible for me to University get my MBA at Carey, but FORMERLY: my managers there didn’t • Director of Strategic Planning, see me as leadership mateNew York Academy of Sciences • Global Marketing Director, rial. It was classic – they American Association for the ended up giving the job I Advancement of Science (AAAS) wanted to a guy who was • Director of Marketing, Apollo Group a lot less qualified and just • Marketing Manager, Duron not very smart. When I left Paints & Wallcoverings, the company as a result, a Sherwin-Williams Company • Manager, Valspar my boss said, ‘Gee, I didn’t realize you were so serious In her role running the 40,000plus-member Society of Women about your career.’ Engineers, Horting works “The exciting thing internationally to champion girls about engineering is that and women in the STEM fields – which she describes as “the there isn’t anything in our coolest, most fulfilling work lives that isn’t touched by in the world.” it, from transportation to

“One of the best things that happened to me was in my first paint industry job. I was 26 and managing people who’d been in their jobs 30, 40 years, and there was one guy who was a real challenge. So I called my Dad, as I often did when I was having a problem, and he said, ‘Well, here’s what I know. They would not have put you in this position if they didn’t think you could do it. So I think you need to remind this person that you’re both there to do a job, you were put in charge of getting these things done, and if he doesn’t want to do them, he has a choice, and that’s to head out.’ So I was terrified, but the next day that’s exactly what I did, and the guy wasn’t happy, but he did what I asked him to do. And I’ll tell you what.

“A LOT OF ORGANIZATIONS HAVE DONE A GOOD JOB OF RAISING AWARENESS OF UNCONSCIOUS BIAS, BUT. . . THEY HAVEN’T DONE A GOOD JOB OF PROVIDING PEOPLE WITH TOOLS TO INTERRUPT THOSE BIASES.”

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“[WOMEN ARE] COLLABORATIVE, WE’RE GOOD TEAM BUILDERS AND LEADERS, AND I THINK WE MAY BE BETTER AT NOT HAVING TO KNOW EVERYTHING. I ALWAYS SAY IF I ALREADY KNEW EVERYTHING, WHY WOULD I NEED MY TEAM?” medical technology to clean water and air. So if women aren’t moving into engineering roles, and, even more important, into engineering leadership roles, how can we have the best innovation? “A lot of organizations have done a good job of raising awareness of unconscious bias, but the big obstacle to change is that they haven’t done a good job of providing people with tools to interrupt those biases. And by that, I mean doing things like taking a look at how they do performance appraisals, or how they evaluate male versus female job candidates. There’s a lot of data, for instance, showing things like emotions are mentioned more frequently in women’s performance appraisals than men’s. So employers can make a conscious commitment to focus on accomplishments and skill sets rather than personality issues. “Women are nevertheless changing the culture of leadership in all sorts of powerful ways. We’re collaborative, we’re good team builders and leaders, and I think we may be better at not having to know everything. I always say if I already knew everything, why would I need my team? And when people feel they’re a truly valued part of a team, they’re more productive, more innovative, and more inclined to be excited about the mission you are trying to accomplish.”

ELICIA FELIX-HUGHEY, MBA ’11:

Driving Cultural Change Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources Sony/ATV Music Publishing

“I acquired my work ethic from my mom, who, after my parents divorced, worked three jobs. She would leave her day job at 3 p.m., go to another job right after that, come home at 7 p.m., sleep for a couple of hours, then get up at midnight and head over to the old Whitestone Movie Theater to clean the theaters after the last show. Elicia Felix-Hughey We lived in an extremely EDUCATION : dangerous housing project • MBA, Johns Hopkins Carey in a not-so-nice neighborBusiness School • BBA, Business and hood, we didn’t have a car, so HR Management, she took the bus and subway. City University of New York What I remember most is FORMERLY: didn’t know the first thing the fear every night that she • Vice President, Human about HR , but I was seamResources, Octave Group would not make it back home • Vice President, Human lessly able to transition safely. But she always did Resources, TouchTunes into the role. I was very arrive home safely and never Interactive Networks organized, paid attention to • Director, Human Resources, showed signs of fear, exhausThe Harry Fox Agency detail, and was able to catch tion, or sadness. She exuded • Vice President, on very quickly. nothing but strength. Human Resources, EMI Music “I’ve been lucky. I’ve “My parents and I never Publishing/Sony/ ATV Music Publishing had amazing mentors and talked about schooling or a This year Felix-Hughey became champions throughout my career. My family, especially the first human resources career, and I’ve never had to my father, loved music, and executive named to Billboard’s search for a job. Your netso did I. When I was younger, “Power List,” the 100 professionwork, your work ethic, your als deemed most influential in I learned to play the clarinet the music industry. reputation, your personal and the saxophone, and I PR – they just follow you. sang in the choir. There was “Still, what happened last year was no less always loud music playing, booming out of than a miracle. At EMI music publishing an apartment or at a block party. It was what (before it was acquired by Sony/ATV), where we listened to for fun, but I never saw it as a I became vice president, human resources, way to support myself. I met Jon Platt, who at the time was head “I landed a job right out of high school at of creative. When Jon was named chair and a medical malpractice law firm in ManhatCEO of Sony/ATV Music Publishing, he tan, making $18,000 a year. After I worked called and asked me to join him as senior several months as a receptionist, the HR vice president of global human resources, manager offered me an HR Assistant role. I one of the top positions on his newly minted management team.

Everything about the job is incredible, but the most exciting part is being part of a team that’s determined to make a difference by driving positive cultural change. We are investing in the development and growth of our people and showing them they’re valued. We’re diversifying our staff and creating a collaborative, oneteam environment. We’re raising the bar for the entire industry. “We’re continuing to build a leadership team that understands the benefits of collaboration, but also of diversity. We’re hiring people with different skills, from different backgrounds, of different ethnicities and sexual orientations. Before Jon and I started, we had zero women in senior leadership. We’ve seen significant growth

“IT’S SAID THAT ‘SAMENESS PLUS SAMENESS BREEDS SAMENESS.’ AND THE LAST THING WE WANT IS SAMENESS. WHAT WE WANT IS TO INNOVATE AND GROW.” in this area and are continuously looking to make further improvements. We’re laser focused on why all of this is important, especially in today’s society, and we’ve done all of this in less than a year. “It’s said that ‘sameness plus sameness breeds sameness.’ And the last thing we want is sameness. What we want is to innovate and grow.”

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BY THE NUMBE RS

A SHRINKING GAP By Sue De Pasquale

The longtime wage gap between men and women in the American workplace has narrowed, according to a Pew Research Center study released in late January. The study found that from 1980 to 2018, the average hourly wage of women increased 45 percent, from $15 to $22, compared with an increase of 14 percent for men, from $23 to $26. That shrunk the wage gap (advantage: men) from 33 cents to the dollar in 1980 to 15 cents to the dollar in 2018. According to the report, U.S. wages – and jobs – have grown most quickly in fields that require skilled workers, particularly those who possess “social” or “fundamental” skills (used in the legal, teaching, and counseling occupations) and “analytical” skills (such as accounting and programming). Women, who have seen a rapid rise in college completion over the past 40 years, are “in the vanguard” of filling these higher-skilled jobs, the Pew researchers note.

“Yes, the wage gap is shrinking, but there is still a notable gap,” says Stuart. “Women are [increasingly] better educated and working in better jobs, but they still aren’t being paid the same as men, and there are factors contributing to this remaining gap that are complicated and difficult to move the needle on.” These factors, she notes, include the changing nature of work itself, societal expectations of women when it comes to the work/family balance, discrimination, and more.

GENDER GAP

SKILLS IN DEMAND

The increase in women’s average hourly wage is attributed in part to the rise in college completion among women working in high-skill jobs.

Women are taking the lead in meeting the increasing demand for skilled workers, filling positions in which social, fundamental, and analytical skills are deemed most essential.

n Men n Women

HOURLY WAGES:

$26

$25 $23

$22

$20

YEAR

$15

1980

2018

35

YEAR

33 30

40%

2018

From 1980 to 2018, the growth of overall employment in jobs in which the following skills are considered most important:

1980

2018

FUNDAMENTAL (such as critical thinking and writing)

25

PERCENT 20

SOCIAL

111%

FUNDAMENTAL

104%

ANALYTICAL

92%

MANAGERIAL

77%

60

15

1980

52%

15

45

2018

30

Still, women occupy relatively few of the top spots at major companies.

15

Percentage of female CEOs at Fortune 500 companies:

36%

YEAR

1980

2018

ANALYTICAL (such as science and systems analysis)

1995 2017

PERCENT

2018

45 30

42%

SOURCES: “Women Make Gains in the Workplace Amid a Rising Demand for Skilled Workers,” Pew Research Center, January 30, 2020; and “Women and Leadership, 2018,” Pew Research Center, September 20, 2018.

YEAR

0% 6.4% 4.8%

(all-time high)

27%

15

I L L U S T R AT I O N : S C O T T R O B E R T S

1980

52% 45

15

CENTS TO THE DOLLAR:

While seemingly good news for the nation’s women workers, the study’s findings “don’t tell the whole story,” notes Colleen Stuart, an assistant professor of management and organization at the Carey Business School whose research examines how women overcome barriers in the workplace to achieve success.

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30

60

Gender wage gap (advantage to men)

YEAR

47% 40%

YEAR

30

While wage parity between men and women has improved at entry- and mid-level jobs, Stuart points out, representation of women at the highest levels, where employment policy decisions are made, remains “strikingly” low. Top spots are still overwhelmingly held by men, Stuart says, pointing to a Pew report, “Women and Leadership, 2018,” which shows that the share of female CEOs of Fortune 500 companies was just 4.8 percent in 2018. “Clearly,” she says, “there’s still work to be done.”

60

15

SOCIAL (such as negotiation and persuasion) PERCENT

$15

PERCENT

45

Percentage of women in jobs in which these three skills are most important:

$30

MANAGERIAL (such as guiding personnel)

1980

2018

From 1995 to 2017, the share of female board members at Fortune 500 companies more than doubled, yet reached only 22 percent.

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EXPERIENCE

F E AT U R E | E X P E R I E N T I A L L E A R N I N G

The Office of Experiential Learning creates innovative, immersive projects to provide Carey students with real-world business skills.

SPEAKING FROM BY ANNIE BRACKEMYRE

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ILLUSTR ATIONS: LUKE B EST

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EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

It’s 6 p.m. on a February evening in the Johns Hopkins Bayview Emergency Department. The waiting room is full, but the floor is calm – for now. As the sun sets and ambulances rush in patients, the Emergency Department doctors, nurses, physician assistants, and techs transform chaos into choreographed care. And tonight, 12 Carey Business School students are in the middle of it all. They are here as part of an experiential learning “Impact Sprint.” The 24-hour challenge embedded the students in the emergency department to find a solution to one of the hospital’s complex business challenges: How can hospital staff improve communication when sharing critical information between shift changes? A streamlined process will strengthen the patient experience while bolstering a healthy work culture built on trust. Johns Hopkins hospitals are accustomed to students and see residents, interns, and all levels of doctors and nurses in training circling through on a regular basis – especially in February, well before the COVID-19 pandemic. But a group of business school students on the floor with doctors is novel. These innovative, immersive experiences are devised and provided to Carey students by the school’s Office of Experiential Learning. Experiential learning, the process of learning by doing, dates back to the very founding of Johns Hopkins University, in 1876. When the university’s founder, Johns Hopkins, wanted to build a hospital, he traveled around the world to learn from other institutions. The roll-up-your-sleeves, immersive approach is squarely in the Johns Hopkins tradition. From its inception more than a decade ago, Carey Business School has made experiential learning a key component of its course offerings, culminating in 2018 with the formal launching of the experiential learning office. Since then, the office has grown to oversee more than 17 courses, 19 student organizations, over 50 non-credit or student organization events, and numerous case competitions each year. Michael Doyle, director of experiential learning, says, “Experiential learning offers opportunities to apply the models and theories students learn in their classes in a real-life

“Experiential learning offers opportunities to apply the models and theories students learn in their classes in a real-life setting. Not only do our students know the theories and models, but through experiential learning, they do the work under faculty and industry experts who give continuous and involved feedback.” MICHAEL DOYLE

setting. Not only do our students know the theories and models, but through experiential learning they do the work under faculty and industry experts who give continuous and involved feedback.” The Impact Sprint that placed 12 Carey students in the emergency department at Bayview was just one of these opportunities. Students spent their shifts shadowing and interviewing medical staff and then testing their recommendations in real time. The students then presented actionable recommendations to the emergency department leadership. “Being on the floor allowed us to gain real experience of what it’s like to be under immense stress dealing with life-and-death situations while trying to manage teams and communicate with colleagues,” says Nike Panetta, a Flexible MBA student. “We were able to learn the staff’s motivations, strengths, and weaknesses, and fine-tune our recommendations based on direct feedback.” Student plans included formalizing a cross-functional huddle of doctors, nurses, and physician assistants during shift changes. Another recommendation leveraged existing technology to create a staff directory so that traveling nurses and rotating staff integrate with the full-time staff more quickly. Edward Bessman, chairman emeritus of emergency medicine at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and a Carey MBA alumnus ’11, was on the floor with the students and was one of the hospital staff members listening to the student recommendations. “Some of the recommendations the teams made were similar to those we had previously

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identified. This confirms that they were on the right track,” Bessman says. “A few of the proposals were new and quite interesting, so I imagine that Emergency Department leadership will consider implementing one or more.” Indeed, as is the case with almost all experiential learning opportunities at Carey, student recommendations are developed to be implemented. And as the school continues to design such opportunities, says Doyle, students benefit from a range of chances to hone their skills in environments that, they say, push them out of their comfort zones. SIGNATURE EXPERIENTIAL COURSES

The growth of Carey’s experiential learning corresponds with the surge in such programs at many business schools. And Carey’s MBA program, revised for fall 2020, is doubling down on its promise of these opportunities. All Carey full-time MBA students now graduate with a minimum equivalent of four internships, with the option to take an unlimited number of additional experiential learning courses as electives. And all full-time MBA candidates beginning this fall will take Innovation Field Project, the new signature MBA course. During the spring of their first year, students will spend five weeks in the classroom and up to three weeks on site embedded at a client organization to solve a complex business problem. Student projects are still being developed, but past experiential learning projects provide a sense of potential project scope. In a previous course, an established solar energy company with 90,000 customers was pursuing

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EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

“Carey’s experiential course sequence allows faculty to collaborate with corporate partners to increase project complexity as students build new skills over time. Students apply new frameworks and strategies involving teaming, critical thinking, and creativity, coupled with new analytical skills, to address increasing complex business problems.” DAN SHEATS

a new model of distributed irrigation systems for farmers in emerging economies. Carey students tested the concept with potential customers, adjusted the pricing model, and delivered new pricing and financial models to improve affordability for customers and profits for the company. Brian Gunia, the full-time MBA academic program advisor and an associate professor, says, “The course represents the first major opportunity for the students to take what they’ve learned in their foundational Carey coursework out into the real world. Since that is where they’ll be going for their internships and jobs, it represents a critical step in their intellectual and professional development.” Ozge Sahin, Innovation Field Project professor, says that the course pushes students beyond traditional client-facing opportunities. “Unlike most MBA courses, students in Innovation Field Project are not only expected to solve a business problem. They first collect evidence using primary and secondary research methods to identify the client’s biggest challenge or opportunity,” says Sahin. Innovation Field Project evolved from its predecessor, Innovation for Humanity, which launched in 2010 and required MBA students to help small businesses in emerging economies solve finance, supply chain, marketing, or other business challenges. Throughout the course’s tenure, students have completed 170plus projects in nine countries from Rwanda to Ecuador. While no longer a required course, it is being redesigned as an elective. Throughout the 10-year run of Innovation for Humanity, the experiential learning

office translated the program successes, lessons learned, and opportunities into today’s best practices. WHAT EMPLOYERS WANT

All of Carey’s experiential courses are part of a sequential strategy to equip students with the skills today’s employers demand. These skills include complex problem solving, critical thinking, and creativity, according to the 2018-2022 World Economic Forum “Future of Jobs” report, which tracks the workforce abilities that drive planning, hiring, training, and investment decisions, particularly at the world’s largest organizations. The report predicts that “creativity, originality and initiative, critical thinking, persuasion and negotiation will likewise retain or increase their value, as will attention to detail, resilience, flexibility and complex problemsolving. Emotional intelligence, leadership and social influence as well as service orientation also see an outsized increase in demand relative to their current prominence.” While many other business schools offer behavioral skills training through experiential learning, these trainings are often disconnected from other aspects of students’ curriculum, according to Christopher Myers, an assistant professor who co-teaches the school’s Leadership Development Expedition. “As faculty and staff, we are aware of what students are doing and experiencing at Carey. We are able to integrate the experiential learning with other elements of their curriculum so that we can pick up where they left off in their leadership development and help them

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practice and apply the skills they started developing in the classroom,” Myers says. Carey’s experiential learning staff and course faculty work lockstep with each other and corporate partners to deliver a student experience that translates into skills for the professional world. Dan Sheats, director of curricular experiential learning, says, “Carey’s experiential course sequence allows faculty to collaborate with corporate partners to increase project complexity as students build new skills over time. Students apply new frameworks and strategies involving teaming, critical thinking, and creativity, coupled with new analytical skills, to address increasing complex business problems. By practicing these skills in a supported, sequential structure, students build the knowledge, experience, and confidence to take on opportunities throughout their careers.” FROM CLASSROOM TO FIELD

Branden Anderson, Flexible MBA ’19, was looking for his next career move as he neared the end of his degree program. He was in the middle of the interview process for a senior human resources business partner position while kayaking through Belize’s waterways in the Leadership Development Expedition course. In this popular course, students put their leadership skills to work when forced into challenging outdoor environments and out of their comfort zones. Anderson’s cohort kayaked through Belize for nine days, with the students alternating responsibilities for navigation, cooking, and setting up camp. Anderson, who served in the Army for over 20 years, says he was ready physically for the challenge but wasn’t expecting to come away with an entirely new set of “soft” skills. “I was able to translate the experience and show that I gained leadership skills, feedback, awareness, empathy, and compassion – all of the soft skills that are actually really hard,” he says. “Most people don’t take opportunities to develop these skills. But it’s like exercise, and we can’t say we did it once and are good for the year. You have to do it extensively, or those muscles go to waste.”

He credits honing these soft skills on the Leadership Development Expedition as one of the final factors that helped him land his new position. “You really learn about your resiliency,” he says. “Every Leadership Development Expedition has its own curveball. Half of our people got sick after drinking bad water. Others who hadn’t stepped into a leadership role yet really had to step up. That level of vulnerability when you’re already psychologically and physically vulnerable is a real test of your resiliency. I was able to take that experience and translate it into a business setting during my job interviews.” The course was so influential for so many students that a group of Carey alumni started a Leadership Development Expedition alumni Facebook group. The Facebook group evolved into a weekend camping excursion in the Shenandoah Mountains in 2019, completely organized by the alumni, including Anderson. The trip featured the typical outdoor accoutrements and activities of an alumni reunion. But this trip stood out as more than just an opportunity to reminisce. The alumni invited Doyle, the director of experiential learning, to incorporate curricular components into the weekend. The group reviewed a business leadership article in advance of the trip and then discussed the article and their personal leadership challenges and successes during an evening campfire. CREATING LASTING CONNECTIONS

As the students at Hopkins Bayview can attest, Carey students don’t need to travel far to benefit from Carey’s experiential learning offerings. Andrew Lyle, a Flexible MBA student, used experiential learning to connect with the funding and resources to launch a new company – without leaving the Carey campus. In December 2019, seven teams and individual Carey Business School students competed for initial funding for their startups through the Student Startup Challenge. The challenge, hosted by the Office of Experiential Learning, gives students the opportunity to pitch for initial seed money in the fall,

meet monthly with industry mentors as they develop their businesses, and pitch for a second round of funding in the spring. Lyle took home the top purse in the first round of funding, securing $5,500 with his pitch for a website and app, Sifter, that helps consumers navigate and compare telemedicine options. “It’s the wild, wild West in telemedicine. It’s a free-for-all trying to get patients’ attention any way possible,” Lyle says. Lyle’s website works to change that, aggregating telemedicine options at various price points so that consumers can compare options just as they compare travel options on Expedia. He used his initial round of funding to hire a web developer. The experiential learning opportunity was the push he needed to take his idea to market. But no matter the results of the second round of funding, he says, he is committed to the company and will continue bringing Sifter to market. For some students, connectivity across the Johns Hopkins ecosystem means meeting

two-day residencies. Otherwise, they interact with their classmates and professors entirely online. Experiential learning courses offer a condensed, immersive way to build and strengthen relationships with classmates. Vipul Kella, an emergency medicine physician in Rockville, Maryland, and a Flexible MBA student, enrolled in Global Immersion, an experiential learning course that took students to Peru for seven days over the 2020 January intercession. The class met with Peruvian business school professors and representatives of the American Chamber of Commerce and corporations such as L’Oreal and a Peruvian health care provider to examine Peru’s trade opportunities and challenges on the macro, micro, and human levels. “Networking, collaboration, and exchange of ideas with colleagues is a necessary part of business school education. It’s where you interact with people from different backgrounds and perspectives, learn new ways to solve problems, and challenge your own way of thinking,” Kella says. “The real-world

“Networking, collaboration, and exchange of ideas with colleagues is a necessary part of business school education. It’s where you interact with people from different backgrounds and perspectives, learn new ways to solve problems, and challenge your own way of thinking. The real-world experiences serve as idea incubators and spark creativity and innovation.” VIPUL KELLA

their classmates face to face for the first time. For the 89 percent of Flexible MBA students taking courses online, experiential learning is one of their best chances to capitalize on building a strong network of colleagues, the hallmark of all good MBA programs. Flexible MBA students can take all their courses in-person, online, or in a mix of both formats. Students taking courses mostly online travel to Baltimore for three one- to

experiences serve as idea incubators and spark creativity and innovation.” Experiential learning, Myers explains, has many “official learning benefits.” “But you’ll also grow from the unofficial benefits,” he adds, “whether that’s traveling out of the country or kayaking for the first time. It’s your chance to step out of your comfort zone and try something new.”

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CAREY

RESEARCH FACULTY STUDY AND INVESTIGATION AT THE CAREY BUSINESS SCHOOL

I, ROBOT VS. I, CONSUMER

DOCS ‘UNDER-TEST’ TO IMPRESS PEERS

As the use of big data, machine learning, and artificial intelligence become more widespread, so do concerns about how these information-harvesting tools will affect consumers’ sense of autonomy. A recent article co-authored by Haiyang Yang, an assistant professor of marketing at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, notes these concerns while urging companies to follow three safeguards that could ensure customers feel that they – and not superintelligent software programs – are controlling their choices. The list of safeguards is laid out in the piece in MIT Sloan Management Review. It starts with the admonition that consumers in the digital realm must be able to feel they’re being treated as unique individuals rather than as faceless consumers being shoved toward selections on the basis of their past user data. Above and beyond “programmed” personalization (e.g., addressing consumers by their first names), companies, even those using AI bots, should enable consumers to customize aspects of their interactions with the products/services in ways that let them express their individual identities. Safeguard number two: Don’t spark the defiance of consumers by infringing on their “freedom not to be predictable.” The paper says that Amazon, for example, could solicit customers who have purchased one of the Lord of the Rings books by subtly inviting them to “continue exploring Tolkien” or “learn all there is to know about the series.” Yang and his co-authors write, “Such an approach would implicitly reward consumers for continuing to follow a chosen path, rather than pushing them to deviate from it in order to assert their autonomy.”

Some expert medical diagnosticians may limit the number of patient tests they order as a way to signal a high level of competence to their peers, according to a study by two Carey Business School researchers. These “high-type experts” engage in “undertesting” despite an increase in diagnostic techniques, including artificial intelligence tools that can assess patient conditions more accurately than past methods, say co-authors Tinglong Dai and Shubhranshu Singh, associate professors at the Carey School. While they care about their patients’ welfare and might feel that tests can burden patients with steep financial, physical, and emotional costs, the doctors are also concerned about maintaining their reputations as top-flight diagnosticians, Dai and Singh note. “These doctors believe that they know what’s best and that testing isn’t always necessary. Testing has implications and may lead some of their peers to have less regard for their inherent diagnostic skills,” explains Dai. Singh adds, “Past studies have shown an industry bias against doctors who perform numerous tests.” “Low-type experts” – defined by the researchers as less experienced and not as well trained as the high-type doctors – tend not to undertest out of concern they might otherwise miss important information. They realize that the loss to patients’ welfare would be much larger if they engaged in undertesting by not ordering blood analyses, X-rays, ultrasound scans, and other tests. These lowtype experts choose not to sacrifice patients’ welfare for the reputational benefit of being perceived as high-type experts. The researchers’ findings are summarized in the paper “Conspicuous by Its Absence: Diagnostic Expert Testing Under Uncertainty,”

CONSUMERS IN THE DIGITAL REALM MUST BE ABLE TO FEEL THEY’RE BEING TREATED AS UNIQUE INDIVIDUALS RATHER THAN AS FACELESS CONSUMERS BEING SHOVED TOWARD SELECTIONS ON THE BASIS OF THEIR PAST USER DATA. Finally, the article urges companies to safeguard their customers’ sense of privacy, observing that “privacy and autonomy are discrete but related concepts that overlap each other.” As the article notes, governments and cybercriminals aren’t the only ones amassing precise data about individuals;

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many companies also are gathering consumer information. The article recommends that businesses embrace and build on efforts, such as the European Union’s data-protection law, that give consumers greater control over the use of their personal data. By following these safeguards, Yang and his co-authors suggest, companies can offer a digital environment more likely to maintain the good will – and repeat business – of their customers. “Designing AI Systems That Customers Won’t Hate” was written by Haiyang Yang of Carey, Professor Ziv Carmon and Professor Klaus Wertenbroch, both of INSEAD, and Associate Professor Rom Schrift of Indiana University. ­– Patrick Ercolano

ILLUSTRATIONS: GIULIO BONASERA

published in Marketing Science. The conclusions were based on a game-theoretic model created by the authors and supported by indepth interviews with medical professionals. Most investigations of medical diagnostics have focused on high levels of testing, particularly in the context of financial incentives linked to testing. Dai and Singh’s paper differs by examining the motives behind low levels of testing. As the authors write, “Undertesting has emerged as an important source of misdiagnosis but has not received due attention from either the public or the health care community.” Doctors’ reluctance to order medical tests becomes more problematic as AI-enabled diagnostic tools “are set to transform much of the health care sector [by] leveraging big data and deep learning to aid physicians in reaching more precise diagnosis,” the authors write. Yet situations exist when highly skilled doctors are unable to signal their diagnostic ability through undertesting. These occur when the reputational payoff is either very

“GIVEN WHAT’S AT STAKE IN HEALTH CARE, MAYBE WE SHOULD WORRY MORE ABOUT PATIENTS AND THEIR OUTCOMES RATHER THAN HOW DOCTORS MAKE THEIR REPUTATIONS KNOWN TO ONE ANOTHER.” large (for example, in a specialty in which the doctor heavily depends on peer referrals) or very small (as in a specialty in which the doctor relies less on peer referrals). A possible way to discourage undertesting by physicians would be to offer them financial incentives, the authors suggest. They add, however, that top doctors would likely see taking incentives as a poor reflection on their diagnostic skills and thus would decline them. Undertesting has at least one positive effect, Dai says. “You could argue that it helps by making various doctors’ skill levels known among their peers,” he adds. “But given what’s at stake in health care, maybe we should worry more about patients and their outcomes rather than how doctors make their reputations known to one another.” ­– PE

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CAREY RESEARCH

MORE AWARENESS IS THE RESULT

HIV and HCV, Frimpong says. She adds that future research could examine how health care organizations might best implement the rapid testing strategy for HIV and HVC. “Bundling Rapid Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Testing to Increase Receipt of Test Results” was co-authored by Frimpong of Johns Hopkins; Professor Lisa Rosen-Metsch, Professor Susan Tross, and doctoral candidate Karen Shiu-Yee, all of Columbia University; Professor Thomas D’Aunno and Professor Shiela Strauss, both of New York University; Professor David Perlman of the Icahn School of Medicine; Professor Bruce Schackman of Weill Cornell Medical College; and Professor Daniel Feaster of the University of Miami.

When substance use disorder patients were tested for both HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) at the same time and given the results within 20 minutes, they were far more likely a month later to indicate they had received results, compared with patients who were referred for testing services, according to a new study published in Medical Care. For the study, led by Carey Associate Professor Jemima Frimpong, 162 patients at two New York City treatment facilities were divided into a treatment group that immediately got test results and post-test counseling, and a control group that was referred off-site and encouraged to get tested, as is standard practice. Of the 134 patients who completed the

FINDINGS SUGGEST THAT JOINTLY OFFERING HIV AND HCV TESTING ON SITE AND PROVIDING IMMEDIATE TEST RESULTS WOULD HELP INCREASE INFECTION AWARENESS AMONG PEOPLE WITH SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS. follow-up assessment a month later, 69 percent of those in the treatment group said they had gotten both test results. Only 19 percent of those in the control group reported receiving them. None of the study participants tested positive for HIV. Seven from the immediateresults treatment group tested preliminarypositive for HCV, and one from the referral control group reported getting an HCV-positive result, says Frimpong, an expert in decision making within health care organizations. The findings suggest that jointly offering HIV and HCV testing on site and providing

­– PE

immediate test results would help increase infection awareness among people with substance use disorders who don’t know they have HIV or HCV. It also means greater opportunities for getting patients in treatment and improving their quality of life, Frimpong says. At the facility level, she says, managers will have a more accurate picture of infection rates, which can then inform how they organize service delivery. As the study notes, substance use disorder is associated with HIV and HCV. Yet a survey conducted in 20 U.S. cities found that about 50 percent of HIV-positive people who inject drugs were unaware they had the virus, while 75 percent of HCV-positive people with a substance use disorder did not know they were infected. Such numbers have led the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to recommend routine HIV and HCV testing for people with a history of substance use. Patients typically are tested at facilities other than their usual treatment centers, and they must return days later to get the results. Often,

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they are unable or unwilling to make the return visits – as reflected in the study’s finding that only about one-fifth of patients in the control group later said they knew their test results. Frimpong says this indicates “lapses in the care-delivery process, which may have negative consequences for increasing awareness of HIV and HCV infections, and for early initiation of treatment.” Conducting tests at patients’ regular treatment centers with results in 20 minutes has significant advantages over the traditional approach to testing, says Frimpong. “The rapid test kits that were used in our study did not take blood from a vein; it was done less invasively, with a finger stick. These tests can be performed by program staff with limited but focused training. The kits are also highly accurate in detecting HIV and HCV, and do not require a return visit for the patient. In addition, rapid HIV and HCV testing has been shown to be cost effective,” she says. The study covers new ground with its development and test of a comprehensive package of strategies for rapid testing for

TAKING AIM AT ‘SUPERBUGS’

“According to the World Health Organization, one of the biggest threats to global health is the growing number of infections – including pneumonia and tuberculosis – that are becoming harder to treat because of antibiotic resistance,” Hermosilla wrote in a summary of the grant he won from the Johns Hopkins Alliance for a Healthier World. “India is at the center of the crisis due to the high levels of antibiotic resistance among its population, but also because it was the first country in which the NDM-1 ‘superbug’ was identified.” Hermosilla will be conducting the research with Chirantan Chatterjee, a professor at the Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad. Carey Associate Professor Mario Macis also was named a recipient of a grant from the Alliance for a Healthier World. He is one of the leaders of an investigative team

“ONE OF THE BIGGEST THREATS TO GLOBAL HEALTH IS THE GROWING NUMBER OF INFECTIONS, INCLUDING PNEUMONIA AND TUBERCULOSIS, THAT ARE BECOMING HARDER TO TREAT BECAUSE OF ANTIBIOTIC RESISTANCE.” seeking to advance the well-being of rural communities in Uganda through strengthened community health programs. More than three-fourths of the Ugandan population are in rural areas, far from the cities where health care workers are concentrated. Macis and his colleagues will focus on ways to improve rural residents’ access to care through the Ugandan community work force known as Village Health Teams. The investigators, including researchers from several other divisions of Johns Hopkins University, will partner with a consortium of partners in Uganda. ­– Doug Donovan

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest threats to global health, according to international health organizations. “Superbugs” born out of overuse of antibiotics in humans and animals could kill 10 million people each year by 2050 if nations do not start to significantly curtail the use of the most powerful antibiotics, the United Nations estimates. More antibiotic resistance is also expected to intensify the fatalities associated with pandemics such as the COVID-19 coronavirus. Manuel Hermosilla, an assistant professor of marketing at Carey Business School, recently won a Johns Hopkins grant to study whether India has reduced its use of antibiotics of last resort after serving as ground zero for one of the world’s most dangerous superbugs, NDM-1. India has one of the world’s highest levels of antibiotic resistance because of over-prescribing by medical professionals, excessive consumption of over-the-counter versions, and overuse of the drugs in livestock.

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BUSINESS NEWS FROM INSIDE THE CAREY BUSINESS SCHOOL

CAREY FOUNDATION MAKES $25 MILLION GIFT TO SCHOOL The W. P. Carey Foundation, whose generosity launched Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, has made a $25 million commitment to the school to recruit faculty, enhance academic programs, and help launch student careers. The gift, announced February 19, will be matched with commitments from Johns Hopkins University and contributions from other donors for a fundraising total of $50 million. Carey Business School was named in honor of James Carey, a 19th-century merchant and forefather of the school’s benefactor, William Polk Carey, who contributed $50 million to Johns Hopkins University in 2006 to transform its part-time business education program into a full-time business school. The foundation’s new gift provides Carey Business School the support to ensure its path of growth and advance its mission to shape the business leaders of the future. “On behalf of the W. P. Carey Foundation, we are proud to build on our investment in Johns Hopkins Carey Business School with today’s gift,” said William P. Carey II, chairman of the W. P. Carey Foundation. “This support will help fulfill my great-uncle Bill Carey’s vision of educating leaders who can have a transformative impact nationally and globally. As a long-term partner, it is the foundation’s goal that this support will ensure Carey Business School continues to be a world-class institution in the years ahead.” A portion of the new gift will be used to establish the James Carey Distinguished Professorships, which will enhance the school’s ability to attract outstanding researchers and academic leaders with records of significant scholarship. “With the James Carey Distinguished Professorships, we will increase the impact

of our cutting-edge and interdisciplinary research, including research related to the business of health, which is an area of distinction for Carey Business School,” said Dean Alexander Triantis. The gift will also enhance the overall student experience, which recently underwent a comprehensive redesign for fall 2020. The full-time MBA curriculum now includes two pathways of study for students: • The Health, Technology, and Innovation pathway capitalizes on Johns Hopkins’ renowned leadership in medicine, nursing, public health, and advanced biotechnology and enables students to complete experiential courses and co-curricular activities focused on a range of health-related fields. • The Analytics, Leadership, and Innovation pathway blends leadership and behavioral science skills to prepare students for the unique opportunities and challenges facing 21st-century organizations. The new gift provides additional career development services and resources for students, such as greater access to internships, immersive career opportunities, and professional networking. “This is a very meaningful gift for Carey Business School, as the school enters the next phase of its development,” said Sunil Kumar, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs for Johns Hopkins University. “The renewed commitment of the W. P. Carey Foundation ensures that Carey Business School will continue to grow, to produce innovative scholarly research, and to provide an outstanding education for our students.” The school’s first decade was a period of tremendous growth as it established a fulltime MBA program and specialized Master of Science programs in finance, marketing, business analytics, information systems, real estate and infrastructure, and health care management. The school also developed dual degree programs that leverage the expertise

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of other Johns Hopkins divisions to fuel interdisciplinary education. Since its founding, Carey Business School has bolstered the ranks of its full-time faculty, growing from 21 to 107 members including 14 tenured professors and eight endowed faculty positions. Nearly a quarter of Carey’s full-time faculty study or teach in health-related fields. The school now enrolls 2,300 students, with about 38 percent of current full-time MBA students and 35 percent of part-time MBA students focusing on

“WITH THE JAMES CAREY DISTINGUISHED PROFESSORSHIPS, WE WILL INCREASE THE IMPACT OF OUR CUTTING-EDGE AND INTERDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH, INCLUDING RESEARCH RELATED TO THE BUSINESS OF HEALTH.”

GE BAI TESTIFIES TO CONGRESS ABOUT PHARMA POLICIES, COSTS Ge Bai, an associate professor of accounting at Carey Business School, testified February 5 at a congressional hearing on pricing in the pharmaceutical industry. An expert on health care costs, Bai was one of five witnesses who addressed the Health Subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives Ways and Means Committee, chaired by Rep. Lloyd Doggett, a Texas Democrat.

—DEAN ALEXANDER TRIANTIS

health-related areas of study. In 2017, Carey Business School earned accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, the world’s leading authority on the quality assurance of business school programs. AACSB accreditation is considered a “hallmark of excellence” in business education. “The foundation is thrilled to support the Carey Business School as Johns Hopkins builds on its existing strengths in medicine, public health, and technology,” said Zachary Pack, director of the W. P. Carey Foundation and a Johns Hopkins alumnus. “Through the support of the W. P. Carey Foundation and the matching funds from the university and other donors, Bill Carey’s goals for Johns Hopkins will be realized.” ­– The JHU Hub

GE BAI

In her opening remarks, Bai called attention to pharma company strategies such as donating cash to independent patient assistance programs and patient advocacy organizations, and giving free drug samples to clinicians with the aim of influencing drug use. Such actions, she said, “lead to market distortions, price increases, and inefficient drug spending, but benefit the bottom lines of the drug manufacturers.” In recent years, Bai has co-authored a series of widely covered journal articles on exorbitant pricing and other questionable practices in the health care industry, including a February 17 article in JAMA Internal Medicine that found the highest-earning nonprofit hospitals in the United States provided less charity care to patients than

 AI CALLED ATTENTION B TO PHARMA COMPANY STRATEGIES SUCH AS DONATING CASH TO INDEPENDENT PATIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS AND PATIENT ADVOCACY ORGANIZATIONS, AND GIVING FREE DRUG SAMPLES TO CLINICIANS WITH THE AIM OF INFLUENCING DRUG USE. lower-earning hospitals did, relative to the facilities’ respective profits. Another recent study published in JAMA examined 274 patient assistance programs operated by six independent charity programs. Bai and colleagues found that 97 percent of the programs excluded uninsured patients. The most common income eligibility limit was 500 percent of the federal income poverty level – which means the focus of assistance is not on the poorest people. The approximately two-hour-long congressional hearing – titled “More Cures for More Patients: Overcoming Pharmaceutical Barriers” – can be viewed on the YouTube channel of the House Ways and Means Committee (www.youtube.com/ watch?v=v4zyXPNCryg).

SHARON TRIVINO PROMOTED TO DIRECTOR OF DAR Sharon Trivino was promoted to the position of director of development and alumni relations at the Carey Business School. She will oversee both the development and alumni relations teams at Carey, said Greg Bowden, associate dean for development and alumni relations, in a March 4 email to DAR staff. Evan Zaletel, the previous director of development, left Carey in January to become director of annual giving and digital strategy in Johns Hopkins University’s central development office. Trivino joined Carey in November 2015 as director of alumni relations. Her responsibilities later expanded to include

SHARON TRIVINO

constituent engagement. She led the design and implementation of an alumni engagement infrastructure that encompasses 10 regional clubs, two mentorship programs, three affinity networks, an alumni engagement metrics system, and signature alumni events such as Alumni Weekend and Beet Week, a new school-wide student engagement/philanthropy initiative. She also revitalized the alumni board, doubling board giving and creating a major gifts pipeline. Before arriving at Johns Hopkins, Trivino spent four years as a campaign consultant at CCS, leading feasibility studies and capital campaigns for clients such as the University of Maryland Children’s Hospital, the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, and UnidosUS, the largest Latino nonprofit advocacy organization in the United States. She began her development career at Columbia Business School’s external relations and development office. There, she managed the board of overseers and served as chief of staff to the vice dean – while also engaged in a professional dance career. She earned her BA in history at Princeton University and her MBA at Columbia Business School. “Above and beyond her core duties, Sharon is a tremendous team member and leader within Carey and DAR,” Bowden said. “She participates on numerous committees across the school and university. This promotion is a testament to Sharon’s skill and effort, and an important piece of the school’s continued growth.”

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OTHER BUSINE SS

NEWS AFRICA BUSINESS CONFERENCE HELD AT CAREY

WALKING A MILE IN THEIR SHOES

1960s–1990s

By Andrew Blumberg

It is the second-largest continent in the world, bigger than the United States, China, and Europe combined. Its $1.4 trillion in consumer spending surpasses that of the more populous India. It is poised to become the world’s largest free-trade area, with 400-plus companies posting revenues in excess of $1 billion. Yet the economic development and potential of Africa remains an under-told story on the world stage. The Carey Business School’s studentrun Africa Business Club – which seeks to promote the economic, cultural, and social development of Africa – hopes to spark a change in the narrative. That idea drove the agenda of the Africa Business Conference, sponsored by the student club and held at Carey’s Harbor East campus this past January. Building on the momentum of the Mzuzah Convergence 2018 Conference – a previous Carey-hosted event that focused on business in Africa – this year’s conference brought together African development experts and policy shapers with faculty, students, alumni, and members of the Carey community at large. More than 100 people from the African continent and diaspora attended the conference, along with representatives of Carey and other Johns Hopkins divisions. The event featured five panel discussions linked to the conference theme, “Africa’s Place in an Increasingly Global Network.” Keynote speaker for the conference was Eleni Gabre-Madhin, founder and “chief happiness officer” at Blue Moon (Ethiopia’s first youth agriculture business incubator), and former CEO of the Ethiopia Commodity Exchange (ECX). Her comments spoke to the power of

Ed Donahue (BS, Accounting ’68), merged his Annapolis-based financial and management consulting firm, which focuses on environmental infrastructure, with NewGen Strategies and Solutions, a Denver-based consultancy of 50-plus professionals in eight offices. Jibran Joseph Hannaney (Master of Administrative Science ’81) is president of HEMC Environmental Managing Corp. in El Cajon, California. He also is a licensed professional civil engineer, contractor for the removal of hazardous substances, insurance broker, real estate broker, and tax preparation consultant, and he reports that HEMC is planning for an initial public offering.

AFRICA CONFERENCE PANEL CAPTION TO COME.

“THE CONFERENCE HERE AT HOPKINS IS AN ENGINE... ONE THAT TRANSLATES IDEAS INTO CONVERSATIONS AND CONVERSATIONS INTO ACTIONS THAT ADVANCE AWARENESS AND PURSUIT OF BUSINESS AND CAREERS IN AFRICA.” —ERNEST NYARKO

social media in connecting people and spreading ideas, especially in relation to the burgeoning economic opportunities in Africa. “I refer to the current generation as ‘Generation C’ for connected, because through the power of social media, dreams and ideas are no different,” she said. Rhoda Weeks-Brown, general counsel and director of the Legal Department, International Monetary Fund (IMF), also addressed the conference, focusing on the critical importance of making connections, especially early in one’s career.

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In all, 20 speakers from Africa and its diaspora spoke at the conference. Ernest Nyarko (MBA ’20), James Gyenes (MBA ’20), and Mahamed Konfrou (MBA ’20) served as conference co-chairs. With other student volunteers, they worked tirelessly to make the conference a reality. “The Africa Business Conference here at Hopkins is an engine,” Nyarko observed, “one that translates ideas into conversations and conversations hopefully into actions that advance awareness and pursuit of business and careers in Africa starting with Hopkins.” Already, Nyarko and his student colleagues are looking toward the future. “Our club plans to make the Africa Business Conference at Hopkins an annual affair. … We are working toward a case competition and career fair that we hope will connect startups and businesses in emerging markets in Africa with students at Hopkins,” he said. Nyarko added that the team also hopes to organize a student trek to these emerging markets.

Thomas M. Franklin (Master of Administrative Science ’89) retired last year from the Theodore Roosevelt Conservation Partnership. He also has been involved in leadership roles at the Wildlife Society, the National Bobwhite Conservation Initiative, and the Howard County Recreation and Parks Advisory Board. Amit Patel (Master of Administrative Science ’89) is managing director at Mythos Group and collaborated with 15 other Silicon Valley consultants to publish a business journal titled Turning Ideas Into Impact, available on Amazon.com. He also has partnered with some business associates to develop a holistic organizational transformation framework called Change Emotional Intelligence. Ann Costlow (Master of Administrative Science ’90) is the founder of Sofi’s Crepes, which has six locations in the Baltimore-Annapolis region, with hopes of adding new locations in Washington, D.C., and Frederick, Maryland. Andrew Kurnicki (Master of Administrative Science ’90) has been the Polish ambassador to Canada since 2017. William Wallace (Master of Administrative Science ’91) is executive vice president of Revenue Storm Corporation. He won a Stevie Award in Las Vegas, Nevada, from the American Business Awards organization. Revenue Storm has worked with clients such as IBM, Xerox, KPMG, Schneider Electric, WiPro, Waste Management, Capita, and TCS. Ritsuko Gray (MS, Information and Telecommunication Systems ’99) is a global area manager of AppleCare for Apple Inc. and reports that a move from California to Texas, near Austin, “turned out to be one of the best decisions I have made in my life.”

By Andrew Blumberg

Brandon Wylie (MBA ’19), one of Baltimore Business Journal’s 2019 “40 under 40” people to watch, approached his studies at the Carey Business School a little differently than most students. As the secondgeneration CEO of one of Baltimore City’s best-known funeral facilities, Wylie Funeral Homes, he had tackled successive levels of leadership early in his career. Now, he wanted to put himself in his employees’ shoes to better learn their perspectives and ideas. To be a better leader, says Wylie, “I wanted to learn how to follow.” Company staff were used to Wylie’s father, Albert, who founded the business and employed a hands-on style, typical of many people who build a business from the ground up. Now with the company firmly established, the younger Wylie felt it was especially important to maximize input from all who had a stake in its continuing success. “How can I change the culture my father had left?” Wylie remembers wondering. He found he had to “ease staff” into a cultural change, empowering individual ideas and initiatives. Wylie, who jokes that his father is working on his “third retirement,” credits him with making the transition possible. “It was the trust that he gave to do different things, implement different strategies,” he says. “He gave me the opportunity to make my own decisions.” Carey Business School’s Flexible MBA program exposed Wylie to different models and frameworks of how businesses are run, and how he could implement them. The MBA degree, he says, enabled him to give his staff “autonomy” to develop their own ideas and strategies.

“I’m looking for ways to grow the business. [The funeral] industry is $1 billion large, but there’s no real information on how to manage this type of business.” One of Carey’s core values, “unwavering humanity,” resonates especially strongly with Wylie, who has long served on the board of the Living Legacy Foundation of Maryland, an organ donor procurement program. It offers a chance, he says, to help educate the African-American community about organ donation and increase the supply of available organs in the process. Currently, Wylie is redeveloping a flower shop housed in an old brownstone on Baltimore’s North Avenue into a new floral boutique called Fleurs d’Ave. “I didn’t want to see another dilapidated building on our corner,” he says.

Another of Wylie’s businesses, Above It All, focuses on providing the child development and life skills that can lead to success in school. That venture is run out of what was the original Wylie Funeral Home, which also once doubled as the family’s residence, on “We are working as a team to develop these Gilmor Street in West Baltimore. concepts to change the way funeral services “I want to provide for the community are done,” he adds. economically and make sure there are jobs Wylie, a graduate of Baltimore City College in the community for people to have,” says Wylie. “I was born in Baltimore, this is my and Morgan State University, whose home, and I have to keep providing hope for mother was a Johns Hopkins graduate and Baltimore City Public Schools teacher, says, my home.”

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ALUMNI

A WELCOMING HARBOR FOR ENTREPRENEURSHIP

2000s Bruce Johnson (MBA ’00) has owned, operated, and managed his law practice in Bowie, Maryland, since March 2000. The firm has 10 employees and practices business, criminal, and real estate law in Maryland, Washington, D.C., and Virginia. Sean Smith (MS, Marketing ’00) was promoted from vice-president of marketing to chief marketing officer at Washington, D.C.-based software company Sorcero. Eddie Tuvin (MBA ’00), senior vice president of City First Bank of DC, was named a recipient of a Coleman’s 2019 SBA Lender Award. Laura Bossi (MBA ’01), director of marketing for MedStar Medical Group, was an invited speaker at a Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering event about salary negotiation for women in industry. Sonja Cox (MBA ’03) was appointed president and chief executive officer of Southern Maryland Electric Cooperative. Dan Flynn (MBA ’03) was named director of development, marketing and communications for the Community Foundation of Howard County (Maryland), which raises, manages, and distributes funds to support Howard County nonprofits. Ted Girard (MBA ’03) was announced as vice president of the public sector unit at Snowflake, a cloud data warehousing technology provider based in the Washington, D.C., area. Jason Melby (MS in Information and Telecommunication Systems ’03) is chief systems engineer at L3Harris. He also is a writer of suspense fiction, having published several novels. He reports: “Despite numerous achievements in my professional career at L3Harris, my passion for writing novels continues.” Rob Weinhold (MS, Marketing ’03) is chief executive of the Fallston Group, a Baltimore-based global reputation agency that marked 10 years in business last fall. “In addition to our robust crisis leadership and marketing business verticals, our firm has completed architecting a new business line which enhances our interactive work in the training and workshop arena,” Weinhold said in a recent statement. “…We are incredibly grateful for a decade of growth, the trust our clients place in our team and a marketplace which has legitimized our business model.” Melissa Wu (MBA ’03), a physician and immediate care medical director at Southern New Hampshire Medical Center, has joined the board of trustees of Rivier University in Nashua, New Hampshire. Michael Gerran (MS, Finance ’04) was named vice president of Stratus Capital Corporation, based in Denver, Colorado.

Redonda Miller (MBA ’04), president of Johns Hopkins Hospital, was named to the Baltimore Business Journal’s “Power 10” for 2020, the newspaper’s list of “the metro area’s most powerful businesspeople and community leaders.” In conjunction with the announcement of the Power 10, Miller was profiled in a March 5, 2020, article in the BBJ. Kevin Crysler (MBA ’06) is president of Western Shore Services, which owns Mr. Handyman of Anne Arundel and North PG. He also is on the board of directors of the Greater Maryland Better Business Bureau, serving on the Standards and Practices Committee, and is president of the Columbia, Maryland-based opera company Opus Concert Theatre. Buwa Binitie (MS, Real Estate ’07), managing principal at Washington, D.C.-based housing developing firm Dantes Partners, was profiled in an article last December on BisNow.com. Greg Ferrante (MBA ’07) was recently appointed chief financial officer of Save the Children U.S. He will oversee financial planning and analysis, risk management, and audit functions that contribute to the financial operations of the international humanitarian organization. Joshua Sircus (MBA ’07) has joined Stellar IT Solutions as its chief operating officer. Stellar is an information technology design, development, product solutions, and talent management company. It recently formed an in-house technology incubator focused on big data analytics, deep learning, as well as innovations in IOT. He writes: “I’m excited to bring my operational experience to Stellar following the sale of my fintech company to Digital Media Solutions in 2018. I am also a mentor for Carey Business School graduate students and serve on the Dean’s Alumni Advisory Board.” Robert Roca (MBA ’08), recently named vice chair for clinical business development in the psychiatry and behavioral sciences department of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, was profiled in an article on the website of Johns Hopkins Medicine. Wajdi H. Alquliti (MS, Information and Telecommunication Systems ’09) is senior advisor on digital transformation, strategic planning, and development at the Organization of Islamic Cooperation, headquartered in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. He was appointed as the organization’s observer to the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers. Desiree de la Torre (MBA ’09) is director, community affairs and population health improvement, at Children’s National Hospital in Chevy Chase, Maryland. She was named one of the 60 new Presidential Leadership Scholars. Jeff Ryan (MBA ’09) was named chief executive officer of Legacy Healthcare Services, headquartered in Raleigh, North Carolina. Legacy provides rehabilitation services in senior living facilities in over 400 communities in 15 states.

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2010s Geoff DeLizzio (MBA ’10) is chief marketing and development officer at the Epilepsy Foundation of America, based in Washington, D.C. He says, “The Carey School offered the knowledge base, real-world experience, and network to support my professional development. I am grateful for the skills acquired and lifelong relationships made during my time at Carey.” Leah Messina (MS, Marketing ’10), founder and chief executive officer of Las Cruces, New Mexicobased digital marketing firm Sinuate Media, was profiled in an article in The Las Cruces Bulletin in February. Messina started the firm in Baltimore in 2006 before moving to New Mexico a decade ago. Saliq Khan (MS, Finance ’11, and MBA ’13) is vice president in investment banking at Credit Suisse. In February 2020, he joined the board of directors of Union Settlement in New York. Brent Renner (MS, Real Estate ’11) was named chief development officer of Phoenix, Arizona-based restaurant group Upward Projects. Jarrett G. Bauer (MBA ’12) is chief executive officer of Health Recovery Solutions. He was featured in a September 5, 2019, Forbes article titled “32-YearOld Raises $10 Million Series B To Lower Hospital Readmission Rates with Mobile Patient Management.” He discussed the deal in a live interview on the Cheddar news network with Gregg Michaelson of Edison Partners, which led the funding round. Caitlin Christ (MS, Marketing ’12) joined Acts Retirement-Life Communities as the Chesapeake regional director of development for the Acts Legacy Foundation. In her new role, she will manage major gift fundraising and planned giving programs in support of Acts’ Maryland communities of Bayleigh Chase, Buckingham’s Choice, Fairhaven, and Heron Point, as well as the Delaware community of Manor House. Barry Christopher Howard (MBA ’12) is chief financial and administrative officer at New America Foundation, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank. He previously served for eight years as CFO of World Relief. He is the co-author of the new book Tsunami Watch: Power, Pain and Progress in the American Narrative. Sam Hopkins (MBA ’13) last year joined Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures as commercialization academy manager. John Lim (MBA ’13) is an author, attorney, and entrepreneur. In February, he released his third book, Making More Fake Star Trek, a sequel to Making Fake Star Trek. The book details the behind-the-scenes making of an original Star Trek episode written by an Emmy Award-winning writer and starring George Takei, who also wrote the foreword. Lim details his

journey as an actor working with Hollywood professionals. The book is available on Amazon.com. Ethan Jeong (MBA ’14) and Paul Kang (MBA ’14), co-founders of FastVisa.us, a legal technology software startup based in Dallas, Texas, were featured in an article on StartupsSanAntonio.com. Katherine Pinkard (MBA ’14), president of Baltimore-based real estate firm Pinkard Properties, was featured in a November 2019 article in The (Maryland) Daily Record. Varghese Abraham (MBA ’15) became head of clinical development at Alladapt Immunotherapeutics last September, and previously was senior medical director (immunology) as U.S. medical lead for Actemra at Genentech. Gerard Battersby (MS, Marketing ’15) is a data scientist and management consultant in the Midwest region at Celonis Inc. He has led many AI-enhanced process mining and digital transformation proof-ofvalue projects, enabling Celonis to acquire and retain some of the biggest enterprise clients in the world, including Cargill, the largest privately held company in the United States. J.J. Reidy (MBA ’15), the chief executive officer of Baltimore-based development firm Urban Pastoral, was featured in a Q&A with the Baltimore Business Journal in February. Olena Yanakova (MBA ’15) is program management team lead at Leidos, a defense, aviation, information technology, and biomedical research company based in Reston, Virginia. She has managed global and domestic programs for United States agencies, foreign governments, and nonprofit and privatesector organizations. In addition, she has evaluated e-governance of municipalities worldwide, contributing to the publication of research studies conducted by Rutgers University. Obafemi Ayanbadejo (MBA ’16), a former National Football League running back who played on the Super Bowl-winning Baltimore Ravens team of 2000, is founder and chief executive officer of HealthReel. Haley Donato (MS, Real Estate ’16) was promoted to vice president of asset management at Continental Realty Corporation, a Baltimore-based commercial real estate investment and management company. Ritu Ghosh (MS, Finance ’16), an associate financial data analyst at Xignite, reports: “I have started a new podcast called Bad Company. It tells stories of companies that have done unethical things, and how our current systems failed to stop them, or sometimes actually worked to help them. Through this podcast, I want to help educate the public about the importance of corporate social responsibility, while also educating them about business and finance.” Andrew Lentz (MBA ’16) is senior lead, policy and government relations, at Deloitte. He writes, “I work

By Tim Parsons

Daniel Lunz (MBA ’19) has partnered with a Johns Hopkins oncologist to bring a potentially lifesaving cancer-detection test to market. Thanks to their efforts, a DNA test for Barrett’s esophagus, a precancerous condition closely associated with esophageal cancer, promises an affordable, less invasive, and more widely available means to prevent deaths from esophageal cancer. Lunz says he found Johns Hopkins to be the perfect environment for an aspiring entrepreneur. “One of the values of Carey is that it has the Johns Hopkins resources. It’s really opened up so many doors for me,” he says.

biomarkers from a minimally invasive tissue swab of the patient’s esophagus. Capsulomics continues to move forward. The company recently secured office and laboratory space at Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures and has research funding from the National Institutes of Health. Last September, Capsulomics beat out 50 other startups to earn top honors at Patriot Boot Camp, which aims to help veterans launch new technology companies. (Lunz served in the Marine Corp.) They are also raising seed funding to pursue insurance reimbursement with the goal of bringing their first test to market.

For Lunz, the ability to bring a lifesaving technology to market validates earning his MBA. He While earning his MBA, Lunz worked as a was searching for a more rewarding career strategic adviser with the Johns Hopkins path when he came across the Carey Business Clinical Research Network, where he met School. He was making a living as the owner Stephen Meltzer, an oncology professor at the of a precious metals business, but he wanted Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. to pursue entrepreneurship through a busiMeltzer had developed and validated a DNA ness that would allow him to “serve others.” test to detect Barrett’s esophagus. “I was successful, but it didn’t bring me The test offered tremendous potential for much joy and fulfilment,” says Lunz. preventing esophageal cancer, but Meltzer was struggling to turn his discovery into a His career search led to a job as a research product that could benefit the public. Lunz coordinator at the Johns Hopkins School of offered to help, and in September 2018 he Medicine and the part-time MBA program at and Meltzer founded Capsulomics to bring Carey Business School. the cancer test to market. “What led me to Hopkins was the connecEsophageal cancer is considered one of tion with the School of Medicine and health the deadliest cancers worldwide, killing realm,” says Lunz. “I remember thinking, ‘If more than 509,000 people each year. It is I can somehow get in there and find some treatable if detected early, but the condition way to use this interest in entrepreneurship can be diagnosed only through an invasive and business, and merge it with the passion upper endoscopy procedure. Capsulomics’s and the purpose I have for serving others, diagnostic test looks for specific DNA this could be a real win.’”

closely with our firm’s director for public policy to set the firm’s policy agenda. I promote the firm’s business interests in Washington and in state capitals by actively engaging key policy makers and influential policy stakeholders. This includes conducting analysis of trending policy issues in the external environment and anticipating any potential impact on the firm. I build and maintain relationships with members of Congress, state lawmakers, administration officials, and key policy influencers in support of the firm’s policy and legislative priorities. Henry Rubin (MBA ’16) was named senior vice president of the Hawthorn Group, a state and local advocacy firm based in the Washington, D.C., area. Bianca Jackson (MBA, ’17) took her passion for food and turned it into a slot as a contestant on the

recent holiday edition of “The Great American Baking Show.” Jackson advanced to the fourth round of the eight-round competition. On her biancabakes. com website, she says her specialty as a baker is “custom cakes that are inspired by Southern flavors of my childhood in Atlanta, but taken up a notch through texture and design.” The Seattle, Washington, native graduated from the MBA/MA in Design Leadership offered by Carey with the Maryland Institute College of Art. Joseph D’Antuono (MBA ’18) is a management consultant at Accenture. He says he has helped a Fortune 100 telecom client implement AI to expand its chatbot’s capabilities, thereby enabling customer self-service and reducing overhead costs. He adds, “Carey’s recent curriculum pivot, with renewed empha-

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ALUMNI

CAREY BUSINESS SCHOOL LAUNCHES NER ISRAEL ALUMNI NETWORK

By Rebecca Ruark

When Frederick Kauffman was a young man, he came to a crossroads and had to decide whether to follow the path of industry or the path of academia. He chose academia, and built a successful life out of pharmacology research and teaching at three universities before he retired. But he didn’t travel his path alone. His wife, Ella, a public health nurse, was always at his side. When Frederick’s academic career brought the family to Maryland, Ella decided to further her education, earning her master’s degree in public administration from Johns Hopkins in 1989.

PHOTO: STEVEN HERPPICH

SCHOLARSHIP FUND PAYS TRIBUTE TO A LOVE AFFAIR WITH LEARNING FRED KAUFFMAN WITH ELLA

Can you tell us about your history of giving to Johns Hopkins?

her long and interesting and wonderful life that I was privileged to share. Can you tell us about Ella’s career?

In this interview, Frederick talked about Ella, their life together, and what his commitment will mean for students.

Ella had a long career with the Visiting Nurses Association, and she was working as a nurse when I first met her. After we moved, she worked in Chicago’s North Side, an area of great need. When we returned to Maryland, she was in charge of various public health stations, and she kept up her work when we moved to New Jersey. Ella retired before I did and suffered a stroke in 2002, which meant I became the chief cook and bottle-washer for the last 12 years of her life. But they were 12 good years.

What inspired this commitment to the Carey Business School?

What was your life together in academia like?

Ella’s life. While I pursued my academic career, Ella became a mother to our children, Elizabeth and Andrew. It wasn’t until we returned to Maryland that she went back to work and school, and she was very proud to have graduated from such a fine business school. I thought this scholarship would be a good way to acknowledge Ella, in tribute to

At my first academic appointment in Buffalo, Ella was a part of a women’s club consisting of wives of faculty members. They had the joking privilege of obtaining their “PhTs” – instead of PhDs – short for “putting hubby through.” Joking aside, she really did help me. It definitely takes two. Over my career, I was very fortunate to teach thousands of students.

With Ella’s passing, Frederick has honored her memory by establishing the Ella S. and Frederick C. Kauffman Scholarship Fund at the Carey Business School.

sis on data science and analytics, is a step in the right direction and will help prepare future MBAs for similar roles. I have temporarily stepped away from this role to support overseas military operations as an Army Engineer Officer. I plan to return to Accenture this winter.” Elizabeth Gunn (MBA ’18) was promoted last summer from assistant dean to associate dean at Douglass Residential College, a women’s college at Rutgers University. She oversees all academic, STEM, and professional development programs.

Heon-Jae Jeong (MBA ’18) is president and chief executive officer of the Care Quality Institute. Alex Jonas (MBA ’18) is senior manager in digital product management at Comcast NBCUniversal. In January, he was promoted to a new role on the Comcastbusiness.com digital team. He adds: “Enjoying my time in Philadelphia with my wife, who is also a JHU grad (master’s in nursing) and looking forward to building the JHU Carey Philadelphia alumni base.”

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Ella and I began supporting the university through charitable gift annuities in 2005. This scholarship is a way to deepen our commitment, honor Ella, and help students in the business school that benefited her so much. By making additional, outright gifts to financial aid, I’ll be able to see the first student awarded the scholarship in the fall of 2020. How do you think Ella would respond to this tribute?

I remember us talking about her continuing her education at Carey Business School. She was so enthused. She received a scholarship from a local business that helped us out. It definitely encouraged her to continue with her education, and that’s what we hope this scholarship will do – encourage young people to pursue the path that Ella did. I feel privileged to be able to do that, and I’m sure she would feel privileged, too. This story first appeared in the winter 2020 issue of Planning Matters, a newsletter published by the Johns Hopkins University Office of Gift Planning.

Kevin White (MBA ’18), executive director of Global Vision 2020, was the keynote speaker last October at National Honor Society induction ceremonies at the Gunston School in Centreville, Maryland. Tianyun (Joyce) Ji (MBA ’19) is an associate attorney in Winston & Strawn LLP’s Shanghai office, assisting clients in general corporate matters, mergers and acquisitions, corporate compliance, and commercial disputes. Qualified in New York and Maryland, she also has extensive experience in financial modelling, data analysis, accounting, and marketing.

Aaron Lai (MBA ’19) is a senior consultant at EY, and wrote in February: “Traveling to Delaware for my next client, a global conglomerate with its footprint in multiple sectors. Things are heating up, but more excited than ever for the things that lie ahead!”

Sixty alumni and current students of Ner Israel Rabbinical College (NIRC) and the Carey Business School gathered last November to launch the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Ner Israel Alumni Network.

Akshay Monga (MBA ’19) is an associate capability manager at HM (Highmark) Health Solutions in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He works in the strategic business office, monitoring market risks that could affect the business – such as the COVID-19 outbreak – and forming risk-mitigation plans.

The featured speaker at the event was Sholom Wilheim, a current Carey and NIRC student who recently formed Carey’s Jewish Business Association (JBA), a student group that seeks to support Jewish students at Carey through programming and social events.

Mojisola (Moji) Ndukwe (MBA ’19) is founder and executive director of Better Way Passage Inc., a nonprofit organization that aims to improve health care systems in West Africa by building multiuse medical simulation centers that demonstrate and standardize quality health care. Kathryn Norris (MS, Finance ’19) is a financial analyst at CPower Energy Management in Baltimore’s Harbor East area. Stephanie Gajda Padula (MBA ’19) is director of product management at Conifer Health. She says her Carey MBA helped her rise three levels within her organization and gain a substantial pay raise. Oliver Queen, Jr. (MBA ’19) is president/co-founder of OCAI Professional Solutions Group and partner

DEAN’S ALUMNI ADVISORY BOARD 2019-20 Sam Huleatt, MBA ’08, Chair Co-Founder, Heights Media, LLC Harsha Aggarwal, MSF ’07 Principal, TCK Capital Partners Ian Lee Brown, MS ’99 Certificate in Senior Housing and Care, ’04, VP of Learning and Organizational Development, Erickson Living Jessica Chao, MBA ’12 Director, Clinical Innovation Center, University of California at San Francisco Elizabeth Cherot, MD, MBA ’16 Chief Medical Officer, Axia Women’s Health

Two years ago, the two schools formed a partnership in which NIRC students would be offered enrollment in Carey’s degree programs and non-degree certificate programs.

The Carey programs are available to select students who have completed all or most of their studies at Ner Israel, a rabbinical school in Pikesville, Maryland. Ner Israel was established in 1933. Its mission is to train students in religious scholarship and Jewish living, including critical thinking, finance, commercial law, and business ethics. Johns Hopkins University has a long history of collaboration with Ner Israel dating back to the 1950s, including a prior agreement with the School of Professional Studies in Business and Education, a precursor to the Carey Business School.

of Green Zodiac LLC. In his work as a consultant, he supports federal and local government agencies in the Washington, D.C., area in matters of government acquisition, contracting, procurement, supply chain management, change management, knowledge management, and business strategy. He is a retired Navy officer of 23 years and is working toward a PhD in instructional design technology at Old Dominion University. He adds that he is “excited to dive into the future as a Carey Business School MBA graduate.”

Garry Choy, MD, MBA ’13 Chief Medical Officer, Q Bio; Co-Founder/Chief Medical Officer, CredSimple Lalita Hamilton, MS ’10 Primary Patent Analyst, U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Randi Kitt, MS ’92 Portfolio Research Analyst, Avalon Global Asset Management Andrew Klein, M.D. Certificate Business of Medicine ’99, MBA ’02, Esther and Mark Schulman Chair in Surgery and Transplant Medicine, Director of the Comprehensive Transplant Center, Professor and Vice Chairman of the Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center Bobby Long, MS ’02 President/CEO, Longevity Consulting

Shradha Verma (MS, Finance ’19) is a financial analyst at Crane ChemPharma in Houston, and reports: “Graduating from Carey didn’t only get me an amazing job but also allowed me to live the dream to travel. Moving to Texas, besides the barbecue, has been all sorts of interesting as I find myself on a plane or on the road almost every weekend.... It has been an incredible journey since graduation with absolutely no dull moment!”

John Meduri, MS ’94, MBA ’00 Head of Business Development, Accelerate Diagnostics, Inc.

Allison Reardon, MBA ’07 Associate VP, Client Executive, AT&T

Mario Morken, MBA ’13 VP, Business Development, Exosome Diagnostics

Randy Russell, MBA ’01 CEO, Pendrell Financial Services

Sam Neuberger, BBM ’06 Counsel, Manekin

Patrick Ryan, MBA ’18 GM, Strategy and Planning, Chevron Mark Schaper, MBA ’10 Management Consultant, Accenture

Christy Peacock, MS ’11 Managing Director/Head of Human Resources, DCS Advisory Katherine Pinkard, MBA ’10 President, Pinkard Properties Isaac Pretter, MBA ’03 Principal, Mosaic Realty Partners Mahe Rangareddy, MBA ’11 CFO/CTO, Alpha Omega Integration, LLC

Joshua Sircus, MBA ’07 Chief Operating Officer, Stellar IT Solutions Clifford Wang, MBA ’02 Senior VP, RBC Wealth Management Gareth Warren, MBA ’11 Former Regional VP, Towne Park

Monika Mason, MSF ’16 Project Manager, Department of Defense

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ALUMNI

ALUMNA HONORED AS ‘PHYSICIAN OF THE YEAR’

AYESHA KHALIL

By Andrew Blumberg Physician Ayesha Khalil (MBA ’19), a hospitalist and inpatient provider at Howard County General Hospital, was recently honored as a “Physician of the Year” through the Johns Hopkins Medicine Clinical Awards program. Khalil is a believer in the power of business to help produce healthier outcomes. When she earned her MBA from Carey in 2019 through the Flex MBA program, it marked the latest step in a career path that becomes clearer as time, and experience, accumulate. Khalil, who joined Howard County General, a member of Johns Hopkins Medicine, in 2013, is described by the hospital “as always putting patients’ needs and interests first. She has demonstrated an unwavering commitment to advance the quality and safety of patient care within the organization.” “After finishing my residency, I wanted to pick the right path for myself,” Khalil recalls. “I really enjoyed participating in committees, working with teams, leading projects.” When an opportunity at Johns Hopkins Healthcare materialized, she investigated. “I remember speaking to the medical director, telling her that I wanted to go into a leadership position. She said that this was a new program in Howard County, and that ‘we want physicians to take leadership roles, so you will get a lot of opportunity here to work on different initiatives.’’’ That perfectly suited Khalil, who says, “Working at Hopkins, you get so many interesting opportunities. Whatever you want to do, you’ll find a path for that.” In addition to seeing patients, Khalil is chair of the hospital’s Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee, parsing difficult data and decisions across disciplines; a member of the Sepsis Committee, focused on strategies to improve sepsis care; and an administrator on call for the Collaborative Inpatient Service group. Her specialized expertise includes quality and patient safety, patient experience, informatics, utilization management, and regulatory compliance.

With her newly minted MBA, she says, “I think I definitely have a better understanding of the business side of medicine and a better perspective on leadership as well.” She adds that she’s now more confident discussing issues with the CEO and chief medical officer of Howard County General. “I can understand where they are coming from.” “All of us want the same thing,” she says. “We want the best care for our patients, but our responsibilities are different. … Being fiscally responsible is an important thing. We don’t have infinite resources.” Khalil says her MBA has given her “a much better understanding of the projects I work on; now I always work on the business side of them as well. Is this something worth doing or not worth doing? What is the impact on patient care? What is the financial impact as well?”

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Collaboration is key to providing health care that is both cost effective and medically effective. Often, better treatment plans at lower expense are the result. “It’s not physicians against administration. We can actually bridge that gap and bring both perspectives and connect the two dots. … For the ultimate success of the organization, we need to work together,” she says. The clinical awards program, established in 2015 by the Office of Johns Hopkins Physicians, honors physicians and care teams at Johns Hopkins who embody the best in clinical excellence. Nominations are accepted annually for physicians and care teams associated with Johns Hopkins Hospital, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, Howard County General Hospital, Sibley Memorial Hospital, Suburban Hospital, Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Community Physicians.

Your investment in the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School helps us provide the best education for tomorrow’s business leaders.

By donating to Carey, you can support the school’s mission and inspire our students with your commitment. To make a gift by credit card, visit carey.jhu.edu/give. You can also go to giving.jhu.edu/ ways-to-give/gift-planning to explore gift planning strategies, including: • Gifts of stocks and bonds • G  ifts that pay you and your loved ones a lifetime of income • Bequests through your will • D  esignating the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School as beneficiary of your employersponsored retirement plan, Individual Retirement Account (IRA), or life insurance policy • Gifts of real estate


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ENDOWED CHAIRS. Attracting and retaining innovative professors.

Phillip Phan — the Alonzo and Virginia Decker Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship at the Carey Business School — applies his expertise in agency theory and innovation management to align goals, pinpoint methods for growth, and encourage inventive practices in government, industry, and medicine, specifically in areas of patient safety and pharmacology. There’s no question that the excellence that is Johns Hopkins rests on the quality of our faculty. And our ability to create endowed professorships depends on you, our generous donors. These professorships help us attract some of the greatest intellects and visionaries to our institution and provide critical support for their work as teachers, scholars, researchers, and clinicians. To learn more, visit – https://giving.jhu.edu/phillip-phan

@HopkinsGiving | #JohnsHopkins | #GoHop

Profile for Johns Hopkins Carey Business School

Carey Business Magazine: Spring 200  

Carey Business is the award-winning, twice-yearly magazine of the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. Its contents are made available in pr...

Carey Business Magazine: Spring 200  

Carey Business is the award-winning, twice-yearly magazine of the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. Its contents are made available in pr...

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