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Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology 2017 Annual Report


“People look to us for leadership and guidance as we work collectively to improve the lives of our patients and the health of our community, to find new breakthroughs, and to train the next generation of caregivers.� Maureen G. Phipps, MD, MPH Chair, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology


Our team of fellows – the next generation of women’s health leaders.

CONTENTS Message from the Chief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Ambulatory Care. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Emergency Obstetrics & Gynecology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Gynecologic Oncology. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Gynecologic Oncology – Breast Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Maternal-Fetal Medicine. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Midwifery Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Clinical Research in Women’s Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Resident Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Minimally-Invasive Surgery and Robotic Surgical Services . . . . . . 26 Simulation Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Inpatient Obstetrics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Community-Based Faculty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Hospital-Based Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Grant Funding – 2017. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Peer-Reviewed Publications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Editorial Positions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Contact Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 2017 Annual Report

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Message from the Chief

And that’s exactly what we do in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, a Care New England hospital, and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, where we remain steadfastly focused on patient care, research, and academics. People look to us for leadership and guidance as we work collectively to improve the lives of our patients and the health of our community, to find new breakthroughs, and to train the next generation of caregivers.

Focus on what matters – improving the health of our communities. This year, our department was pivotal in helping the State of Rhode Island shine with two distinct milestones. First, the March of Dimes presented Rhode Island with its Virginia Apgar Prematurity Campaign Leadership Award for the state’s dramatic reduction in the rate of preterm births, a health issue closely tied to brain, lung, hearing, and vision issues in newborns. Our preterm birth rate fell from 9.6% in 2010 to 8.6% in 2015, a 10% drop, versus the 2015 national preterm birth rate of 9.6%. This accomplishment was due in large part to the incredible work of the Rhode Island Task Force on Premature Births, led by Katharine Wenstrom, MD, director of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, which includes a diverse network of committed groups and focused initiatives all aimed at ameliorating various adverse situations that can contribute to preterm birth. All of the projects are collaborative and involve community agencies and the Rhode Island Department of Health. All of the initiatives focus on working together to benefit from collective ideas and resources, to be as effective as we can be in reducing the preterm birth rate in Rhode Island.

Nationally, regionally, and in our own community, our commitment to women’s health is palpable, and I am so very proud of my colleagues for all the work they do. Our residents have been tremendous, presenting nationally and receiving awards that recognize the start of what are sure to be very successful careers in medicine. The rate of matching in fellowship programs is unprecedented over decades. This is no small feat, and much credit is due to the commitment by our faculty to medical education and mentorship. This year we added depth to our educational leadership team by appointing B. Star Hampton, MD, as our vice chair for education. With Dr. Hampton’s leadership and expertise, the department is well-positioned to continue to serve as a role model nationally for innovation in education and scholarship.

Just a few months later, Rhode Island became the first state in the nation to pass a law explicitly requiring coverage for fertility preservation prior to gonadotoxic medical therapy, treatment that could directly or indirectly cause infertility. Ruben Alvero, MD, and Eden Cardozo, MD, from the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, and Ashley Stuckey, MD, from the Division of Gynecologic Oncology/ Breast Health, initiated the legislative process, co-wrote the bill, and along with patients testified on behalf of its passage at hearings at both the Rhode Island House of Representatives and Senate. This law explicitly mandates fertility preservation coverage prior to medical treatment that could render a patient infertile, setting a new precedent nationwide. Although pushing through legislation is out of the

Focus on what matters. Whether you are a doctor, a reporter, an accountant, or a teacher. Whether you are 15 years old, 30 years old, 45 years old, or 80 years old. Whether you are considering your personal life or your professional life. It is crucial that we focus on what matters.

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Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Department leadership team, left to right: B. Star Hampton, MD; Gary Frishman, MD; Elisabeth Howard, PhD, CNM; Roxanne Vrees, MD; Katharine Wenstrom, MD; Paul DiSilvestro, MD; Maureen Phipps, MD; Ruben Alvero, MD; Deborah Myers, MD; Kristen Matteson, MD; Renee Eger, MD.

comfort zone for Drs. Alvero, Cardozo, and Stuckey, this was something in which they fiercely believed, and they fought hard for their patients. In October, their perspective on the process was published in the New England Journal of Medicine. Focus on what matters – research. This year, we were honored to be the recipient of a number of very successful, highly competitive grants. We remain active in some of the nation’s most respected research collaboratives, including NRG Oncology, a National Cancer Institute funded, multiinstitutional, cooperative research group with a major focus on gynecologic and breast cancer treatment; the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network, investigating problems in clinical obstetrics; and the NICHD Pelvic Floor Disorders Network, conducting multi-centered trials studying pelvic floor disorders. And we continue our 12th year of NIH funding for our Women’s Reproductive Health Research (WRHR) Career Development Program, with our current scholars E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH, and Sarah Davis, MD. With just 15 active sites throughout the country, this highly competitive program

provides tailored research and career development planning to enable junior faculty obstetrician-gynecologists to develop into leaders in women’s health research. Toward conducting research that will shed light on the maternal health consequences after pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia, diabetes, and preterm birth, Women & Infants was awarded a $12.2 million National Institutes of Health (NIH) Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE) grant to boost interdisciplinary research related to women’s reproductive health. The programmatic and scientific goals of this COBRE for Reproductive Health are to develop research infrastructure for a center that supports a multidisciplinary, translational, and innovative program in women’s reproductive health. We are proud of our partnership with Swim Across America in the fight against cancers. In September, more than 600 swimmers took to the ocean for the eighth annual Swim Across America Rhode Island. Buoyed by the attendance of Rhode Island’s own Olympian Elizabeth Beisel, this swim, the largest in Swim Across America’s national network, raised more than $188,000 to support oncology research in 2017 Annual Report

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Message from the Chief

Women & Infants’ Program in Women’s Oncology and the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine. Over the past eight years, the swim has raised more than $900,000 to support Women & Infants’ women’s cancer research program – and we are delighted that Swim Across America has signed on for another four years of this wonderful event.

So many faculty have national leadership roles and are making great strides in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. Among the many leadership positions, two stand out as society president positions this year. Vivian Sung, MD, is president of the SGS; Charles Rardin, MD, is now president of the American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS).

Focus on what matters – leadership and training. This year, following a rigorous national search, Paul A. DiSilvestro, MD, accepted the position of director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology. Dr. DiSilvestro has been an innovative, trusted, and steadfast leader who presents an exciting vision for the future, including creation of a research program in developmental therapeutics and a personalized cancer medicine treatment program.

I am also privileged to have served a four-year term on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. It is humbling to sit amongst 15 colleagues who represent some of the nation’s most respected academic medical centers; they are true experts in prevention and evidence-based medicine. I am most proud of the work I have done to build awareness about the Task Force, its process, and the positive impact it has on improving women’s health.

We are proud of all our colleagues’ accomplishments, and this year there are a few standouts for career accomplishments. Deborah L. Myers, MD, director of the Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery, was recognized with the Distinguished Surgeon Award at the 43rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons (SGS). John Buster, MD, a distinguished member of the Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Division was inducted into the Hall of Fame by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG). And, Donald R. Coustan, MD, former chairman of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and current director of the Prenatal Diabetes Program in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, was recognized as a Giant in Obstetrics & Gynecology by the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. In the field of medicine, there are physicians who rise above and break new ground, making an indelible mark on clinical care, research, and education. Drs. Myers, Buster, and Coustan are three such physicians, and we are so very proud of them on these wonderful achievements.

By focusing on what matters and working together, we are able to make a positive impact on women, families, and communities locally and around the globe.

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Maureen G. Phipps, MD, MPH Chair and Chace-Joukowsky Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology Assistant Dean for Teaching and Research in Women’s Health The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Professor of Epidemiology Brown University School of Public Health Chief of Obstetrics & Gynecology Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island Care New England

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Dr. Donald Coustan, a True “Giant” For more than 35 years, Donald Coustan, MD, has graced the hallways at Women & Infants Hospital and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. Patients, students, and colleagues have come to rely on his wisdom, guidance, and gentle manner. This year, Dr. Coustan announced his plans for retirement. Like so many of his colleagues, Dr. Coustan works tirelessly every day to help improve the lives of women. Through his innovative work in the field of maternal-fetal medicine, and in particular his groundbreaking research on treating diabetes in pregnancy, he has impacted women’s health care in unique and valuable ways. Those in Obstetrics & Gynecology across our nation know of Dr. Coustan, an internationally recognized expert on the management of diabetes in pregnancy and author of more than 200 research papers and scholarly publications. He has cared for countless women and their babies and imparted wisdom to thousands of medical students, residents, interns, and fellows. Here in Rhode Island, we have benefited from Dr. Coustan’s expertise and leadership since 1981, when he first joined Women & Infants/Brown as director of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. In 1991 he was named chairman of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, a position he held until 2008. For the past 10 years, he has served as director of the Prenatal Diabetes Program in the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine.

Dr. Coustan has been a role model and mentor to so many physicians, and we are so very proud of him on this wonderful recognition of so many of his achievements. This year, Dr. Coustan was honored with the distinction as a “Giant in Obstetrics & Gynecology” as part of a series by the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology (AJOG) through which AJOG recognizes individuals who have changed the practice of medicine. In the field of medicine, there are physicians who rise above, break new ground, and inspire others, making an indelible mark on all aspects of medicine including clinical care, research, and education. Dr. Coustan has been a role model and mentor to so many physicians, and we are so very proud of him on this wonderful recognition of so many of his achievements. We congratulate Dr. Coustan and wish him well on his retirement. He will be missed – personally and professionally. 2017 Annual Report

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Ambulatory Care

EXPERTISE The Obstetrics & Gynecology Care Center (OGCC) continues its mission to care for a multicultural, ethnically diverse population with a team that has a reputation for advocating for and representing their diverse and unique patient population. In fiscal year 2017, the OGCC had more than 19,000 patient visits in such services as general obstetric and gynecologic care, evaluation and treatment of cervical dysplasia and vulvar disorders, pediatric gynecology, urogynecology, reproductive endocrinology, family planning and complex contraception, preoperative evaluation and planning, and a menopause program. The team has been a leader in the Baby Friendly USA® campaign with comprehensive efforts in education and support to ensure best health for mothers and babies through breastfeeding, and has worked with the Rhode Island Department of Health in the design and implementation of screening tools for patients at risk for exposure to the Zika virus. OGCC clinicians are actively participating in a multi-center, open-label, uncontrolled study designed to study contraceptive efficacy and safety of Mirena® during extended use before five years. Clinicians are also participating in an open-label, nonrandomized, prospective observation cohort study to assess post-procedural outcomes after hysteroscopic sterilization (Essure®) or laparoscopic tubal ligation. Parallel with clinical care and research is a commitment to education. All residents in Obstetrics & Gynecology at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University/Women & Infants Hospital attend continuity clinics at the OGCC in which they follow patients with a variety of ob/gyn issues. The OGCC also serves as the primary ambulatory site for the Warren Alpert Medical School ob/gyn clerkship. Nurse practitioner students from the University of Rhode Island and Boston College spend longitudinal time at the OGCC, learning from nurse practitioners’ deep fund of knowledge. 6

ACHIEVEMENTS • During FY2017 the staff at the OGCC saw 1,082 new obstetric patients, performed 483 colposcopic examinations, placed 157 subdermal contraceptive implants, inserted 385 intrauterine devices, and administered more than 1,800 immunizations. • Rebecca Allen, MD, MPH, was an invited meeting participant at the National Women’s Health Technologies Coordinated Registry Network, Sterilization Workgroup, Silver Spring, MD. This initiative is a collaboration among the FDA, the National Institute of Health (NIH)/National Library of Medicine (NLM), the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC), the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), the American Urogynecologic Society (AUGS), clinicians, and industry and other stakeholders to develop and expand the registry system for critical medical devices in the area of women’s health. • Rebecca Crichton, MD, completed her eighth year as director of the Vulvar Clinic, overseeing a team that provides comprehensive evaluation and treatment of acute, chronic, and recurrent conditions of the vulva or vagina. • Renee Eger, MD, became a North American Menopause Society Certified Menopause Practitioner (NCMP). She continues to serve as the medical director of the OGCC and director of the Menopause Program at Women & Infants Hospital. She oversaw the implementation of Epic for the entire staff at the OGCC, including clerical, nursing, resident, and nurse practitioner providers. • James O’Brien, MD, Women & Infants’ medical director of inpatient obstetrics, joined the OGCC clinical staff. He provides expertise in obstetrics management in the ambulatory setting.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


MEDICAL DIRECTOR: Renee Eger, MD

Front row: Patricia O’Connell, RNP; Rebecca Allen, MD, MPH; Renee Eger, MD; Erin Dobson, RNP. Back row: Maureen Phipps, MD, MPH; Jay O’Brien, MD; Rebecca Crichton, MD. Missing from photo: Ann Cooper, RNP; Darcy Renaghan, MSN, WHNI-BC; Anne Stulick, RNP.

COMPLEX CONTRACEPTION PROGRAM The Complex Contraception program at the OGCC offers contraceptive consultations by obstetrician/gynecologists with expertise in family planning who evaluate and recommend contraceptive options for women with complex medical conditions. On-site intrauterine device (IUD) and contraceptive implant insertion is available. Arrangements for permanent sterilization can also be made. The program is known for its experience with difficult IUD removals, e.g. non-visible IUD strings, and challenging contraceptive implant removals. Along with Dr. David Edmonson, a general surgeon in Women & Infants Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Dr. Rebecca Allen offers evaluation for too-deeply-placed or missing contraceptive implants and performs removals. The OGCC has been named a member of the Nexplanon Centers of Experience Referral Network organized by Merck, the manufacturer of Nexplanon®, to assist referring providers with difficult Nexplanon® removals.

2017 Annual Report

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Emergency Obstetrics & Gynecology

EXPERTISE The Women & Infants Division of Emergency Obstetrics & Gynecology is a unique and growing division within the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology. The faculty include board certified and board eligible specialists in general Obstetrics & Gynecology, certified nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners with passion and expertise in women’s health. The team provides patient care across a variety of clinical settings including the Women & Infants Emergency Department, the Obstetrics & Gynecology Care Center, the Adult Correctional Institution, Saint Joseph’s Clinic, Thundermist Health Center, Women’s Care Inc., University Ob/Gyn, and Blackstone Valley Community Health Center. The team has reached out to members of the greater Rhode Island community to foster integration and collaboration with patients and local Obstetrics & Gynecology practices in order to continue to enhance the current model that is built on academics, primary and preventative health care, acute illness management, and ultimately caring for women throughout the circle of life. Current focus areas include building community partnerships to collaborate and share information regarding vulnerable individuals and facilitating seamless transitions of care for patients. The patient care team includes 50 staff nurses and 20 SANE (sexual assault nurse examiner) nurses; 11 board certified/board eligible specialists in general Obstetrics & Gynecology; six certified nurse midwives; four nurse practitioners; residents in Obstetrics & Gynecology, emergency medicine, and family medicine; medical students; and other trainees.

ACHIEVEMENTS • The Sexual Assault Research and Awareness team earned a CARE Award, World Class Workforce Honorable mention. • Women & Infants’ Emergency Department, in partnership with the Division of Obstetric and Consultative Medicine, developed a formal Code Stroke Protocol. 8

• The team completed the design for a dedicated special pathogen patient care room as a part of the hospital’s ongoing Special Pathogen Assessment Center preparedness initiative. • The Emergency Department continues to exceed national benchmarks with respect to key quality indicators including length of stay, time to provider, left without being seen rates, and admission to transfer times. •

E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH, met with Rhode Island State Representatives to discuss preservation of women’s health care under the new administration. She was also inducted as 2017– 2018 secretary of the Rhode Island Medical Society at the Rhode Island Medical Society Convivium.

Dayna Burrell, MD, was featured in the April edition of the APGO e-bulletin, UMEC Spotlight on Faculty Development. The story highlighted Dr. Burrell’s January 2017 presentation (with co-presenters Silka Patel, MD, and Betty Chou, MD) “Escaping the PowerPoint Quicksand: Engaging Your Faculty in Interactive Teaching Modalities.” She also lectured at ACOG District 1 Junior Fellow and Medical Student Day, “A Career in Obstetrics & Gynecology, How Did We Get Here.”

• Mohamad Hamdi, MD, was selected as the Young Physician member to the ACOG District I Council. •

Bridget Kelly, MD, was named associate program director in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Women & Infants/Brown. She participated in the 35th Annual Congressional Leadership Conference: The Presidents’ Conference, Washington, DC, and also traveled to Cambodia as part of an ACOG mission to assess Cambodia’s need for assistance by ACOG physicians.

• Amy Snyder, MD, participated in the Sexual Assault Medical Subcommittee meeting with Day One. •

Roxanne Vrees, MD, was named clerkship program director in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Women & Infants/Brown. She was also featured in the Office of Women in Medicine October 2017 newsletter.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


MEDICAL DIRECTOR: Roxanne Vrees, MD Front row: Chelsy Caren, MD; Roxanne Vrees, MD; Bridget Kelly, MD; Erin Cleary, MD. Back row: E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH; Kate Zaluski, MD; Dennis Goulet, MD, MPH; Amy Snyder, MD; Mohamad Hamdi, MD; Dayna Burrell, MD; Michael Sisitsky, MD.

A CALL TO ACTION: RESPONSE TO THE OPIOID EPIDEMIC Many people have patients, friends, family, and even colleagues who have been personally affected by addiction and opioid use disorder. While accidental drug overdose has been a growing problem across the nation, Rhode Island has been one of the most severely impacted states in recent years. In 2013, Rhode Island had the highest rates of illicit drug use in the United States and the highest rate of drug overdose in all of New England. In 2014, 239 people in Rhode Island lost their lives due to overdose, and this epidemic spares no one, including some pregnant patients. Furthermore, in 2016, more than 50 percent of overdose deaths in Rhode Island were attributable to Fentanyl, a substance that is 100 times more potent than morphine and 50 times more potent than heroin. In response to Governor Gina Raimondo’s Executive Order to establish a statewide task force to address this epidemic, Women & Infants Emergency Department partnered with other Care New England facilities and the Department of Health (DOH) to ensure the needs of this specialized patient population are met. The strategic plan has four fundamental areas focusing on treatment, overdose rescue, prevention, and recovery. The team has worked to develop organizational policies, clinical protocols, and institutional infrastructure to ensure that patients are managed appropriately. The Emergency Department has submitted a proposal to the DOH requesting a Level 3 designation, which

formalizes the hospital’s commitment to this health care problem and requires that the hospital maintain standard protocols, capacity, and commitment to the following: • Follow the discharge planning standards as stated in current law. • Administer standardized substance use disorder screening for all patients. • Educate all patients who are prescribed opioids on safe storage and disposal. • Dispense naloxone for patients who are at risk, according to a clear protocol. • Offer peer recovery support services in the Emergency Department. • Provide active referral to appropriate community provider(s). • Comply with requirement to report overdoses within 48 hours to DOH. • Perform laboratory drug screening that includes fentanyl on patients who overdose. By establishing Women & Infants with a Level 3 designation, the team hopes to continue to do its part in ending the opioid epidemic and take back the lives of so many who would otherwise be lost. 2017 Annual Report

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Gynecologic Oncology

EXPERTISE The Program in Women’s Oncology is nationally recognized for excellence in clinical care, research, and education in the treatment of gynecologic and breast cancer. Women & Infants program focuses on the needs of its patients, both now and in the future, and in the training of future leaders in cancer care. The Research Program in Women’s Oncology continues to focus on delivering high impact clinical trials to patients, while the Integrative Care program helps patients through the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of their cancers. Focusing on “What Matters Matter” and guided by “What would you want done for your loved ones?”, the providers in the Program in Women’s Oncology strive to create the treatment strategy that best fits each patient’s needs and gives them the best possible chance for a positive outcome.

ACHIEVEMENTS • Cornelius (Skip) Granai, MD, directed the inspirational “Pills and Poems” program. This is an innovative representation of the Program in Women’s Oncology’s commitment to the combination of medicine and art. • Paul DiSilvestro, MD, was appointed director of the Program in Women’s Oncology and director of the Division of Gynecologic Oncology. • Cara Mathews, MD, co-authored guidelines for the “Role of Colposcopy: Benefits, Potential Harms, and Terminology for Colposcopic Practice” through her service on the ASCCP Colposcopy Standards Committee.

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• Mathew Oliver, MD, fellow in gynecologic oncology, and Jennifer Ribeiro, PhD, research fellow, were recipients of a grant from The LaRue S. & Walter F. Fisher Memorial Trust for their project, “MicroRNA Biomarkers for Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer.” • Katina Robison, MD, was promoted to associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and appointed director of the Research Program in Women’s Oncology. • Dario Roque, MD, in collaboration with Kyle Wohlrab, MD (Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery), were the recipients of the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons (SGS) research award in robotic-assisted gynecologic surgery for their proposal entitled, “The Impact of a Stepwise Training Program for OB/GYN residents on the outcomes and Cost Effectiveness of Robotic Assisted Hysterectomy.” • Ashley Stuckey, MD, was promoted to associate professor in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and appointed fellowship program director for the Gynecologic Oncology Fellowship. • The Program in Women’s Oncology, in conjunction with the Department of Pathology, was the recipient of the Swim Across America research grant for the eighth straight year and was renewed for an additional four years. This year’s Swim raised more than $188,000 in support of current oncology research at Women & Infants related to ovarian cancer biomarkers and early tissue markers that may identify women at risk for developing endometrial cancer.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


DIVISION DIRECTOR: Paul DiSilvestro, MD

Front row: Cara Mathews, MD; Ashley Stuckey, MD; Katina Robison, MD. Back row: Cornelius “Skip” Granai III, MD; Dario Roque, MD; Paul DiSilvestro, MD.

MOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS The landscape of cancer care has shifted dramatically in the past few years based on our increasing knowledge of the molecular biology of cancer. Projects such as the Cancer Genome Atlas project have caused a paradigm shift in how we look at cancer, from one in which a cancer is classified by the organ from which it originates to a system where cancers are defined by their molecular fingerprint. This has led to the rapid increase in new drugs approved for cancer and has benefited many patients with certain diseases when there were no effective therapies. The Program in Women’s Oncology has embraced this

change in several ways but exemplified in two areas. First, the Research Program in Women’s Oncology is participating in clinical trials where eligibility is defined by the molecular fingerprint of the cancer, such as the Tesaro Garnet study for women with cancer of the uterus whose tumors express microsatellite instability. Second, and applicable to the entire spectrum of the Program’s patients, is the development of a molecular tumor board. In conjunction with Foundation Medicine, and with a programmatic commitment to molecular sequencing, the Program in Women’s Oncology now participates in a monthly virtual molecular tumor board with the doctors from the Roswell Park Cancer Institute and Foundation Medicine. During this tumor board, individual cases are reviewed, utilizing the information obtained from their sequencing, in an effort to best match patients to either FDA-approved targeted therapies, or to clinical trials that may be available to them.

2017 Annual Report

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Gynecologic Oncology – Breast Health

EXPERTISE The Breast Health Center at Women & Infants Hospital is a regional and national leader in the care for women with both benign and malignant breast disease. In a holistic and respectful environment, members of the team provide stateof-the-art care and an expansive opportunity to participate in clinical research trials. As a regional and national leader in breast cancer, the clinicians in the Breast Health Center strive to provide the best possible care for patients, while working to define new and innovative therapies. Within this framework, the team is also dedicated to educating future health care providers. On a daily basis clinicians are immersed in the training of students and young physicians from The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University as well as visiting students and physicians from national and international institutions.

ACHIEVEMENTS

• David Edmonson, MD, was named associate director of the Breast Disease Fellowship. In addition, he has led the Breast Health Center’s efforts toward innovative approaches for tumor localization. • Elizabeth Butler, DO, breast disease fellow, under the guidance of Breast Health Center faculty, delivered the national video presentation, “15 Steps to Easy Successful IMF Nipple Sparing Mastectomy,” at the American Society of Breast Surgeons Annual Meeting in Las Vegas. • Sonali Pandya, MD, became the principal investigator at Women & Infants on the recently initiated national research trial POSITIVE – Pregnancy Outcome and Safety of Interrupting Therapy for Women with Endocrine Responsive Breast Cancer, as part of the Breast Health Center’s focus on treating and caring for young women with breast cancer. • Bachir Sakr, MD, presented, “Is it global warming or is it Tamoxifen?,” focusing on endocrine therapy efficacy and side effects at the Seventh Annual Survivorship Day in May.

• The Breast Health Center is accredited by the Society of Surgical Oncologists (SSO) and the National • Ashley Stuckey, MD, recently published data in the Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC). Journal of Cancer Survivorship examining the association of body mass index, appearance satisfaction, and sexual • The Breast Health Center is one of 48 programs nationally, function in breast cancer survivors. and the only program in Rhode Island, to offer a Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO)-accredited breast disease • William Sikov, MD, continues to expand the Center’s fellowship. clinical research program with several new trials this year focusing on the use of “targeted therapy” and • In May, the Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program immunotherapy to treat breast cancer. hosted a regional symposium at Women & Infants Hospital entitled “Critical Advances in Cancer Genetic: Applications to Daily Patient Care,” focusing on recent advances in both the understanding and application of cancer genetics to the treatment and prevention of cancer. 12

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


CO-DIRECTOR: Jennifer Gass, MD

CO-DIRECTOR: Robert Legare, MD

Front row: Jennifer Gass, MD; Ashley Stuckey, MD; David Edmonson, MD; Sonali Pandya, MD. Back row: Robert Legare, MD; William Sikov, MD; Hannah Bansil, MD; Bachir Sakr, MD.

SURGICAL MANAGEMENT OF BREAST CANCER With a long history in surgical leadership, bringing sentinel node biopsy to the region in the late 1990s, the Breast Health Center surgeons continue to move the surgical management of breast cancer forward. Clinicians increasingly use initial medical therapy, chemotherapy and oral endocrine therapy, shrinking cancer both in the breast and the lymph glands under the arm, to limit the extent and morbidity of surgery. The team has tailored the extent of surgical and radiation therapy recommended for those patients presenting with more biologically favorable tumors, and is investigating the use of new techniques for localizing non-palpable tumors. This technique utilizes a signal-emitting device placed into the tumor several days before surgery, avoiding the traditional guidewire placement through the skin on the day of surgery. This may help alleviate the emotional distress associated with wires entering the breast and simplify the patient’s schedule on the day of surgery.

As the majority of patients will become breast cancer survivors, leading a long, full life cancer-free, the team more actively engages patients in a comprehensive assessment of their breast health. For patients who suffer from macromastia, an oncologic procedure is designed that incorporates removing their tumor and reshaping and resizing their breasts. Not only are symptoms alleviated, but potential toxicity from postoperative radiation therapy may be avoided. Breast surgeons at Women & Infants continue as leaders in the effort to improve the patient survivorship journey by minimizing the visibility of surgical scars, “hiding” scars in natural anatomic locations. Partnering with plastic surgery, the surgeons continue to advance oncoplastic techniques to improve cosmetic surgical outcomes by utilizing glandular reshaping to minimize post-treatment deformity.

2017 Annual Report

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Maternal-Fetal Medicine

EXPERTISE The Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine (MFM) includes nine faculty physicians, four fellows, and five genetic counselors, working with a team of clinical and research nurses, ultrasound technicians, and other health professionals to provide the full scope of MFM care. Among their many roles, the MFM physicians serve as consultants and primary obstetric providers for women with a wide range of chronic medical problems, obstetric complications, and fetal conditions. The team is dedicated to taking care of vulnerable, high-risk women through all stages of pregnancy and delivery, and to providing the full range of prenatal diagnosis and therapy and pregnancy monitoring services. In addition to providing the most up-to-date, evidencebased medical, obstetrical, and surgical care, the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine also trains medical students, residents, and fellows, and conducts the highest quality obstetric and maternal-fetal medicine research.

ACHIEVEMENTS • With an ongoing commitment to education, Tanya Booker, MD, completed her fifth year as small group leader in the Biology 3674 course; Matt Esposito, MD, was named the associate clerkship director; Erika Werner, MD, MFM fellowship director, achieved ACGME accreditation of the Women & Infants/Brown program; and MFM faculty presented multiple lectures and participated in courses both locally and nationally. • Donald Coustan, MD, was recognized as a Giant in Obstetrics & Gynecology by the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology (AJOG), through which AJOG recognizes individuals who have changed the practice of medicine.

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Dr. Coustan announced his retirement after a 54-year career as a diabetes researcher and national leader, including 17 years as department chairman and the past eight years as an irreplaceable member of the Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine. The entire faculty is immensely grateful for his contributions to the department’s and division’s missions, and his MFM colleagues especially will miss his wise counsel, and his embracing friendship and comradery.

• Sarah Davis, MD, was named the seventh scholar in the Brown/ Women & Infants Women’s Reproductive Health Research (WRHR) Program. • MFM fellows Rosemary Froehlich, MD, Maureen Hamel, MD, Martha Kole, MD, and Michael Benninati, MD, presented five juried research abstracts at national scientific meetings. •

In August 2017, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network at Brown University/Women & Infants, led by Dwight Rouse, MD (principal investigator), and Dr. Werner (coinvestigator), completed enrollment for the ARRIVE trial. With 6,106 participants, it is the largest randomized trial of labor induction ever conducted, and should definitively answer whether it is better for mothers and babies if delivery occurs when the pregnancy reaches the 39th week, or if awaiting the onset of natural labor is the best option. With the enthusiastic support of countless Women & Infants providers, more patients (484) were enrolled at this hospital than at any other participating hospital. Results of the trial will be available in early 2018.

• Dr. Rouse was also part of the MFMU team that published research in the New England Journal of Medicine refuting the need for universal screening of thyroid disease in pregnancy. • In July, the Division welcomed Melissa Russo, MD, who was previously on faculty at the Baylor College of Medicine. •

Other research activities included Dr. Werner’s funded projects involving diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular risk; the division’s participation in the North American Fetal Therapy Network (NAFTNET) and other national research groups; and faculty supervision of many resident and fellow research projects.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


DIVISION DIRECTOR: Katharine Wenstrom, MD

Front row: Melissa Russo, MD; Donald Coustan, MD; Tanya Booker, MD, Erika Werner, MD; Katharine Wenstrom, MD; Sarah Davis, MD; Matthew Esposito, MD. Back row: Dwight Rouse, MD, MSPH; Stephen Carr, MD.

PRENATAL GENETICS Prenatal diagnosis and treatment is a big part of maternalfetal medicine (MFM) practice. The Women & Infants MFM division performs 40,000 ultrasound exams and fetal monitoring procedures annually at its Prenatal Diagnosis Centers in Providence and North Dartmouth, helping hundreds of families understand the complexities of a variety of fetal disorders. The MFM division also provides counseling, testing, and pregnancy management guidance for women with genetic disorders, a family history of genetic disease, a previous child with a birth defect, or a current pregnancy complicated by genetic or structural fetal abnormalities. These services are made possible by an incredible team of talented genetic counselors who provide personalized care to every patient and their family. The prenatal genetics team includes five genetic counselors and two faculty members who are board certified in both MFM and clinical genetics. The genetic counselors see approximately 2,400 patients each year, and the physician geneticists hold a weekly perinatal genetics clinic. This team

ensures that all patients receive appropriate prenatal genetics services, which include being educated about their ultrasound findings, their family or personal genetic Genetics Counseling Team history, and their test results. Ultrasound exams and test results are, fortunately, reassuring for most women. However, when patients receive abnormal results, this team provides exceptional emotional support as they help these families navigate through their options. Most referring doctors eventually come to know the genetic counselors personally, and the women they help often bond with them for life, making the counselors an essential part of the MFM division.

2017 Annual Report

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Midwifery Program ACHIEVEMENTS • Elisabeth Howard, PhD, CNM, FACNM, presented nationally for both the American College of Nurse Midwives and the Society for Teachers in Family Medicine on inter-professional teaching strategies. • Linda Hunter, EdD, CNM, FACNM, was named president elect of the American Midwifery Certification Board.

EXPERTISE The Midwifery Program at Women & Infants Hospital is an academic midwife practice nationally recognized for innovation in inter-professional education, quality, and clinical excellence. A team-based approach is used to facilitate patient-centered care while supporting resident and medical student learning in the Emergency Department, Labor and Delivery, and the Mother/Baby Units. In addition to patient care and clinical education, the Midwifery faculty provides ongoing curriculum development and support in the form of mentoring, didactic lectures, workshops, original game-based interactive learning, and simulation experiences. The Midwifery Program is well-represented in key leadership positions on both a state and national level, including with the American College of Nurse-Midwives Medical Education Caucus, the American Midwifery Certification Board, The Journal of Midwifery and Women’s Health Editorial Board, The Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing Editorial Board, the National Quality Forum, the American College of NurseMidwives Reducing Primary Cesareans learning collaborative, the American College of Nurse-Midwives Political Action Committee Board, the Rhode Island Affiliate of the American College of Nurse-Midwives, and the Rhode Island InterProfessional Education Collaborative. 16

• Elizabeth Kettyle, CNM, MPH, MSN, a graduate of Dartmouth College and Yale University, joined the department this year. She brings a broad scope of experience in clinical, teaching, and leadership. • Edie McConaughey, CNM, MSN, led the national item review for Midwifery Ultrasound Exam and Maintenance of Certification standard setting. • Janet Singer, MSN, CNM, was selected for the Brown Advocates for Social Change and Equity (BASCE) Fellowship. • Linda Steinhardt, CNM, FNP, MSN, and Elisabeth Howard were invited speakers to the International Confederation of Midwives in Toronto, Canada to present “Cultivating Collaboration: A Sustainable Model of Inter professional Education.” • Elisabeth Howard, Linda Hunter, and administrative chief resident Alex Friedman, MD, were invited to speak at the American College of Nurse-Midwives national conference on game-based and interactive learning strategies. • All members of the department contributed chapters to the second edition of “Obstetric Triage Protocols“ published in October. Editors include Diane Angelini, professor emeritus, and Elisabeth Howard is an associate editor.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


PROGRAM DIRECTOR: Elisabeth Howard, PhD, CNM, FACNM Front row: Elizabeth Kettyle, CNM, MSN, MPH; Linda Steinhardt, CNM, FNP-C, MS; Janet Singer, MSN, CNM. Back row: Edie McConaughey, MSN, CNM; Elisabeth Howard, PhD, CNM, FACNM; Linda Hunter, EdD, CNM, FACNM.

INNOVATION IN QUALITY: THE REDUCING PRIMARY CESAREAN LEARNING COLLABORATIVE Approximately one in three pregnant women in the U.S. gives birth by cesarean section. Recognizing that while cesarean delivery may be life-saving for the mother, the baby or both, the dramatic increase in cesarean birth rates over the past 10 years is concerning for overuse. This past year, the Midwifery Program led the Women & Infants Hospital acceptance into the American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Reducing Primary Cesareans Project. This multi-hospital national learning collaborative focuses on improved health outcomes through prevention or reduction of cesareans in low-risk women.

demonstrate improvement in readiness, assessment, reliable and appropriate care, recognition and response, and systems learning. There are three bundles, based on data-driven analysis of the major cause of first cesarean in low-risk women: • Improving Care and Comfort in Labor. • Promoting Spontaneous Progress in Labor. • Implementing Use of Intermittent Auscultation as the Standard for Fetal Assessment.

The Reducing Primary Cesareans (RPC) Project is part of the ACNM Healthy Birth Initiative® (HBI), a long-term effort with representatives from leading maternity care organizations. HBI focuses on preserving normalcy by promoting evidence-based practices that support a healthy birth based on a pregnant woman’s own physiology. The HBI works to encourage a consistent approach to birth practices and is focused on reducing those that are not evidence-based.

The first bundle selected and initiated by the Women & Infants team is “Improving Care and Comfort in Labor.” This encompasses collaborative work with the community outpatient facilities, Emergency Department, Antepartum Care Unit, and Labor and Delivery. Promoting comfort in labor is patient-focused, helping women set realistic expectations; individualizing the patient experience; educating about both pharmacologic and nonpharmacological coping strategies; and providing multidisciplinary education in the skills of active labor support.

The Midwifery Program champions and coordinates this hospitalwide quality improvement project. As providers, midwives possess considerable expertise in physiologic approaches to the care of women during childbirth. The hospital team is working with experts around the country to identify the optimal care practices that will lead to a reduction in the cesarean section rate. The multidisciplinary group works with the RPC Quality Improvement expert panel and ACNM staff to identify areas of improvement and track process and outcome measures to

Women & Infants is the largest hospital in the learning collaborative and has already been successful initiating the bundle. For example, the way labor pain is assessed has been changed to the innovative “coping with labor” algorithm, which more appropriately and completely captures the complex nature of the experience of labor pain. It is sensitive to a woman’s values and preferences for nonpharmacologic versus pharmacologic pain modalities and represents a process of shared decision-making with her care team. 2017 Annual Report

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Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

EXPERTISE The Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility at Women & Infants Hospital continues to build on the introduction of new and state-of-the-art fertility-enhancing technologies. As the only high complexity assisted reproductive technologies laboratory in the state of Rhode Island, the Women & Infants Fertility Center (WIFC) provides sophisticated services for the region’s women and their families. In keeping with the Center’s mission of providing high quality, effective, and patient-centered care, the providers at the Fertility Center are focused on utilizing all of the techniques to optimize care, including starting with the least invasive most cost-effective approach first, and turning to more complex and invasive modalities when needed. Patients benefit from access to the latest treatments, including many developed and optimized at the WIFC. Whether using mild ovarian stimulation with intrauterine insemination or in-vitro fertilization with preimplantation genetic testing, the Women & Infants Fertility Center provides compassionate care with the most effective treatment options individualized to patient needs.

ACHIEVEMENTS • Ruben Alvero, MD, participated as part of the United States delegation at the International Gynecology Society’s meeting with Australian colleagues at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. He was also selected as a Top Doc by Rhode Island Monthly. • Lynae Brayboy, MD, received the Elsevier Atlas Award for her development of the Girl Talk smartphone app. Each month a single Atlas article is selected from published research from across more than Elsevier’s 2,000 journals by an external advisory board made up of representatives from national and international non-governmental organizations. 18

• John Buster, MD, was inducted into the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Hall of Fame. This distinction puts Dr. Buster in an elite group of obstetricians/gynecologists. • Eden Cardozo, MD, co-wrote and spearheaded passage of legislation mandating insurance coverage for patients facing gonadotoxic therapy due to cancer or other medical conditions. Rhode Island thus became the first state to specifically mandate such coverage. A perspective on this mandated coverage in Rhode Island and similar legislation in Connecticut has been published in the New England Journal of Medicine. • Gary Frishman, MD, was named vice president of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists. He was also selected as a Top Doc by Rhode Island Monthly. • Warren J. (Jay) Huber, MD, fellow, received the Top Fellow Teacher of the Year Award, Medical Student Education, the Warren Alpert Medical School/Women & Infants Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology. • May-Tal Sauerbrun-Cutler, MD, fellow, was first author on a chapter about survivors of childhood cancer in the textbook, “Abnormal Female Puberty: A Clinical Casebook.” • Victoria Snegovskikh, MD, was selected as the co-director of the Human Reproduction, Growth and Development course at the Warren Alpert Medical School. • Carol Wheeler, MD, was promoted to professor at the Warren Alpert Medical School. She was also selected as a Top Doc by Rhode Island Monthly.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


DIVISION DIRECTOR: Ruben Alvero, MD Front row: Victoria Snegovskikh, MD; Eden Cardozo, MD; Carol Wheeler, MD; Lynae Brayboy, MD. Back row: Gary Frishman, MD; Ruben Alvero, MD; John Buster, MD. Missing from photo: Andrew Blazar, MD; Shunping Wang, PhD.

FERTILITY PRESERVATION LEGISLATION Each year, more than 150,000 patients under the age of 45 are diagnosed with cancer. Thanks to advances in cancer treatments, more than 80% of these patients also survive at least five years. In parallel with increased survivorship, patients’ expectations for quality of life also are enhanced, and many of these reproductive age Americans hope that this includes the ability to start a family. While new cancer treatments are remarkably effective, these modalities, which most frequently involve chemotherapy, radiation, surgery, or a combination of these, can damage eggs or sperm. In the urgent process of preserving a cancer patient’s life, these so-called gonadotoxic treatments can be started prior to consideration of their reproductive impact. In tandem with advances in cancer care, reproductive medicine has also substantially increased the options and effectiveness of fertility-preserving techniques. Embryo, egg, and sperm freezing are standard, clinically available, and no longer considered experimental. Unfortunately, these approaches are expensive, and medical insurance has not covered fertility preservation for cancer patients. While insurance coverage for infertility is limited to a very few states,

most patients facing gonadotoxic therapy do not yet have a diagnosis of infertility and therefore are excluded. In July 2017, Rhode Island became the first state to specifically mandate commercial insurance companies to cover fertility preservation for beneficiaries undergoing gonadotoxic therapy. The legislative effort was Women & Infants Fertility Center-physician initiated and guided by the community and legislative liaisons as well as legal counsel for Care New England. The legislation passed unanimously in both houses of the Rhode Island legislature and was signed into law by the governor. Connecticut also passed a fertility preservation legislation in 2017. New England has from its earliest days been a leader in advocating for the rights of its citizens. The physicians at the Women & Infants Fertility Center, who initiated this effort on behalf of their patients, hope that the rest of the nation follows this example. 2017 Annual Report

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Clinical Research in Women’s Health ACHIEVEMENTS • The Division of Research provided statistical support and/or database support for 81 research projects. • The team assisted with the submission of 18 faculty applications for federal, local, and foundation research grant funding during the year. • E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH, was invited to present “Review of Gynecology: Common problems, emergent conditions, and specialty care” at the National Conference on Correctional Health Care.

EXPERTISE The goal of the Division of Research is to promote and support the research and scholarly activities of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and the Women & Infants Hospital community. Through its multidisciplinary team, the Division of Research provides expertise in epidemiology, statistics, database development, grant submissions, grants management, public health, and research support. By fostering an environment that encourages innovation in women’s health, the division works toward the goal of generating the scientific evidence needed to advance health care for women and transforming this evidence into practical information that can be shared with health care providers and the community. The Division of Research is driven by collaboration, education, training, and investigator support. The staff works to support faculty within the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology with their research needs, including grant submission, data management, and statistical work. 20

• Sarah M. Davis, MD, received a Research Award from the William and Mary Oh – William and Elsa Zopfi Professorship in Pediatrics for Perinatal Research. • Jenna Emerson, MD, received the National Richardson Prize Paper Award from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists for her resident research project, “Outpatient opiate use after cesarean section.” Valery Danilack, PhD, and Drs. Brousseau and Matteson served as Dr. Emerson’s research mentorship team. • Kristen Matteson, MD, MPH, was appointed chair of the Gynecologic Practice Committee for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. • Maureen Phipps, MD, MPH, served for her fourth year as a member of the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). In 2017, she was a contributing author for nine USPSTF recommendations published in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


INTERIM DIVISION DIRECTOR: Kristen Matteson, MD, MPH Front row: Mindy Marshall; Robin Cram, MPA; E. Christine Brousseau, MD; Christina Raker, ScD. Back row: Phinnara Has, MS; Susan Elmore; Kristen Matteson, MD, MPH; Valery Danilack, PhD.

WOMEN’S REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH RESEARCH (WRHR) CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Since 2005, the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) has awarded Women & Infants and Brown University grant funding to support the highly competitive Eunice Kennedy Shriver Women’s E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH, Reproductive Health and Sarah Davis, MD. Research (WRHR) Program. One of only 15 programs nationally, the Brown/Women & Infants WRHR Program provides education and mentorship to enable wellqualified obstetricians and gynecologists to develop into academic leaders capable of high-quality research that genuinely improves health outcomes important to women. In 2017, Sarah M. Davis, MD, was named the seventh scholar in the Brown/Women & Infants WRHR Program. A maternal-fetal medicine specialist, Dr. Davis is studying maternal immunology as it pertains to inflammatory mediated processes in pregnancy, including preterm birth. Dr. Davis will be developing her research career with

the guidance of mentors Surendra Sharma, MBBS, PhD; James F. Padbury, MD; and Katharine Wenstrom, MD. E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH, a specialist in academic general Obstetrics & Gynecology, continued her fourth year of work as a WRHR scholar, successfully completing a master’s degree in public health at Brown University in 2017 and conducting research to improve reproductive health outcomes for incarcerated women. Maureen G. Phipps, MD, MPH, chair and Chace-Joukowsky Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, is the principal investigator for the WRHR program and Kristen A. Matteson, MD, MPH, interim director of the Division of Research of the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology serves as the research director. Dr. Matteson, along with Vivian Sung, MD, and Katina Robison, MD, are all previous Women & Infants WRHR scholars who have remained on faculty after transitioning to independent funding and are committed to serving as research and career mentors for trainees and junior faculty. By investing in the development of clinician-researchers in obstetrics and gynecology, Women & Infants is leading the way in developing and retaining women’s health physician-scientists as nationally recognized academic leaders. 2017 Annual Report

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Resident Education

EXPERTISE The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at Women & Infants Hospital is the primary teaching site for The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University Undergraduate Medical Education Program for Obstetrics & Gynecology, and home to the only Obstetrics & Gynecology Residency Program in Rhode Island. Faculty from the department lead and participate in a variety of teaching activities for the Undergraduate Medical Education Program, including such programs as the preclinical human reproduction course, the third year core and longitudinal clerkship curricula, sub-internships and clinical electives, and resident readiness courses, in addition to mentoring, career advice, and residency application assistance. The Obstetrics & Gynecology Residency Program provides outstanding and unparalleled training for eight residents per year, the next generation of women’s health leaders and providers. The clinical volume, interaction with and exposure to national leaders in all divisions, mentoring programs, progressive responsibility, and focus on teaching and scholarly work are key features of the educational mission for the program. Along with the other educational programs in the department such as divisional fellowship programs and the Simulation Program, the Undergraduate and Graduate Medical Education Programs continue to be national leaders and examples of outstanding, innovative programs.

ACHIEVEMENTS The residency program maintains its position as a highly respected program, ranked in the top 10 Obstetrics & Gynecology Residency Programs by U.S. News & World Report/Doximity every year since they have published these results.

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• The residency program continues to attract the best and brightest students from around the country with more than 550 applications from U.S. medical students for eight residency spots. •

The residency program continued its record of a 100% match rate for residents applying for subspecialty fellowships, including one in gynecologic oncology, three in maternal-fetal medicine, and one in reproductive endocrinology and infertility.

The unique Undergraduate Medical Education Career Mentoring Committee is a national model for medical student mentoring. Students participating in this program continue to have successful match results at highly desired institutions.

All third-year medical students at the Warren Alpert Medical School receive clinical Obstetrics & Gynecology training at Women & Infants Hospital, with both the core and longitudinal students incorporated into the clinical settings.

Gary Frishman, MD, residency program director, is a member of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Residency Review Committee for Obstetrics and Gynecology. This 15-member national committee oversees accreditation of all Obstetrics & Gynecology residency programs in the country. He also serves as deputy editor for the Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Surgery and is vice president of the AAGL, a society dedicated to improving gynecologic medicine with 7,500 members from close to 100 countries.

B. Star Hampton, MD, vice chair for education, is a member of the Undergraduate Medical Education Committee for the Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics (APGO), the program director for APGO’s national Faculty Development Course, and serves as faculty for the national Clerkship Director School.

Roxanne Vrees, MD, clerkship director, is the diversity ambassador for the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology and currently chairs the department’s Diversity and Inclusion Committee. She also is a board member for the Warren Alpert Medical School’s Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


VICE CHAIR FOR EDUCATION: B. Star Hampton, MD

Roxanne Vrees, MD; Matthew Esposito, MD; B. Star Hampton, MD; Bridget Kelly, MD; Gary Frishman, MD.

SPOTLIGHT ON DIVERSITY The Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology’s educational programs are positioned to both support and lead efforts on training students and residents to be culturally competent providers who can actively address health care disparities. Along with efforts by the Warren Alpert Medical School’s Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs and the Brown Minority Housestaff Association (with Luwam Ghidei, MD, PGY3, serving as co-chair), the residency program has a Committee for Diversity and Inclusion with both faculty and resident leadership. The Committee’s mission is to create and encourage an inclusive, diverse, and welcoming program that promotes strategies to recruit highly qualified residents from underrepresented groups in medicine. As part of this mission, the Committee spearheaded several initiatives during the past residency recruitment season to increase interest in the program and build diversity amongst its trainees. Such efforts included targeted hosting during interviews, in which candidates from underrepresented groups in medicine were paired with similar residents and faculty, and a very successful “second look” program

for candidates interested in the program. Two of the incoming interns this year were participants in this program. The Undergraduate Medical Education Program is working to expand its core teaching regarding diversity and health care disparities. This year all core lectures were reviewed and recommendations were made regarding revisions aimed to create a more culturally sensitive and inclusive curriculum. This included increased information on racial and sexual orientation disparities for each topic, and using images and diagrams representative of diverse patient populations. A disability module and instruction of various positioning techniques for patients with physical disabilities is being incorporated into the core clinical teaching curriculum. A self-learning module on care of the transgender patient has also been added to the core curriculum. Finally, the education team is working on a module to address selected historic social injustices in the realm of reproductive health care as a supplement to core lectures. 2017 Annual Report

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Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery

EXPERTISE

• B. Star Hampton, MD, was named vice chair for education for the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

The clinical mission of the Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery is to provide diagnosis and therapy for women with pelvic floor disorders. The Division serves as a tertiary care center and resource of expertise for patients referred with problems of support of the female pelvic organs. Public and professional education conducted by the Division faculty has increased awareness about what can be done for patients with pelvic floor disorders. Many can be cured, and all can be positively impacted to some degree.

All Division faculty members are subspecialty trained in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS) with expertise in the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, voiding and bowel dysfunction, interstitial cystitis, recurrent urinary tract infections, sexual dysfunction due to vaginal atrophy and pelvic muscle spasm, and fistulas. The Division is a referral source for the treatment of reproductive tract anomalies such as Mullerian agenesis; minimally-invasive surgery (laparoscopic, robotic, and vaginal); sacral stimulators for chronic urge incontinence, urinary retention, and fecal incontinence; urethral injection materials; onabotulinumtoxin A injections; and the selective use of mesh for repairs and their removal. The Division is one of seven national clinical sites of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Pelvic Floor Disorders Network (PFDN) and conducts multi-centered trials studying pelvic floor disorders.

• Deborah L. Myers, MD, was awarded the Society of Gynecologic Surgeons’ Distinguished Surgeon Award.

ACHIEVEMENTS •

Cassandra L. Carberry, MD, MS, as a member of the Guidelines Committee of the American Urogynecologic Society, was a lead contributor to the American Urogynecologic Society Best Practice Statement: Evaluation and Counseling of Patients with Pelvic Organ Prolapse and a contributor to the American Urogynecologic Society Consensus Statement: Cystoscopy at the Time of Prolapse Repair.

Anne C. Cooper, MD, second-year fellow, had successful submission of her poster “Long-Term Subjective Outcomes of Porcine-Derived Small Intestine Submucosa Graft-Augmented versus Native Tissue Rectocele Repair,” for an upcoming Society of Gynecologic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

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Kristen Jacobs, MD, third-year fellow, received a Pelvic Floor Disorders Research Foundation Grant from the American Urogynecologic Association/Interstitial Cystitis Association for “Female Urinary Microbiome in Patients with Interstitial Cystitis/ Painful Bladder Syndrome.”

• Nicole B. Korbly, MD, received a Certificate of Recognition for Exemplary Teaching, BIOL 3674 IMS III: Human Reproduction Small Group.

• G. Sarah Napoe, MD, second-year fellow, was awarded the Top Teacher Award in Obstetrics & Gynecology from the Warren Alpert Medical School. • Charles R. Rardin, MD, was promoted to professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Brown University and was inducted as president of the American Urogynecologic Society. •

Lauren Stewart, MD, first-year fellow, led a team that gave an oral presentation entitled, “Stress Urinary Incontinence Surgery in Washington State Before and After Introduction of the Mesh Midurethral Sling” at the 2017 American Urogynecologic Society Annual Meeting.

• Vivian W. Sung, MD, MPH, is a member of the Committee on Gynecologic Practice of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology. •

Kyle J. Wohlrab, MD, became the associate director of the Fellowship in Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery and a member of the American Urogynecologic Society fellowship training program committee. He was also promoted to associate professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, clinician educator.

• Research evaluating treatment options for pelvic organ prolapse was published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. The research was conducted by Vivian W. Sung, MD, MPH, FACOG; Kyle J. Wohlrab, MD, FACOG; and Annetta Madsen, MD (fellow), as well as Christina Raker, ScD, of the Division of Research.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


DIVISION DIRECTOR: Deborah Myers, MD Front row: B. Star Hampton, MD; Vivian Sung, MD, MPH; Nicole Korbly, MD; Cassandra Carberry, MD; Deborah Myers, MD. Back row: Charles Rardin, MD; Kyle Wohlrab, MD.

SURGICAL EDUCATION The Division of Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery has had a long-standing commitment to education of pelvic anatomy and surgical techniques. Understanding pelvic anatomy is a basic fundamental for the pelvic surgeon. Having a solid foundation in anatomy allows the surgeon to understand the relationships of organs to nearby structures, recognize normal anatomy and thus abnormal anatomy, and how to operate safely with confidence and efficiency. To this end, the Division oversees and runs several workshops for its trainees, beginning with the basics of pelvic anatomy. The Division oversees annual workshops that build the pelvic muscles in clay on a model, mimic third- and fourth-degree perineal lacerations and their repair on a beef tongue model, and perform operative procedures not routinely encountered by the gynecologic surgeon, such as repair of ureteral and bladder injuries, and repair of bowel injuries in a fresh frozen cadaver laboratory. To further enhance the surgical skills of its trainees, the Division faculty teach through endoscopic, hands-on, and virtual models that are housed in Women & Infants’ Simulation

Center. Teaching through these stations, virtual or hands-on, allows the trainee to perform procedures in a “safe” environment, where errors can be made without real patient consequence. The Division is committed to teaching pelvic surgery of all approaches – vaginal, open, laparoscopic, and robotic. The operating room is where surgical teaching is most intensive, as it is experiential. Teaching in the operating room is not only about the steps and technique of the operation, it is where surgical judgement, decision-making, problem-solving, and temperament are demonstrated. Teaching these skills is critical to producing excellent pelvic surgeons for our future generations. Surgical teaching is a passion of the urogynecology team and its importance is highly regarded.

2017 Annual Report

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Minimally-Invasive and Robotic Surgical Services EXPERTISE 2017 was another year of growth and enhancement of the Minimally-Invasive and Robotic Surgical Services program at Women & Infants Hospital. The team is committed to a program that supports the availability of all forms of minimally-invasive surgery (MIS), so that each patient has access to the type of surgery that suits her specific needs. Women with MIS approaches to hysterectomy can enjoy shorter hospitalization and recuperation, fewer infections, less pain, and quicker return to work and other activities.

Stated simply, Women & Infants is committed to providing excellence in care in all forms of minimally-invasive surgery. With this commitment, patients and their surgeons can select the right approach, with a surgeon with the right training and ongoing experience that meets their individual needs.

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Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Charles Rardin, MD; Beata DiZoglio, MD; Gary Wharton, MD.

ACHIEVEMENTS • There is a continued balance of approaches to hysterectomy. A robust program of vaginal, laparoscopic, and robotic routes for this surgery illustrates the full array of skills that Women & Infants surgeons offer to all patients. • The robotic surgery program has passed the milestone of 2,600 cases performed on one of the hospital’s two daVinci robotic platforms. • Surgeons from all areas of gynecology and its surgical subspecialties, including gynecologic oncology, reproductive endocrinology and infertility, and urogynecology, participate in the program.

• A robust and continually evolving structure of credentialing and education ensures that surgeons’ skills and experience remain fresh and sharp. • A quality infrastructure of surgical support includes steering committees, peer review groups, and credentialing processes, and is designed to support the surgical teams with best practices and program outcomes data. • The team continues to develop processes to support vaginal surgery, including lectures, new surgical equipment, policies, simulation, and preceptorships for trainees and attendings alike. These efforts have helped to distinguish Women & Infants from many other institutions nationally in preserving vaginal hysterectomy. 2017 Annual Report

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Simulation Program EXPERTISE The Simulation Program at Women & Infants Hospital continues to grow, expand, and support the clinical expertise of the region’s premier hospital for women and newborns. The following are just a sampling of the programs offered in the Simulation Center during the past year. Procedural simulation labs for resident and fellow physicians: • Abdominal hysterectomy. • Severe obstetrical laceration repairs on a beef tongue model. • Bakri placement for postpartum hemorrhage. • IUD simulation station. • Hysteroscopy simulator. • Ultrasound modules. • Shoulder dystocia. • Clamp Camp. • Intern Boot Camp. • Advanced anatomy and cadaver lab. • “Code Blue” simulations. Certification modules for attending physicians: • Laparoscopic hysterectomy. • Endometrial ablation. • Vacuum-assisted vaginal delivery. • Robotic surgery. • Essure sterilization. Communication skills training for providers: • Empathy training. • Transgender health. • Periviability counseling. • Palliative care discussions. • “Breaking bad news.” Team training – Hospital-wide simulations: • QUEST. 28

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


PROGRAM CO-DIRECTOR: Kyle Wohlrab, MD

EDUCATIONAL GRANTS AND PRESENTATIONS In addition, the Simulation Program has been involved in local, regional, and national grants in simulation education: • Society for Simulation in Healthcare Workshop: Connecting through comedy – using comedy to enhance empathy, teamwork, and cultural sensitivity. • Interprofessional Education Grant: RI Interprofessional Education and Practice Collaborative. • Everett Boyden Trust Grant: 3-D printer for medical simulation.

Presentations include: • Assessing Ob/Gyn Resident Needs for a Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Simulation Curriculum: A Focus Group Presented by Reeva Makhijani, MD, et al. at the AAGL Scientific Meeting. • Laparoscopic skills acquisition through self-directed simulation versus attending-supervised simulation Presented by Alexandra (Pali) Jen, MD, et al. at the Women & Infants Resident Research Day.

2017 Annual Report

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Inpatient Obstetrics

EXPERTISE In fiscal year 2017, Inpatient Obstetrics remained focused on improved clinical performance and a renewed emphasis on a family-friendly obstetrical experience. This is reflected in the obstetrical dashboard in which most goals were met or surpassed, and an equally impressive performance on The Joint Commission Perinatal Core Measures. Increased attention to the family experience was the impetus behind the development of the Culture of Care Committee. This robust group included all clinical disciplines, hospital leadership, and community representatives who have formed five subcommittees that have been tasked with creating a family-centric focus for all inpatient care. In addition, Inpatient Obstetrics continues its multidisciplinary work to review and revise labor induction practices, as rates have continued to trend upward with a current rate of 30.7%. This work is intended to support patient care and enhance safety. It includes the development of an internal database to provide feedback data on induction rates, indications, and outcomes for all practices. Collaborative work with Blue Cross Blue Shield of Rhode Island continues on the region’s first maternity care partnership, also known as the maternity bundle. Second year clinical performance was again impressive, meeting or exceeding national benchmarks on a number of intrapartum and postpartum metrics. These metrics included total and primary cesarean section rates as well as appropriate contraceptive counseling, postpartum depression screening, and follow-up testing for women with gestational diabetes.

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Inpatient Obstetrics has continued its ongoing commitment to safely lowering both total and primary cesarean delivery rates and promoting increased rates of successful vaginal birth for women with prior cesarean delivery. As part of that commitment, Women & Infants Hospital has also been selected for participation in the Reducing Primary Cesareans Project. This initiative represents a national effort to examine different aspects of care and their contributions to the current rates of cesarean delivery in the U.S. with the ultimate goal of reducing the number of cesareans. As is reflective of regional and national trends, Women & Infants saw a slight downturn in obstetrical activity this fiscal year, with 8,704 deliveries.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


MEDICAL DIRECTOR: James O’Brien, MD

Measures Total Cesarean Delivery Rate

Primary Cesarean Delivery Rate

VBAC Rate

DD

Numerator Denominator N: Number of CSs performed D: Number of deliveries performed N: Number of CSs performed without prior CS

Bench mark Source

Bench mark

Base line

Target

Threshold

Q1–3

CWISH

CWISH 35.3%

31.5%

31.3%

33.4%

31.7%

CWISH

CWISH 19.5%

18.1%

17.9%

18.8%

17.4%

CWISH

(12.0%)

17.4%

17.7%

14.7%

18.6%

D: Number of deliveries performed N: Number of vaginal births to women with a prior CS D: Number of births to women with a prior CS

FY17

2017 Annual Report

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Community-Based Faculty

Team Gange: Laina Crowthers, MD – Associate Team Chief; Michele Gange, MD – Team Chief; David Carcieri, MD – Associate Team Chief.

Outstanding clinicians and educators, the community-based faculty are integral to the training of medical students and residents at the Warren Alpert Medical School, to the care of patients at Women & Infants Hospital, and to research that aims to improve the health of women and newborns for generations to come. The Team Chiefs and Associate Team Chiefs system is an essential part of the success of the Women & Infants/Brown resident inpatient service. The community-based faculty provide clinical support, guidance, and oversight of patient care and teaching, tapping into their literally hundreds of years of clinical experience. The teams, led by the Team Chiefs, represent Women & Infants’ entire cadre of specialists in Obstetrics & Gynecology including providers practicing in community-based practices, federally qualified health centers, and the hospital setting. The Team Chiefs and Associate Team Chiefs support educational programs, faculty and resident development, and serve as role models for both residents and specialist faculty. 32

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Team Bowling: Dilek Cermik, MD – Associate Team Chief; Kathleen Cote Bowling, MD – Team Chief; Elizabeth Sullivan, MD – Associate Team Chief.

Team Domagalski: Jeannine Connolly, MD – Associate Team Chief; Lisa Domagalski, MD – Team Chief; Jane Sharp, MD – Associate Team Chief.

Team Medeiros: Debra Goldman, MD – Associate Team Chief; Carroll Medeiros, MD – Team Chief; Anne Murray, MD – Associate Team Chief.

Gyn Team: Renee Eger, MD – Team Chief; Mohamad Hamdi, MD – Associate Team Chief; Cynthia Hanna, MD – Associate Team Chief.

2017 Annual Report

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Community-Based Faculty

Physicians are listed here with their academic title in the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology at The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. M. David Beitle, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Rosa Bermudez-Emmanuelli, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

David A. Carcieri, MD Designated Institutional Official Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor

Suzanne Dambek, MD Clinical Instructor Anh-Tai Dang, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Marshall Carpenter, MD Kathleen Cote Bowling, MD Team Chief Clinical Associate Professor

Colleen Cavanaugh, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Lisa Boyle, MD President, Medical Staff Clinical Assistant Professor

Dilek Cermik, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor

Debra Brendel, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Kue Choi, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Constance Brennan, MD

Mauro Colavita, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Cheryl Brodsky, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Fred A. Brosco, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Karen Browning, MD Clinical Instructor Elizabeth Burchard, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Terrence F. Cahill, MD Clinical Associate Professor 34

Mary Catherine DeRosa, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Paula DeYoung, MD Clinical Instructor John DiOrio, Jr., MD Clinical Assistant Professor Beata DiZoglio, MD Co-Director, Robotics Surgery Program Clinical Assistant Professor Joseph DiZoglio, MD

Jeannine Connolly, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor Michael Coppa, MD Clinical Instructor Beth Cronin, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Laina Crowthers, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor

Lisa Domagalski, MD Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor Lindsay Clark Donat, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Stephen Falkenberry, MD Clinical Associate Professor Harris M. Galkin, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Elizabeth Gamble, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Kerri Keselowsky, MD

Carol Manning, MD

Erika Klein, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Beth Marcaccio, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Tolga Kokturk, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Elizabeth Mayhall, MD Clinical Instructor

Altug Koymen, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Karen McGoldrick, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Alicja Kreczko, MD Clinical Instructor

Megan McMahon, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Michael Gottlieb, MD (7/2014–7/2017) Clinical Instructor

Erin Kunkel, MD

Robin Gray, DO Clinical Assistant Professor

Donna LaFontaine, MD Clinical Associate Professor

Carroll Medeiros, MD Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor

Michele Gange, MD Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor Alfredo Gil, MD Debra Goldman, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor

Cynthia M. Hanna, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor Tawfik F. Hawwa, MD Clinical Associate Professor Jennifer Hosmer, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Marc A. Jaffe, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Annmarie Jurczak, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Amr Kader, MD Clinical Instructor

Christine LaRose, MD Nicole Larrea, MD Clinical Instructor Sung-Hee Lee, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Stacey P. Lievense, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Althea Lindsay, DO Clinical Instructor

Anne Murray, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor Laura S. Nevel, MD Clinical Assistant Professor J. Douglas Nisbet II, MD Chief, Kent Hospital Obstetrics & Gynecology Clinical Assistant Professor Courtney Noonan, MD Nwamaka M. Onwugbenu, MD

Audoen D. Maddock, MD Nayana Manjunath, MD Clinical Instructor

Frank Pensa, MD Clinical Associate Professor

2017 Annual Report

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Community-Based Faculty

Michael Pepi, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Mark F. Scott, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Doreen Wiggins, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Adrienne J. Perry, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Bahram Shah-Hosseini, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Robert Williams, MD Clinical Associate Professor

Martha Pizzarello, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Jane Sharp, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor

Bethany Wortman, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Marylin Powers, DO Clinical Assistant Professor Donald Ramos, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Rebecca W. Randall, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Rajendrasinh Rathod, MD

Meera Simþes, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Caroline M. Skudlarek, DO Clinical Assistant Professor J’Leise Sosa, MD Timothy Spurrell, MD Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor

Tina Rizack, MD, MPH Clinical Assistant Professor Medicine and Obstetrics & Gynecology

Elizabeth Sullivan, MD Associate Team Chief Clinical Assistant Professor

Pablo Rodriguez, MD Clinical Associate Professor

Marguerite Vigliani, MD Clinical Professor

Caitlin Saint-Aubin, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Gary G. Wharton, MD Medical Director, Surgical Services Clinical Associate Professor

Jessica Salak, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Robert Salk, DO Clinical Assistant Professor 36

Emily White, MD Clinical Assistant Professor

Emeritus Appointments in Obstetrics & Gynecology Wayne Clairborne, MD Clinical Associate Professor (Emeritus) Nabil Khoury, MD Clinical Associate Professor (Emeritus) Henry G. Magendantz, MD Clinical Associate Professor (Emeritus) Samir Moubayed, MD Clinical Associate Professor (Emeritus) John Murphy, MD Clinical Assistant Professor (Emeritus) Reza Shah-Hosseini, MD Clinical Associate Professor (Emeritus) Santina L. Siena, MD Clinical Assistant Professor (Emerita) Benjamin Vogel, MD Clinical Assistant Professor (Emeritus)

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


2017 Annual Report

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Hospital-Based Faculty

FACULTY LISTING Chair Maureen G. Phipps, MD, MPH Chace-Joukowsky Professor Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Epidemiology Vice Chair Deborah Myers, MD Professor Vice Chair for Education B. Star Hampton, MD Associate Professor Assistant Chief Kathleen Cote Bowling, MD Clinical Associate Professor Ambulatory Care Renee Eger, MD Medical Director Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Rebecca H. Allen, MD, MPH Associate Director Medical Student Core Clerkship Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Medical Science Rebecca Crichton, MD Clinical Assistant Professor Beth Cronin, MD (1/2012 – 4/2017) Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator James O’Brien, MD Associate Professor, Clinician Educator

38

Nurse Practitioners Ann Cooper, RNP Senior Teaching Associate Erin Dobson, RNP Senior Teaching Associate Ann Holdredge, CNM, NP (1990 – 4/2017) Senior Teaching Associate Patricia O’Connell, RNP Senior Teaching Associate Darcy Renaghan, MSN, WHNI-BC Senior Teaching Associate Anne Stulik, RNP Senior Teaching Associate Emergency Obstetrics & Gynecology Roxanne Vrees, MD Medical Director Director, Medical Student Core Clerkship Assistant Professor E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH Assistant Professor Dayna Burrell, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Chelsy Caren, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Erin Cleary, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Beth Cronin, MD (1/2012 – 4/2017) Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator

Dennis Goulet, MD, MPH Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Mohamad Hamdi, MD Associate Team Chief Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Bridget Kelly, MD Associate Director, Residency Program Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Michael Sisitsky, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Amy Snyder, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Kate Zaluski, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Nurse Practitioners Tara Capuano, MSN, WHCNP-C, SANE-A Teaching Associate Heather Aliotta, MSN, CNP Kristin Gianelis, MSN, ANP-BC, WHNP-BC Melissa Pragana, WHNP-BC Gynecologic Oncology and Breast Health Paul DiSilvestro, MD Division Director Professor Hannah Bansil, MD Steven Cohen, MD Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Obstetrics & Gynecology David Edmonson, MD Associate Director, Breast Health Fellowship Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator, Surgery and Obstetrics & Gynecology Jennifer Gass, MD Co-Director, Breast Health Center Chief of Surgery Director, Breast Health Fellowship Program Associate Professor, Surgery and Obstetrics & Gynecology C. O. (Skip) Granai III, MD Professor Kyu Kwang Kim, PhD Assistant Professor (Research) Robert D. Legare, MD Co-Director, Breast Health Center Director, Cancer Genetics and Prevention Program Associate Professor, Clinician Educator, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Medicine Cara Mathews, MD Assistant Professor

William Sikov, MD Associate Director of Research Associate Professor, Clinician Educator, Medicine and Obstetrics & Gynecology Ashley Stuckey, MD Director, Fellowship Program Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Medical Science Rebecca Vanasse, MD Naohiro Yano, MD, PhD Research Associate Nurse Practitioners Patricia K. Barlow MSN, ANP-BC Megan T. Gaynor Charette, RNP, MSN Laura Doherty, FNP-BC, MSN Patricia Karwan, DNP, RNP Paige McCann, MSN, RNP Molly Merlino, MSN, RNP Heather Murphy, MSN, RNP Elizabeth S. Ricci, RNP, MS Wendy Young, NP-C, MSN

Sonali Pandya, MD Clinical Instructor, Surgery and Obstetrics & Gynecology

Maternal-Fetal Medicine Katharine Wenstrom, MD Division Director Professor

Katina Robison, MD Director, Research Program Associate Professor

Tanya L. Booker, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator

Dario Roque, MD Assistant Professor

Stephen Carr, MD Director, Prenatal Diagnosis Center Professor

Bachir Sakr, MD Director, Medical Oncology Medical Director, Infusion Unit Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator

Donald R. Coustan, MD Professor

Jennifer Scalia Wilbur, MS Teaching Associate

Sarah Davis, MD Assistant Professor

Matthew Esposito, MD Associate Director, Medical Student Clerkship Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Dwight Rouse, MD, MSPH Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Epidemiology Melissa Russo, MD Assistant Professor Erika Werner, MD, MS Director, Fellowship Program Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Epidemiology Nurse Faculty Julie Daley, RN Teaching Associate Midwifery Elisabeth Howard, PhD, CNM, FACNM Program Director Associate Professor, Clinician Educator Linda Hunter, EdD, CNM, FACNM Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Elizabeth Kettyle, CNM, MSN, MPH Teaching Associate Edie McConaughey, MSN, CNM Senior Teaching Associate Janet Singer, MSN, CNM Senior Teaching Associate Linda Steinhardt, MS, FNP-C, CNM Senior Teaching Associate Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Ruben Alvero, MD Division Director Director, Fellowship Program Professor 2017 Annual Report

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Hospital-Based Faculty

Lynae Brayboy, MD Assistant Professor (Research), Obstetrics & Gynecology and Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry John Buster, MD Professor Eden Cardozo, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Gary Frishman, MD Director, Residency Program Professor Victoria Snegovskikh, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Shunping Wang, PhD Associate Professor, Clinician Educator Carol Wheeler, MD Professor, Clinician Educator Clinical Research in Women’s Health Kristen Matteson, MD, MPH Interim Division Director Director, Resident Research Associate Professor E. Christine Brousseau, MD, MPH Assistant Professor Susan Cu-Uvin, MD Professor Valery Danilack, PhD Assistant Professor (Research) Christina Raker, ScD Research Associate Dwight Rouse, MD, MSPH Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Epidemiology 40

Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery Deborah L. Myers, MD Division Director Professor Cassandra L. Carberry, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator B. Star Hampton, MD Associate Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Medical Science Nicole B. Korbly, MD Assistant Professor, Clinician Educator Charles R. Rardin, MD Director, Fellowship Program Director, Minimally-Invasive and Robotic Surgical Services Professor Vivian W. Sung, MD, MPH Chair, Women & Infants Hospital Institutional Review Board Associate Professor Kyle J. Wohlrab, MD Co-Director, Simulation Center Associate Director, Fellowship Program Associate Professor, Clinician Educator Nurse Practitioners Yanghee Courbron, RN, MS, WHNP-BC Leah K. Moynihan, RNC, MSN Inpatient Obstetrics James J. O’Brien, MD Medical Director Associate Professor, Clinician Educator Surgical Services Gary Wharton, MD Medical Director Clinical Associate Professor

Secondary Appointments in Obstetrics & Gynecology Eli Adashi, MD, MS Professor Kenneth Chen, MD Assistant Professor Jennifer Clarke, MD, MPH Associate Professor Francois Luks, MD Professor Niharika Mehta, MD Associate Professor Geralyn Lambert-Messerlian, PhD Professor Raymond Powrie, MD Professor David Savitz, PhD Professor Caron Zlotnick, PhD Professor Adjunct Appointments in Obstetrics & Gynecology Sandra Carson, MD Adjunct Professor Melissa Clark, PhD Adjunct Professor, Obstetrics & Gynecology and Epidemiology Richard Moore, MD Adjunct Professor Brenda Roy, MD Adjunct Assistant Professor Rakesh Singh, PhD (6/2011 – 6/2017) Adjunct Associate Professor (Research) Timothy Shafman, MD Adjunct Assistant Professor

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Obstetrics & Gynecology

Emeritus Appointments in Obstetrics & Gynecology Diane Angelini, EdD, CNM Professor, Clinician Educator (Emerita) Andrew Blazar, MD Clinical Professor (Emeritus) Patrick Sweeney, MD, PhD Professor (Emeritus)

CURRENT RESIDENTS PG-1 (2017 – 2021) Ida Bernstein, MD Jia Jennifer Ding, MD Jessica DiSilvestro, MD Amita Kulkarni, MD Jennifer Narvaez, MD Alana Pinsky, MD Justine Reilly, MD Eva Reina, MD PG-2 (2016 – 2020) Ralph Burns, MD Fei Cai, MD Andrey Dolinko, MD Leanne Free, MD Deanna Glassman, MD Merima Ruhotina, MD Julia Shinnick, MD Chi-Fong Wang, MD PG-3 (2015 – 2019) Kelly Benabou, MD Kathleen Cohen, MD Michael Cohen, MD Jenny David, DO Luwam Ghidei, MD Sebastian Ramos, MD Bridget Spelke, MD Hope Yu, MD

PG-4 (2014 – 2018) Libertad Flores, MD Mary Friedman, MD Meghana Limaye, MD Caitlin MacGregor, MD Reeva Makhijani, MD Katherine Miller, MD Desmond Sutton, MD Meena Theva, MD

RECENT RESIDENT GRADUATES (2013 – 2017) Ilina Datkhaeva, MD Jenna Emerson, MD Dennis Goulet, MD, MPH Alexandra Jen, MD Martha Kole, MD Kristin Rojas, MD Jennifer Villavicencio, MD Erica Weston, MD

CURRENT FELLOWS Program in Women’s Oncology (Gynecologic Oncology and Breast Health) Lindsey Beffa, MD (2016 – 2020) Evelyn Cantillo, MD (2014 – 2018) Jenna Emerson, MD (2017 – 2011) Abby Geletzke, MD (Breast Fellow) (2017 – 2018) Matthew Oliver, MD (2015 – 2019)

Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Warren J. Huber, MD, PhD (2016 – 2019) May-Tal Sauerbrun-Cutler, MD (2017 – 2020) Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery Anne Cooper, MD (2016 – 2019) Kristin Jacobs, MD (2015 – 2018) G. Sarah Napoe, MD (2016 – 2019) Lauren Stewart, MD (2017 – 2020)

RECENT FELLOWSHIP GRADUATES Rosemary Froehlich, MD (2014 – 2017) Fellow in Maternal-Fetal Medicine Elizabeth Butler, DO (2016 – 2017) Fellow in Breast Oncology Anze Urh, MD (2013 – 2017) Fellow in Gynecologic and Breast Oncology Virginia Mensah, MD (2014 – 2017) Fellow in Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Annetta Madsen, MD (2014 – 2017) Fellow in Urogynecology & Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery

Maternal–Fetal Medicine Michael Beninati, MD (2016 – 2019) Maureen Hamel, MD (2015 – 2018) Martha Kole, MD (2017 – 2020) Christopher Nau, MD (2017 – 2020)

2017 Annual Report

41


Grant Funding — 2017

Our grant funding agencies and foundations have included:

42

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Allen, RH: NICHD. Contraceptive Clinical Trials Network (HHSN2752013000151) 2013 – 2020. Role: Co-PI. Alvero, R: Role: Co-PI.

Brayboy, L: Connie Howes Award. “Predicting Gestational Hypertensive Disease and Diabetes in Ages High-Risk Patients in the Preconception Period.” 12/2016 – 12/2017. Role: PI.

Allen, RH: Bayer. “Multi-center, open-label, uncontrolled study to assess contraceptive efficacy and safety of Mirena during extended use beyond 5 years in women 18 to 35 years of age including a subgroup evaluation of treatment effect on heavy menstrual bleeding.” 2017. Role: Site PI.

Carr, S: NIH/NIDA. “Fetal Behavior, Brain & Stress Response: Ultrasound Markers of Maternal Smoking.” (R01 DA036999-01 (Stroud)). 2013 – 2018. Role: Co-I.

Allen, RH: Bayer. “An open-label, non-randomized, prospective observational cohort study to assess post-procedural outcomes in two cohorts of women who chose to undergo either hysteroscopic sterilization (Essure®) or laparoscopic tubal sterilization.” 2017. Role: Site PI. Brayboy, L: NIH/NICHD Reproductive Scientist Development Program, “The Role of Multidrug Resistant Transporters in the Protection of the Ovary from Chemotherapy.” (K12HD000849 (Moley)) 7/1/2014 – 7/1/2020. Role: Physician Scientist. Brayboy, L: Reproductive Health COBRE. “Predicting Gestational Hypertensive Disease and Diabetes in Aged High-Risk Patients in the Preconception Period.” (P20 GM121298-01 (Sharma)). 4/1/2017 – 2/28/2022. Role: Junior Investigator.

Clarke, JG: NICHD. “Contraceptive Awareness and Reproductive Education.” (1R01HD065942 (Stein)). 9/15/11 – 6/30/18 (NCE). Cu-Uvin, S: NIH/FIC. “AIDS International Research and Training Program (Fogarty Center).” (5D43TW000237 (Cu-Uvin)). 6/1/10 – 4/30/17-NCE. Role: PI. Cu-Uvin, S: NIH. “Reproductive Hormones and Their Impact on HIV-1 Acquisition.” (R01HD072693 (Cu-Uvin/Ramratnam/Gupta)). 4/14/12 – 2/28/17. Role: Co-I. CuUvin, S: NIH/NIAID. “HIV-1 Reservoirs in the Female Genital Tract.” (1R01AI108538-01A1 (Tsibris)). 5/1/14 – 4/30/19. Role: Co-I. Cu-Uvin, S: NIH. “Results of Cryotherapy/LEEP among HIV-and HIV+ Women in Western Kenya.” (1U54 CA190151 (Loehrer)). 8/1/14 – 7/31/19. Role: Co-I. 2017 Annual Report

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Grant Funding

DiSilvestro, P: GOG of NCI. “A Phase III Clinical Trial of Bevacizumab with IV versus IP Chemotherapy in Ovarian, Fallopian Tube and Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma.” 2003 – present. Role: Group Wide Study Co-Chair GOG 252. DiSilvestro, P: Genetech. “A randomized, open-label, multicenter, phase II trial evaluating the safety and activity of DNIB0600A compared to pegylated liposomal doxorubicin administered intravenously to patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer (GO28609).” 2013 – 2017. Role: PI.

Cu-Uvin, S: NIH/NIAID. “Lifespan/Tufts/Brown Center for AIDS Research.” (5P30AI042853-16 (Cu-Uvin)). 9/1/1998 – 6/30/2017. Role: HIV and Women’s Core Co-Director. Cu-Uvin, S DHHS/HRSA. “Ryan White Part C – Outpatient Early Intervention Services with Respect to HIV Disease.” (5H76HA00018 (Garland)). 5/1/1994 – 12/31/2017. Role: Co-Director. Danilack, V: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). “Comparative Effectiveness of Interventions for Labor Induction.” (K01HS025013 (Danilack)). 9/1/2016 – 8/31/2021. Role: PI. Phipps, MG: Role: Mentor. Savitz, D: Role: Mentor. Werner, E: Role: Collaborator. Davis, SM: Brown University and Women & Infants Hospital, William and Mary Oh – William and Elsa Zopfi Professorship in Pediatrics for Perinatal Research. “Oh-Zopfi Pilot Project Grant Program.” 6/1/2017 – 5/30/2018. Role: PI. DiSilvestro, P: NIH. “NRG Oncology of the NCI (formerly GOG), Women and Infants Hospital.” (CA-12-010). 3/2014 – present. Role: PI. 44

DiSilvestro, P: Janssen Pharmaceuticals. “A randomized, openlabel study comparing the combination of YONDELIS and DOXIL/ CAELYS with DOXIL/CAELYX Monotherapy for the treatment of advanced-relapsed epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer.” 2013 – present. Role: PI. DiSilvestro, P: Tesaro. “A randomized, open-label study of maintenance with Nariparib versus placebo in patients with platinum sensitive ovarian cancer.” 2013 – present. Role: PI. Luks, FI: NIDDK. “Non-Operative Management of Pediatric Appendicitis: A Randomized Controlled Study.” (U34 1U34DK112584-01 (Luks/Chun)). 9/1/2017 – 8/31/2018. Role: Co-PI. Madsen, A: American Urogynecologic Society Foundation. “Peer support for Pelvic Floor Disorders (PEERS).” 7/1/2015 – 6/30/2017. Role: PI Sung, V: Role: Primary Mentor Mathews, C: AstraZeneca. “A Phase III randomized, double blind, placebo controlled, multicenter study of Olaparib maintenance monotherpay in patients with BRCA mutated advanced (FIGO Stage III_IV) ovarian cancer following first line platinum based chemotherapy.” 2013 – present. Role: Site PI. DiSilvestro, P: Role: International Project PI.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Matteson, KA: NIH/NICHD. “Levonorgestrel intrauterine system versus oral contraceptives for heavy menses.” (R01 HD074751 (Matteson)). 2/2013 – 2/2017. Role: PI.

Phipps, MG: NIH/NICHD. “Efficacy of a Prenatal YOGA Intervention for Antenatal Depression.” (1 R01 HD0811868-01A1 (Battle)). 9/1/2015-6/30/2020. Role: Co-I.

Lambert-Messerlian, GM: NIH. “Placental role in mediating adverse outcomes in obstructive sleep apnea.” (1R01HD07851501A1 (Bourjeily)). 2014 – 2019. Role: Co-Investigator/Consortium PI.

Phipps, MG: NIH/NINR & OD. “COBRE for Reproductive Health.” (1 P20 GM121298 (Sharma)). 4/1/17 – 2/28/22. Role: Deputy Director.

Lambert-Messerlian, GM: NIH “De novo predictors of OSA.” (R01 HL13071 (Bourjeily)). 2016 – 2019. Role: Co-I/Consortium PI.

Rardin, C: Foundation for Female Health Awareness. “vaULT: Vaginal Uphold Hysteropexy and Laparoscopic Sacral Hysteropexy for the Treatment of Uterovaginal Pelvic Organ Prolapse: A Parallel Cohort Study.” 2011 – present. Role: PI.

Lambert-Messerlian, GM: Fujirebio Diagnostics. “CA 15-3 Precision.” 2017. Role. PI. Lambert-Messerlian, GM: Fujirebio Diagnostics. “CA 19-9 Precision.” 2017. Role: PI. Lambert-Messerlian, GM: Perkin Elmer. “Validation of low cost aneuploidy screening.” (Palomaki). 2016 – 2017. Role: Co-I. Phipps, MG: NIH NICHD. “Brown University/Women & Infants Women’s Reproductive Health Research Program.” (3K12 HD050108 (Phipps)). 9/27/05 – 6/30/20. Role: PI (01/11 to present) and Research Director (01/06 – 12/13). Matteson, KA: Role: Research Director (12/13 to present). Brousseau, EC: Role: Scholar (1/15/14 – present). Davis, SM: Role: Scholar (2/2017 – present). Phipps, MG: NIH NIMH. “Project REACH: Preventing Postpartum Depression in Adolescent Mothers.” (R01 MH093342 (Phipps)). 8/1/11 – 4/30/18. Role: PI. Zlotnick, C: Role: Co-I. Phipps, MG: NIH NINR. “RCT of a tailored walking program to reduce stress among pregnant women.” (R01NR014540-01A1 (Battle / Salisbury)). 9/17/14 – 7/31/19. Role: Co-I.

Rardin, C: Pelvalon, Inc. “LIBERATE: A Clinical Evaluation of the Eclipse™ System, a Vaginal Bowel Control (VBC) Therapy for Fecal Incontinence in Women.” 2015 – present. Role: RI Site PI. Rardin, C: Solace Therapeutics. “SUCCESS Trial: Stress Urinary inContinence Control/Efficacy and Safety Study. Randomized Controlled trial of the VesAir balloon system.” 2015 – present. Role: RI Site PI. Robison, K: Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) “Cancer of the Uterus and Treatment of Incontinence (CUTI).” (PCORI: FC14-1409-22034 (Robison)) 06/01/2015 – 06/01/2018. Role: PI. Wohlrab, K: Role: Co-PI. Sung, VW: Role: Co-I Robison, K: NIH/NCI. GOG Protocol 237, Comparative analysis of CA-IX, P16, proliferative markers, and human papilloma virus in the diagnosis of significant cervical lesions in patients with a cytologic diagnosis of atypical glandular cells (AGC). 02/09 – present. Role: Site PI.

2017 Annual Report

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Grant Funding

Robison, K: LaRue S. and Walter F. Fisher Memorial Trust, “The effect of neoadjuvant depot medroxyprogesterone acetate on glandular cellularity in women with complex atypical hyperplasia or grade 1-2 endometrial adenocarcinoma awaiting hysterectomy.” 12/1/15 – 6/1/17. Role: PI.

Savitz, DA: NIH NICHD. “Effect of iatrogenic delivery at 34-38 weeks’ gestation on pregnancy outcome.” ( R01 HD077592 (Savitz)) 9/2014 – 4/30/18. Role: PI. Danilack,VA: Role: Investigator Rouse, DJ: Role: Investigator.

Robison, K: LaRue S. and Walter F. Fisher Memorial Trust. “The impact on sleep quality in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast and ovarian cancer.” 9/1/16 – 9/1/17. Role: PI.

Savitz, DA: Westat, Inc/NIEHS. “Children’s Health Exposure Analysis Resource (CHEAR): Coordinating Center (1U24ES02653901(O’Brien). 9/30/15 – 8/31/19. Role: Co-I.

Robison, K: Myles and Gertrude Hanson Trust. “The impact on sleep quality in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast and ovarian cancer.” 12/1/16 – 12/1/17. Role: PI

Sung, VW: NIH / NICHD. “The Pelvic Floor Disorders Network (PFDN) Brown/Women & Infants Site.” UG1 HD069013 7/1/2011 – 6/30/2021. Role: Site PI. Myers, DM: Role: Alternate PI. Rardin, C: Role: Co-I.

Rouse, DJ: NIH/NICHD. “Cooperative Multicenter Network of Maternal Fetal Medicine Units.” (UG1HD040500 (Rouse)). 4/1/2011 – 3/31/2021. Role: PI. Werner, E: Role: Alternate PI. Rouse, DJ: NICHD. “Identification of Herpes SimpleX Virus (HSVS) Shedding in the female genital tract of pregnant and non-pregnant women by the Xpert HSV ½ Assay, routine PCR and culture.” (HHSN272201100034C (Whitley)). 3/15/2015 – 3/2017. Role: UAB Subcontract Co-I. Rouse, DJ: NIH/NICHD. “Pulmonary Complications in a Birth Cohort after a Randomized Trial of Exposure to Antenatal Corticosteroids: the ALPS Follow-Up Study. (2 R01 HL09835404 (Rouse)). 6/2016 – 5/2021. Savitz, DA: NIH NIEHS. “Residential Air Pollution and Preeclampsia.” (5R21 ES023073-01 (Wellenius)). 08/09/13 – 7/31/17. Role: Site – PI.

46

Sung, VW: NIH / NIDDK. “Symptoms of Lower Urinary Tract Dysfunction Research Network (LURN).” (U01 DK097772 (Bradley/ Kreder)). 9/30/12 – 5/31/17. Role: Co-I. Sung, VW: NIH/NIA. “Investigation to Minimize Prolapse Recurrence of the Vagina using Estrogen (IMPROVE).” (1R01AG047290-01A1 (Rhan)). 8/15/2015 – 4/30/2020. Role: Site PI. Werner, E: ADA. “Assessing and avoiding barriers to post-partum glucose testing among women with gestational diabetes mellitus.” (I-16-ICTS-118 (Werner)). 1/2016 – 12/2018. Role: PI. Werner, E: Alpert Medical School of Brown University. “Hassenfeld Child Health Innovation Institute.” 2/2016 – 2/2021. Role: Birth Cohort PI; Obesity Co-I and Faculty Scholar. Werner, E: Connie Howes Award, Women & Infants Hospital. “Postpartum Screening and Intervention for Women with Preeclampsia to Reduce Cardiovascular Risk: A Pilot Investigation. 1/2016 – 9/2017. Role PI.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Werner, E: NIH/NIDA. “Prenatal marijuana: Impact on infant neurobehavior, stress, & epigenetic mechanisms.” (R01-DA044504-01 (Stroud)). 9/2017 – 6/2022. Role: Co-I. Werner, E: RI Foundation. “Initiating metformin after delivery in post-partum women at high risk for diabetes mellitus: A pilot study.” 5/2016 – 4/2017. Role: PI. Werner, E: NIH/Food and Drug Administration. “Impact of Flavors and Design Features on Patterns of Waterpipe Use and Toxicity in Pregnant Mothers. (R01-DA042484-01 (Stroud). 10/2016 – 9/2019. Role: Co-I. Werner, E: AHRQ. “Comparative Effectiveness of Interventions for Labor Induction.” (K01-HS025013). 9/2016 – 8/2021. Role: Collaborator. Zlotnick, C: NICHD. “Computer-based Intervention for Battered Sheltered Women with Substance Use.” (R34 DA 038770). 04/15/15 – 02/28/18. Role: PI. Zlotnick, C: NICHD. “Dating Violence Prevention for Juvenile Justice Girls.” (R01 HD080780-01 (Rizzo)). 04/1/15 – 03/31/20. Role: Co-I. Zlotnick, C: Department of Defense. “Addressing the Health Concerns of VA Women with Sexual Trauma.” (W81XWH-14-1-0368 (Zlotnick)). 09/2015 – 08/2018. Role: PI. Zlotnick, C: CDC. “Preventing Sexual Aggression among High School Boys.” (1-U01-CE002541-01 (Orchowski)). 09/30/2014 – 09/29/2018. Role: Co-I. Zlotnick, C: NIMH. Web-based Interactive Program to Prevent Postpartum Depression in High Risk Women. (R43 MH11221601(Fox/Zlotnick)). 9/1/2017 – 2/28/2018. Role: Joint PI.

2017 Annual Report

47


Peer-Reviewed Publications

Adashi EY. Clomiphene citrate at 50: the dawning of assisted reproduction. Fertil Steril. 2017 Oct;108(4):592-593. Epub 2017 Sept 11. No abstract available. PMID: 28911929.

Albright CM, Has P, Rouse DJ, Hughes BL. Internal Validation of the Sepsis in Obstetrics Score to Identify Risk of Morbidity From Sepsis in Pregnancy. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Oct;130(4):747-755. PMID: 28885400.

Adashi EY, Cohen IG. Mitochondrial replacement therapy: born in the USA: the untold story of a conceptual breakthrough. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jul 29. [Epub ahead of print]. No abstract available. PMID: 28764900.

Albright CM, Hughes BL, Werner EF. In Reply. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jul;130(1):217-218. No abstract available. PMID: 28644318.

Adashi EY, Cohen IG. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Unmade in the USA. JAMA. 2017 Feb 14;317(6):574-575. No abstract available. PMID: 28196242. Adashi EY, Gleicher N. Is a Blanket Elective Single Embryo Transfer Policy Defensible? Rambam Maimonides Med J. 2017 Apr 28;8(2). Review. PMID: 28467762. Adashi EY, Krishna GR, Grupposo PA. For-Profit Medical Education— Reply. JAMA. 2017 Jul 18;318(3):302. No abstract available. PMID: 28719690. Adashi EY, Krishna GR, Gruppuso PA. For-Profit Medical Schools— A Flexnerian Legacy Upended. JAMA. 2017 Mar 28;317(13):1209-1210. No abstract available. PMID: 282411974. Adashi EY, McCoy RC. Technology versus biology: the limits of preimplantation genetic screening: Better methods to detect the origin of aneuploidy in pre-implantation embryos could improve the success rate of artificial reproduction. EMBO Rep. 2017 May;18(5):670-672. Epub 2017 Mar 29. No abstract available. PMID: 28356328. Adashi EY, Occhiogrosso RH. The Hyde Amendment at 40 Years and Reproductive Rights in the United States: Perinnial and Panoptic. JAMA. 2017 Apr 18;317(15):1523-1524. No abstract available. PMID: 28301642.

Albright CM, MacGregor C, Sutton D, Theva M, Hughes BL, Werner EF. Group B Streptococci Screening Before Repeat Cesarean Delivery: A Cost Effectiveness Analysis. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jan;129(1):111-119. PMID: 27926650. Atri M, Zhang Z, Dehdashti F, Lee SI, Marques H, Ali S, Koh WJ, Mannel RS, DiSilvestro PA, King SA, Pearl M, Zhou X, Plante M, Moxley KM, Gold M. Utility of PET/CT to Evaluate Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Metastasis in High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: Results of ACRIN 6671/ GOG 0233 Trial. Radiology. 2017 May; 283(2):450-459. PMID: 28051912. Basch E, Dueck AC, Rogak LJ, Minasian LM, Kelly WK, O’Mara AM, Denicoff AM, Seisler D, Atherton PJ, Paskett E, Carey L, Dickler M, Heist RS, Himelstein A, Rugo HS, Sikov WM, Socinski MA, Venook AP, Weckstein DJ, Lake DE, Biggs DD, Freedman RA, Kuzma C, Kirshner JJ, Schrag D. Feasibility Assessment of Patient Reporting of Symptomatic Adverse Events in Multicenter Cancer Clinical Trials. JAMA Oncol. 2017 Feb 16. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28208174. Beffa L, Robison K. Sentinel Lymph Node Biopsy in Vulvar Cancer: What is the standard of care? J Oncol Transl Res 3:118. Doi: 10.4172/2476-2261.1000118.

Adashi EY. Conflict of Interest in Medicine: Plausible Deniability? Am J Bioeth. 2017 Jun;17(6):31-31. No abstract available. PMID: 28537832.

Blackwell SC, Landon MB, Mele L, Reddy UM, Casey BM, Wapner RJ, Varner MW, Rouse DJ, et al.; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. Relationship Between Excessive Gestational Weight Gain and Neonatal Adiposity in Women With Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Dec; 128 (6): 13251332. PMID: 27824768.

Ahmed AH, Schnatz PF, Adashi EY. Allopathic and Osteopathic Medicine Unify GME Accreditation: A Historic Convergence. Fam Med. 2017 May;49(5):372-377. PMID: 28535318.

Bliss JM, Carr SR, De Paepe ME, Luks FI. What – and why – the neonatologist should know about twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome. NeoReviews 18:e22-e32, 2017.

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Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


2013–2014

Bourjeily G, Danilack VA, Bublitz MH, Lipkind H, Muri J, Caldwell D, Tong I, Rosene-Montella K. Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Pregnancy is Associated with Adverse Maternal Outcomes: A National Cohort. Sleep Medicine 2017 Sep 19 10.1016/j.sleep.2017.06.035 Epub ahead of print] Brayboy LM, Oulhen N, Long S, Voigt N. Raker C, Wessel GM. Multidrug resistance transporter-1 and breast cancer resistance protein protect against ovarian toxicity and are essential in ovarian physiology. Reprod Toxicol. 2017 Apr;69:121-131. [Epub 2017 Feb 12]. PMID: 28216407. Brayboy LM, Sepolen A, Mezoian T, Schultz L, Landgren-Mills BS, Spencer N, Wheeler C, Clark MA. Girl Talk: A Smartphone Application to Teach Sexual Health Education to Adolescent Girls. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2017 Feb;30(1):23-28. PMID: 27393638. Breyer BN, Creasman JM, Richter HE, Myers D, Burgio KL, Wing RR, West DS, Kusek JW, Subak LL; Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise (PRIDE). A Behavioral Weight Loss Program and Non-Urinary Incontinence Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms in Overweight and Obese Women with Urinary Incontinence: A Secondary Data Analysis of the Program to Reduce Incontinence by Diet and Exercise (PRIDE). J Urol. 2017 Aug 12. pii: S00225347(17)77304-1. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2017.07.087. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28807645. Brousseau EC, Danilack V, Cai F, Matteson K. Emergency Department Visits for Postpartum Hypertension. Hypertens Pregnancy. 2017 May 19:105. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28524763. Brousseau EC, Danilack, V, Cai F, Matteson KA. Emergency Department Visits for Postpartum Complications. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2017 Sep 22. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28937843. Bukowski R, Hansen NI, Pinar H, Willinger M, Reddy UM, Parker CB, Silver RM, Dudley DJ, Stoll BJ, Saade GR, Koch MA, Hogue C, Varner MW, Conway DL, Coustan D, Goldenberg RL; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network (SCRN). Altered fetal growth, placental abnormalities, and stillbirth. PLoS One 2017; Aug 18: 12(8):e0182874. PMID: 28820889.

Bustos ML, Caritis SN, Jablonski KA, Reddy UM, Sorokin Y, Thorp JM Jr, Varner MW, Wapner RJ, Iams JD, Carpenter MW, Peaceman AM, Mercer BM, Sciscione A, Rouse DJ, Ramin SM; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. The association between cytochrome P450 3A, progesterone receptor polymorphisms, plasma 17-OHPC concentrations, and spontaneous preterm birth. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 May 15. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28522317. Carberry CK, Tulikangas PK, Ridgeway BM, Collins SA, Adam RA. AUGS Best Practice Statement: Evaluation and Counseling of Patients with Pelvic Organ Prolapse. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg. 2017 Sept/Oct;23:281-287. PMID: 28846554. Cardozo ER, Huber WJ, Stuckey AR, Alvero R. Mandating Coverage for Fertility Preservation - A Step in the Right Direction. N Engl J Med 2017 Oct 26;377:1607-1609. No abstract available. PMID: 29069561. Casey BM, Thom EA, Peacemen AM, Varner MW, Sorokin Y, Hirtz DG, Reddy UM, Wapner RJ, Thorp JM Jr., Saade G, Tita AT, Rouse DJ, Sibai B, Iams JD, Mercer DM, Tolosa J. Caritis SN, VanDorsten JP; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network. Treatment of Subclinical Hypothyroidism or Hypothyroxinemia in Pregnancy. N Engl J Med. 2017 Mar; 376(9):815-825. PMID: 28249134. Chauhan SP, Rice MM, Grobman WA, Bailit J, Reddy UM, Wapner RJ, Varner MW, Thorp JM Jr, Leveno KJ, Caritis SN, Prasad M, Tita ATN, Saade G, Sorokin Y, Rouse DJ, Tolosa JE; MSCE, for the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. Neonatal Morbidity of Small- and Large-for-GestationalAge Neonates Born at Term in Uncomplicated Pregnancies. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Sept; 130 (3): 511-519. PMID: 28796674. Cheng L, Zhang B, Zheng T, Hu J, Zhou A, Bassig BA, Xia W, Savitz DA, Buka S, Xiong C, Braun JM, Zhang Y, Zhou Y, Pan X, Wu C, Wang Y, Qian Z, Yang A, Romano ME, Shi K, Xu S, Li Y. Critical Windows of Prenatal Exposure to Cadmium and Size at Birth. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 2017 Jan 9;14(1). pii: E58. doi: 10.3390/ijerph14010058. PMID: 28075368. 2017 Annual Report

49


Peer-Reviewed Publications

Clark MA, Ott M, Rogers ML, Politi MC, Miller SM, Robison K, Stuckey A, Dizon D. ADVANCE CARE PLANNING (ACP) AS A SHARED ENDEAVOR: The impact of multidisciplinary cancer care on rates of completion of ACP documents. Pscycho Oncology. 2017 Jan;26(1):67-73. Cohen IG, Hoffman S, Adashi EY. Your Money or Your Patient’s Life? Ransomware and Electronic Health Records. Ann Intern Med. 2017 Sep 19. [Epub ahead of print]. No abstract available. PMID: 28975246. Cohen IG, Daley GQ, Adashi EY. Disruptive reproductive technologies. Sci Transl Med. 2017 Jan 11;9(372). Review. PMID: 28077678. Coleman R, Brady MF, Herzog TJ, Sabbatini P, Armstrong DK, Walker JL, Kim BG, Fujiwara K, Tewari KS, O’Malley DM, Davidson SA, Rubin SC, DiSilvestro P, Basen-Engquist K, Huang H, Chan JK, Spirtos NM, Ashfaq R, Mannel RS. Bevacizumab and paclitaxel-carboplatin chemotherapy and secondary cytoreduction in recurrent, platinumsensitive ovarian cancer (NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study GOG-0213): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial. Lancet Oncol. 2017 Jun;18(6):779-791. [Epub 2017 Apr 21]. PMID: 28438473. Committee on Gynecologic Practice (Collaborators: Matteson KA, Butts SF). Committee Opinion No 701: Choosing the Route of Hysterectomy for Benign Disease. Obstet Gynecol. 2017. Jun;129(6):e155-e159. PMID: 28538495. Committee on Gynecological Practice, Society of Gynecologic Oncology (Collaborators: Matteson KA, Gunderson C, Richardson DL). Committee Opinion No 716: The Role of the ObstetricianGynecologist in the Early Detection of Epithelial Ovarian Cancer in Women at Average Risk. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Sep;130(3):e146-e149. PMID: 28832487. Connor EV, Raker CA, Clark MA, Stuckey AR. Obesity risk awareness in women with endometrial cancer. Arch Gynecol Obstet. 2017 Apr;295(4):965-969. [Epub 2017 Feb 6]. PMID: 28168655. Coustan DR. An Ounce of Prevention…. Am J Gynecol. 2017 Feb 24. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28242286.

50

Creasman WT, Ali S, Mutch DG, Zaino RJ, Powell MA, Mannel RS, Backes FJ, DiSilvestro PA, Argenta PA, Pearl ML, Lele SB, Guntupalli SR, Waggoner S, Spirtos N, Boggess JF, Edwards RP, Filiaci VL, Miller DS. Surgical-pathological findings in type 1 and 2 endometrial cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study on GOG-210 protocol. Gynecol Oncol. 2017 Apr 6. Doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2017.03.017. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28392124. Cui L, Li L, Adashi EY, Chen ZJ. Author’s reply re: Surrogacy: a familybuilding option in search of legitimacy. BJOG. 2017 Jun;124(7):1125. No abstract available. PMID: 28544723. Danilack VA, Gee RE, Berthelot DP, Gurvich R, Muri JM. Public Health Data in Action: An Analysis of Using Louisiana Vital Statistics for Quality Improvement and Payment Reform. Matern Child Health J. 2017 Mar 18. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28316039. Datkhaeva I, Dray D, Has P, Stifani B, Hughes B, Rouse D. Uptake of a Guideline for the Administration of a Rescue Course of Antenatal Corticosteroids, Obstet Gynecol 2017 Apr;129(4):1–8. [Epub 2017 Mar]. PMID: 28277360. Davis SM, Sweet LM, Oppenheimer KH, Suratt BT, Phillippe M. Estradiol and progesterone influence on influenza infection and immune response in a mouse model. Am J Reprod Immunol. 2017 May 30. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28557314. Diamond MP, Legro RS, Coutifaris C, Alvero R, Robinson RD, Casson PA, Christman GM, Huang H, Hansen KR, Baker V, Usadi R, Seungdamrong A, Bates GW, Rosen RM, Schlaff W, Haisenleder D, Krawetz SA, Barnhart K, Trussell JC, Santoro N, Eisenberg E, Zhang H; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Reproductive Medicine Network. Sexual function in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Apr 26. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28455078. Dolinko AV, Farland LV, Kaser DJ, Missmer SA, Racowsky C. National survey on use of time-lapse imaging systems in IVF laboratories. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2017 Jun 10. doi:10.1007/s10815-017-0964-9. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28600620.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Dolinko AV, Vrees RA, Frishman GN. Non-Tubal Ectopic Pregnancies: an Overview and Treatment via Local Injection. J Minim Invasive Gynecol. 2017 Jul 19. [Epub ahead of print]. Review. PMID: 28734972. Dugoff L, Pradhan A, Casey P. Dalrymple JL, Abbott JF, Buery-Joyner SD, Chuang A, Cullimore AJ, Forstein DA, Hampton BS, Kaczmarczyk JM, Katz NT, Nuthalapaty FS, Page-Ramsey SM, Wolf A, Hueppchen NA. Pelvic and breast examination skills curricula in United States medical schools: a survey of Obstetrics & Gynecology clerkship directors. BMC Med Educ. 2016 Dec 16;16(1):314. PMID: 27986086. Durfey SNM, George P, Adashi EY. Permanent GME Funding for Teaching Health Centers. JAMA. 2017 Jun 13;317(22):2277-2278. No abstract available. PMID: 28472299. Edwards R, Grabosch S, Tseng G, Lankes H, Moore K, Odunsi K, Blad A, Ma t, Strange M, Brozick J, Lugade A, Omilian A, Bshara W, Stuckey AR, Walker J, Birrer M; Multiplex Profiling Identifies Distinct Local and Systemic Alterations during Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy for Ovarian Cancer; an NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study. Gynecol Oncol 2017 May 5. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28483269. Engmann L, Jin S, Sun F, Legro RS, Polotsky AJ, Hansen KR, Coutifaris C, Diamond MP, Eisenberg E, Zhang H, Santoro N; Reproductive Medicine Network (Alvero R). Racial and ethnic differences in the polycystic ovary syndrome metabolic phenotype. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 May;216(5):493.e1-493.e13. Epub 2017 Jan 16. PMID: 28104402. Etzel TM, Calafat AM, Ye X, Chen A, Lanphear BP, Savitz DA, Yolton K, Braun JM. Urinary triclosan concentrations during pregnancy and birth outcomes. Environmental Research 2017 Jul;156:505-511. doi: 10.1016/j.envres.2017.04.015. Epub 2017 Apr 26. PMID: 28427038. Expert Panel on Breast Imaging:, Mainiero MB, Moy L, Baron P, Didwania AD, diFlorio RM, Green ED, Heller SL, Holbrook AI, Lee SJ, Lewin AA. Lourenco AP, Nance KJ, Niell BL, Slanetz, PJ, Stuckey AR, Vincoff NS, Weinstein SP, Yepes MM, Newel, MS. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Breast Cancer Screening. J Am Coll Radiol. 2017 Nov;14(11s):S383-S390. PMID: 29101979.

Expert Panel on Breast Imaging:, Salentz PJ, Moy L, Baron P, diFloria RM, Green ED, Heller SL, Holbrook AI, Lee SJ, Lewin AA, Lourenco AP, Niell B, Stuckey AR, Trikha S, Vincoff NS, Weinstein SP, Yepes MM, Newel MS. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Monitoring Response to Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer. J Am Coll Radiol. 2017;14(11S):S462-S475. PMID: 29101985. Farina A, Eklund E, Bernabini D, Paladino A, Righetti F, Monti G, Lambert-Messerlian G. A first trimester biomarker panel for predicting the development of gestational diabetes. Reprod Sci. 2017 Jun;24(6):954-9. PMID: 27837083. Fell DB, Bhutta ZA, Hutcheon JA, Karron RA, Knight M, Kramer MS, Monto AS, Swamy GK, Ortiz JR, Savitz DA. Report of the WHO technical consultation on the effect of maternal influenza and influenza vaccination on the developing fetus: Montreal, Canada, September 30-October 1, 2015. Vaccine 2017 Apr 25;35(18):2279-2287. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2017.03.056. Epub 2017 Mar 24. PMID: 28343772 Friedman MA, Shaw JS, McGarry K, Wohlrab K. Vesicovaginal fistula: an unexpected consequence of changing sexual practices. Sex Health. 2017 Apr 7 [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28384429. Froehlich RJ, Maggio L, Has P, Werner EF, Rouse DJ. Evaluating the Performance of Ultrasound Screening for Congenital Heart Disease: A Descriptive Cohort Study. Am J Perinatol. 2017 Jul;34(9):905-910. Epub 2017 Mar 16. PMID: 28301892. Garg D, Grazi R, Lambert-Messerlian G, Merhi Z. Correlation between follicular fluid levels of sRAGE and vitamin D in women with PCOS. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2017 Aug 19. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28825156. Gass JS, Onstad M, Pesek S, Rojas K, Fogarty S, Stuckey A, Raker C, Dizon DS. Breast-Specific Sensuality and Sexual Function in Cancer Survivorship: Does Surgical Modality Matter? Ann Surg Oncol. 2017 Jun 12. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28608119. Goulet D, Danilack V, Matteson KA. Enhanced Recovery Pathways for Improving Outcomes After Minimally Invasive Gynecologic Oncology Surgery. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jan;129(1):207. No abstract available. PMID: 28002297.

2017 Annual Report

51


Peer-Reviewed Publications

Grabosch S, Tseng G, Edwards RP, Lankes HA, Moore K, Odunsi K, Vlad A. Ma T, Strange M, Brozick J, Lugade A, Omilian A, Bshara W, Stuckey AR, Walker JL, Birrer M. Multiplex profiling identifies distinct local and systemic alterations during intraperitoneal chemotherapy for ovarian cancer: an NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study. Gynecol Oncol. 2017 July;146(1):137-145. [Epub 2017 May 5]. PMID: 28483269. Grobman WA, Bailit J, Sandoval G, Reddy UM, Wapner RJ, Varner MW, Thorp JM Jr, Caritis SN, Prasad M, Tita ATN, Saade GR, Sorokin Y, Rouse DJ, Blackwell SC, Tolosa JE; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development MaternalFetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. The Association of Decisionto-Incision Time for Cesarean Delivery with Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes. Am J Perinatol. 2017 Sept. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available. PMID: 28915515. Gruppuso PA, Adashi EY. More Transparency is Needed to Curb Rising Numbers of Residency Applications. Acad Med. 2017;92(7):896. No abstract available. PMID: 28654515. Gruppuso PA, Adashi EY. Residency Placement Fever: Is It Time for a Reevaluation? Acad Med. 2017 Jul;92(7):923-926. PMID: 27805954. Gutman RE, Rardin CR, Sokol ER, Matthews C, Park AJ, Iglesia CB, Geoffrion R, Sokol Al, Karrak M, Cundiff GW, Blomquist JL, Barber MD. Vaginal and laparoscopic mesh hysteropexy for uterovaginal prolapse: a parallel cohort study. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jan;216(1):38. PMID: 27596620. Hamel MS, Werner EF. Interventions to Improve Rate of Diabetes Testing Postpartum in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Curr Diab Rep. 2017 Feb;17(2):7. PMID: 28150160. Hampton BS, Pradhan A, Abbott JF, Buery-Joyner S, Craig LB, Forstein DA, Hopkins L, Wolk A, Page-Ramsey S. Journal Watch from ACE (Alliance for Clinical Education): Review of Medical Education Articles in Obstetrics & Gynecology, 2013-2015. Teach Learn Med. 2017 Jan-Mar; 29(1):109-114. No Abstract Available. PMID: 28051890. Hariton E, Kim K, Mumford SL, Palmor M, Bortoletto P, Cardozo ER, Karmon AE, Sabatini ME, Styer AK. Total number of oocytes and

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zygotes are predictive of live birth pregnancy in fresh donor oocyte in vitro fertilization cycles. Fertil Steril. 2017 Jun 7. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28601410. Hartmann KE, Velez Edwards DR, Savitz DA, Jonsson-Funk ML, Wu P, Sundermann AC, Baird DD. Prospective cohort study of uterine fibroids and miscarriage risk. American Journal of Epidemiology 2017 Jun 7:19. doi: 10.1093/aje/kwx062. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28591761. Hey SP, Cohen IG, Adashi EY, Kesselheim AS. Influence, Intetgiry and the FDA: An ethical framework. Science. 2017 Sep 1;357(6354):876877. No abstract available. PMID: 28860375. Hopkins L, Hampton BS, Abbott JF, Buery-Joyner SD, Craig LB, Dalrymple JL, Forstein DA, Graziano SC, Mckenzie ML, Pradham A, Wolf A, Page-Ramsey SM. To the Point: Medical Education, Technology, and the Millennial Learner. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jun 6. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID:28599897. Howard ED. Patient-Centered Culturally Sensitive Maternity Care Begins at Home. J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2017 Jul/Sept;31(3):195-197. No abstract available. PMID: 28737538. Howard ED. An Innovation in the Assessment of Labor Pain. J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2017 Apr/Jun;31(2):96-98. No abstract available. PMID: 28437298. Howard, ED. Optimizing the Birth Environment with Evidence-Based Design. J Perinat Neonatal Nurs. 2017 Oct/Dec;31(4):290-293. No abstract available. PMID: 29068846. Hughes BL, Gans KM, Raker C, Hipolito ER, Rouse DJ. A Brief Prenatal Intervention of Behavioral Change to Reduce the Risk of Maternal Cytomegalovirus: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Oct;130(4):726-734. PMID: 28885428. Hyman DM, Sill MW, Lankes HA, Piekarz R, Shahin MS, Ridgway MR, Backes F, Tenney ME, Mathews C, Hoffman JS, Aghajanian C, Hensley ML. A Phase 2 Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Recurrent or Persistent Uterine Leiomyosarcoma: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study 0231D. Gynecol Oncol 2017 Jan;144(1):96-100. PMID: 28094040.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Jayaraman M, Radhakrishnan R, Mathews CA, Yan M, Husain S, Moxley KM, Song YS, Dhanasekaran DN. Identification of novel diagnostic and prognostic miRNA signatures in endometrial cancer. Genes Cancer 2017 May;8:566-576. PMID: 28740575. Jandial DA, Brady WE, Howell SB, Lankes HA, Schilder RJ, Beumer JH, Christner SM, Strychor S, Powell MA, Hagemann AR, Moore KN, Walker JL, Disilvestro PA, Duska LR, Fracasso PM, Dizon DS. A Phase I pharmacokinetic study of intraperitoneal bortezomib and carboplatin in patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Gynecol Oncol. 2017 May;145(2):236-242. [Epub 2017 Mar 22]. PMID: 28341300. Jeppson PC, Balgobin S, Rahn DD, Matteson KA, Dieter AA, Ellington DR, Aschkenazi SO, Grimes C, Mamik MM, Balk EM, Murphy M; Society of Gynecologic Surgeons Systematic Review Group. Comparison of Vaginal Hysterectomy Techniques and Interventions for Benign Indications: A Systematic Review. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 May;129(5):877;886. Review. PMID: 28383375. Jeske YW, Ali S, Byron SA, Gao F, Mannel RS, Ghebre RG, DiSilvestro PA, Lele SB, Pearl ML, Schmidt AP, Lankes HA, Ramirez NC, Rasty G, Powell M, Goodfellow PJ, Pollock PM. FGFR2 mutations are associated with poor outcomes in endometrioid endometrial cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Gynecol Oncol. 2017 Mar 14. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28314589. Khan N, Lambert-Messerlian G, Monteiro JF, Hodosy J, Tóthová L,Celec P, Eklund, E, Curran P, Bourjeily G. Oxidative and carbonyl stress in pregnant women with obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep Breath, 2017 Feb 24. doi: 10.1007/s11325-017-1475-8. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28236270. Khan MJ, Werner CL, Darragh TM, Guido RS, Mathews C, Moscicki AB, Mitchell MM, Schiffman M, Wentzensen N, Massad LS, Mayeaux EJ Jr, Waxman AG, Conageski C, Einstein MH, Huh WK. ASCCP colposcopy standards: Role of colposcopy, benefits, potential harms, and terminology for colposcopic practice. J Low Genit Tract Dis 2017 Oct; 21:223-229. PMID: 28953110. Katz B, Raker C, Edmonson D, Gass J, Stuckey A, Rizack T. Predicting Breast Tumor Size for Pre-operative Planning: Which Imaging Modality is Best? Breast J. 2017 Jan; 23(1):52-58. PMID: 27612172.

Kemper AR, Fan T, Grossman DC, Phipps MG. Gaps in evidence regarding iron-deficiency anemia in pregnant women and young children; summary of the US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations. Am J Clin Nutr. 2017 Oct 25. [Epub ahead of print]. Review. PMID: 29070541. Knies J, Cai F, Weinreich DM. Enzyme efficiency but no thermostability drives cefotaxime resistance evolution in TEM-1 β-lactamase. Mol Biol Evol. 2017 Jan 12 [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28087769. Komesu YM, Amundsen CL, Richter HE, Erickson SW, Ackenbom MF, Andy UU, Sung VW, Albo M, Gregory WT, Paraiso MF, Wallace D. Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence Treatment in Women: Impact of Age on Outcomes and Complications. NICHD Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Oct 11. pii: S00029378(17)31188-2. doi: 10.1016/j.ajog.2017.10.006. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 29031894. Komesu YM, Richter HE, Dinwiddie DL, Siddiqui NY, Sung VW, Lukacz ES, Ridgeway B, Arya LA, Zyczynski HM, Rogers RG, Gantz M. Methodology for a vaginal and urinary microbiome study in women with mixed urinary incontinence. Int Urogynecol J. 2017 May;28(5):711-720. doi: 10.1007/s00192-016-3165-7. Epub 2016 Oct 13. PMID:27738739. Kulkarni A, Tran T, Luis C, Raker CA, Cronin B, Robison K. Understanding Women’s Sexual Behaviors That May Put Them at Risk for Human Papillomavirus-Related Neoplasias: What Should We Ask? J Low Genit Tract Dis. 2017 Jul;21(3):184-188. PMID: 28514239. Kulkarni AD, Adashi EY, Jamieson DJ, Crawford SB, Sunderam S, Kissin DM. Affordability of Fertility Treatments and Multiple Births in the United States. Paediatr Perinal Epidemiol. 2017 Aug 1. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28762537. Kumar NR, Raker CA, Ware CG, Phipps MG. Characterizing Social Determinants of Health for Adolescent Mothers during the Prenatal and Postpartum Periods. Womens Health Issues. 2017 Apr 24. [Epb ahead of print]. PMID: 28462813. Lam C, Anderson B, Lopes V, Schulkin J, Matteson K. Assessing Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: Are Physicians Taking a Meaningful Clinical History? J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2017 Jul;26(7):762-767. PMID: 28318358. 2017 Annual Report

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Peer-Reviewed Publications

Lambert-Messerlian GM, Eklund EE, Neveux LM, Palomaki GE. Measuring maternal serum screening markers for Down’s syndrome in plasma collected for cell-free DNA testing. J Med Screen. 2017 Sep;24(3):113-119. Epub 2016 Oct 21. PMID: 28756761.

Nager CW, Sung VW, Whiteside JL. Committee Opinion No.703: Asymptomatic Microscopic Hematuria in Women.Committee on Gynecologic Practice, American Urogynecologic Society.Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jun;129(6):e168-e172. PMID:28368896.

Madsen AM, Raker C, Sung VW. Trends in Hysteropexy and Apical Support for Uterovaginal Prolapse in the United States from 2002 – 2012. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg. 2017 July 19 [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28723720.

Nelson KB, Sartwelle TP, Rouse DJ. Authors’ reply to Lees. BMJ. 2017 Feb 16;356:j835. No abstract available. PMID: 28209563.

Lee J, Eklund E, Lambert-Messerlian G, Butterfield K, Palomaki GE, Butterfield K, Curran P, Bourjeily G. Serum progesterone levels in women with obstructive sleep apnea during pregnancy. J of Women’s Health (Larchmt) 2017 Mar;26(3):259-65. PMID: 28103130. Matteson KA. Menstrual questionnaires for clinical and research use. Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2017 Apr;40:44-54. PMID: 27829537. Mercado A, Marquez B, Abrams B, Phipps MG, Wing RR, Phelan S. Where Do Women Get Advice About Weight, Eating, and Physical Activity During Pregnancy? J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2017 May 19; [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28525293. Mercado MC, Sumner SA, Spelke MB, Bohm MK, Sugerman DE, Stanley C. Increase in Drug Overdose Deaths Involving FentanylRhode Island, January 2012-March 2014. Pain Med. 2017 Mar 6. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28340233. Moon-Grady AJ, Baschat A, Cass DL, Choolani M, Copel JA, Crombleholme TM, Depreset JA, Emery SP, Evans MI, Luks FI, Norton ME, Ryan G, Tsao K, Welch R, Harrison MR. Fetal Treatment 2017: The Evolution of Fetal Therapy Centers – A Joint Opinion from the International Fetal Medicine and Surgical Society (IFMSS) and the North American Fetal Therapy Network (NAFTNet). Fetal Diagn Ther 2017 [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28531885. Moore RG, Plante B, Hartnett E, Mitchel J, Raker CA, Vitek W, Eklund E, Lambert-Messerlian G. Assessment of serum HE4 levels throughout the normal menstrual cycle. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jul;217(1):53. e1-9. PMID: 28237871.

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Nelson KB, Sartwelle TP, Rouse DJ. Electronic fetal monitoring, cerebral palsy, and caesarean section: assumptions versus evidence. BMJ. 2016 Dec; 355:i6405. doi: 10.1136/bmj.i6405. No abstract available. PMID: 27908902. Newman DK, Borello-France D, Sung VW. Structured behavioral treatment research protocol for women with mixed urinary incontinence and overactive bladder symptoms. Neurourol Urodyn. 2017 May 2. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28464426. Ng C, Zhang Z, Lee SI, Marques HS, Burgers K, Su F, Bauza J, Mannel RS, Walker J, Huh WK, Rubin SC, DiSilvestro P, Martin LP, Chan JK, Bookman MA, Coleman RL, Lee TY. CT perfusion as an early biomarker of treatment efficacy in advanced ovarian cancer: an ACRIM and GOG study; Clin Cancer Res. 2017 Feb 7. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28174234. O’Brien BM, Halliday J, Lambert-Messerlian G, Eklund EE, Kloza EM, Palomaki GE. Nuchal translucency measurement in the era of prenatal screening for aneuploidy using cell free (cf) DNA. Prenat Diagn. 2017 Mar;37(3):303-5. .PMID: 28124379. Ollila DW, Cirrincione CT, Berry DA, Carey LA, Sikov WM, Hudis CA, Winer EP, Golshan M. Axillary Management of State II/III Breast Cancer in Patients Treated with Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy: Results of CALGM 40601 (HER2-Positive) and CALGM 40603 (Triple-Negative). J Am Coll Surg. 2017 Apr;224(4):688-694. [Epub 2017 Jan 13]. PMID: 28089784. Pachman DR, Dockter T, Zekan PJ, Fruth B, Ruddy DJ, Ta LE, Lafky JM, Dentchev T, Le-Lindqwister NA, Sikov WM, Staff N, Beutler AS, Loprinzi CL. A pilot Study of minocycline for the prevention of paclitaxelassociated neuropathy: ACCRU study RI2214081. Support Care Cancer. 2017 May 27. [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 28551844.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Page JM, Christiansen-Lindquist L, Thorsten V, Parker CB, Reddy UM, Dudley DJ, Saade GR, Coustan D, Rowland Hogue CJ, Conway D, Bukowski R, Pinar H, Heuser CC, Gibbins KJ, Goldenberg RL, Silver RM. Diagnostic Tests for Evaluation of Stillbirth: Results From the Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Apr;129(4):699-706. PMID: 28333795. Palomaki, GE, Kloza EM, O’Brien BM, Eklund, EE, LambertMesserlian G. The clinical utility of DNA-based screening for fetal aneuploidy by primary obstetrical providers in the general population. Genet Med. 2017 Jul’19(7):778-86. PMID: 28079901. Pesek SE, King HM, Koelliker S, Raker C, Edmonson D, Dizon DS, Gass J. Axillary Ultrasound Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy: Is There a Role in the Post Z-0011 Era? Am J Clin Oncol. 2017 Mar 23. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28338482. Richter HE, Amundsen CL, Erickson SW, Jelovsek JE, Komesu Y, Chermansky C, Harvie HS, Albo M, Myers D, Gregory WT, Wallace D NICHD Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. Characteristics Associated with Treatment Response and Satisfaction in Women Undergoing OnabotulinumtoxinA and Sacral Neuromodulation for RefractoryUrgency Urinary Incontinence. J Urol. 2017 Oct;198(4):890896. Epub 2017 May 10. PMID: 28501541. Richter HE, Moalli P, Amundsen CL, Malykhina AP, Wallace D, Rogers R, Myers D, Paraiso M, Albo M, Shi H, Nolen T, Meikle S, Word RA; Pelvic Floor Disorders Network. Urinary Biomarkers in Women with Refractory Urgency Urinary Incontinence Randomized to Sacral Neuromodulation versus OnabotulinumtoxinA Compared to Controls. J Urol. 2017 Jun;197(6):1487-1495. doi: 10.1016/j.juro.2017.01.037. PMID: 28089729. Rojas K, Stuckey A. Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk Factors. Clin Obstet Gynecol. 2016 Dec:59(4):651-672. PMID: 27681694. Rojas KE, Matthews N, Raker C, Clark MA, Onstad M, Stuckey A, Gass J. Body mass index (BMI), postoperative appearance satisfaction, and sexual function in breast cancer survivorship. J Cancer Surviv. 2017 Oct 17. doi: 10.1007/s11764-017-0651-y. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 29043480.

Rojas K, Onstad M, Raker C, Clark MA, Stuckey A, Gass J. The Impact of mastectomy type on the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI), satisfaction with appearance, and the reconstructed breast’s role in intimacy. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2017 Jun;163(2):273-279. Epub 2017 Mar 4. PMID: 28260139. Romano ME, Hawley NL, Eliot M, Calafat AM, Jayatilaka NJ, Kelsey K, McGarvey S, Phipps MG, Savitz DA, Werner EF, Braun JM. Variability and predictors of urinary concentrations of organophosphate flame retardant metabolites among pregnant women in Rhode Island. Environ Health. 2017 Apr 11;16(1):40. PMID: 28399857. Rouse DJ. Twins Are Not a Per Se Indication for Cesarean Delivery. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 May 8. [Epub ahead of print] No abstract available. PMID: 28486376. Rouse DJ. What is New in Cesarean Delivery?: Best Articles From the Past Year. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Nov;130(5):1152-1154. PMID: 29016501. Sacks DB, Coustan DR, Cundy T, Donovan L, Hod M. Gestational Diabetes mellitus: Why the Controversy? Clin Chem. 2017 Oct 11. [Epub ahead of print]. No abstract available. PMID: 29021327. Sartini S, Calosi G, Granai C, Harris TS, Bruni F, Pastorelli M. Duplex ultra-sound in the early diagnosis of acute mesenteric eschemia: a longitudinal cohort multicentric study. Eur J Emerg Med. 2017 Dec;24(6):e21-e26. Schumacher A, Sikov WM, Quesenberry MI, Safran H, Khurshid H, Mitchell KM, Olszewski AJ. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study. PLoS One. 2017 Feb 24;12(2):e0172957. eCollection 2017. PMID: 28235011. Seungdamrong A, Steiner AZ, Gracia CR, Legro RS, Diamond MP, Coutifaris C, Schlass WD, Casson P, Christman GM, Robinson RD, Huang H, Alvero R, Hansen KR, Jin S, Eisenberg E, Zhang H, Santoro N; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Reproductive Medicine Network. Preconceptional antithyroid peroxidase antibodies, but not thyroid-stimulating hormone, are associated with decreased live birth rates in infertile women. Fertil Steril. 2017 Oct 25. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 29102040. 2017 Annual Report

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Peer-Reviewed Publications

Sharp HT, Johnson JV, Lemieux LA, Currigan SM. Executive Summary of the reVITALize Initiative: Standardizing Gynecologic Data Definitions. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Apr;129(4):603-607. PMID: 28277367. (Matteson, KA – stakeholder) Shaw J, Wohlrab K, Rardin C. Recurrent of stress urinary incontinence after midurethral sling revision: A retrospective cohort study. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg. 2017 May/June;23(3):184-187. PMID: 27748665. Scherzer R, Greenblatt RM, Merhi ZO, Kassaye S, LambertMesserlian G, Maki PM, Anastos K, Karim R, Bacchetti P. Use of Anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) to predict the menopausal transition in HIV-infected women. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Jan;216(1):46e1-11. PMID: 27473002. Shinnick JK, Kumar N, Beffa L, Miller K, Friedman MA, Kalife E, DiSilvestro P, Mathews C. Management of Low-Grade Cervical Müllerian Adenosarcoma in a 14-Year-Old Girl. J Pediatr Adolesc Gynecol. 2017 Jun 1. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28578185. Sibai BM, Rouse DJ. In Reply. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Feb; 129(2): 382383. No abstract available. PMID: 28121812. Sikov WM. Which patients with early-stage triple-negative breast cancer should receive a platinum? Clin Adv Hematol Oncol. 2017 Jul;15(7):510-514. No abstract available. PMID: 28749912. Silverman ME, Reichenberg A, Savitz DA, Cnattingius S, Lichtenstein P, Hultman CM, Larsson H, Sandin S. The risk factors for postpartum depression: A population-based study. Depression and Anxiety 2017 Feb;34(2):178-187. doi: 10.1002/da.22597. Epub 2017 Jan 18. PMID: 28098957 Smith-Dupont KB, Wagner CE, Witten J, Conrol K, Rudoltz H, Pagidas K, Snegovskikh V, House M, Ribbeck K. Probing the potential of mucus permeability to signify preterm birth risk. Sci Rep. 2017 Sep 7;7(1):10302. PMID: 28871085. Sperling JD, Maggio L, Has P, Daley J, Khander A, Coustan DR. Prenatal Care Adherence and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Admission or Stillbirth among Women with Gestational and Preexisting Diabetes

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Mellitus. Am J Perinatol. 2017 May 15. [Epub ahead of print]. No abstract available. PMID: 28505681. Sperling JD, Maggio L. Has P, Daley J, Coustan DR, Werner EF. Insulin Delivery Method and Admission for Glycemic Control in Pregnant Women with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Am J Perinatol. 2017 July 14. [Epub ahead of print]. No abstract available. PMID: 28709165. Steinberg AC, Schimpf MO, White AB, Mathews C, Ellington DR, Jeppson P, Crisp C, Aschkenazi SO, Mamik MM, Balk EM, Murphy M. Preemptive Analgesia for Postoperative Hysterectomy Pain Control: Systematic Review and Clinical Practice Guidelines. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Sep;217(3):303-313. Epub 2017 Mar 27. Review. PMID: 28351670. Styer AK, Jin S, Liu D, Wang B, Polotsky AJ, Christianson MS, Vitek W, Engmann L, Hansen K, Wild R, Legro RS, Coutifaris C, Alvero R, Robinson RD, Casson P, Christman GM, Christy A, Diamond MP, Eisenberg E, Zhang H, Santoro N; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Reproductive Medicine Network. Association of uterine fibroids and pregnancy outcomes after ovarian stimulationintrauterine insemination for unexplained infertility. Fertil Steril. 2017 Mar;107(3):756-762.e3. Epub 2017 Jan 12. PMID: 28089575. Sudduth CL, Shinnick JK, Geng Z, McCracken CE, Clifton MS, Raval MV. Optimal surgical technique in spontaneous pneumothorax: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J. Surg Res. 2017 Apr;210;32-46. [Epub 2016 Nov 3]. PMID: 28457339. Sufrin C, Baird S, Clarke J, Feldman E. Family Planning Services for Incarcerated Women: Models for Filling an Unmet Need. Int J Prison Health. 2017 Mar 13;13(1):10-18. PMID: 28299966. Sullivan ME, Frishman GN, Vrees RA. Showing your public face: does screening social media assess residency applicants’ professionalism? Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Nov;217(5):619-620. [Epub 2017 Aug 4]. PMID: 27884415. Taouk LH, Matteson KA, Stark LM, Schulkin J. Prenatal depression screening and antidepressant prescription: obstetrician-gynecologists’ practices, opinions, and interpretation of evidence. Arch Womens Ment Health. 2017 Aug 2. Doi: 1007/s00737-017-0760-7. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28770341.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Thaker PH, Salani R, Brady WE, Lankes HA, Cohn DE, Mutch DG, Mannel RS, Bell-McGuinn KM, DiSilvestro PA, Jelovac D, Carter JS, Duan W, Resnick KE, Dizon DS, Aghajanian C, Fracasso PM. A Phase I Trial of Paclitaxel, Cisplatin and Veliparib in the Treatment of Persistent or Recurrent Carcinoma of the Cervix: An NRG Oncology Study (NCT#01281852). Ann Oncol. 2016 Dec 19. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 27998970 US Preventive Services Task Force, Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Davison KW, Epling JW Jr, Garcia FA, Herzstein J, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phillips WR, Phipps MG, Pignone MP, Silverstein M, Tseng CW. Screening for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Adults: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2017 Jan 24;317(4):407-414. PMID: 28118461. US Preventive Services Task Force, Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Davison KW, Epling JW Jr, Garcia FA, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phillips WR, Phipps MG, Pignone MP, Silverstein M, Tseng CW. Folic Acid Supplementation for the Prevention of Neural Tube Defects: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2017 Jan 10;317(2):183-189. PMID: 28097362. US Preventive Services Task Force, Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Barry MJ, Davidson KW, Doubeni CA, Epling JW Jr, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phipps MG, Silverstein M, Simon M,A, Siu AL, Tseng CW. Screening for Thyroid Cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2017 May 9;317(18):1882-1887. PMID: 28492905. US Preventive Services Task Force, Grossman DC, Bibbins-Domingo K, Curry SJ, Barry MJ, Davidson KW, Doubeni CA, Epling JW Jr, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phipps MG, Silverstein M, Simon MA, Tseng CW. Screening for Obesity in Children and Adolescents: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA 2017 Jun 20;317(23):2417-2426. PMID: 28632874. US Preventive Services Task Force, Grossman DC, Bibbins-Domingo K, Curry SJ, Barry MJ, Davidson KW, Doubeni CA, Epling JW Jr, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phipps

MG, Silverstein M, Simon MA, Tseng CW. Behavioral Counseling to Promote a Healthful Diet and Physical Activity for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention in Adults Without Cardiovascular Risk Factors: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Station. JAMA. 2017 Jul 11;318(2):167-174. PMID: 28697160. US Preventive Services Task Force., Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Davidson KW, Epling JW Jr, Garcia FA, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phillips WR, Phipps, MG, Pignone MP, Silverstein M, Tseng CW. Serologic Screening for Genital Herpes Infection: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2016 Dec 20;316(23):2525-2530. PMID: 27997659. US Preventive Services Task Force., Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Barry MJ, Davidson KW, Doubeni CA, Epling JW Jr, GarcĂ­a FA, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phillips WR, Phipps MG, Silverstein M, Simon M, Siu AL, Tseng CW. Screening for Gynecologic Conditions with Pelvic Examination: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA 2017 Mar 7;317(9): 947-953. PMID: 28267862. US Preventive Services Task Force., Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Barry MJ, Davidson KW, Doubeni CA, Ebell M, Epling JW Jr, Herzstein J, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phipps MG, Silverstein M, Simon MA, Tseng CW. Screening for Celiac Disease: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA 2017 Mar 28;317(12):1252-1257. PMID: 28350936. US Preventive Services Task Force., Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Barry MJ, Davidson KW, Doubeni CA, Epling JW Jr, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phillips WR, Phipps MG, Silverstein M, Simon MA, Tseng CW. Screening for Preeclampsia: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2017 Apr 25;317(16):1661-1667. PMID: 28444286. US Preventive Services Task Force, Grossman DC, Curry SJ, Owens DK, Barry MJ, Davidson KW, Doubeni CA, Epling JW Jr, Kemper AR, Krist AH, Kurth AE, Landefeld CS, Mangione CM, Phipps MG, Silverstein M, Simon MA, Tseng CW. Vision Screening in Children Aged 6 Months to 5 Years: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. JAMA. 2017 Sep 5;318(9):836-844. PMID: 28873168. 2017 Annual Report

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Peer-Reviewed Publications

Varner MW, Rice MM, Landon MB, Casey BM, Reddy UM, Wapner RJ, Rouse DJ, et al.; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. Pregnancies After the Diagnosis of Mild Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Risk of Cardiometabolic Disorders. Obstet. 2017 Feb; 129(2):273-280. PMID: 28079773.

Winkelman WD, Huang AJ, Schembri M, Rogers RG, Richter H, Myers DL, Kraus SR, Johnson KC, Hess R, Gregory T, Bradley CS, Arya L, Brown JS, Subak LL. Modifiers of Response to Treatment With Fesoterodine for Urgency-Predominant Urinary Incontinence in a Randomized Controlled Trial. Female Pelvic Med Reconstr Surg. 2017 Mar/Apr;23(2):151-156. PMID: 28118174.

Vigliani MB. A Report of Two Cases of Age-Related Changes in Cervical Morphology in Postmenopausal Women with Vaginal Adenosis. Case Rep Obstet Gynecol. 2017;2017: 9523853. Epub 2017 Jan 1. PMID: 28316850.

Wohlrab K, Jelovsek JE, Myers D. Incorporating simulation into gynecologic surgical training. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2017 May 13 [Epub ahead of print] Review. PMID: 28511894.

Vrees RA. Evaluation and Management of Female Victims of Sexual Assault. Obstet Gynecol Surv. 2017 Jan;72(1):39-53. PMID: 28134394. Wentzensen N, Massad LS, Mayeaux EJ Jr, Khan MJ, Waxman AG, Einstein MH, Conageski C, Schiffman MH, Gold MA, Apgar BS, Chelmow D, Choma KK, Darragh TM, Gage JC, Garcia FAR, Guido RS, Jeronimo JA, Liu A, Mathews CA, Mitchell MM, Moscicki AB, Novetsky AP, Papasozomenos T, Perkins RB, Silver MI, Smith KM, Stier EA, Tedeschi CA, Werner CL, Huh WK. Evidence-based Consensus Recommendations for Colposcopy Practice for Cervical Cancer Prevention in the United States. J Low Genit Tract Dis 2017 Oct; 21:216222. PMID: 28953109. Wenzel L, Mukamel DB, Osann K, Havrilesky L, Sparks L, Lipscomb J, Wright A, Walker J, Alvarez R, Van Le L, Robison K, Bristow R, Rimel BH, Hsieh S, Wahi A, Cohn D. Rationale and study protocol for the Patient-Centered Outcome Aid (PCOA) randomized controlled trial: A personalized decision tool for newly diagnosed ovarian cancer patients. Contemp Clin Trials. 2017 Mar 19;57:29-36. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28330753. Winder AD, Maniar KP, Wei JJ, Liu D, Scholtens DM, Lurain JR, Schink JC, Buttin BM, Filiaci VL, Lankes HA, Ramirez NC, Park K, Singh M, Lieberman RW, Mannel RS, Powell MA, Backes FJ, Mathews CA, Pearl ML, Secord AA, Peace DJ, Mutch DG, Creasman WT, Kim JJ. Synuclein-Îł in uterine serous carcinoma impacts survival: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study. Cancer 2017 Apr 1;123(7):1144-55. Epub 2016 Dec 7. PMID: 27926776.

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Wysham WZ, Roque DR, Han J, Zhang L, Guo H, Gehrig PA, Zhou C, Vae-Jump VL. Effects of Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibition by Orlistat on Proliferation of Endometrial Cancer Cell Lines. Target Oncol. 2016 Dec;11:763-69. PMID: 27188391. Wysham WZ, Schaffer EM, Coles T, Roque DR, Wheeler SB, Kim KH. Adding Bevacizumab to Single Agent Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Platinum-Resistant Recurrent Ovarian Cancer: A Cost Effectiveness Analysis of the AURELIA Trial; Gynecol Oncol. 2017 May;145: 340-45. [Epub 2017 Mar 11]. PMID: 28291545. Yee LM, Costantine MM, Rice MM, Balit J, Reddy UM, Wapner RJ, Varner MW, Thorp JM Jr, Caritis SN, Prasad M, Tita ATN, Sorokin Y, Rouse DJ, Blackwell SC, Tolosa JE; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) MaternalFetal Medicine Units (MFMU) Network. Racial and Ethnic Differences in Utilization of Labor Management Strategies Intended to Reduce Cesarean Delivery Rates. Obstet Gynecol. 2017 Nov 3. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 29112649.

OTHER PUBLICATIONS Adashi EY, Cohen IG (2017). Ideology v Beneficence. J Law Biosci Isx023, https://doi.org/10.1093/jlb/lsx023. Cantillo E, Robison K, Stuckey A. Breast, Ovary and Cervical Cancer. Principles and Practice of Hospital Medicine. McKean, Ross, Dressler, Scheurer, eds. McGraw-Hill, ACP 2nd edition. 2017.

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Edmonson D, Rizack T, Steinhoff M, Sung J, Khalil H, Hepel J, Pandya S, Legare R, Dizon D. Breast Cancer. In: Chi DS, Berchuck A, Dizon DS, Yashar C (eds). Gynecologic Oncology: Principles and Practice, 7th edition. Wolters Kluwer. May 2017. Friedman MA, Theva M, Hampton BS, “Enhanced Recovery After Surgery: Improving Perioperative Care,” Topics in Obstetrics & Gynecology, 37(8):6, May 30, 2017. Kelly B. Ectopic Pregnancy: Treatment Options and Consideration of Future Fertility. Topics in Obstetrics & Gynecology. 15 November 2017; 37(16)1-8. LaGrave D, Devers Winters P and Lambert-Messerlian G. Prenatal screening technologies and test issues In: Practical Genetic Counseling for the Laboratory, Oxford Press, 2017 Luks FI. Minimally Invasive Fetal Surgery (Fetoscopy). In: Isfer EV (ed): Medicina fetal, 2nd edition, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Revinter. Makhijani, R., Bhagat, V., Fayek, M. “Colon cancer presenting as pseudo-obstruction during pregnancy – A case report.” Obstetric Medicine 16 May 2017: 1-3. Mathews CA and Walker JL. Chapter 2 Preinvasive Vulvar and Vaginal Disease. Clinical Gynecologic Oncology, Expert Consult – Online and Print, Ninth Edition, Philip J. DiSaia and William Creasman, Editors, 2017. Myers DL. A Timeline of the Development of Urogynecology and Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery in the US. https://www.augs.org/about/history/. Revised May 2017. Roque DR, Dizon Ds. “Prophylactic Oophorectomy for Patients with Germline BRCA Mutations.” Managing BRCA Mutation Carriers. Ed. Anees Chagpar. Springer, 2017. Spivak R, Cohen IG, Adashi EY (2017). Germ-Line Gene Editing and Congressional Reaction in Context: Learning from Almost 50 Years of Congressional Reactions to Biomedical Breakthroughs. J.L. & Health http://engagedscholarship.csuohio.edu/jlh/vol30/iss1/2.

Vigliani, MD, Eaton, G, Hoose P. A History of Medicine in 50 Discoveries (History in 50). Tilbury House Publishers; 1st edition. June 27, 2017. Vrees RA. Evaluation and Management of Female Victims of Sexual Assault. CME Webinar http://npic.org/Education/Sexual_Assault.php. Yu H, Vrees R, Frishman GN. Infertility, the Basics. Clinical Reproductive Medicine and Surgery: A Practical Guide, Tomasso Falcone and William W. Hurd, eds. Springer International Publishing. Third Edition, June 2017. Obstetric Triage and Emergency Care Protocols. 2nd edition. Angelini DJ, LaFontaine D. (eds). Cronin B, Howard ED. (assoc eds). New York: Springer, 2017. Phipps MG, Coustan DR. Forward Angelini DJ, Howard ED. Overview of Obstetric Triage Vrees, R. Ectopic Pregnancy Cronin B. Vaginal Bleeding in Early Pregnancy Singer J. Recognition and Treatment of Postabortion Complications Snyder A. Nausea, Vomiting, and Hyperemsis of Pregnancy McConaughey E. Fetal Evaluation and Clinical Applications Steinhardt L. Limited or No Prenantal Care at Term Hunter L. Preterm Labor Vrees R. Trauma in Pregnancy Howard ED. Labor Evaluation Gray R. Vaginal Bleeding in Pregnancy Caren C, Edmonson D. Common General Surgical Emergencies in Pregnancy Froehlich RJ, Hughes B. Infections in Pregnant Women LaFontaine D. Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Assault in Pregnancy LaFontaine D. Sexually Transmitted Infections Caren C, Edmonson D. Postpartum Breast Complications Shepherd R, Pizzarello M. Secondary Postpartum Hemorrhage and Endometritis

2017 Annual Report

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Editorial Positions

PUBLICATION

POSITION

DATES OF SERVICE

FACULTY

American Journal of Clinical Oncology

Editorial Board

2008 – Present

Gass

American Journal of Epidemiology

Associate Editor

2012 – Present

Savitz

American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology

Associate Editor

2007 – Present

Phipps

Advisory Board

2002 – Present

Wenstrom

Annals of Surgical Oncology

Editorial Board

2007 – Present

Gass

Brown Medicine

Editorial Board

2016 – Present

Luks

Editorial Board

2014 – Present

Vrees

Clinical Medicine – Case Reports

Editorial Board

2008 – Present

Alvero

Contraception and Reproductive Medicine

Editorial Board

2014 – Present

Allen

Editorial Board

2014 – Present

Alvero

Environmental Health Perspectives

Editorial Board

2009 – Present

Savitz

Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery

Assistant Editor

2017 – Present

Sung

Fertility and Sterility

Editorial Board

2013 – Present

Buster

Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy

Associate Editor

2015 - Present

Luks

Journal of Midwifery and Women’s’ Health

Contributing Editor

2011 – Present

Hunter

Journal of Perinatal and Neonatal Nursing

Editorial Board

2016 – Present

Contributing Editor for Perinatal Expert Opinion Column

2016 – Present

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Associate Editor

2013 – Present

Rouse

Postgraduate Obstetrics & Gynecology

Associate Editor

2013 – Present

Hampton

The Journal of Minimally Invasive Gynecology

Deputy Editor

2012 – Present

Frishman

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Howard

Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology | Women & Infants Hospital | The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University


Contact Information Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island 101 Dudley Street Providence, RI 02905 womenandinfants.org Maureen G. Phipps, MD, MPH Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology Chair and Obstetrician-Gynecologist-in-Chief mphipps@wihri.org (401) 274-1122, ext. 41575 Patrick McCabe, MBA Director, Administrative Operations pmccabe@wihri.org (401) 274-1122, ext. 41577 Kathy Farnum Executive Secretary kfarnum@wihri.org (401) 274-1122, ext. 41575 Denise Flinn Senior Project Coordinator dflinn@wihri.org (401) 274-1122, ext. 48554

Ruben Alvero, MD Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility Division Director ralvero@wihri.org

Kristen A. Matteson, MD, MPH Clinical Research in Women’s Health Interim Division Director kmatteson@wihri.org

Paul DiSilvestro, MD Gynecologic Oncology Division Director pdisilvestro@wihri.org

Deborah Myers, MD Urogynecology and Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery Division Director dmyers@wihri.org

Renee Eger, MD Obstetrics & Gynecology Care Center (Ambulatory Care) Medical Director reger@wihri.org Gary Frishman, MD Medical Education Director, Residency Program gfrishman@wihri.org Jennifer Gass, MD Gynecologic Oncology – Breast Health Co-Director jgass@wihri.org B. Star Hampton, MD Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology Vice Chair for Education bhampton@wihri.org Elisabeth Howard, PhD, CNM Midwifery Director ehoward@wihri.org Robert Legare, MD Gynecologic Oncology – Breast Health Co-Director rlegare@wihri.org

James O’Brien, MD Inpatient Obstetrics Medical Director jobrien@wihri.org Charles Rardin, MD Minimally-Invasive and Robotic Surgical Services Director crardin@wihri.org Roxanne Vrees, MD Emergency Obstetrics & Gynecology Medical Director rvrees@wihri.org Katharine Wenstrom, MD Maternal-Fetal Medicine Division Director kwenstrom@wihri.org Gary Wharton, MD Surgical Services Medical Director gwharton@wihri.org Kyle Wohlrab, MD Simulation Center Co-Director kwohlrab@wihri.org 2017 Annual Report

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Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology 101 Dudley Street Providence, Rhode Island 02905 (401) 274-1100 womenandinfants.org/BrownObGyn

Department of Ob/Gyn 2017 Annual Report  

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University

Department of Ob/Gyn 2017 Annual Report  

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island/The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University