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CARE Nederland Annual Report 2014-2015


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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015


CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

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Contents Foreword 5 Summary 8

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1. CARE Nederland

1.1 CARE Nederland mission and history 1.2 CARE International 1.3 CARE Nederland Strategy 1.4 Partnerships 1.5 Risk management 1.6 Quality standards and codes of conduct 1.7 The world of CARE

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2. Programmes

2.1 Introduction 18 2.2 Humanitarian action 20 2.3 Promoting lasting change and innovative solutions 22 2.4 Multiplying impact 25 2.5 Programme partnerships 33 Highlight - Biraturaba: it concerns us all 34 2.6 Overview of (current and new) programmes in the 2015 financial year 36 Highlight - Project Nepal 40 Highlight - Syria Joint Humanitarian Response 46

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3. Fundraising

3.1 Institutional donors 3.2 Private donors Highlight - Pamodja: Partnering 4 Change

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4. Outlook 56 Highlight - Partners for Resilience

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5.1 General information about CARE Nederland 5.2 General explanatory notes to the financial statements 5.3 Accounting principles 5.4 Notes on the balance sheet 5.5 Notes to the statement of income and expenditure 5.6 Approval and Auditor’s Report

Appendices

Publication details Publication: CARE Nederland/ Ellen Adriaanssen English editor: Barbara Kolff van Oosterwijk Design: Engine Branding & Identity Photography: CARE International Printing: DR&DV Media Services

General information

5. Financial statements

62 62 65 68 79 89

Appendix 1 Board and personnel 92 Appendix 2 Supervisory Council 96 Appendix 3 Accountability statement 102

CARE Nederland / CARE International: In this report, when we refer to ‘CARE Nederland’ we mean the organisation based in the Netherlands. When we refer to ‘CARE’, ‘CARE International’ or ‘the CARE confederation’ we mean the work of the total network of CARE members and country offices.

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Name under the Articles: Stichting CARE Nederland Corporate domicile: The Hague Address: Parkstraat 21 Telephone number: +31 70 310 50 50 Legal form: A foundation under Dutch law (stichting) Chamber of Commerce registration: The Articles were filed on December 2, 1993 under number 41158230 Latest amendment to the Articles: April 12, 2013 Member of: CARE International Confederation, established in Geneva, Switzerland

Cover photograph: Nepal, Lalitpur Country, May 2015: People of the remote village of Nullu recieve relief materials such as sleeping mats, food items and water purifiers from CARE Nepal. Photographer: Prashanth Vishwanathan (CARE)


Foreword Our partnerships I had hoped to open this message on a more positive note. However, the past year saw significant new humanitarian challenges against a backdrop of a growing number of victims of humanitarian crises worldwide, as well as increasing inequality, both within and between countries. Despite global progress in reducing absolute poverty, social inequality, climate change and humanitarian disasters, continue to widen the poverty gap. Furthermore, environmental hazards, political instability and conflict, as well as population growth and urbanisation, exacerbate the impact of disasters. The nature of disasters is changing as well; slow-onset disasters, such as we see in Syria and South Sudan, seem to be more prevalent than before. People and countries appear to be becoming less tolerant, with some countries closing their borders to refugees, resulting in worsening humanitarian crises. Together with local communities, CARE Nederland seeks sustainable and practical solution to problems. We primarily work in countries characterised by fragile contexts, and provide assistance ranging from humanitarian aid to programmes promoting lasting change and innovative solutions. Together with our global and local partners we invest in integrated risk management, inclusive governance and women economic empowerment. In financial

Our key areas

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Dutch Relief Alliance

Gender in Emergencies

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Partners for Resilience

Integrated Risk Management

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Every Voice Counts

Inclusive Governance in fragile states

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H&M Conscious Foundation

Women Economic Empowerment

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year 2014-15, CARE Nederland managed to help in 33 countries through a total of 45 programs. We multiply impact by using the evidence, learning and innovation from our programmes to influence broad and lasting social change. All our programmes focus on gender equality and strengthening community resilience. In this way we make sure that EVERY VOICE COUNTS. Almost on a daily basis images and reports of refugees dramatically risking their lives for a better future in Europe, brought the unfolding crises close to home for many Europeans. Most

refugees fleeing to the European continent come from Syria, Afghanistan, Sudan, Iraq, Somalia and Eritrea. The crises in these countries clearly illustrate the importance of safe & secure livelihoods and access to food, resources and opportunities. To achieve this, it is essential we continue to invest in people and communities so that they can take charge of their own lives. The primary focus of CARE remains to provide assistance in the countries of origin, for example to people inside Syria, and the Syrian refugee families in neighbouring countries: Jordan, Lebanon and Turkey.

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Foreword

During the past financial year, CARE Nederland continued to engage with a broad range of partners, donors and stakeholders. In June 2015, we launched the first Walk in her Shoes campaign in the Netherlands for our individual and corporate relations. We look forward to working together again on next year’s campaign. In March 2015, corporate relations participated in the conference The Power of Entrepreneurial Women Worldwide. In February 2015, CARE Nederland co-organised the Dutch Humanitarian Summit with 12 other Dutch humanitarian organisations. The closing statement of this summit, will serve as input from the Netherlands for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit of the United Nations in Istanbul.

This report illustrates our commitment and drive in creating real impact on people’s lives. None of this would be possible without the generous support and involvement of our partners, donors and stakeholders, both for the financial resources provided, and their commitment and engagement in improving the lives of vulnerable and excluded people. We continue to count on your support in achieving our joint goals. Together we can create a world of hope, tolerance and social justice, where poverty has been overcome and people can live with dignity and in security. On behalf of the CARE Nederland team,

Perry Heijne

Chief Executive Officer, CARE Nederland

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Together we can create a world of hope, tolerance and social justice, where poverty has been overcome and people can live with dignity and in security.


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Summary All our programmes emphasise resilience, gender equality and women’s voice.

CARE Nederland saves lives in emergencies and seeks to increase the resilience of communities made vulnerable by natural disasters and violent conflicts. We ensure communities’ basic needs are met by combatting poverty worldwide with sustainable solutions. Our work focuses on women and girls. As humanitarian organisation, we inform and engage in dialogue with the Dutch public, and lobby relevant institutions for the causes we work for and the solutions we offer. CARE Nederland is a member of the global CARE International confederation. We implement projects through local CARE country offices and enter into partnerships with local civil society organisations. During financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland contributed to Humanitarian Action following seven humanitarian disasters in: Vanuatu, Yemen, North Iraq, South Sudan, Sierra Leone and Liberia (in the fight against Ebola), Syria and Nepal.

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All CARE Nederland programmes focus on creating Lasting Change. The programmes are divided over three key themes: social justice and gender equality, good governance and sustainable livelihoods. In financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland had its largest portfolio share in Somalia, with current projects aimed at strengthening education, water and sanitation, ecosystem management and the development of income generation for local people. In Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo, CARE Nederland is currently working on projects that address gender based violence and gender justice. In the Philippines, we responded to Typhoon Haiyan with emergency assistance. Also, we are now working closely with local communities to help them better prepare for the next disaster. In a three-year global partnership set up in 2014, CARE Nederland and the H&M Conscious Foundation focus on investing in women’s economic empowerment in poor communities. CARE Nederland also became beneficiary of the worldwide 2014 H&M Holiday Campaign.

With these funds, we will support the development of small enterprises set up by marginalised women in Addis Abeba, Ethiopia. CARE Nederland always tries to Multiply its Impact by using what we have learned about fighting poverty to influence broader social change. In the past financial year, we developed a Peacebuilding Toolbox; a collection of peacebuilding strategies that have been implemented by CARE country offices, local partners, or by peer organisations. A second CARE Nederland publication, the Gender, Peace and Conflict Manual, explores the link between gender, power and conflict, and especially focuses on gender based violence and peacebuilding. CARE Nederland put forward gender as topic of the 2015 Dutch Humanitarian Summit in The Hague. In the past financial year, CARE Nederland appointed three Goodwill Ambassadors. Sierra Leonean author Babah Tarawally who has lived in the Netherlands for 20 years; Dutch journalist, writer and television presenter Sander


de Kramer; and Dutch middle distance runner and European Indoor Championships Bronze medallist Maureen Koster, all actively engaged with the CARE Nederland programmes. In June 2015, CARE Nederland launched the first Walk in Her Shoes campaign in the Netherlands. We invited the Dutch general public to unite in solidarity with women across the globe who have to walk for miles each day just to survive. Participants walked 25, 50 or 100 kilometres to help raise funds. A second edition is planned for 2016. In light of International Women’s Day,

‘Stichting Maatschappij en Ondernemen / SMO’ and CARE Nederland united international entrepreneurs, researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders to discuss barriers and success factors in female entrepreneurship at the conference The Power of Entrepreneurial Women – Worldwide in March 2015. In financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland formulated its strategy for the period 2015 – 2020. In our strategic framework we distinguish ourselves by bridging Humanitarian Action,

promoting Lasting Change and Multiplying Impact. All our programmes emphasise resilience, gender equality and women’s voice. Our focus in the upcoming strategic period, will be to deliver world class expertise in four areas: Integrated Risk Management, Inclusive Governance in Fragile Settings, Women Economic Empowerment through Business Development and Gender in Emergencies. This new strategy is fuelled by CARE Nederland’s experience and knowledge gained over the years.

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1.

CARE

1.1 CARE Nederland mission and history Mission

Our mission is to increase the resilience of communities made vulnerable by natural disasters and violent conflicts. We ensure communities’ basic needs are met with sustainable solutions. How do we achieve this mission? • By contributing to combatting poverty worldwide, particularly in areas vulnerable to natural disasters and armed conflict. CARE Nederland is mainly active in providing emergency aid and aid for disaster prevention and reconstruction in countries plagued by natural disasters and/ or war; • By informing and engaging the Dutch public about poverty, conflicts and disasters in the poorest countries of the world, the causes and the ways in which the foundation supports people during reconstruction efforts; • By lobbying for our causes as well as for appropriate and effective measures with the relevant individuals and institutions. The vision, mission and global programme strategy formulated by CARE International act as the fundamental starting point for CARE Nederland’s mission, strategy plans and work.

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Core competencies

The core competencies embraced by CARE Nederland epitomise CARE and the work we undertake. They combine the specific knowledge and skills reflected in all the activities and in the people involved in CARE. These core competencies are: • Tenacity. We have been operating in regions afflicted by disasters and conflicts for many years helping to provide emergency aid, fight poverty and build community resilience while at the same time affirming people´s dignity; • Intelligence. We seek to find intelligent and sustainable solutions to tackle the often complex causes of poverty; • Joint approach. Our combined strength enables us to bring about change. Together with our local partners in the field and with support from donors and businesses we make a difference and structurally contribute to a life of human dignity for all. Our combined strength enables us to bring about change.

History and CARE Nederland today

The roots of CARE Nederland lie in the Disaster Relief Agency (DRA) founded in 1993 by a group of Dutch development organisations actively engaged in reconstruction efforts in regions afflicted by war or disasters. In the following years DRA grew increasingly independent,

having a greater need to seek international collaboration and efficiency due to the scale of its operations. DRA joined the CARE International confederation in July 2001 and changed its name to CARE Nederland. With a staff of 40 employees carrying out programmes in 33 countries in financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland has a lean and cost effective organisation structure. CARE Nederland has a volunteer procedure which provides clarity on the duties, rights and responsibilities of volunteers. In the 2015 financial year one volunteer worked for CARE Nederland. CARE Nederland is a non-partisan and non-sectarian organisation.

The majority of the 1,2 billion people living in abject poverty worldwide are women and girls. At its root, poverty is caused by unequal power relations that result in the uneven distribution of resources and opportunities between women and men, between powerholders and marginalised communities, and between countries. CARE believes that poverty cannot be overcome without addressing those underlying power imbalances.


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In 2014, CARE International:

1.2 CARE International CARE Nederland is a member of CARE International, one of the oldest and largest aid organisations in the world. CARE was founded in 1945 in the aftermath of World War II by 22 American charities for the purpose of distributing millions of emergency relief packages to the victims of war in Europe. When recovery of the economies of the former war-torn countries set in, CARE’s focus shifted from Europe to the problems facing developing countries.

CARE International members and Country Offices

The global confederation CARE International comprises 14 members: Australia, Austria, Canada, Denmark, Germany-Luxembourg, France, India, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Peru, Thailand, the United Kingdom and the United States of America. All members are autonomous non-governmental organisations that carry out programmes, advocacy work, fundraising and communications activities in their respective countries and in the developing countries they work in. All members are represented on the CARE International Board. Projects are implemented through CARE country offices. These offices are firmly embedded in the local communities and enter into partnerships with local civil society organisations. The combined approach of the CARE global network of members, country offices and local partners helps maintain a long-term presence in disaster-stricken regions. In this way CARE can use the vast knowledge and confidence of local communities in bringing about lasting change that is tailored to their needs. CARE places importance on building the capacity of local CARE staff and partners in the countries where we work, by providing training, technical guidance and tools; with qualified staff already on the ground, we can respond immediately and quickly scale up our response. The CARE International Secretariat is located in Geneva (Switzerland), with offices in Brussels (Belgium) and New York (USA).

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Worked in 90

countries

Carried out 880

projects

Reached more than

72 million direct participants

(who are directly affected by the problem the project seeks to address and who are directly involved and actively engaged in project activities or receiving services/ goods/resources) and reached more than

218 million indirect participants (not directly involved in project activities)

Employed over 9,000 people; nearly 96% of which are nationals of the country they work in.


1.3 CARE Nederland strategy The global programme strategy formulated by CARE International is the fundamental starting point for all CARE Nederland strategy plans and work. In financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland drew up a new strategic plan that acts as the basis for all our activities for the upcoming five years. By drawing on our expertise and building on our experience over the past years, CARE Nederland will be able to reach and engage with beneficiaries to tailor to their needs more effectively. CARE Nederland distinguishes itself by bridging humanitarian action, promoting lasting change and multiplying impact. Programmes always place special emphasis on gender equality and strengthening women’s voice and resilience. CARE Nederland primarily operates in fragile settings, characterised by weak governance and often affected by conflicts, violence and natural disasters. This means we work for poor and marginalised communities in the most difficult locations. For our long-term programming, CARE Nederland has identified 19 focus countries, of which 12 have fragile settings.

Strategic goals for 2020: •

To have an excellent reputation as a leading Dutch humanitarian organisation that creates lasting impact on the lives of 2 million people affected by humanitarian crises; To provide 1 million people in 19 focus countries with excellent community solutions for social justice and gender equality that ensure lasting positive change; To enhance the livelihoods of 3 million vulnerable people in 19 focus countries by improving basic services, agricultural production and access to markets and finance; To implement inclusive governance solutions for 2 million people in 12 fragile countries together with local communities; To deliver world class expertise and have an influential voice within the CARE International network and in relevant policy think tanks and working groups worldwide for programing on Integrated Risk Management, Inclusive Governance in Fragile Settings, Women Empowerment through Business Development and Gender in emergencies;

To engage with a community of 100,000 active private supporters who are committed to enhancing and multiplying our impact; To achieve a constant dialogue with governments, corporates, knowledge centres and the general public to improve the impact of their donations and our interventions and co-create innovative solutions to fight poverty and inequality; To establish a financially healthy and credible organisation that has excellent access to the best expertise, facilities, instruments, policies and procedures so we can achieve our 2020 goals to fight poverty and defend dignity for the most vulnerable and excluded communities.

CARE helped almost 17 million people in 33 countries gain better access to health care. CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

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1.4 Partnerships Partnerships

Strategic partnerships enable CARE Nederland to achieve greater impact for its beneficiaries, work more efficiently and strengthen influence on all levels. We work together with a range of partners, including international CARE members, CARE country offices and local partner organisations, Dutch and international NGOs and international civil society organisations. Specific programme partnerships and fundraising partnerships are highlighted in Chapter 2 and Chapter 4. CARE Nederland adheres to a transparent ccommunication policy towards partners and stakeholders. Formal and informal meetings with institutional and corporate stakeholders take place regularly. Various communication channels are being used to communicate with private stakeholders. CARE Nederland is a member of: • ‘Partos’ (Dutch Association of NGOs working in International Development). This association represents the interests of 120 Dutch development organisations that work in the field of poverty reduction, humanitarian aid, human rights and sustainable development. • ‘Vereniging Fondsenwervende Instellingen / VFI’, now called ‘Goede Doelen Nederland’ (Dutch Association of Fundraising Organisations). This association has 130

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members and is active in a wide range of fields: culture, animal welfare, healthcare and international development cooperation. Together, the members account for more than two thirds of expenditure on community causes by Dutch fundraising organisations.

ing additional CARE Nederland employees in Somalia to increase monitoring and control activities mitigates this risk. In general, maintaining collaborative relationships with CARE country offices is a constant point of attention. Furthermore, the fact that CARE employees often travel to high-risk regions can have serious consequences for the employees, as well as for CARE Nederland in terms of financial and reputational damage. Increasing adequate safety and security structures and procedures where necessary, and providing training mitigates this risk. Despite these measures, some level of residual risk remains, which is inherent to the nature of our activities in these locations.

1.5 Risk assessment Risks affecting CARE Nederland can have consequences for economic performance and professional reputation, as well as affecting environmental, safety and societal outcomes. To perform well, CARE Nederland works with a risk matrix to help determine the size of the risk and whether or not the risk is sufficiently controlled. The most important risks are: • Strategic risks. These are risks mainly related to the possible decrease in restricted (for specific projects) or unrestricted funds. To minimise these risks, CARE Nederland seeks to diversify the funds it receives from a range of donors. • Reputation risks. To minimise the risk of reputational damage, CARE Nederland adheres to strict criteria and procedures regarding transparency and when entering into partnerships. • Operational risks. These risks relate to overexposure in one country. For example CARE Nederland has a large portfolio in Somalia, which could potentially expose CARE Nederland to financial losses. Station-

Financial risks. To ensure that less than satisfactory income does not endanger the continuity of the activities carried out by CARE Nederland, the organisation holds several reserves and funds to cushion financial setbacks, according to the guidelines of VFI and of CBF (see also, the Financial Statements 2014 – 2015, 5.4.5. on page 70). The CARE Nederland investment policy is conservative.


1.6 Quality standards and codes of conduct

CARE Nederland observes various quality standards and codes of conduct, including: •

ISO 9001 Quality Standard. CARE Nederland works according to the standards of the NEN-EN-ISO 9001:2008 quality management system, which has been certified since November 2007 by external auditor Lloyd’s Register Quality Assurance B.V., Rotterdam. The ISO 9001 standard is based on eight quality management principles, including: customer focus; process approach; involvement of people; continual improvement and factual approach to decision making. These principles guide the organisation towards improved performance. CARE Nederland also follows the corporate social responsibility guidelines of ISO. We compensate the CO2 emissions for employees’ air travel and actively separate waste. Also, CARE Nederland encourages employees to work from home and has an active public transport policy. The Director of CARE Nederland consults with the employee representative body on a regular basis. CARE Nederland seeks to promote workforce diversity and has established a procedure for voluntary workers.

‘Centraal Bureau Fondsenwerving (CBF)’ Seal of Approval. The regulations of the CBF Seal of Approval stipulate criteria for management and governance, organisation policy, fundraising, management of resources and for activity reporting. CARE Nederland was awarded the CBF Seal of Approval in 2011 for a period of three years and is audited annually. One of the criteria is that ‘Costs of direct fundraising activities as a percentage total income’ over a three-year period cannot be higher than 25%. With 21%, CARE Nederland meets the CBF requirements on this issue (see the Financial Statements 2014 – 2015, table 5.2.5 on page 65 of this report). The Code of Good Governance for Charity Organisations (‘Wijffels Code’). Since 2005 CARE Nederland works in accordance with the rules set out in the ‘Wijffels Code’, a code created by an independent committee of the ‘Vereniging Fondsenwervende Instellingen (VFI)’, the Dutch association for fundraising institutions. The CARE International Code. As a member of CARE International, CARE Nederland observes the principles set out in the CARE International Code. This code constitutes a series of policy papers, guidelines, constitutional documents, a code of ethics and a

code of conduct. CARE Nederland observes the following CARE Programming Principles: 1) Promote empowerment; 2) Work with partners; 3) Ensure accountability and promote responsibility; 4) Address discrimination; 5) Promote the non-violent resolution of conflicts; 6) Seek sustainable results. •

The Code of Conduct for The International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and NGOs in Disaster Relief. This code lays down ten points of principle which all humanitarian actors should adhere to in their disaster response work and describes the relationships that agencies working in disasters should seek with donor governments, host governments and the UN system.

The Sphere Project. CARE Nederland observes the standards set out by the Sphere Project, the most widely known and recognised set of common principles and universal minimum standards for humanitarian response. This initiative joins a wide range of humanitarian agencies around the common aim of improving the quality of humanitarian assistance and the accountability of humanitarian actors to their constituents, donors and affected populations.

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The world of CARE

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Countries with CARE programming Countries in which CARE Nederland worked 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25.

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Afghanistan Albania Armenia Azerbaijan Bangladesh Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Chad Czech Republic Côte d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Democratic Republic of the Congo Djibouti Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Ethiopia Georgia Ghana

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51.

Guatemala Guinea Haiti Honduras India Indonesia Iraq Jordan Kenya Kosovo Laos Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Madagascar Malawi Mali Montenegro Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Nepal Nicaragua Niger Pakistan Papua New Guinea

52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77.

Peru Philippines Romania Rwanda Serbia Sierra Leone Somalia South Africa South Sudan Sri Lanka Sudan Syria Tanzania Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tunisia Turkey Uganda United Arab Emirates Vanuatu Vietnam West Bank & Gaza Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe

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CARE International Members and Secretariat 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 30. 84. 85. 86. 52. 65. 87. 88.

Australia Austria Canada Denmark France Germany-Luxemburg India Japan Netherlands Norway Peru Thailand United Kingdom United States (CARE USA and sub office of CI Secretariat in New York) 89. Switzerland (CI Secretariat in Geneva) 90. Belgium (sub-office of CI Secretariat in Brussel)

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20 52

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87 85 90

81 14

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82 89 79 16 8

54 56

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35

43

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68

63

37

74

44

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84 1

32

47

50

33 21

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30 42 27 39

62

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19

6

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57

49

25

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60

12

55

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61 58 31 51

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2.

Programmes

2.1 Introduction CARE Nederland predominantly operates in fragile settings; areas or countries characterised by weak governance or at risk of natural disasters and/or conflicts. In these settings, CARE Nederland provides emergency aid (humanitarian action) and implements innovative programmes and projects for sustainable development (promoting lasting change). The key areas of focus in our programmes and activities are resilience and gender equality and women’s voice. Our programmes include advocacy and policy change at local, national and international level, as well as corporate and civic engagement (multiplying impact). Information about CARE Nederland programmes can be found in the programme list on page 36. In this chapter you will read more about the roles we performed during financial year 2014-15 in achieving the CARE Nederland mission, the focus areas in our programmes and activities, and the partnerships we participated in.

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CARE Nederland key areas of focus and focus countries

Key areas of focus in all CARE Nederland’s programmes and activities are resilience and gender equality and women’s voice. •

Resilience. The ‘resilience approach’ is the lens through which our programmes can be seen. CARE Nederland endorses the following definition of resilience: ‘the ability of a system to accommodate positively adverse challenges and shocks, simultaneously at different scales and with consideration of all the different components and agents of the system.’ The ‘resilience approach’ aims to achieve a lasting impact on the enhanced resilience of vulnerable communities in fragile situations. It promotes social justice, sustainable livelihoods and good governance and so contributes to human dignity, equality and inclusiveness.

Gender equality and women’s voice. CARE Nederland places special emphasis on gender equality and strengthening women’s voice in our programmes. Promoting gender equality requires defending women’s rights, supporting

women’s empowerment and engaging men as agents of change. Women and girls make up the majority of the 1,2 billion people living in abject poverty worldwide. Over a quarter of a million women die each year from largely preventable causes related to pregnancy and childbirth. On average, greater numbers of women and girls die during and after natural disasters than men. In situations of political unrest, they are extremely vulnerable to sexual violence. Women play critical roles in food production and preparation, but in many cultures they consume the poorest quality food and are the first to face hunger when food is scarce. We recognise that power relations between girls and boys, men and women are unequal, and that such inequalities should be addressed to end discrimination in all its forms. That is why gender equality is incorporated in all of CARE Nederland’s work, both as an end in itself, as well as a means to overcome poverty more effectively ensuring the human rights of women, girls, boys and men are equally promoted and protected.


Focus countries

Over the past year, CARE Nederland has reduced the number of focus countries for long-term programming to 19 countries. In this way we can concentrate on developing extensive knowledge about local circumstances, beneficiaries and donor requirements. CARE country offices can also be supported more effectively and efficiently. We carry out 80% of our activities in focus countries. The remaining 20% of our activities are carried out in non-focus countries for the following reasons: •

Humanitarian intervention. CARE Nederland responds to crises with emergency aid and victim relief irrespective of location. Activities and programmes are usually of short duration. Innovative projects. CARE Nederland is always open to innovative types of programming that may also take place in non-focus countries. Phase-out countries. Countries not reselected as focus country, may still receive on-going programme support, whilst support is gradually being phased out. Regional focus. If the programme has a regional focus, some programming may include non-focus countries, for example in West Africa.

In financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland was active in 33 countries (see the world map on page 16-17).

CARE Nederland roles

CARE Nederland performs three important roles in development: •

Delivering humanitarian action: when disaster strikes, we respond with life-saving emergency aid, giving special attention to the needs of women and girls and to the most marginalised in communities. We take a comprehensive approach to emergency response: first by partnering with local groups to provide immediate assistance when disaster strikes, and then working with survivors to help them recover after the crisis has passed, and finally by working with communities to reduce the impact of future disasters. In this way, humanitarian work and our programmes for lasting change blend into a long process, which helps people recover and communities rebuild devastated by disaster. Promoting lasting change and innovative solutions: by supporting new supply methods and strengthening essential service delivery, by building capacities and resilience for risk reduction, as well as empowering the most vulnerable, particularly women and girls, we aim to activate innovative solutions for sustainable development. Our programmes for promoting sustainable development cover three themes: social justice and gender equality/ good governance and sustainable livelihoods.

Multiplying impact: we seek to make impact in the communities we work with, as well as having an impact beyond the community boundaries. We use the evidence, learning and innovation from our humanitarian action and long-term development programmes, to scale up projects together with our partners. We advocate for better policies and seek to influence broader social change. By multiplying our impact we can contribute to a deeper and more sustainable development.

In the following section we will highlight our programmes and activities in relation to each of these roles, and highlight our activities for financial year 2014-15.  

Humanitarian action

Lasting change

Multiplying Impact

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2.2 Humanitarian action Introduction

Humanitarian emergencies have many guises and may take on complex forms. The provision of emergency aid is one of our key priorities; an emphasis reflected in many of our projects. Following the guidelines of the CARE International humanitarian action strategy, CARE Nederland mobilises its donors, companies and the Dutch public to raise funds, which can then be channelled quickly and efficiently to those in need. By sourcing materials locally whenever possible we can support local businesses, distribute supplies more efficiently to people in need, and make our budget stretch further. By partnering with local aid agencies and community groups and by hiring local staff, we tap into the knowledge of a community’s language and culture, develop a deeper understanding of the people we are serving, and make effective use of local expertise.

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Before an emergency strikes

For poor, vulnerable communities, the impact of any emergency can destroy hard-won gains in the fight against poverty. Good planning and preparedness can help save lives, reduce the impact of disasters and help recovery. By incorporating disaster risk reduction methods and emergency preparedness plans into our long-term development programming, CARE Nederland helps people and communities develop sustainable methods and strengthen community resilience for future disasters.

During an emergency

With on-going programmes in many of the world’s most disaster prone areas, the CARE network of organisations already has emergency response experts on the ground and additional emergency specialists ready to deploy immediately. During an emergency, CARE coordinates with local governments and participates in the United Nations cluster system, a coordinated

approach that aims to ensure humanitarian actors work together, reducing duplication of efforts and ensuring all people in need receive aid. The aid we provide is always tailored to the needs of victims and focuses on: shelter, water, food security, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), sexual and reproductive health.

After an emergency

Following the emergency phase, CARE Nederland works together with communities towards long-term recovery. We aim to transition as quickly as possible from emergency response to rehabilitation, and then to sustained development. Instead of providing long-term handouts, we help people to help themselves so as to reduce community vulnerability for future emergencies. Examples are small business assistance and agricultural rehabilitation.


Humanitarian action in financial year 2014-15

CARE Nederland contributed to the following humanitarian action programmes during financial year 2014-15: •

Vanuatu. In March 2015, cyclone Pam hit the island nation of Vanuatu in the South Pacific Ocean. CARE Nederland participated in a six-month relief effort (April to September) as part of a consortium with World Vision and Save the Children. With the emergency phase declared over in June, rebuilding and resilience programming started in July. Yemen. The six-year-long civil war in Yemen has displaced thousands of Yemeni civilians; 80% of Yemen’s population faces a dire humanitarian situation with no end in sight. When the conflict escalated significantly in March 2015, the UN launched an appeal. CARE Nederland led a six-month emergency programme, working in a five-member consortium. Initially work was done remotely from Amman and Jordan, but later activities were carried out in various locations around the country. North Iraq: This is a nine-month 12partner programme with Cordaid in the lead (January to September 2015). CARE Nederland has been working in the area around Dohuk. An immediate one-year follow-up programme has been initiated. South Sudan: This is a 13-partner one-year emergency response programme in South Sudan with Save the Children in the lead. The programme is fraught with difficulty

due to the on-going conflict in several implementation areas. A follow-up programme is expected to begin in the autumn of 2015. Sierra Leone and Liberia (Ebola): CARE Nederland has been focusing on food security and livelihoods in the fight against Ebola in Sierra Leone and Liberia. In this way we help stop infection from spreading, minimise the outbreak of new cases, and help rebuild livelihoods by strengthening infrastructure and health/education systems for better response capacity in the future. Syria: After five years of civil war, the situation in Syria continues to be highly complex and dangerous. CARE Nederland has been active in Syria in the Idlib province for more than two years. By local partner: • we support beneficiaries with food vouchers; • we replace livestock to improve food security and generate income; • we make improvements and smallscale repairs to irrigation systems; • we provide small grants or in-kind assistance for the creation of small businesses for income-generation. Furthermore, CARE International is providing life-saving services to Syrian refugees in Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Yemen, Turkey and Serbia. In collaboration with host country governments, the United Nations, and international and local organisations, we are helping refugees and host communities meet their most urgent needs and protect their dignity.

Nepal: Nepal was struck by two of the strongest earthquakes in 80 years in April and May 2015. Over 8 million people were affected by the quakes, and almost 9,000 people lost their lives. After the first earthquake hit Nepal, the Dutch ‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties / SHO’ immediately launched the national appeal ‘Nederland helpt Nepal’. This campaign raised € 25.074.780 for humanitarian aid and primary rehabilitation. CARE Nederland was allocated 5,82 % of this amount to deliver aid and support in Nepal. The Dutch Relief Fund also allocated budget for emergency relief in Nepal. On the basis of our many years of experience in working together on disaster risk reduction, we were able to quickly and effectively start emergency operations, immediately after the first earthquake. CARE’s focus has been on four of the hardest-hit remote areas, after landslides and rockfalls almost totally cut off access from the outside world: Dhading, Gorkha, Sindhupalchowk and Lamjung.

The aid we provide is always tailored to the needs of victims

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2.3 Promoting lasting change and innovative solutions Introduction

In fulfilling our second role, the promotion of lasting change and innovative solutions, CARE Nederland seeks to enhance the resilience of vulnerable communities in fragile situations based on three areas of expertise: social justice and gender equality, good governance, and the development of sustainable livelihoods.

Social justice and gender equality

Social justice means that societies and institutions focus on human rights, emphasising the principles of equality, solidarity, and human dignity for all. CARE Nederland stimulates people to fulfil their potential and contribute to the development of their community, together forming a strong socio-economic livelihood. Power imbalances and injustice are structural problems that contribute to poverty and exclusion. Gender inequality between men and women is one of the most common forms of power imbalance and social injustice. Gender inequality is often linked to and a contributing factor in other forms of exclusion of disadvantaged groups, based on ethnicity, class, age and religion.

Good governance

CARE Nederland works in fragile contexts where governments are often unable to provide essential services for its citizens. Lack of good governance results in loss of faith in authorities, and participation of citizens is often low.

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This can result in unrest between citizens, and between citizens and authorities. Conflict situations, potential human rights violations and poverty may ensue, due to the fact that the needs and wishes of the population are no longer aligned with government policies.

Sustainable livelihoods

Livelihoods are regarded as sustainable once a household has adequate and sustainable access to the income and resources necessary to meet its basic needs. This includes access to food, water, markets and financial systems, medical facilities, educational facilities, housing, time to participate in the community and integration.

• • •

• To promote lasting change and innovative solutions, CARE Nederland: • Promotes women’s leadership in disaster preparedness, conflict prevention, peace-building and conflict resolution; • Mobilises men as agents of change for gender equality; • Facilitates dialogue and conflict resolution; • Transforms harmful cultural beliefs and practices through dialogue with religious,

political and community leaders; Increases opportunities and participation of excluded groups, such as women, youth and minorities to make sure their voices are heard in society; Improves access of minority groups to markets and financial services; Promotes business and vocational skills development; Uses Village Savings and Loan Associations (VSLAs) to increase savings and loan facilities in a community; Organises community events that engage excluded groups to enable them to make full use of their rights of inclusion; Increases institutional capacity of local civil society organisations to participate in and influence decision-making; Strengthens the capacity of public officials in institutions such as the police, justice, military, education, health services, to increase their responsiveness to the interests of excluded groups; Promotes disaster and conflict preparedness, prevention and early warning.


Promoting lasting change and innovative solutions in the financial year 2014-15

CARE Nederland implemented programmes to promote lasting change and innovative solutions in all 19 focus countries. The Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation and the Partners for Resilience programmes are highlighted on pages 58-60. Other programmes are: • Somalia. CARE Nederland has its largest portfolio share in Somalia with current projects aimed at strengthening education, improving water and sanitation, ecosystem management and the development of income generation for local people. As a strategic partner, together with the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, CARE Nederland is working to lessen the effects and causes of the chronic crisis in the Horn of Africa. • In Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of Congo (the Great Lakes region), we are involved in several projects addressing gender based violence and gender justice. One of these projects is Biraturaba, which is highlighted on page 34-35. • In the Philippines, programmes in response to hurricane Haiyan have been implemented. In addition, we set up a programme to support local communities to help reduce the potential for damage by natural disasters, with funds made available by the Dutch Postcode Lottery. (see page 52).

In Pakistan, Indonesia, and in the Andean region in South America, various projects focussed on preparing communities for disasters were carried out. In Somalia, Afghanistan and Yemen, the Peace under Construction (PuC) programme is currently being implemented in spite of the challenging environment in these countries. The situation in Yemen last year was especially tense. However, the programme aimed at peace building, inclusive governance and livelihood development has been extended. For another Peace under Construction (PuC) programme in South Sudan and Burundi, CARE Nederland collaborates with the Hague Academy for Local Governance and Radio La Benevolencija in a project involving fostering democratic governance to help strengthen safety and human rights, and help improve the social and economic prospects for young people and especially women in Burundi and South Sudan.

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Women Empowerment through Business Development In February 2014, H&M Conscious Foundation provided funding to help scale up efforts of CARE’s Women Empowerment through Business Development programme. This global three-year programme is aimed at strengthening the capacities of 100,000 women worldwide. By working on local, regional, national and international levels, CARE Nederland will help bring about lasting change and empower women through business development. Highlights of this programme include: •

100,000 women in developing countries will obtain access to skills and/or seed capital to start up or to expand their business in order to become economically empowered. In 2015, ten skills development projects started in Guatemala, Peru, Burundi, Sierra Leone/Cote d’Ivoire, Zambia, Jordan, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, and in the Philippines. Around 13,000 women in these ten countries have already received training. Five campaigns focusing on the sharing of positive stories of female role models, to help women believe in their potential and to inspire them to develop their own business. The campaign kicked off in Peru. The four other campaign countries (Jordan, Nepal, Cote d’Ivoire / Sierra Leone and Burundi) have developed campaign plans and will start implementation between August 2015 and mid 2016. Experiences and lessons learned will feed into a global report that will include advice on policy changes needed worldwide to allow women to take advantage of opportunities in enterprise development and economic empowerment.

CARE Nederland became beneficiary of the worldwide 2014 H&M Holiday Campaign. With these funds, we will support the development of small enterprises by marginalised women in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The project started in 2015 and will generate ‘stories of change’ about the impact of the programme on the lives of individual women involved.

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2.4 Multiplying impact Introduction

CARE Nederland seeks to make an impact in the communities we work with, as well as having an impact beyond the community boundaries. We use the evidence, learning and innovation from our humanitarian action and long-term development programmes to influence broader social change. In collaboration with a wide range of actors from civil society, the government and the private sector, the press and with our supporters, we work towards multiplying impact. Advocacy, civic and corporate engagement, the sharing of knowledge and publications and events, help create a greater impact in our work towards sustainable development.

Advocacy

CARE Nederland’s lobbying and advocacy activities are key to all our programmes. To strengthen our work in humanitarian action and to promote lasting change, our advocacy activities are aimed at improving the policies and practices of governments, businesses and society as a whole, at local, regional, national and international level.

Advocacy target groups

CARE Nederland’s advocacy target groups can be divided into: • local community organisations; • policy makers at Dutch, European Union and international level.

Local community organisations

At the local level, CARE Nederland primarily strives to make people living in fragile or conflict situations aware of their rights, enabling them to make their interests known and hold policy makers accountable. To this end, CARE Nederland trains CARE country offices and local community organisations to help them defend the rights of the local population more effectively. Through the CARE country offices, CARE Nederland also helps to establish accountability mechanisms and facilitates dialogue between local communities and government authorities. Activities for local community organisations are integrated into the CARE programmes for humanitarian action, and into programmes for lasting change and innovative solutions.

Policy makers at Dutch, EU and international level

CARE Nederland seeks to represent the interests of local communities by advocating relevant policy measures and defending their positions at Dutch, European Union and international level. In the Netherlands, CARE Nederland engages in dialogue with policy makers, mainly with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Other target groups are political parties, including members of the Dutch House of Representatives, other NGOs and research institutes.

Advocacy activities

The CARE Nederland advocacy strategy includes activities such as: • Writing memoranda, emails and letters; • Writing shadow reports and policy briefs; • Holding talks and consultations; • Conducting independent reviews; • Taking part in various platforms; • Organising symposia either individually or jointly with partner organisations; • Participating in conferences and symposia in which political parties, the government, NGOs and academics jointly discuss issues; • Providing advocacy support to CARE country offices and community organisations, through organising training workshops, hands-on advise and joint lobbying activities.

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Advocacy activities in the 2014-15 financial year

During financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland’s advocacy activities were centred around four themes: • Strengthening advocacy capacity; • Humanitarian advocacy; • Women, peace and security; • Gender in emergencies.

Strengthening advocacy capacity

CARE Nederland’s activities in strengthening advocacy capacity fall under the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (see page 55).

Humanitarian advocacy •

CARE Nederland has continued to provide policy makers and politicians with key information from the field and policy recommendations on current crises in Burundi, Yemen, Somalia, South Sudan, Syria and Afghanistan. CARE Nederland participated in the organisation of the Dutch Humanitarian Summit (see page 27).

Women, peace and security

In financial year 2014-15 CARE Nederland, the WO=MEN gender platform and the Dutch government, continued to push for better implementation of the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security. This Resolution requires parties in conflicts to prevent violations of women’s rights,

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to support women’s participation in peace negotiations and in post-conflict reconstruction, and to protect women and girls from sexual and gender-based violence in armed conflict. This year, the resolution celebrated its 15th anniversary – a reason to take stock of what has been achieved. In financial year 2014-15 CARE Nederland undertook the following activities: • Contributed to the annual Global Network of Women’s Peacebuilders (GNWP) monitoring report on the implementation of UNSCR 1325; • Participated in formal consultations of the UN Global Study on UNSCR 1325; • Co-organised the international conference ‘Women: Powerful Agents for Peace and Security’ with the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs and other NGOs in February 2015. CARE Nederland and the Interchurch Organisation for Development Cooperation / ‘ICCO’ organised a session about the participation of women in peace processes and contributed to the final report of the conference; • Co-developed and disseminated CARE international’s position paper on the 15th anniversary of UNSCR 1325 ‘Beyond 2015 for Women, Peace and Security’; • Participated in the consultation on the UN Global Study UNSCR 1325 at the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) 2015 Conference; • Contributed to the development of a new Dutch National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325 in cooperation with WO=MEN.

Gender in emergencies

In 2015, CARE Nederland’s humanitarian lobby and advocacy activities focused strongly on gender in emergencies, to ensure that NGOs and large donors take into account the different needs and capacities of men and women in humanitarian emergency responses. Although the need to provide gender-specific assistance is widely accepted, it still lags behind in everyday practice. Insufficient attention is given to the proper integration and implementation of gender-specific assistance in emergency aid. Moreover, financial resources are scarce, and financing conditions concerning the inclusion of a gender perspective are invariably insufficiently set.


Dutch Humanitarian Summit 2015 / World Humanitarian Summit 2016

How can Dutch humanitarian organisations contribute to the improvement of the provision of relief aid during major crises? To answer this question, 13 Dutch humanitarian organisations joined forces to organise the Dutch Humanitarian Summit in February 2015. The closing statement of this summit serves as input for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit of the United Nations in Istanbul. A large audience of (international) experts, humanitarian aid workers and scientists attended the Dutch Humanitarian Summit. CARE Nederland actively contributed to discussions on the following topics: urban refugees, innovation in humanitarian aid, the role of Supervisory Councils in humanitarian organisations and gender in emergencies.

Gender in Emergencies

CARE Nederland considers it vital that gender in emergencies features prominently on the agenda of the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit. In order to exchange ideas and share knowledge, CARE Nederland organised the side event Gender in Emergencies: Putting words into Action at the Dutch Humanitarian Summit. Florika Fink-Hooijer (ECHO), Lara Quarterman (DFID), Jelte van Wieren (Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs) and Jasveen Ahluwalia (Gender in Emergencies Coordinator at CARE International) debated questions such as: How can gender be better integrated in all facets of emergency aid? Which best practices should we adopt? How can this subject feature prominently on the agenda at the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit?

We must cooperate to give gender a permanent place within emergency aid. - Jasveen Ahluwalia (CARE International Gender in Emergencies Coordinator)

Furthermore, CARE Nederland carried out an active lobby vis-à -vis the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the European Union during the past financial year. We also actively contributed to CARE International’s joint advocacy to ensure that gender appears prominently on the agenda of the World Humanitarian Summit. In addition, we developed and disseminated a policy brief for policy makers, participated in the World Humanitarian Summit thematic task force meeting, and participated in an ECHO consultation on the position of the European Union. These activities all contributed to CARE Nederland’s profile on the issue of gender in emergencies and to the formal recognition of this issue by the Dutch government as one of three key priorities for the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit.

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Closing statement of the Dutch Humanitarian Summit:

Gender in emergencies featured prominently in the nine recommendations of the final summit statement. The full closing statement can be found in the visual notes of the summit on: http://issuu.com/cre-aid/docs/visuele_notulen_ humanitaire_top

Gender in Emergencies in the statement: •

We recognise that: Humanitarian emergencies have profoundly different impacts on women and girls as well as on boys and men, and existing gender inequalities may be exacerbated in times of crises; We are convinced that: A gendersensitive approach in emergencies saves lives, and the humanitarian system should promote gender equality throughout the humanitarian cycle.

Especially in countries where governments cannot protect their own people, NGO’s get to places others can’t reach, and so their work can be incredibly valuable. In war-torn countries, they are often the glue that binds society together. - Minister Ploumen (Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Foreign Trade and Development Aid)

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Civic and corporate engagement, sharing knowledge

CARE Nederland strives to engage individuals and corporate relations in our ambition to reduce poverty and obtain more social justice by working alongside women and girls. Our engagement with the general public and corporate relations ranges from active donations of time and experience to funding. In this way, we can multiply the impact of our programmes and increase awareness of the underlying causes of poverty worldwide. Our strategic aim is to increase the number of supporters from the present-day number of approximately 55,000 to over 100,000 supporters (both individuals and corporate relations) by the year 2020. We would like to engage with supporters who are enthusiastic about CARE Nederland’s vision and mission, share our messages amongst friends and colleagues, employees and clients, advocate for CARE by signing petitions and / or carry out fundraising activities for CARE beneficiaries.

Whocares.me

February 2014 saw the official launch of the Whocares.me platform. This platform shares inspiring stories of people who make a difference worldwide. By the end of financial year 2014-15, the platform attracted over 10,000 unique visitors per month. The number of visitors actively engaging with the content through likes and responses has increased steadily over the past 16 months.

www.CARENederland.org, Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube

CARE Nederland continues to inform and encourage open communication with individuals and corporate relations by sharing beneficiaries’ stories, new project launches, and responses to conflicts and disasters. Communication channels include our website and social media channels: Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube. The CARE Nederland website attracted an average of 8,000 unique monthly visitors and the number of followers on Facebook (7,000), Twitter (1,200) and LinkedIn (1,600) has grown.

Collaboration with MasterPeace

CARE Nederland became collaborative partner of MasterPeace in 2015. MasterPeace is a global grassroots peace movement that inspires people to use their talents and energy for building peace and togetherness. Our joint ambition is to engage more people and organisations in our activities to promote peace and inclusive governance worldwide, especially for excluded and marginalised groups in fragile states. In order to achieve this, we have agreed to develop a joint programme proposal and to mutually promote independently organised events and activities. MasterPeace will also share its network of business partners for mutual initiatives.

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CARE Nederland ambassadors

In financial year 2014-15 CARE Nederland appointed three ambassadors.

Babah Tarawally, who fled to the Netherlands from Sierra Leone 20 years ago, is an author and is especially committed to combating Ebola as CARE Nederland ambassador.

Sander de Kramer, a Dutch journalist, writer and television presenter, kicked off the first Walk in Her Shoes campaign and is supporter of the ‘Dijk van een Wijk’ campaign as CARE Nederland ambassador.

Maureen Koster, a bronze medal winner at the 2015 European Athletics Indoor Championships, supports the women and girls programmes in developing countries as CARE Nederland ambassador.

Success requires not only hard work and perseverance, but the right support is essential in reaching your full potential. - Maureen Koster

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Publications and events

Walk in Her Shoes Challenge

Peacebuilding Toolbox

In financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland published the ‘Peacebuilding Toolbox’; a collection of inspirational peacebuilding approaches from around the world. Thirteen peacebuilding strategies that have been implemented by CARE country offices, local partners or peer organisations offer inspiration and serve as a reference for those working on proposal development and project implementation on peacebuilding. The toolbox includes both theoretical and practical information, as well as various references to background information. www.carenederland.org/content/ uploads/2014/09/PeaceBuildingToolbox-Final. pdf

Gender, Peace and Conflict Manual

The Gender, Peace and Conflict Manual explores the link between gender, power and conflict, and especially focuses on gender based violence and peacebuilding. The manual, published in 2015, was developed by CARE Nederland and builds on the Gender, Equity and Diversity Training Manual of CARE International. issuu.com/carenederland/docs/ care_gpc_training_manual_v0_1_4_pri

In June 2015, CARE Nederland launched the first Walk in Her Shoes campaign in the Netherlands. The Dutch public was invited to unite in solidarity with women and girls across the globe who have to walk for miles each day just to survive. Many of these women never have the opportunity to fulfil their potential. During the campaign (21-27 June) participants walked 25, 50 or 100 kilometres to demonstrate their solidarity and to help raise funds. CARE Nederland ambassadors Babah Tarawally and Sander de Kramer joined participants and CARE employees at the launch by leading the walk through the city centre of The Hague. More than 100 people joined the Walk in Her Shoes Challenge and successfully raised over € 22,000 for a CARE women entrepreneurial project in Peru.

The Walk in Her Shoes challenge is a perfect fit. Taking part in the challenge has given a big boost to the team spirit in the office. - Michel Jacobs (Lawyer at Ploum Lodder Princen and participant of the Walk in Her Shoes challenge)

Employees of Ploum Lodder Princen, a law firm based in Rotterdam and corporate partner of CARE Nederland, raised funds by participating in the challenge. Furthermore the Management Board of the firm agreed to an additional donation. The editorial team of GezondNu took part in the Walk in Her Shoes challenge and kept a daily blog to share stories with their supporters during the campaign week.

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The Power of Entrepreneurial Women – Worldwide

In light of International Women’s Day, ‘Stichting Maatschappij en Ondernemen / SMO’ and CARE Nederland united international entrepreneurs, researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders to discuss barriers and success factors in female entrepreneurship at the conference ‘The Power of Entrepreneurial Women Worldwide’ in March 2015. Here Lilianne Ploumen, the Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation, shared her vision of the future on female entrepreneurship. Furthermore she officially received the first edition of the SMO publication with contributions by CARE Nederland The Economic Power of the Entrepreneurial Woman. At the conference, the joint programme on women and entrepreneurship between the H&M Conscious Foundation and CARE Nederland (see page 24) was highlighted.

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Maria Esther Landa, Founder and General Manager of Santa Maria Industries in Peru, told the audience how she became a successful entrepreneur after taking part in free CARE courses in welding and business skills. Maria received a loan of € 10,000 from a CARE microfinance scheme to set up her company, which she repaid within a year. Today, Maria is the proud owner of three successful businesses. She has been recognised by the Peruvian government for her contribution to the country’s economic development, and was one of 31 women entrepreneurs from around the world chosen to participate in a Fortune 500 mentoring programme. In Peru, Maria shares her success by helping ‘open doors’ for women and tries to ‘give back’ to her community where she can. When an 8.0-magnitude earthquake hit Peru in 2007, 40,000 families lost their homes. CARE contracted Maria’s company to weld 1,000 family tent frames for earthquake survivors in need of shelter and 100 classroom-sized tents so that children could resume their studies. A summary and video of the event can be found on: poeww.com.

With CARE I didn’t just learn how to weld. I learned how to start a business. - Maria Ester Landa (Founder and General Manager of Santa Maria Industries in Peru)


Platforms, working groups and partnerships

2.5 Programme partnerships To carry out our programmes and activities effectively and efficiently, CARE Nederland works together with a number of partners at local, regional, national and international level. The following list provides an overview of the partners we worked with in financial year 2014-15. Other partners not mentioned or only briefly mentioned here, such as ‘Vereniging Fondsenwervende Instellingen / VFI’, now called ‘Goede Doelen Nederland’ and Pharos are discussed in further detail in Chapter 1, and ‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties /SHO’ and ‘Dutch Relief Alliance / DRA’ in Chapter 3.

Partnerships in Humanitarian Action •

‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties / SHO’. CARE Nederland is member of the ‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties / SHO’ for fundraising in the Netherlands for humanitarian action programmes (see page 20). In financial year 2014-15 SHO launched two national appeals; for the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, and for the earthquake in Nepal.

Dutch Relief Alliance. Thirteen Dutch NGOs, including CARE Nederland, set up the consortium Dutch Relief Alliance (DRA) in April 2015, to optimise the allocation of funds made available by the Dutch Relief Fund / DRF (see page 49). The DRA strives to provide effective and swift joint responses to disasters in the world’s poorest countries. By working together the DRA members generate synergies, reduce overlap and duplication of activities, seek innovations and mutual learning, and increase the visibility of the Dutch government’s role in humanitarian aid. The bottom line is that those in need receive support and aid as quickly and efficiently possible. In financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland provided humanitarian assistance as member of the Dutch Relief Alliance in Nepal, North Iraq, South Sudan, Syria, Vanuatu and Yemen and in response to the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone and Liberia.

The CARE Nederland programme team participates in the following platforms, working groups and partnerships in the Netherlands: • Afghanistan platform; • ACT Alliance; • Burundi platform; • Congo platform; • Do not forget Afghanistan campaign; • Dutch Relief Alliance; • Humanity House; • Knowledge Platform Security & Rule of Law (Reconstruction Tender Working Group); • Platform Humanitaire Actie (PHA); • Netherlands Water Partnership; • Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties (SHO); • Schokland treaty; • South Sudan platform; • WO=MEN. In addition, CARE Nederland collaborates with a range of Dutch and international nongovernmental organisations in programmatic alliances, such as the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (see page 55) and Partners for Resilience (see pages 58-60). At an international level CARE Nederland collaborates with: • International Gender Network; • DRR platform (Disaster Risk Reduction); • Poverty, Environment and Climate Change Centre (PECCN of CARE International).

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Biraturaba: us all

It concerns(in Kirundi)

Since the signing of the ceasefire peace agreement in 2003, Burundi has struggled to recover from its thirteen-year civil war, largely attributable to the fact that Burundi is one of the world’s poorest nations. Gender inequality, deeply engrained in society, aggravates vulnerabilities for both girls and boys. Boys are often brought up to be ‘brave’ and are supposed to fulfil male gender stereotypes that justify violence and create a gender imbalance in the family. An attitude which does not support sharing vulnerabilities, questions and decision making. Girls on the other hand are being taught that they are supposed to be submissive, are inferior to their husbands and other male family members and should accept violence. This situation leads to a high level of unwanted pregnancies, the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases, and impairs the overall wellbeing of young people. The Biraturaba project provides information on sexual and reproductive health, improves support to victims of sexual violence and promotes gender equality. Aim of the project is to reach 38,710 young people in cities and rural areas in Bubanza, Bujumbura Rural, Bujumbura Mairie and Cibitoke. The ultimate objective is to reduce their exposure to sexually-related violence and bring down the number of violent incidents.

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CARE organises training programmes in the area of sexual education, mother and child care and family planning and helping to create economic opportunities for young people. Stakeholders in 33 villages also receive training aimed at changing attitudes, beliefs and behaviour in order to engender greater understanding and respect for the rights and dignity of young people (both girls and boys) and promote gender equality. CARE also improves support to female victims of sexual violence by training medical, legal and psychosocial aid workers and building the capacity of social organisations so that they can effectively advocate the implementation of projects on sexual health, family planning and codes of conduct at schools and lobby for the adoption of new laws against sexual violence. The Burundi Ministry of Public Health and the Ministry of Education approved a sexuality education curriculum that was submitted by CARE and Rutgers called ‘le monde commence par moi.’ This curriculum consists of a teacher’s and student manual that provides comprehensive information on sexuality education and helps teachers to open up a dialogue with students. The approval of the curriculum is the first step in the provision of high-quality sexuality education for all students in Burundi.

During the course of 2015, the Biraturaba programme was rolled out in five additional provinces in Burundi. Inspired by its success, the donor has decided to increase funding by € 17,4 million to scale up the programme to a national level. This follow-up programme is called ‘Improving the sexual and reproductive health of adolescents and youth in Burundi’, and addresses the underlying causes of poor adolescent sexual and reproductive health and rights, by working not only in the education and health sectors, but by including the communities to foster an enabling and supporting environment. All teachers will receive training, so that comprehensive sexuality education will be included at a national level in Burundi. CARE and UNFPA manage the programme, with support from Cordaid and Rutgers, and in close cooperation with the relevant Burundi government ministries and departments. This programme will reach 1,1 million adolescents and young adults between 10 – 24 years of age.


Project information Objective: Budget: Duration: Donor: International partner:

My name is Thacienne Niyonzima and I have just completed 8th form studies. When I started 7th form, I had bad friends who drew my into misbehaviour. Having bad friends is a serious problem and many of my friends got pregnant; it was just by good luck that I did not become pregnant. Thanks to the training I received from Biraturaba, I decided to safeguard my life as much as possible, because I understood that I am the only person responsible for my life. Now, I give my contribution in sensitizing other youths that they must be careful because no-one can take care of their lives better than they themselves do.

38,710 young people (52% females, aged 10-24) experience reductions of exposure to sexually related violence and of the number of violent incidents. ₏ 2,800,000 November 2013 – June 2016 Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Burundi / Ministry of Foreign Affairs Rutgers and ten local partners

Areas of CARE activities

CARE role:

Cibitoke

Lasting change

Multiplying Impact

Bubanza

BURUNDI Bujumbura Mairie

CARE activities

Domains of change:

Bujumbura Rural

Social Justice

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2.6 Overview of (current and new) programmes in the 2015 financial year Nr.

Country

Project

Africa

36

Lasting Change

1

Burundi

Biraturaba: It concerns us (see page 34)

2

Burundi, DR Congo, Liberia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation / DCR (see page 55)

3

Burundi, South Sudan

Peace under Construction - PUC

4

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Bokonzi ya bana kin

5

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Tuongoze Pamoja

6

Liberia

Community Empowerment and Collaborative Action for Change

7

Liberia

Stop de Ebola ramp

8

Madagascar

ASARA (Amélioration de la Sécurité Alimentaire et Augmentation des Revenus Agricoles)

9

Madagascar

AINA (Actions Intégrées en Nutrition et Alimentation)

10

Madagascar

AINA follow up

11

Rwanda

Umugore Arumvwa (A woman is listened to)

12

Sierra Leone

COME IN

13

Sierra Leone

Joint response Ebola

14

Somalia

Waxbarashada Waa Iftiin: Education is light

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Role

Multiplying Impact

Humanitarian Action


Total budget for the project

Domains of change

Social Justice & Gender Equality

Sustainable Livelihoods

Donor

No. of people reached / target group

Duration

Good Governance

2,800,000

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Dutch embassy in Burundi

6,450

13,491,880

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / MFS II

90,000

Jan 2011 - Jan 2016

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Reconstruction grant

77,360

July 2012- July 2016

7,102,905

Nov 2013 – June 2016

709,629

EuropeAid

200,000

Feb 2013 - Feb 2016

770,453

EuropeAid

297,700

April 2015 - March 2018

500,000

EuropeAid

370,000

Nov 2011 - Nov 2014

609,000

SHO

250,000

Nov 2014 - Nov 2015

2,749,325

EuropeAid

25,000

Jan 2014 - June 2017

1,693,501

EuropeAid

80,000

May 2013 - May 2016

1,051,109

EuropeAid

80,000

Dec 2014 - Dec 2017

597,780

EuropeAid

754

760,000

EuropeAid

150,000

March 2013 - March 2015 August 2012 - August 2015

1,932,002

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Relief Fund / Oxfam

25,000

Dec 2014 - August 2015

7,583,333

EuropeAid

38,314

Nov 2012 - Nov 2015

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

37


Nr.

Country

Project

Africa

Lasting Change

15

Somalia

Horumarinta Elmiga: Education for empowerment through a cohesive and harmonised system

16

Somalia

Degaankaagu waa noloshaada: Your Environment is Your Life

17

Somalia

Basic and sustainable WASH for the MDGs in Puntland

18

Somalia

Iskufilnaasho: Towards Self reliance II

19

Somalia

Badbaadinta Nolosha (BANO): Lifesaving and Resilience Strengthening Programme in Somaliland

20

Somalia & Sudan

Resilience in the Horn: Chronic crises

21

South Sudan

Joint response

22

South Sudan and Sudan

Sudan Emeregency Response and Early Livelihood Recovery

23

Sudan

CSO-SD

24

Sudan

SEED Sudan

Latin America

38

25

Bolivia, Peru

Regional programme

26

Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru

Multicountry programme

27

Haiti

Katye Nou Pi Bèl: Integrated Neighbourhood Reconstruction in Carrefour

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Role

Multiplying Impact

Humanitarian Action


Total budget for the project

Domains of change

Social Justice & Gender Equality

Sustainable Livelihoods

Donor

No. of people reached / target group

Duration

Good Governance

3,315,700

EuropeAid

44,634

Nov 2012 - Nov 2016

8,000,000

EuropeAid

5,568

Feb 2013 - Dec 2016

3,400,004

EuropeAid

261,013

2,260,000

EuropeAid

13,146

ECHO

85,537

800,000 1,875,000

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Strategic Partnership Chronic Crises

4,840

July 2011- August 2015 Nov 2013 - May 2016 Oct 2014 - Oct 2015

March 2014 - Dec 2016

799,292

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Relief Fund / Save the Children

976,927

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

600,000

EuropeAid

16,000

Dec 2013 - Dec 2015

600,000

EuropeAid / ECHO

16,000

Jan 2015 - Jan 2017

13,200 258,898

Jan 2015 - Dec 2015 July 2013 – August 2014

1,859,042

ECHO

300,000

April 2015 - Oct 2016

1,099,354

ECHO

17,655

April 2013 - Sep 2014

2,579,773

EuropeAid

10,000

April 2013 – April 2016

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

39


Project

NEPAL

Nepal was struck by two of the strongest earthquakes in 80 years in April and May 2015. The devastation caused widespread destruction and loss of life; over 8 million people were affected by the quakes, and almost 9,000 people lost their lives. After the first earthquake hit Nepal on 25 April 2015, the Dutch ‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties / SHO’ immediately launched the national appeal ‘Nederland helpt Nepal’. This campaign raised € 25.074.780 for humanitarian aid and primary rehabilitation. CARE Nederland was allocated 5,82 % of this amount to deliver aid and support in Nepal. The Dutch Relief Fund also allocated budget for emergency relief in Nepal. CARE International has been active in Nepal for more than 35 years, providing aid in the form of food, healthcare, education, water and sanitation facilities, and programmes aimed at women’s empowerment. During this period, CARE has formed strong alliances with local

40

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

authorities and national governments. On the basis of our many years of experience in working together on disaster risk reduction, we were able to quickly and effectively start emergency operations, immediately after the first earthquake. CARE’s focus has been on four of the hardest-hit remote areas, after landslides and rockfalls almost totally cut off access from the outside world: Dhading, Gorkha, Sindhupalchowk and Lamjung. CARE is fully committed to incorporating gender equality in emergency aid. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by disasters. After disasters, destroyed health centres and blocked access roads prevent women from receiving healthcare. In Nepal, CARE provided healthcare for young girls and pregnant and breastfeeding mothers, and provided protection against violence of women and girls (gender based violence). CARE distributed essential medicines, health kits and birthing kits. Furthermore, CARE ensured the UNFPA tents had ’women friendly spaces’.


Project information

Relief funds made available in Nepal by CARE Nederland

• • •

7.8-magnitude earthquake on 25 April 2015, and 7.3-magnitude earthquake on 12 May 2015 8,1 million people affected by the quakes, among them 3,2 million children 8,898 people killed; 22,309 people injured 769,907 houses destroyed or damaged (VN)

Areas of CARE activities

SHO: € 1,567,596. 14% of this amount was spent by 31 July 2015 , the remaining amount will be spent within two years. Dutch Relief Fund:

CARE is fully committed to incorporating gender equality in emergency aid. Women and girls are disproportionately affected by disasters.

CARE provides: Lamjung

NEPAL

Gorkha

CARE activities

Hygiene kits

Livelihood

Shelter

Food

Sindhupalchowk

Healthcare for young girls and pregnant and breastfeeding mothers

WASH facilities

Dhading

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

41


Nr.

Country

Project

Middle East

Lasting Change

28

North Iraq

Joint Response

29

Turkey

Joint Response

30

Yemen

Joint response Yemen

Asia

42

31

Indonesia

Climate-Proof Disaster Risk Reduction project (Partners for Resilience Alliance)

32

Nepal

Joint response

33

Nepal

Aardbeving Nepal 2015 (Earthquake Nepal 2015)

34

Pakistan

Enhancing resilience by strengthening government institutions to roll-out inclusive Community-based DRM in KPK Province

35

Pakistan

Integration of DRR in Emergency Planning for vulnerable communities in Nowshera district, KPK province

36

Philippines

BOPHA II

37

Philippines

Bohol Response

38

Philippines

Help slachtoffers Philippijnen

39

Philippines

ER Consortium Haiyan II

40

Philippines

Een Dijk van een Wijk - proud of your purok

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Role

Multiplying Impact

Humanitarian Action


Total budget for the project

Domains of change

Social Justice & Gender Equality

Sustainable Livelihoods

Donor

No. of people reached / target group

Duration

Good Governance

800,000

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Relief Fund / Oxfam

15,400

Jan2015 - Sep 2015

1,250,000

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Relief Fund / ZOA

19,200

May 2015 - March 2016

3,000,000

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Relief Fund / CARE Nederland

18,500

370,550

AXA

10,000

July 2012- July 2017

503,151

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Relief Fund / Oxfam

20,391

April 2015 - Oct 2015

9,645

April 2015 - April 2016

1,500,000

SHO

May 2015 - Nov 2015

529,412

ECHO

85,475

May 2015 – Oct 2016

542,414

ECHO

32,000

April 2013 – Oct 2014

2,262,037

ECHO

54,000

March 2013 - Dec 2014

275,001

ECHO

50,600

Oct 2013 - August 2014

2,600,000

SHO

20,775

Nov 2013 - Nov 2015

1,646,091

ECHO

43,500

Jan 2014 - Jan 2015

Nationale Postcode Loterij through Netherlands Red Cross

35,000

April 2014 - April 2017

649,058

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

43


Nr.

Country

Project

Pacific

Lasting Change

41

Vanuatu

Yumi Redi 2

42

Vanuatu

Joint response cyclone PAM

Multiple continents 43

Afghanistan, Somalia, Yemen,

Foundation for Peace - YAS

44

Burundi, Cote d'Ivoire, Guatemala, Indonesia, Jordan, Nepal, Peru, Sierra Leone, Sri Lanka, Zambia

HMCF Flagship Program

45

Ethiopia, Guatemala, Indonesia, Mali, Nicaragua, Philippines, Uganda

Partners for Resilience - RR (MFS II)

Target group: people who are directly affected by the problem the project seeks to address and who are directly involved and actively engaged in project activities or receiving services/goods/ resources. The numbers of beneficiaries may vary greatly; some projects target individuals and others communities.

44

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Role

Multiplying Impact

Humanitarian Action


Total budget for the project

Domains of change

Social Justice & Gender Equality

Sustainable Livelihoods

Donor

No. of people reached / target group

Duration

Good Governance

411,764

ECHO

675,000

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Relief Fund / World Vision

18,992 8,498

April 2013 - Sep 2014 April 2015- Sep 2015

7,602,035

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Reconstruction grant

69,850

July 2012- July 2016

6,820,560

H&M Conscious Foundation

100,000

Feb 2014 - Feb 2017

6,344,257

Ministry of Foreign Affairs / MFS II

46,321

Jan 2011 - Jan 2016

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

45


Syria

Joint Humanitarian Response

With no solution in sight as the civil war enters its fifth year, the situation in Syria continues to be highly complex and dangerous. CARE Nederland has been active in Syria in the Idlib province for more than two years. In collaboration with a local partner, we support beneficiaries with food vouchers, we replace livestock to improve food security and generate income, we make improvements and small-scale repairs to irrigation systems, and we provide small grants or in-kind assistance for the creation of small businesses for income-generation. The distribution of food vouchers to vulnerable beneficiaries is proving to be the most efficient way to deliver humanitarian aid. The voucher system avoids the logistical challenges of distributing in-kind aid, such as food items, across the border. Also, the system strengthens and stimulates local markets and empowers small traders. Our Syrian partner organisation has selected and contracted reliable, trustworthy suppliers known to the community, to take part in the programme. The voucher system preserves the dignity of beneficiaries and gives them the power of choice.

46

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Furthermore, CARE International is providing life-saving services to Syrian refugees in Jordan, Lebanon, Egypt, Yemen, Turkey and Serbia. In collaboration with host country governments, the United Nations, and international and local organisations, we are helping refugees and host communities meet their most urgent needs and protect their dignity.

Beneficiary’s story

A displaced Christian family originally from an area now under ISIS control, currently lives in Idlib province. The father died fighting in the war; his wife lives with their two adult daughters and three young children in a wardamaged house. Both daughters are married, but their husbands are away fighting in the war. They sell vegetables to make a living, but they do not make enough money to feed the whole family. The family was selected for the CARE food voucher programme, providing them with access to food and the opportunity to expand their vegetable business.

Challenges

The area where we carry out our activities is considered one of the safest areas in the province. However, clashes in neighbouring areas remain ongoing, which hinders travel to project locations. Some field operations have been put on hold due to heightened safety and security measures, and some beneficiaries have reported their houses were destroyed and seek refuge and safety elsewhere. Transport is fraught with danger as routes suffer heavy shelling and bombing.

Lessons learned

Since the programme’s inception, we have learned that it is essential to establish a feedback and complaints procedure mechanism within the communities, to maintain accountability for the project. Especially during the beneficiary selection process, an adequate procedure to receive and respond to feedback and complaints can play a crucial role in reducing possible conflicts and tensions among community members.


Project information Number of people reached / target group: Total Budget: Budget CARE Nederland: Duration: Leading Donor: Local partners: Dutch partners:

19,200 people € 12,000,000 € 1,200,000 May 2015 – February 2016 Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs / DRA Local Syrian partner Dutch Relief Alliance / DRA

Numbers: 12,5 million

>4 million

6,5 million

people in need of humanitarian assistance

Syrian refugees in neighbouring countries

internally displaced persons

> 230,000 death toll

CARE role:

Humanitarian Action

Areas of CARE activities Idlib

SYRIA

CARE activities

The voucher system preserves the dignity of beneficiaries and gives them the power of choice.

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

47


3.

Fundraising

CARE Nederland’s programmes can only be implemented with the generous support of institutional donors, corporate donors, foundations, and individuals. This broad range of donors helps the organisation stay financially viable and plays a vital role in ensuring long-term help for the many beneficiaries of CARE Nederland.

3.1 Institutional donors The Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the European Commission are CARE Nederland’s most important institutional donors.

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

Overall the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA) was CARE Nederland’s largest donor in the 2014-15 financial year. MoFA uses various funding channels: • ‘Mede Financieringsstelsel II’ 2011 – 2015 (‘MFS II’ / Ministry of Foreign Affairs Co-financing System) The overall aim of the Co-financing System MFS II, initiated by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Social Development Department (DSO), is to contribute to the establishment and strengthening of civil society in the Global South as a building block for structural poverty reduction. To be eligible for the MFS II, Dutch civil society organisations need to form strategic partnerships with Southern partners. Under the MFS II programme, CARE Nederland participates in two partnerships: 1. The Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (DCR) jointly with Healthnet TPO, Save the Children Fund and ZOA (see page 55). 2. Partners for Resilience (PfR), jointly with the Red Cross, Cordaid, Wetlands International and the International Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre (see pages 58-60). A new grant scheme, the so-called Strategic Partnerships, will replace the MFS II system as per 1 January 2016.

In the 2014-15 financial year, the CARE Nederland programme team set up two programmes; a follow-up to Partners for Resilience, and a new programme Every Voice Counts. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs approved both applications earlier this year. You can read more about these new programmes in Chapter 4 Outlook. Reconstruction Grants The overarching objective of the grant policy framework for Reconstruction 2012-15 is to contribute to reconstruction and development in post-conflict areas. Programmes funded under the Reconstruction Grant Scheme should focus on improving human security and promoting rule of law, and invest either in developing a legitimate government or in activities concerned with achieving a peace dividend by creating conditions for socioeconomic reconstruction. In financial year 2014-15, the Peace Under Construction (PuC) and Foundation for Peace (FFP) programmes of CARE Nederland were funded through the Ministry of Foreign Affairs Reconstruction Grants. Strategic Partnerships Chronic Crises CARE Nederland also received contributions from the Strategic Partnerships for Chronic Crises 2014 / 2016 of the Department of Stabilisation and Humanitari-


an Aid (DSH). This department promotes stability with humanitarian assistance and reconstruction, and by promoting peace and security, rule of law and good governance before, during and after crisis situations. Relief Fund (RF) In September 2014, the Dutch Minister for International Trade and Development Cooperation established a special relief fund. A total of € 120 million has been reserved in this fund for Dutch Non-Governmental Aid Organisations (NGOs) for the period 2015-17. CARE Nederland and twelve other Dutch NGOs set up a consortium, the Dutch Relief Alliance (DRA), to optimise the allocation of the financial resources in the Relief Fund. For each action, one of the alliance organisations takes the lead in distributing the funds to the other participating organisations. CARE Nederland is lead organisation for the funds for the crisis in Yemen. Embassies of the Kingdom of the Netherlands The Dutch Embassy in Burundi funds the Biraturaba programme being conducted by CARE Nederland in collaboration with Stichting Rutgers WPF.

European Commission

The European Commission (EC) is one of the world’s largest donors of development cooperation funds. In the past financial year it was in fact CARE Nederland’s second-most important donor. The Commission’s funds are distributed through two channels: EuropeAid and the Directorate-General for Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection (ECHO). • EuropeAid or the Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development (DG DEVCO), is the European Commission’s department responsible for providing structural aid to non-EU countries. EuropeAid’s objectives are to reduce poverty, prevent conflict situations and strengthen vulnerable societies. • The European Commission Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection (ECHO) provides emergency aid to victims of natural disasters and armed conflicts in countries outside the European Union, irrespective of race, religion or political conviction. ECHO ensures the protection of civilians, provides food and aid to displaced persons and supports measures aimed at improving disaster preparedness, and recovery measures. ECHO works in close association with several partner NGOs (including CARE Nederland), through framework partner agreements. To qualify as a partner, organisations must meet stringent quality requirements.

Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations / FAO

Together with EuropeAid, CARE Nederland has implemented the AINA programme in Madagascar with funds provided by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations / FAO. The main aim of the FAO is to ensure people have regular access to enough high-quality food to lead active, healthy lives. Among FAO’s goals are: the eradication of hunger, food insecurity and malnutrition, the elimination of poverty and the driving forward of economic and social progress for all, and the sustainable management and utilisation of natural resources including land, water and air for the benefit of present and future generations.

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

49


3.2 Private donors Private donors include individuals, corporate donors and charitable foundations.Fundraising activities are face-to-face-recruitment, online activities and campaigning. Donations made by our donors are used for programmes, investments in expertise, sharing knowledge, education and capacity building of CARE Nederland.

Individual donors

CARE Nederland welcomed almost 13,000 new individual donors this financial year, increasing the total number of individual donors to approximately 52,000. All donors receive monthly newsletters with updates on CARE Nederland developments and projects. New donors receive four additional specially themed newsletters during their first year of supporting CARE Nederland. Donors who remain committed after one year receive a ‘thank you’ postcard. We received 11 individual donor complaints over the past year. Following our complaints policy guidelines, all complaints were dealt with to the satisfaction of the complainants.

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Corporate donors, partners and foundations

The private sector increasingly plays an important role in alleviating poverty. It is essential that the beneficiaries of CARE programmes, all benefit from job creation, technological innovation, the opening up of markets and overall economic development and growth. In partnering with corporations we co-create opportunities for poor and marginalised people by improving their access to goods, services and livelihoods, and by negotiating fairer terms. When opportunities created for our beneficiaries coincide with and enhance business goals, we help to create shared value, which benefits

all partners. We believe that we can create the greatest impact when all parties contribute from their own strengths and when there is a natural fit to their core business. Corporate relations and CARE Nederland work together on specific programmes, or relations can participate in one of our campaigns. Some companies and foundations support us by sharing their knowledge, donating their time or by making a financial contribution towards the work carried out by CARE Nederland. In the following examples, employee engagement plays an important role.


Contributing to one of our programmes:

H&M Conscious Foundation. CARE Nederland entered into a three-year global partnership with H&M Conscious Foundation on behalf of CARE International in 2014. For this partnership, CARE Nederland developed a programme focussing on empowering women economically and on advocating policy changes needed worldwide to ensure women’s full economic participation. CARE Nederland developed this programme, which we are currently managing in ten countries and five regions worldwide, in the context of its strategic theme and focus ‘Women Empowerment and Business Development’. In addition to this global programme, CARE Nederland has developed a second comprehensive women’s economic empowerment and business development programme in Ethiopia, Addis Ababa. This project has been made possible by funds provided by the H&M Conscious Foundation following the H&M Holiday Campaign held at the end of 2014. The project started in the last quarter of 2015.

Stichting BABinactie. Founded in 2005, this foundation collects donations for victims of natural disasters. The foundation made a financial contribution to the CARE livelihoods recovery programmes in the Philippines in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.

CARE Nederland welcomed almost 13,000 new individual donors this financial year, increasing the total number of individual donors to approximately 52,000.

Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties. The ‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties (SHO / giro 555)’, is a coalition of 12 Dutch humanitarian aid organisations that organises national appeals to raise money at times of humanitarian crisis in poor countries. CARE Nederland joined the ‘SHO’ in September 2013. ‘SHO’ plays an essential role in informing the Dutch public about major disasters and about how money raised is allocated to the 12 aid organisations and spent towards helping victims. In financial year 2014-15, ‘SHO’ launched two national appeals for the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, and for the earthquake in Nepal.

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

51


52

Dutch Postcode Lottery. The Dutch Postcode Lottery is the largest charitable lottery in the Netherlands, which supports various foundations and NGOs that strive for a fair and green world. CARE Nederland became a beneficiary and partner of the lottery in 2012 and has been granted €500,000 yearly for a five-year period. These unrestricted funds make a substantial contribution to the co-financing of a large number of the projects carried out by CARE Nederland, as well as contributing to capacity building of the organisation and knowledge sharing. In financial year 2014-15, the Dutch Postcode Lottery participated as a jury member for the ‘Dijk van een Wijk’ competition. The aim of the competition was

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

to find the most impactful, sustainable project supported by the local community in the Netherlands. ‘Energie Coöperatie Anneville’ in Ulvenhout won the competition in the Netherlands with a plan for solar panels on the roof of a local school and an accompanying educational programme. This competition was jointly organised by CARE Nederland, the Netherlands Red Cross, Wetlands International and Nudge, as part of the ‘Dijk van een Wijk’ programme. This programme focuses on strengthening disaster preparedness of 35,000 residents in 150 neighbourhoods in Mindanao in the Philippines.

French insurance company AXA co-funds a climate-Proof Disaster Risk Reduction project in Indonesia, which is part of Partners for Resilience (see pages 58-60). CARE France achieved funding for this project and contributed to the PfR programme of CARE Nederland.


Participating in our campaigns:

Supporting CARE Nederland with time, knowledge or financial donations:

Ploum Lodder Princen, lawyers and civillaw notaries in Rotterdam, continues to be a firm supporter of CARE Nederland. The participation of employees in the Walk in her Shoes Challenge organised by CARE Nederland and the raising of funds further strengthened our relationship.

SITA continued to support CARE Nederland in the 2014-15 financial year by donating a percentage of the turnover of SITA Green Label, whereby waste is 100% CO2 neutrally collected and processed.

GezondNU. The editorial team of gezondNU (part of the MixCom Media Group and the largest independent health magazine in the Netherlands for over 50 years), took part in Walk in Her Shoes Challenge and kept a blog to share stories with their supporters during the campaign.

AmbaFlex, world leader in spiral and conveyor belts, selected CARE Nederland for their yearly Christmas donation.

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

53


Pamodja:

Par tnering 4 Change

The effects of war and violence are devastating on people. War drives people to flee their country, to leave behind their homes and forces them to give up their livelihoods. Worse still, war can tear families apart. Once the war is over, new problems arise. Where do people begin to rebuild their lives and livelihoods in the chaos that is left behind? The most effective weapons against war are greater stability and sustainable economic growth. By improving basic facilities, creating employment and strengthening community ties, the Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation (DCR), a collaboration of social organisations, works side by side with communities to rebuild war-torn communities. The DCR focuses on countries that have taken their first careful steps on the road to recovery after a period of prolonged conflict. In close cooperation with key advocacy officers, CARE Nederland coordinated the DCR advocacy activities in each of the six programming countries. The three pillars of the Pamodja advocacy strategy are: 1. Advocacy Capacity building for local partners in programming countries. The Consortium strengthens advocacy skills and capacities by facilitating strategic advocacy planning sessions, by providing training, and by advocating joint advocacy positions. This will contribute to relevant policy change, and will help local partners

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

improve civil society capacity once the DCR programme has been completed 2. Country-specific advocacy. The topics, approaches and targets differ per country and are regularly adapted to the circumstances. The DCR aims to influence Dutch and EU policies related to the programming countries. 3. Thematic advocacy. This covers emerging topics for a larger number of programming countries. It is mainly carried out in the Netherlands, and where possible also in the programming countries. In financial year 2014-15, CARE Nederland developed an Advocacy Capacity Assessment Tool, which enables civil society organisations to assess themselves on a range of key capacities for effective advocacy. Representatives from CARE country offices and from local partner organisations in the six programming countries were trained in the use of the tool. This provided them with better insight into their advocacy capacity needs. CARE Nederland enabled more than 60 key individuals engaged in lobbying & advocacy to participate in a blended training course on advocacy. Furthermore, an advocacy community of practice, joint advocacy meetings and exchange visits, facilitated linking and learning. In 2015 CARE Nederland also developed a booklet, titled How to effectively strengthen advocacy capacity. Lessons learned from the DCR programme

2011-2015. This publication includes a number of DCR's ‘best practices’ on how to strengthen local partner organisations’ advocacy capacity, and illustrates how comprehensive training, guidance and support can help foster success in advocacy work at local and national levels. The DCR’s advocacy approach has resonated well, resulting in increased impact in the countries. On 3 November 2015, the DCR partners held a conference to discuss the results of the five-year Pamodja project. The DCR programme ends this December, but several local organisations in the six programming countries will continue to lobby for their rights based on the structure laid down by the programme. For instance in the Lubero region, province of North-Kivu in the Democratic Republic of Congo, a local organisation has set up the CoPamodja programme, in cooperation with Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs), peace committees and village development committees.

Lessons learned

Staff turnover was the most disruptive factor in achieving advocacy successes at all levels of the DCR programme. In order to build and sustain commitment, it is vital that all local advocates have a clear understanding of their role, and have the backing of local organisations and managers.


Project information Number of people reached / target group: Total Budget: Budget CARE Nederland: Duration: Leading Donor: Partners: Website:

CARE role:

90,000 people € 64,000,000 € 13,491,880 January 2011 – January 2016 Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs / MFS II CARE Nederland, Healthnet TPO, Save the Children Nederland and ZOA, working side by side with 50+ local NGO partners and community based organisations dcr-africa.org

Areas of CARE activities Sudan

AFRICA

CARE activities

Lasting change

Multiplying Impact

Domains of change:

Inclusive governance

We have shared our knowledge with the school management committees and the parent teacher associations. They are lobbying and taking more ownership of their schools. We have seen participating farmer groups develop into formal networks. They are now able to negotiate better prices for their crops.

Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation / DCR

South Sudan Uganda

Liberia Democratic Republic of Congo Burundi

Mission: The DCR strives towards greater stability and sustainable economic growth in (post-)conflict zones in Africa, by improving basic facilities, creating employment and strengthening community ties.

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

55


4.

Outlook

Financial year 2014 – 15 has been very successful for CARE Nederland, both in terms of our programmes and finances. The results of the past year form a solid foundation for the future. Last year we finalised our strategy plans for 2015 – 2020 (see page 13) that are structured around CARE Nederland’s three roles: Lasting Change, Humanitarian Action and Multiplying Impact. Within these roles, we aim to deliver world-class expertise in: Inclusive Governance in Fragile Settings, Integrated Risk Management, Women Empowerment through Business Development and Gender in Emergencies. These strategy plans will be implemented next year. Our financial position for the coming year is expected to remain stable; we expect to allocate € 65,000 to the continuity reserve.

Income

CARE Nederland foresees a steady increase in institutional funding, mostly for Humanitarian Action programmes. Funding for Lasting Change programmes is expected to remain stable, and has already largely been achieved with the confirmation of two Strategic Partnerships with the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs. We will continue to invest in relationships with

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

individuals and corporate relations, and a rise in income is expected from these sources. Income from third parties is expected to remain stable. CARE Nederland is pleased to report the continued support of the Dutch Postcode Lottery, which was announced by the lottery in 2015. We look forward to strengthening our partnership with the lottery as we continue to fight poverty.

Expenses

Humanitarian Action and Promoting Lasting Change

The rise in disasters worldwide has led to a growing demand for Humanitarian Action programmes. Although disasters cannot be predicted, it is generally expected that emergencies will become more frequent and protracted. In response to disasters, CARE Nederland is committed to incorporating Gender in Emergencies. In 2016, several of our Lasting Change programmes will enter into their second phase, such as the Biraturaba programme (see page 34). Two programmes within the new framework of fiveyear Strategic Partnerships with MoFA, will be effective from 1 January 2016. The first programme, Every Voice Counts, focuses on Inclusive Governance in Fragile Settings.

The second programme, Partners for Resilience, is a continuation of an existing programme (see pages 58-60), and is centred around Integrated Risk Management. Both programmes will strengthen the CARE Nederland strategic goals for 2020. Women Empowerment through Business Development, a programme set up by CARE Nederland and the H&M Conscious Foundation, will be rolled out across several countries. 2016 will also see the launch of the programme in Ethiopia, funded by the 2014 H&M Holiday campaign.

Multiplying Impact

In the coming year, CARE Nederland will continue to invest in Multiplying Impact activities, to influence and engage with policy makers, the general public and corporate relations. Planned advocacy activities include the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul (see page 27). The results of the 2015 Dutch Humanitarian Summit, in particular the importance of Gender in Emergencies, will be brought to the attention of key players in the humanitarian field at the World Summit. General information about programmes and awareness campaigns will feature on our website; we will continue to engage with the


Income * Income from own fundraising activities

* Income from own third-party campaigns

35,308,753 5,665,000

2,000,000

Expenditure

37,896,275

* Expenditure on objective

35,791,512

# Lasting Change

20,149,060

# Humanitarian action

13,602,020 2,040,432

# Multiplying impact * Institutional funds

27,518,753

## Advocacy

767.035

## Public information / awareness campaigns * Other income (inc. Interest)

125,000

* Fundraising costs: # Related to own fundraising # Related to Institutional Funds * Management & Administration:

Result

1,273,397 1,307,093 1,236,200 70.894 797,670 -2.587523

Appropriation of the result Excluding allocation to continuity reserve

-2.652523

Allocation to continuity reserve

Dutch general public with Whocares.me and our social media activities, and with our newsletters we will continue to inform readers. We will launch the second Walk in her Shoes campaign in 2016 and actively seek to engage individual and corporate donors in our efforts to help women and girls. This second campaign

65.000

will be organised in close cooperation with MasterPeace. The successful conference the Power of Entrepreneurial Women Worldwide (see page 32) will also be held again next year.

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Partners for Resilience Working together on disasters, climate, ecosystems A global partnership working towards an integrated approach in community resilience

The number of natural and man-made disasters has increased dramatically over the past decades, with climate change contributing to more extreme and unpredictable weather. Degradation and loss of ecosystems intensify the hazards that, combined with the high vulnerability of communities in the Global South, lead to increased disaster risks. It is well established that the poorest people in the poorest countries suffer disproportionately: lives, assets, products and crops are lost. Disasters wipe out hard-won gains in poverty reduction, and communities are caught in a vicious circle where poverty creates vulnerability, and disasters increase poverty. Partners for Resilience (PfR) aims to reduce the impact of natural hazards on the livelihoods of around 400,000 vulnerable people worldwide. The shared vision is that disaster risk reduction

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

(DRR) and climate change adaptation (CCA) can be integrated with ecosystem management and restoration (EMR) to boost communities’ resilience and enhance livelihoods.

continue with the next phase of the programme, focusing on lobbying and advocacy, in order to implement the PfR approach on a larger scale,

In March 2015, CARE Nederland and the PfR partners participated in the third UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction in Sendai, Japan. The PfR partners organised an interactive session and panel discussion during the conference, to share experiences and the partners’ Recipe for Resilience. Keynote speaker was Lilianne Ploumen, the Dutch Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation. Dr. Sileshi Zewdie, CARE Ethiopia representative, served as a panellist and shared his experience with livelihood resilience and Village, Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs) in strengthening resilience to disaster risk.

Case study: Introduction of gender equality perspective in Disaster Risk Reduction programmes in ten rural communities in Guatemala.

In October 2015, the PfR partners held a closing conference in The Hague with the participating local organisations. Local partners also held closing events in their respective countries, to discuss the results of the programme with local communities and authorities. Most countries will

The ten participating rural communities all live in areas at high risk of natural disasters, such as earthquakes and extreme weather conditions. In these rural communities women mainly carry out domestic tasks and their involvement in decision-making on a community level is low. Within the Partners for Resilience programme, CARE Nederland and the Asociacion Vivamos Mejor, identified the strengths and weaknesses of these women in terms of risk management, valuing their participation and their capacity to help minimise the consequences of climate change.


Project information

Results

The programme achieved the inclusion of 31% women in ten ‘Local Coordinators for Disaster Risk Reduction / COLRED’ groups. The process of strengthening local capacities helped the women to identify and interpret the risks to themselves and their families, and helped them to respond promptly and effectively to those risks. Women improved their self-esteem by participating in these groups, according to their testimonies. Due to their involvement in the COLRED groups, they were also able to participate in other decision-making processes in their communities.

Lessons learned

In rural contexts, formal education is often limited for both men and women, and a high percentage of adult women are illiterate. When introducing programmes such as these, it is important to identify women with leadership skills, to encourage the development of other women leaders. This will help women become an integral part of decision-making structures in communities in the future.

…here in our community we understand our own needs; men and women have the same rights in the community. In our community we take care of those who need care the most. As women we have different ideas; we will unite so that we can do this. - Maria Mas, First Aid Commission, COLRED, Pak’im hamlet

Number of people reached / target group: Total Budget: Duration: Leading Donor: Co-funding: Partners: Local Partners: Website:

90,000 people € 13,491,880 January 2011 – January 2016. The PfR programme ends on 31 December 2015, but will continue in 2016 with a grant given by the Dutch MoFA (Strategic Partnerships framework 2016 – 2020). Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs / MFS II French insurance company AXA co-funds one of the PfR programmes, in Indonesia. CARE France achieved funding for this project and contributed to the CARE Nederland PfR programme. CARE Nederland, Netherlands Red Cross (lead agency), Cordaid, the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre, Wetlands International Six CARE country offices and 11 local partner organisations partnersforresilience.nl

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Philippines Guatemala

Ethiopia Mali

Nicaragua

Uganda

Indonesia

Areas of CARE activities

CARE role:

Lasting change

Multiplying Impact

Domains of change:

Inclusive governance

PfR aims to reduce the impact of natural hazards on the livelihoods of around 400,000 vulnerable people worldwide. 60

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

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5.

Financial statements 2014-2015

5.1 General information about CARE Nederland Name (under the Articles): Stichting CARE Nederland Business location: The Hague, The Netherlands Address: Parkstraat 21

The financial statements cover the reporting period 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015.

5.2.1

Balance sheet after appropriation of the result

ASSETS

30 June 2015

30 June 2014

Tangible fixed assets (ref. 5.4.1)

41,058

48,621

Financial fixed assets (ref.5.4.2)

54,079

54,029

Telephone: +31 (0)70 310 50 50

Receivables, prepayments and accrued income (ref. 5.4.3)

34,246,853

36,296,851

Legal form: Stichting (Foundation under Dutch law)

Cash and cash equivalents (ref. 5.4.4)

13,588,212

16,782,547

Total assets

47,930,202

53,182,048

30 June 2015

30 June 2014

Chamber of Commerce registration: Articles of Association filed on 2 December 1993 (41158230) Latest amendment Articles: 12 April 2013 Membership: CARE International Confederation, located in Geneva, Switzerland

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5.2 General explanatory notes to the financial statements

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

LIABILITIES Reserves and Funds (ref. 5.4.5 and 5.4.6) Continuity reserve Earmarked reserves Earmarked funds Non-current liabilities (ref. 5.4.7.1)

10,751,603 2,723,386 2,891,792 5,136,425

12,386,886 2,353,553 3,671,977 6,361,356

3,198,229

10,213,027

Current liabilities (ref. 5.4.7.2)

33,980,370

30,582,135

Total liabilities

47,930,202

53,182,048


5.2.2

Statement of income and expenditure

INCOME

Result 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

Income from own fundraising activities (ref. 5.5.1.1)

2,558,553

5,783,931

9,065,073

Income from third-party campaigns (ref. 5.5.1.2)

2,461,963

1,500,000

3,137,329

22,196,654

16,927,956

22,530,669

101,703

90,000

213,894

40,811

-

50,862

27,359,684

24,301,887

34,997,827

Result 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

Government grants (ref 5.5.1.3) Interest income and income from investments (ref. 5.5.1.4) Other income (ref 5.5.1.5) Total income

EXPENSE Expenditure on objectives (ref 5.5.2.2) Sustainable development Humanitarian action Multiplying impact Advocacy Public information / Awareness campaigns Costs of income generation (ref 5.5.2.3) Costs of own fundraising activities Costs of raising income from third-party campaigns Acquisition costs institutional grants Management and administration costs (ref. 5.5.2.4) Total expense

Balanse of funds

27,460,916 5,598,905 20,410,229 1,451,782 472,529 979,253

22,961,088 16,373,251 5,005,878 1,581,959 514,400 1,067,559

1,054,682 914,812 103,716 36,154

26,667,755 12,650,757 13,073,434 943,564 299,854 643,710

1,029,059 1,006,604 22,455

621,143 539,752 49,871 31,520

479,365

771,145

689,139

28,994,963

24,761,292

27,978,037

Result 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

1,635,279-

459,405-

7,019,790

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5.2.3

Appropriation of result

RESULT Continuity reserve Earmarked reserves Earmarked funds

5.2.4

Cash flow statement

Result 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

Result 2013-2014

1,635,279-

459,405-

7,019,790

369,836

65,000

135,656

780,185-

688,884-

538,838

1,224,931-

164,479

6,345,296

1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015

Total cash and cash equivalents as at 1 July Cash flow from operating activities Receipts from donors Grants received Payments in connection with grants Payments to suppliers and employees

16,782,547 3,339,8536,970,778 24,562,589 29,204,9435,668,277-

Cash flow generated from operating activities Interest received Interest paid Receipts from other income and expenditure Payments from other income and expenditure

128,697 -

Cash flow from investment activities Investeringen in materiele vaste activa Desinvesteringen materiele vaste activa

10,725-

Net cash flow

1 July 2013 - 30 June 2014

128,697

13,116,854 3,605,638 3,186,951 20,797,957 16,752,1253,627,145194,922 194,922 -

10,725-

38,50638,506-

3,221,881-

3,762,054

27,546

96,361-

Increase / decrease in cash and cash equivalents

3,194,335-

3,665,693

Total cash and cash equivalents as at 30 June

13,588,212

16,782,547

Exchange differences on cash and cash equivalents

The cash flow statement is prepared according to the direct method. Interest received and paid are netted with a positive balance of â‚Ź 128,697.

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5.2.5

Key Performance Indicators

Result 2014-2015

Budget 2014-2015

Result 2013-2014

100

93

76

Expenditure on objective as a percentage of total expenditure

95

94

95

Costs of direct fundraising activities as a percentage of income from these activities

36

17

6

Management and administration expenses as a percentage of total expenditure

2

3

2

Expenditure on objective as a percentage of total income

In the previous financial year, the Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) Conscious Foundation made a contribution of € 6,820,560 that had a significant effect on the key figure ‘Expenditures on objectives as a percentage of total income’ as the activities funded from this contribution started in financial year 2014-2015. This individual contribution caused a material decrease of the key figure in financial year 2013-2014 and an increase in financial year 2014-2015. Abstracting from this contribution, the KPI amounts to 94% in financial year 20142015 and 95% in the previous financial year. The key figure ‘Costs of direct fundraising activities as a percentage of income from these activities’ rose from 6% in the previous financial year to 36% in the financial year 2014-2015. This was brought about by the donation made by the H&M Conscious Foundation in 2013-2014 that had a strong lowering impact on the key figure. The independent Central Bureau for Fundraising (CBF) allows a maximum threeyear average percentage of 25 percent. This three-year average percentage amounts to 21 percent. As a result CARE Nederland meets the CBF requirement.

5.3 Accounting principles

5.3.4

5.3.1 General

5.3.4.1 General The accounting policies used for the valuation of assets and liabilities and the determination of the result are based on acquisition cost. To the extent not stated otherwise, assets and liabilities are stated at face value.

5.3.2 Currency

5.3.4.2 Assets and liabilities in foreign currencies Monetary assets and liabilities in a foreign currency are translated to the functional currency on the balance sheet date at the exchange rate prevailing on that date. Nonmonetary assets and liabilities in a foreign currency entered at historical cost are translated to euro at the exchange rate prevailing on the transaction date. The exchange differences resulting from translation are recorded as expenditure in the statement of income and expenditure.

The CARE Nederland financial statements are prepared in Accordance with the Dutch Annual Reporting Guideline 650 for Fundraising Institutions issued by the Dutch Accounting Standards Board.

The financial statements are drawn up in euro, which is both the functional currency and presentation currency of CARE Nederland.

5.3.3

Use of estimates

The preparation of the financial statements requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of the accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, income and expenses. Actual results may differ from these estimates. The estimates and the underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimates are revised and in any future period affected.

Assets and liabilities

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5.3.4.3 Tangible fixed assets Tangible fixed assets are depreciated from the date on which they are placed in service over the expected future useful life of the asset, based on asset type. The depreciation periods have been determined as follows: fixtures and fittings: five-year period communication equipment: three-year period computers/computer equipment: three-year period If a change is made to the estimated future useful life of an asset, the future amount of depreciation is adjusted. The depreciation figures include gains and losses on the sale of tangible fixed assets. On each balance sheet date, CARE Nederland assesses whether there are any indications that a fixed asset may be subject to impairment. If such indications exist, the recoverable amount of the asset is determined. Impairment exists if the carrying value of an asset exceeds the recoverable amount, being the higher of fair value less costs of disposal and value in use. 5.3.4.4 Financial fixed assets Financial fixed assets are valued at historical cost.

1

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A coalition of Dutch humanitarian aid organisations

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

5.3.4.5 Receivables At recognition, receivables are stated at the fair value of the consideration. After initial recognition, trade receivables are stated at amortised costs, being the amount received adjusted for the share premium or discount, and after deduction of transaction costs. Provisions for doubtful debts are charged to the carrying amount of the receivable. 5.3.4.6 Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash, bank balances and demand deposits falling due within twelve months. Current account credit facilities with banks are recognised under amounts due to credit institutions as current liabilities. Cash and cash equivalents are stated at nominal value. 5.3.4.7 Reserves and funds For CARE Nederland’s policy on reserves and funds see paragraph 4.5 and 4.6. 5.3.4.8 Project commitments Project commitments are recognised on the date on which the commitment is entered into with a CARE International country office or partner. 5.3.4.9 Debts Upon initial recognition, debts are stated at fair value. Transaction costs directly attributable to the acquisition of the debts are included in the measurement at recognition. After recognition, debts are stated at amortised cost

5.3.5

Income and expenses

5.3.5.1 General Income and expenditure are allocated to the period to which they relate. 5.3.5.2 Direct fundraising activities The income derived from direct fundraising activities is recognised in the year to which they relate. All contractual commitments arising from business partnerships are recognised as income, with amounts not yet received recorded as receivables. 5.3.5.3 Third-party campaigns Contributions received from humanitarian action appeals launched by the emergency relief umbrella organization ‘Samenwerkende Hulporganisaties 1(SHO / giro 555)’ are accounted for in the year of receipt. Contributions from the Dutch Postcode Lottery ‘Nationale Postcode Loterij (NPL)’ are accounted for in the year to which they relate.


5.3.5.4 Government grants Income from government grants is recognised with a distinction made between income from direct project expenditure and the contribution towards overhead costs. Grant income from direct project expenditure is recognised in the year in which project expenditure from grants was realised. Expired grant income is deducted from grant income in the year in which the grant expired. Income from the contribution towards overhead costs is recognised in accordance with a fixed pattern as follows: • • •

25% on the grant award date 15% upon determination of the definitive grant amount 60% directly proportional to the number of months in which the relevant project is implemented, less the first month

5.3.5.7 Foreign currency transactions Transactions executed in a foreign currency are translated at the exchange rate prevailing on the date of the transaction. 5.3.5.8 Exchange differences Exchange differences arising from the settlement and translation of monetary assets and liabilities in foreign currency to euros are taken or charged to the statement of income and expenditure. Non-monetary assets stated at the acquisition price in a foreign currency are translated at the exchange rate (or approximate exchange rate) prevailing on the transaction date. 5.3.5.9 Expenditure Monetary project-related commitments to third parties entered into during the reporting period are stated as expenditure. Other expenditure is recorded as an expense in the year in which performance was delivered to CARE Nederland.

5.3.5.5 Income from investments CARE Nederland has no portfolio investments and therefore does not receive any investment income.

5.3.5.10 Periodic remuneration Pursuant to the terms of employment, wages, salaries and social security contributions are recognised in the statement of income and expenditure to the extent payable to employees.

5.3.5.6 Interest income and interest expenses Interest income and interest expenses are recognised on a time-weighted basis, adjusted for the effective interest rate of the assets and liabilities concerned. Interest expenses are stated after adjustment for the transaction costs recognised for loans received, which are factored into the calculation of the effective interest rate.

5.3.5.11 Pensions CARE Nederland recognises all pension schemes in accordance with the liabilities approach. The contribution payable over the course of the reporting year is recognised as an expense. Movements in the pension provision are included in the statement of income and expenditure. The amount entered as the pension provision is the best estimate of

the amounts not yet paid up that are deemed necessary for the purpose of settling the relevant liabilities on the balance sheet date. 5.3.5.12 Operating lease Lease contracts (tenancy agreement), whereby the advantages and disadvantages vested in ownership do not fall to the organisation are recognised as an operating lease. Commitments arising from an operating lease, adjusted for payments received from the lessor, are taken to the statement of income and expenditure on a straight-line basis over the term of the contract. 5.3.5.13 Determination of the result Based on the above accounting policies, the result for the financial year is determined as the difference between income derived from own fundraising activities, the share in both joint and third-party campaigns, government/other grants and other income, on the one hand, and expenditure on the objective, including allocated costs, income generation costs, and management and administration costs, on the other hand.

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5.4 Notes on the balance sheet 5.4.1

Tangible fixed assets (ref. 5.4.1)

Furniture & Fittings

Computer equipment Hardware

Software

Communication equipment

Total

Carrying value as at 30 June 2014

13,677

16,070

683

18,191

48,621

Accumulated investments as at 30 June 2014 Investments in the reporting period Disposals in the reporting period

16,147 -

67,824 10,160 -

9,170 -

20,594 564 -

113,735 10,724 -

Accumulated investments as at 30 June 2015

16,147

77,984

9,170

21,158

124,459

Accumulated depreciation as at 30 June 2014 Depreciation in the reporting period Disposals in the reporting period

2,470 4,063 -

51,754 8,620 -

8,487 589 -

2,403 5,015 -

65,114 18,287 -

Accumulated depreciation as at 30 June 2015

6,533

60,374

9,076

7,418

83,401

Carrying value as at 30 June 2015

9,614

17,610

94

13,740

41,058

In financial year 2014-2015 CARE Nederland invested € 10,724 in computer equipment. Total depreciation amounted to € 18,287. Items depreciated were furniture, computer equipment and communication equipment.

5.4.2

Financial fixed assets (ref. 5.4.2)

Balance as at 30 June 2014 Earned interest Balance as at 30 June 2015

30 June 2015

30 June 2014

54,029

53,974

50

55

54,079

54,029

In financial year 2001-2002 CARE Nederland deposited a sum of € 45,500 in the CARE International Revolving Fund. The purpose of the Revolving Fund is to grant short-term loans to CARE International members to cover temporary, project-related cash flow deficits. The funds received by the relevant CARE members are redeposited (including a limited amount of interest) as soon as a liquidity issue has been resolved. The cumulative interest amounting to € 8,529 was paid and added to the principal sum. The interest paid during the reporting period totalled € 50.

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5.4.3

Receivables, prepayments and accrued income (ref. 5.4.3)

Project receivables Long-term project receivables Short-term project receivables

30 June 2015

30 June 2014 10,384,190 25,515,279

4,155,114 29,501,740

35,899,469

33,656,854 Debtors Various debtors

93,363

15,056

93,363

15,056 Other receivables Security deposits VAT

13,032 91,832

13,032 52,521 104,864

Prepayments and accrued income Statutory payroll / Social security Prepaid pension insurances Other staff costs Interest due Miscellaneous

121,170 20,654 14,969 313,286

Total receivables

65,553 53,950 83,132 16,080 37,396 47,908

470,079

238,466

34,246,853

36,296,851

Receivables largely comprise project receivables. Receivables arising from commitments entered into with third parties during the reporting period are recognised under project receivables. Furthermore, project receivables include receivables arising in connection with project costs incurred by CARE Nederland. Source of financing

30 June 2015

30 June 2014

3,943,040

8,083,073

European Commission

18,671,597

18,352,774

Other donors

11,242,217

9,463,622

Total project receivables

33,656,854

35,899,469

Ministry of Foreign Affairs

In comparison with the previous reporting year total receivables in financial year 20142015 have been reduced by â‚Ź 2,049,998. This is the result of a (temporary) shift from longerterm sustainable development programmes towards short-term humanitarian activities; implementation periods of humanitarian action projects are typically limited to one year.

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5.4.4

Cash and cash equivalents (ref. 5.4.4)

Cash balances Cash in hand

30 June 2015

30 June 2014

72

122 72

Banks Current account Current account (foreign currency) Savings account / deposit

122

697,777 4,440,605 8,449,758

Total cash and cash equivalents

8,816,594 2,177,875 5,787,956 13,588,140

16,782,425

13,588,212

16,782,547

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash, bank and savings balances, and deposits falling due within twelve months, and are at the disposal of CARE Nederland. The balance of the foreign currency current account decreased with approximately â‚Ź 3,000,000 resulting mainly from temporary pre-funding activities in Somalia. In the next financial year dedicated incoming transfers from the European Commission will offset the pre-funding.

5.4.5

Reserves (ref. 5.4.5)

RESERVES

30 June 2014

Dotation

Extraction

30 june 2015

Continuity reserve

2,353,553

369,833

-

2,723,386

Earmarked reserve for covering the costs of the organisation

1,179,945

78,595

384,938

873,602

Earmarked reserve for covering direct project costs

649,097

237,618

815,460

71,255

Earmarked reserve for high-risk projects

815,845

-

-

815,845

24,000

4,000

-

28,000

Earmarked reserve for Innovative Activities

240,000

-

-

240,000

Earmarked reserve for Emergency Aid Projects

153,090

50,000

-

203,090

Earmarked reserve for Reconstruction and Development Projects

610,000

50,000

-

660,000

Total earmarked reserves

3,671,977

420,213

1,200,398

2,891,792

Total reserves

6,025,530

790,046

1,200,398

5,615,179

Greenfund reserve

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015


Continuity reserve With a view to achieving its objectives, CARE Nederland incurs costs that are required to be covered from various sources of income. To ensure that less than satisfactory income does not endanger the continuity of the activities carried out by CARE Nederland, the organisation has created a continuity reserve to cushion any financial setbacks. CARE Nederland maintains a reserve policy prescribing that the optimal continuity reserve should cover 75% to 100% of the operating costs defined in the VFI guideline on the ‘Financial management of charities’. The minimum continuity reserve should cover 50% of the operating costs. The above guideline and the regulations by the Dutch Central Bureau on Fundraising (CBF) provide that a continuity reserve may not exceed one and half times the annual costs of the operating organisation. This means that the maximum amount of the continuity reserve for CARE Nederland is € 6,221,303 for the 2014-2015 period. The actual operating cost amounts to € 4,147,535. As at 30 June 2015 the continuity reserve amounts to € 2,723,386, or 66% of the costs of the operating organisation. This implies that the amount held in the continuity reserve is within the boundaries set by CARE Nederland, where the maximum coverage is 100% of total operating costs. Earmarked reserve for covering organisational costs As regards project-related contracts concluded before the beginning of the 2012-2013 financial year, the size of the reserve earmarked for covering the costs of the organisation was based on the total amount of overhead cost reimbursements pledged by donors, less actual

payments on programmes still running at the end of the reporting period, in accordance with the accounting policies relating to the determination of the result. With effect from the 2012-2013 financial year this estimation method is no longer used for administration cost recovery obtained from institutional donors. However, it still applies to overhead cost reimbursements from both our own and third-party fundraising activities. Other things being equal, the earmarked reserve will be reduced in the years ahead in accordance with the following schedule:

Greenfund reserve The Greenfund reserve seeks to compensate the CO2 emissions arising from activities carried out by CARE Nederland. Earmarked reserve for innovative activities CARE Nederland maintained a reserve for innovative activities during the 2013-2014 reporting period. A Board decision was taken to finance innovative activities from current budgets effective from the 2014-2015 financial year. The reserve will be maintained at a level of € 240,000.

2015-2016

2016-2017

Annual reduction

263,602

116,929

Accumulated reduction

263,602

380,530

Reduction of earmarked reserve for covering the costs of the organisation

Earmarked reserve for covering direct project costs CARE Nederland employs its own funds to finance constituent parts of projects performed by the country offices as well as projects implemented by CARE Nederland. The unrealised costs of these project activities are reserved at the end of the reporting period. Risk reserve The risk reserve is required to cover financial risks if special circumstances preclude adequate project accounting . Furthermore potential third-party claims are estimated and added to the risk reserve.

Earmarked reserve for Humanitarian Action and for Lasting Change projects CARE Nederland holds reserves for the purpose of financing both Humanitarian Action projects and Lasting Change projects. The amount held in the Humanitarian Action reserve for this reporting year amounted to € 203,090. The Board intends to increase the Humanitarian Action reserve to € 500,000 in the course of the 2015-2020 period to ensure that adequate funds are available to respond quickly in the event of disasters or other humanitarian situations.

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5.4.6

Funds (ref. 5.4.6)

FUNDS

30 June 2014

Dotation

Extraction

30 june 2015

348,308

563,778

316,873

595,213

Movement in HMCF earmarked fund

5,990,345

52,308

1,559,442

4,483,211

Movement in HMCF earmarked fund

16,565

12,616

-

29,181

6,138

22,682

-

28.820

6,361,356

651.384

1,876,315

5,136,425

Movement in SHO earmarked fund

Movement in earmarked fund for emergency aid (private donations) Total funds

Earmarked funds Earmarked funds consist of funds designated by third parties to specific activities, themes, etc. that have not yet been spent. The earmarked funds decreased with â‚Ź 1,224,931 due to the spending of funds 1) donated by the H&M Conscious Foundation and 2) raised through the SHO Philippines Hayan appeal. The decrease is partly offset by an increase of earmarked funds related the SHO Nepal Earthquake appeal.

(ref. 5.4.7.1)

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5.4.7 Liabilities

Debts are classified as liabilities towards third parties and other debts. Debts relating to years exceeding one year after the balance sheet date are accounted for under non-current liabilities. 5.4.7.1 Non-current liabilities Non-current liabilities consist of long-term commitments to countries and are payable within five years. The decrease of â‚Ź 7,014,798 is caused by a shift from long-term development projects towards short-term humanitarian action activities in financial year 2014-2015. This shift is apparent in both absolute and relative terms.

30 June 2015

30 June 2014

Long-term project commitments

3,198,229

10,213,027

Total non-current liabilities

3,198,229

10,213,027

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

We seek a world of hope, tolerance and social justice, where poverty has been overcome and people live in dignity and security.


5.4.7.2 Current liabilities (ref. 5.4.7.2) 30 June 2015 Short-term project commitments Prepayment received from donors

30 June 2014 31,029,477

30,048,456

2,255,276

-

335,677

221,210

Creditors Accruals and deferred income Holiday entitlement / Holidays Other staff costs Miscellaneous

218,380 95,627 45,933

Total current liabilities

171,335 68,347 72,787 359,940

312,469

34,180,370

30,582,135

As previously commented, the focus of CARE Nederland is gradually shifting from longterm to short-term activity commitments. The shift is mainly relative for the short-term commitments. While the relative short-term project commitments increased significantly from 75% to 91% of total project commitments in financial year 2014-2015, the total volume of short-term project commitments remained more or less identical during the same period.

charges. CARE Nederland is party to a fiveyear lease contract that commenced on 1 July 2013 and ends on June 30, 2018. This entails a financial liability of € 255,000 for the 2014-2015 financial year that is not shown on the balance sheet. Of the above-mentioned amount € 170,000 comprises a long-term liability and € 85,000 is a short-term liability. A bank guarantee amounting to € 32,230 was issued for the lease of the new building.

5.4.7.3 Off-balance sheet receivables and liabilities CARE Nederland has two off-balance sheet financial liabilities relating to a lease and service

CARE Nederland also has a short-term € 13,914 Service Level Agreement (SLA) with CARE International UK for the provision of IT services.

In conclusion, during the course of the 20122013 financial year the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs allocated two reconstruction grants to CARE Nederland (for the Foundation for Peace and Peace under Construction). The off-balance sheet receivable is the difference between the grant commitment and total funds. The majority of these funds will be spent through the country offices of CARE International, and as a result new liabilities will be created, which are reported as off-balance sheet payables.

Expenditure

Grant Commitment

in 2014-2015

total

Off-Balance Receivable

Off-Balance Payable

Foundation For Peace

7,602,035

902,287

5,764,528

1,837,507

1,550,858

Peace Under Construction

7,102,906

1,178,220

4,994,461

2,108,445

1,902,504

14,704,941

2,080,506

10,758,989

3,945,952

3,453,362

PROJECTS

Totals

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

73


Financial statemens for the national SHO appeal ‘Help slachtoffers Filipijnen’ 1 January - 31 December 2014 Income

Cumulative through 31 December 2014

344,504

2,622,004

-

-

4,433

6,388

348,937

2,628,392

-

-

24,115

183,540

324,822

2,444,852

Income from joint campaigns  Interest Total income Costs of preparation and coordination Ceiling for overhead expenses Total amount available for aid activities Expenditure

Emergency relief

Commitments by participant:

Reconstruction

Emergency relief

Total

Total

-

-

2,401,848

-

-

2,401,848

support received via the implementing organisation

-

85,657

-

-

85,657

-

support received via the international network

-

2,301,543

-

-

2,301,543

-

support received via the participant

-

14,648

-

-

14,648

-

Total available room for commitments

-2,077,026 1 January - 31 December 2014 Emergency relief

Information on participant cash flows Transfers by the participant in connection with:

Reconstruction

43,004 Cumulative through 31 December 2014 Emergency relief

Total

Reconstruction

Total

-

-

1,884,889

-

-

1,884,889

support received via the implementing organisation

-

85,657

-

-

85,657

-

support received via the international network

-

1,799,232

-

-

1,799,232

-

support received via the participant

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,495,985

-

-

1,495,985

support received via the implementing organisation

-

85,657

-

-

85,657

-

support received via the international network

-

1,395,680

-

-

1,395,680

-

support received via the participant

-

14,648

-

-

14,648

-

Insight into local expenditure:

74

Reconstruction

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015


Financial statemens for the national SHO appeal ‘Help slachtoffers Filipijnen’ 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015

Cumulative through 30 June 2015

Income

-

2,622,004

-

-

Interest

-

6,388

Total income

-

2,628,392

Costs of preparation and coordination

-

-

Ceiling for overhead expenses

-

183,540

Total amount available for aid activities

-

2,444,852

Income from joint campaigns

Expenditure

Emergency relief

Commitments by participant:

Reconstruction

Emergency relief

Total

Reconstruction

Total

-

-

316,873

-

-

2,413,414

support received via the implementing organisation

-

-

-

-

85,657

-

support received via the international network

-

292,299

-

-

2,301,542

-

support received via the participant

-

24,574

-

-

26,215

-

Total available room for commitments

-316,873 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015 Emergency relief

Information on participant cash flows Transfers by the participant in connection with:

Reconstruction

31,438 Cumulative through 30 June 2015 Emergency relief

Total

Reconstruction

Total

-

-

292,299

-

-

1,884,889

support received via the implementing organisation

-

-

-

-

85,657

-

support received via the international network

-

292,299

-

-

1,799,232

-

support received via the participant

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1,476,307

-

-

1,773,733

support received via the implementing organisation

-

-

-

-

85,657

-

support received via the international network

-

1,451,733

-

-

1,661,861

-

support received via the participant

-

24,574

-

-

26,215

-

Insight into local expenditure:

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

75


Financial statemens for the national SHO appeal ‘Stop de ebola ramp’ (Liberia) 1 January - 31 December 2014 Income

Cumulative through 31 December 2014

530,000

530,000

-

-

-

-

530,000

530,000

-

-

34,674

34,674

495,326

495,326

Income from joint campaigns  Interest Total income Costs of preparation and coordination Ceiling for overhead expenses Total amount available for aid activities Expenditure

Emergency relief

Commitments by participant:

Emergency relief

Total 495,326

-

-

495,326

-

-

-

-

-

-

495,326

-

495,326

495,326

-

495,326

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total available room for commitments

1 January - 31 December 2014 Emergency relief

Reconstruction

Cumulative through 31 December 2014 Emergency relief

Total

Reconstruction

Total

-

-

-

-

-

-

support received via the implementing organisation

-

-

-

-

-

-

support received via the international network

-

-

-

-

-

-

support received via the participant

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

6,852

-

-

6,852

-

-

-

-

-

-

6,852

-

-

6,852

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Insight into local expenditure: support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network support received via the participant

76

Total

-

support received via the participant

Information on participant cash flows Transfers by the participant in connection with:

Reconstruction

-

support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network

Reconstruction

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015


Financial statemens for the national SHO appeal ‘Stop de ebola ramp’ (Liberia) 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015 Income

Cumulative through 30 June 2015 609,721

609,721

-

-

-

-

609,721

609,721

-

-

39,888

39,888

569,833

569,833

Income from joint campaigns  Interest Total income Costs of preparation and coordination Ceiling for overhead expenses Total amount available for aid activities Expenditure

Emergency relief

Commitments by participant:

Emergency relief

Total 569,833

-

-

569,833

-

-

-

-

-

-

569,833

-

569,833

569,833

-

569,833

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total available room for commitments

1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015 Emergency relief

support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network support received via the participant Insight into local expenditure: support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network support received via the participant

Total

-

support received via the participant

Information on participant cash flows Transfers by the participant in connection with:

Reconstruction

-

support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

Cumulative through 30 June 2015 Emergency relief

Total

Reconstruction

Total

-

-

430,000

-

-

430,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

430,000

-

-

430,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

425,133

-

-

425,133

-

-

-

-

-

-

425,133

-

-

425,133

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

77


Financial statemens for the national SHO appeal ‘Nederland helpt Nepal’ 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015

Cumulative through 30 June 2015

Income Income from joint campaigns

-

-

1,352,244

1,352,244

-

-

1,352,244

1,352,244

-

-

88,465

88,465

1,263,779

1,263,779

 Interest Total income Costs of preparation and coordination Ceiling for overhead expenses Total amount available for aid activities Expenditure

Emergency relief

Commitments by participant:

Emergency relief

Total -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

700,000

-

700,000

700,000

-

700,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

Total available room for commitments

563,779 1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015 Emergency relief

support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network support received via the participant Insight into local expenditure: support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network support received via the participant

78

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

Total

-

support received via the participant

Information on participant cash flows Transfers by the participant in connection with:

Reconstruction

-

support received via the implementing organisation support received via the international network

Reconstruction

Reconstruction

563,779 Cumulative through 30 June 2015 Emergency relief

Total

Reconstruction

Total

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

700,000

-

700,000

700,000

-

700,000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

156,179

-

156,179

156,179

-

156,179

-

-

-

-

-

-


5.5 Notes to the statement of income and expenditure 5.5.1 Income 5.5.1.1 Income from own fundraising activities Generated funds can be categorised into two groups of donors: 1) individuals and 2) corporate donors. Actual July 2014 - June 2015

Budget July 2014 - June 2015

Actual July 2013 - June 2014

Individual donors

2,454,736

2,357,265

2,244,513

Corporate donors

103,817

3,426,666

6,820,560

2,558,553

5,783,931

9,065,073

(ref. 5.5.1.1)

Total income from own fundraising activities Donations made by individuals During financial year 2014-2015 CARE Nederland continued to invest in income generation programmes to deliver growth in voluntary donations. As a result we saw our income from individual donations rise by € 210,223 (9.6%). Furthermore, individual donations exceeded our budgeted income from individual donations by € 97,471.

Corporate donations Corporate donor income has shown a sharp decline for this reporting period. Following the three-year funding agreement with the Hennes & Mauritz (H&M) Conscious Foundation in financial year 2013 – 2014, CARE Nederland has entered into a new funding agreement with H&M Conscious Foundation for a project in Ethiopia for an amount of approximately

€ 2,200,000. Although CARE Nederland has already received the first donation instalment, the government of Ethiopia is only expected to grant approval for this project during financial year 2015-2016. Therefore this donation will be recognised as income in the next financial year. Other corporate donations are received from Ambaflex, Stichting Bab, Otis, and Sita.

Actual July 2014 - June 2015

Budget July 2014 - June 2015

Actual July 2013 - June 2014

500,000

500,000

500,000

Samenwerkende Hulporganisaties

1,961,963

1,000,000

2,637,329

Total income from third-party campaigns

2,461,963

1,500,000

3,137,329

5.5.1.2 Income from third-party campaigns (ref. 5.5.1.2) Nationale Postcode Lotterij

As a designated five-year beneficiary of the Dutch National Lottery (‘Nationale Postcode Loterij’) since 2012, CARE Nederland received a grant of € 500,000 for the fourth consecutive year during financial year 2014-2015.

In addition, CARE Nederland is a member of the ‘Samenwerkende Hulporganisaties’, which is the umbrella group for humanitarian aid organisation in the Netherlands. This umbrella group, also known as SHO or Giro 555, launched two national campaigns in financial year 2014-

2015; the Ebola Crisis Appeal for Western Africa and the Nepal Earthquake Appeal. CARE Nederland received € 609,721 and € 1,352,244 respectively for humanitarian action programmes in these areas.

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

79


5.5.1.3 Income from government grants (ref. 5.5.1.3)

Actual July 2014 - June 2015

Grants for project activities Ministry of Foreign Affairs European Commission Other grants

8,278,184 5,781,038 7,347,350

Grants to cover administration costs Ministry of Foreign Affairs European Commission Other grants

84,773 339,776 365,533

Total income from Government grants

Government grants received for project activities relate to funds allocated to CARE Nederland and are stated as income on the basis of the project costs incurred, excluding administration cost reimbursements. Actual income from government grants shows an excess of € 5,000,000 when compared to the budgeted grants acquisition. This is the result of access to the in the current financial

21,406,572

Budget July 2014 - June 2015 8,945,545 7,391,645 69,854

790,082

Total interest income and income from investments

Actual July 2014 - June 2015 101,703

101,703 101,703

CARE Nederland has no portfolio investments and therefore only income from interest is presented.

80

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

9,578,587 6,997,485 5,326,867 116,069 393,083 118,578

16,927,956

year established Dutch Relief Fund (DRF) via membership of the Dutch Relief Alliance (DRA). CARE Nederland received an amount of € 7,081,245 (excluding administration cost recovery) from this fund, which is reported partly as direct funding from the Dutch Government and partly as ‘Other grants’. The latter applies when the funds are channelled through another member of the DRA.

Interest income and income from investments Interest

520,912

264,300 256,612 -

22,196,654

5.5.1.4 Interest income and income from investments (ref. 5.5.1.4)

16,407,044

Actual July 2013 - June 2014 21,902,939

627,730

22,530,669

Income from administration cost recovery increased by 50%. This is in line with the increased income from grants and the CARE Nederland policy to recognise 25% of the total administration cost recovery as income at the start of the project.

Budget July 2014 - June 2015 90,000

90,000 90,000

Actual July 2013 - June 2014 213,894

213,894 213,894


5.5.1.5 Other income (ref. 5.5.1.5) Other income Miscellaneous

Actual July 2014 - June 2015 40,811

Total other income

40,811

Budget July 2014 - June 2015 -

-

40,811

Actual July 2013 - June 2014 50,862

-

50,862 50,862

Other income relates to the administrative completion of older projects. In the 2014-2015 financial year CARE Nederland received € 24,710,471 from non-private donors. This largely consisted of grants from institutional donors (€ 22,196,654). Income received as institutional funding as part of a consortium (such as the DRA), is reported as income from Other Grants. 5.5.1.6 Overview of income from non-private donors In the 2014-2015 financial year CARE Nederland received € 24,710,925 from non-private donors. This largely consisted of grants from institutional donors (€ 22,196,654). Income received as institutional funding as part of a consortium (such as the DRA), is reported as income from Other Grants. NON-PRIVATE DONORS

1 July 2014 - 30 June 2015

Department for International Developement (DFID) via CARE UK European Commission Development and Co-operation (EuropAid) Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection (ECHO) Through third parties

8,303,150 3,422,068 2,698,745 2,182,337

Handicap International Hennes & Maurits Conscious Foundation Ministry of Foreign Affairs Ministry of Foreign Affairs Through third parties

8,362,957 4,936,483

Nationale Postcode Loterij Nationale Postcode Loterij Through third parties

500,000 560,586

Samenwerkende Hulporganisaties (“giro 555”) Turing Foundation Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) Total

1 July 2013 - 30 June 2014 661,390 10,556,759 4,347,083 3,043,485 3,166,191

-

1,143

52,308

6,820,560

13,299,441

9,694,656 9,694,656 -

1,060,586

500,000 500,000 -

1,961,963

2,637,329

-

1,614

33,477

1,615,107

24,710,925

32,488,558 CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

81


5.5.2 Expenditure 5.5.2.1 Cost categories and allocation model for the costs of the organisation In accordance with Dutch Accounting Standard for Fundraising Institutions RJ 650, a distinction is made between expenditure on objectives, fundraising costs, and management and administration costs of the organisation. The costs of the organisation, i.e. all the costs that cannot be directly allocated to the objective, are charged to three cost categories in accordance with an allocation model conforming to the model set out in the VFI guideline.

5.5.2.2 Expenditure on objectives (ref. 5.5.2.2) CARE Nederland programmes Programme commitments Costs incurred by CARE Nederland Public information / Awareness campaigns Information activities Allocated costs Total expenditure on objective

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CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

The costs of the organisation are allocated in two steps: 1. All costs directly related to the objective or to income generation are recognised directly under those items, with staff costs allocated on the basis of time writing records. 2. Support costs and general costs are allocated to the cost categories on the basis of FTEs and time sheets.

We work to maximize the value of every euro we receive.

Costs of the organisation directly related to the Board, Directors and Supervisory Council or other general costs are recognised in full under ‘Management and Administration’.

Actual July 2014 - June 2015 23,058,433 3,423,230 830,099 149,154

26,481,663

979,253

27,460,916

Budget July 2014 - June 2015 20,384,392 1,509,138 773,301 294,258

21,893,529

1,067,559

22,961,088

Actual July 2013 - June 2014 23,626,793 2,397,252 482,269 161,441

26,024,045

643,710

26,667,755


Programme expenditure consists of programme commitments to CARE International country offices or implementing partners, plus the direct costs incurred by CARE Nederland. In the 20142015 financial year CARE Nederland maintained expenditure on programmes at a similar level to the preceding financial year. Above budget expenditure is related to additional humanitarian action activities as explained in paragraph 5.1.3 Since the previous financial year, CARE Nederland has strengthened its focus on public information and awareness campaigns in order to attract and retain donors. In the reporting period CARE Nederland has continued with this focus, resulting in an expenditure increase of 52%.

FUNDING SOURCE

The Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the European Commission were the main donors for activities carried out by CARE Nederland for this financial year. The shares of both donors (30% and 21% respectively) are lower when compared to the previous financial year (36% and 26% respectively). The third main source of funding for CARE Nederland was achieved by participating in various consortia; this share increased from 20% in the previous financial year to 32% in financial year 20142015.

total expense amounting to € 20,386,513 and overspending the budget by more than 300%. This includes the ongoing operations in the Philippines and Northern Iraq. While financial resources were largely allocated to humanitarian action, CARE Nederland started the preparations for its long-term sustainable development programme. This resulted in two partnerships with the Dutch Government (with focus on inclusive governance and resilience) and the implementation of programmes regarding civil society building, food security and resilience. The new partnerships with the Dutch Government will materialise in the next financial year.

During the reporting period three large humanitarian crises took place: the Ebola crisis in Western Africa, the Syria crisis and the Nepal earthquake. CARE Nederland responded with a significant humanitarian operation through the CARE International country offices with a

Sustainable Development

Humanitarian Action

960,399

Costs made for Advocacy activities are in line with the budgeted amounts.

Multiplying Impact

Total 2014-2015

Total 2013-2014

Advocacy

Public Info

7,038,944

278,841

-

8,278,184

9,578,586

2,624,298

3,156,740

-

-

5,781,038

6,997,484

-

1,586,686

-

-

1,586,686

2,096,542

1,562,911

7,342,121

-

-

8,905,032

5,390,472

451,297

1,285,738

193,688

979,253

2,909,976

2,604,671

Actual 2014-2015

5,598,905

20,410,229

472,529

979,253

27,460,916

26,667,755

Budget 2014-2015

16,373,251

5,005,878

514,400

1,067,559

22,961,088

Actual 2013-2014

12,650,757

13,073,434

299,854

643,710

26,667,755

Ministry of Foreign Affairs European Commission Samenwerkende Hulporgansaties (“giro 555”) Other donors Own resources

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

83


Actual July 2014 June 2015

Budget July 2014 June 2015

Actual July 2013 June 2014

Costs of own fundraising activities

914,812

1,006,604

539,752

Costs of raising income through third-party campaigns

103,716

-

49,871

36,154

22,455

31,520

1,054,682

1,029,059

621,143

5.5.2.3 Costs of income generation (ref. 5.5.2.3)

Acquisition costs of Government grants Total costs for income generation

Costs of income generation in financial year 2014-2015 are in line with the budget, but show a significant increase compared to the costs of income generation of the previous financial year. This increase is in line with the CARE Nederland strategy to increase and secure

Actual July 2014 June 2015

Budget July 2014 June 2015

Actual July 2013 June 2014

Management and administration costs

479,365

771,145

689,139

Total management and administration costs

479,365

771,145

689,139

5.5.2.4 Management and administration costs

Costs for management and administration are € 96,000 lower than budgeted. As a percentage of the total expense, the costs in the 2014-

84

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

direct fundraising from both individuals and the corporate sector. Costs of raising income through third-party campaigns are related to the ‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties (SHO)’ appeals and proposal development for the Dutch Postcode Lottery.

2015 financial year are comparable to the costs incurred in the previous financial year (both 2%).


5.5.3

Specification costs of the organisation

ALLOCATION

OBJECTIVES

FUND-RAISING COSTS

Multiplying Impact

EXPENSE

Grants & Contributions Public Information & Awareness Campaigns Staff costs Housing costs Office & General costs Depreciation & Interest Total

Lasting Change

Humanitarian Action

Advocacy

Public information / Awareness campaings

Own fundraising

Third-party campaigns

Grants

5,151,973

18,692.224

173,132

-

-

-

-

-

24,017,329

-

-

-

830,099

683,929

-

-

-

1,514,028

298,119

1,153.022

211,354

92,708

134,001

65,428

25,071

445,015

2,424,718

13,323

50,581

7,882

5,053

8,674

3,428

992

3,075

93,008

132,871

504,457

78,611

50,399

86,503

34,185

9,896

30,670

927,592

2,619

9,945

1,550

994

1,705

675

195

605

18,288

5,598,905

20,410,229

472,529

979,253

914,812

103,715

36,154

479,364

28,994,963

ALLOCATION

Actual July 2014 - June 2015

Budget July 2014 - June 2015

Actual July 2013 - June 2014

24,017,329

19,800,965

24,296,121

Public Information & Awareness Campaigns

1,514,028

1,473,076

752,357

Staff costs

2,424,718

2,492,867

1,963,741

93,008

86,233

107,458

Office & General costs

927,592

881,651

838,164

Depreciation & Interest

18,288

26,500

20,196

28,994,962

24,761,292

27,978,037

EXPENSE Grants & Contributions

Housing costs

Total

Management / Administration

Actual 2014-2015

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

85


All costs are allocated in the expense categories Objective, Income Generation, and Management & Administration. The costs of the organisation (excluding ‘Grants and contributions’) before allocation to the earmarked categories amounted to € 4,977,631. While in line with the budget, the costs are € 1,295,715 higher than in the previous financial year. This is due to the increased activities for public information and awareness campaigns, as well as more direct fundraising activities. This clarifies the € 761,671 total increase.

Our mission is to serve individuals and families in the poorest communities in the world.

Actual July 2014 - June 2015

Budget July 2014 - June 2015

Actual July 2013 - June 2014

1,595,502

1,660,968

1,322,085

Holiday entitlement and holidays

185,986

172,821

131,062

Social security contributions

276,063

296,191

222,848

Pension contributions

177,282

168,826

144,111

Employee insurances

59,674

59,350

42,194

Commuting expenses

56,864

51,661

39,641

Year-end gratification

73,347

83,048

61,800

2,424,718

2,492,865

1,963,741

STAFF COSTS Gross salaries

Total staff costs

86

Furthermore, staff costs are 23% higher than in the previous year. The reason is threefold. Firstly, the number of employees has increased. Secondly, higher accrued annual leave balances were paid to employees during the financial year. Thirdly, the rise in social security costs in the reporting period was higher than budgeted.

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015


5.5.4 Personnel Actual July 2014 - June 2015

Budget July 2014 - June 2015

Actual July 2013 - June 2014

39.00

33.00

34.00

Advocacy

3.00

3.00

2.00

Board & Executive Assistant

2.00

2.00

2.00

Finance

7.00

6.00

7.00

Quality Management & IT

1.00

1.00

1.00

Office Management

2.00

2.00

2.00

Human Resources

2.00

2.00

2.00

16.00

12.00

13.00

Communication & Fund-Raising

6.00

5.00

5.00

Employees abroad

1.00

2.00

2.00

Number of employees as at the end of the reporting year

40.00

35.00

36.00

Average FTEs in the Netherlands

32.43

28.20

28.39

1.05

2.00

2.00

EMPLOYEES Employees in the Netherlands

Programmes

Average FTEs abroad The employee data excludes temporary employees, consultants and volunteers.

5.5.4

Remuneration of Board and Supervisory Council

5.5.4.1 Remuneration of Board The Board consists of one person with the title Director / CEO. With the appointment of a new Director / CEO in September 2015 there was an overlap period of four months. The Supervisory Council determines the remuneration policy, the amount of remuneration payable to the Board and the amount of other emoluments. The policy is

periodically evaluated and updated. The most recent evaluation took place in 2011. CARE Nederland determines the remuneration policy and sets the level of remuneration in accordance with the Remuneration Scheme for Directors of Charities set out in the VFI guideline and in the Wijffels Code. The Scheme defines a maximum standard for annual income based on weighted criteria. The calculation of annual income excludes employer’s costs. The

Supervisory Council conducted a job evaluation weighting and determined a BSD score of 425455 points with a corresponding maximum salary of € 124,233. With an annual income of € 81,503 the current director’s remuneration remains below the VFI maximum and therefore is in accordance with the Wijffels Code.

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BOARD REMUNERATION

Juli 2014 - June 2015

Employment contract Nature (term) Number of hours part-time percentage period Remuneration Annual income • gross annual salary • holiday pay • year-end gratitude

Fixed contract 38 100 01-09 t/m 30/06 81,503 75,465 6,037 -

Social security contributions (employer’s share)

7,690

Pension contributions (employer’s share

13,613

Total remuneration 2014/2015

102,806

Employment contract Nature (term) Number of hours part-time percentage period Remuneration Annual income • gross annual salary • holiday pay • year-end gratitude Social security contributions (employer’s share)

88

Juli 2013 - June 2014

Retired 38 100 01-07 t/m 31-12-2014

indefinite 38 100 01-07 t/m 30/06

69,433 60,480 4,322 4,631

104,653 92,613 7,409 4,631

4,125

4,827

Pension contributions (employer’s share

10,907

25,764

Total remuneration 2014/2015

84,465

135,244

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015


5.5.4.2 Remuneration of the Supervisory Council

REMUNERATION AND EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENT SUPERVISORY COUNCIL

July 2014 - June 2015

Travel and accommodation expenses The Supervisory Council performs its duties in an honorary capacity. Supervisory Council members’ travel and accommodation expenses totalled € 7,566 in the reporting period. These expenses were mostly incurred on account of Supervisory Council participation in CARE International meetings. 5.5.4.3 Executives’ Pay Financed from Public Funds (Disclosure) Act Pursuant to the Executives’ Pay Financed from Public Funds (Disclosure) Act, ‘Wet normering bezoldiging topfunctionarissen publieke en semipublieke sector (WNT)’, the remuneration for Supervisory Council and Board members may not exceed the specified maximum of € 230,474 in 2014. CARE Nederland is not subject to the above act, as the total grants it receives from the Dutch government comprise less than 50% of its total income. Furthermore, none of members of the Supervisory Council and Board, nor other executives employed by CARE Nederland received remuneration in excess of the specified maximum amount.

July 2013 - June 2014

7,566

We act consistently with CARE’s mission, being honest and transparent in what we do and say, and accept responsibility for our collective and individual actions.

3,699

5.6 Approval and Auditor’s Report 5.6.1

Events after the balance sheet date

During the period between the balance sheet date and the approval of the financial statements by the Supervisory Council and adoption by the Board on 8 december, no events occurred giving further information on the actual situation as at the balance sheet date.

5.6.2 Approval and adoption of the financial statements

The Annual Report and the accompanying financial statements were adopted on 8 december 2015 by the Board composed of: •

Mr. Perry Heijne

The Annual Report and the accompanying financial statements were adopted on 8 december 2015 by the Supervisory Council composed of the following executives: • • • • • •

Ms. Mariëtte Doornekamp (chair) Mr. Jan Broekhuizen Mr. Peter ter Horst Mr. Jochem IJbema Mr. Ed van Meeuwen Ms. Anneke Slob

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5.6.3 Independent Auditor's Report To: the Supervisory Board of Stichting Care Nederland We have audited the accompanying 2014/2015 financial statements of Stichting Care Nederland in The Hague. The financial statements comprise the balance sheet as at 30 June 2015, the statement of income and expenditure for the year then ended and notes, a summary of accounting policies applied and other explanatory notes. Responsibility of the Management Board The Management Board of the Stichting is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in accordance with Guideline 650 for Fund-Raising Institutions issued by the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. The Management Board is also responsible for such internal control as it determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. Auditor’s responsibility Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with Dutch

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law, including the Dutch auditing standards. This requires that we comply with the ethical requirements applicable to us and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement. An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers the internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Stichting's internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of the accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the Management Board of the Stichting, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion In our opinion, the financial statements give a true and fair view of the financial position of Stichting Care Nederland as at June 30, 2015 and its result for the year then ended in accordance with Guideline 650 for Fund-Raising Institutions issued by the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. Comment with respect to the Annual Report We have examined the Annual Report in order to identify any material discrepancies relative to the audited financial statements. Our perusal of the Annual Report gives us reason to state that the Annual Report, to the extent we can asses, is consistent with the information in the financial statements and contains all information required in accordance with Guideline 650 for Fund-Raising Institutions issued by the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. We have not performed any audit or review procedures with respect to the information included in the Annual Report. Amsterdam, December 16, 2015 PricewaterhouseCoopers Accountants N.V. Mr. J.L. Sebel


CARE Nederland Annual Report 2014-2015

Appendices


Appendix 1

Board and personnel CARE Nederland has a Board and a supervisory body, the Supervisory Council, and therefore complies with the general principle of the separation of management and supervisory functions. The duties and responsibilities of the Board and Supervisory Council are recorded in the Articles of Association and further specified in rules for the Board, the Supervisory Council, the Audit Committee and the Remuneration Committee.

Composition of the Board

Under the Articles the CARE Nederland Board may be composed of one or two members, called Directors. In the financial year 2014-2015 two persons consecutively filled the position of Director. Mr. Guus T.F. Eskens filled the position until his retirement, and was succeeded by Mr. Perry C. Heijne as per 1 September 2014.

Board duties and powers

The Board is charged with the management of the foundation, under supervision of the Supervisory Council. In performing its duties and exercising its powers, the organisation’s objectives, interests and social responsibility guide the Board. The Board determines policy, adopts financial guidelines and bears responsibility for daily management. The duties, responsibilities

1 2 3

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and mode of operation of the Board are set out in the Board Rules. The Board provides the Supervisory Council with the necessary information to enable it to perform its duties properly. In achieving its objectives, expending funds, fundraising etc., CARE Nederland observes the principles and methods of relevant quality standards. The ISO 9001 Quality Standard, the Central Bureau on Fundraising (CBF) Seal Regulations, the Code of Good Governance for Charity Organisations (‘Wijffels Code’) and the CARE International Code are the most important guiding principles. See also page 15 of this annual report.

Management Team and Personnel

The Management Team supports the Director in performing his duties and in formulating policy. In the 2014-2015 financial year, the Management Team was made up of the Programme Director, the Marketing & Communication Director, the Finance Director, the Head of Advocacy and the Head of Humanitarian Action. The Management Team’s mode of operation is set out in the Management Team Rules. On 30 June 2015, CARE Nederland employed a total of 40 people, which is the equivalent to 33.48 FTE. CARE Nederland occasionally works with volunteers and in these cases applies a

FUWASYS (FUnctieWAarderingsSYSteem) : a job classification method developed by the Dutch Ministry of the Interior and Kingdom Relations. Civil Servants´ Pay Decree [Bezoldigingsbesluit Burgerlijke Rijksambtenaren]. See www.vfi.nl [in Dutch].

CARE Annual Report 2014 - 2015

volunteer procedure that provides clarity on the duties, rights and responsibilities of volunteers. During the 2014-2015 financial year one volunteer worked for CARE Nederland.

Director remuneration and compensation policy

CARE Nederland applies the FUWASYS1 and BBRA pay classification systems2 to both the Director and its other employees. The Director´s salary, fixed allowances and other terms of employment are determined on the basis of the Advisory Remuneration Scheme for Directors of Charities in the Netherlands set out in the VFI3 code and the ‘Wijffels Code’. The policy is periodically updated and adopted by the Supervisory Council. Remuneration, allowances and further terms of employment are reported in the financial statements in this annual report.


Appointment and term of office of the Board

The Supervisory Council determines the profile of Board members (and Supervisory Council members) and appoints, suspends and dismisses the Board. The Director is appointed for the duration of the employment contract and is eligible for reappointment with the consent of the Supervisory Council. Register of Board members’ interests: • Mr. Guus Eskens: • Board Member, Stichting Nefkens voor Ontwikkelingssamenwerking • Board Member, Josephine Nefkens Stichting • Board Member, i+ solutions • Member of the Church Council, Parish of Laurentius en Ignatius, Rotterdam • Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Stichting IDA Solutions, Woerden • Mr. Perry Heijne: • Board Member, i+ solutions

Representation of CARE Nederland:

Mr. Guus Eskens and Mr. Perry Heijne represented CARE Nederland on the Board, Board committees and advisory bodies of CARE International. Furthermore, they represented CARE Nederland on the boards of the following Dutch organisations: • Board Member Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties / SHO in the Netherlands; • Member of the Steering Committee, Dutch Consortium for Rehabilitation; • Member of the Steering Committee, Partners for Resilience.

Mr. Guus Eskens

Mr. Perry Heijne

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Organization chart

Supervisory Council

National Director / CEO

Executive Assistant Office Management

Marketing & Communication Director

Head of Advocacy

Head of Humanitarian Action

Finance Director

Programme Director

Advocacy Coordinator

General Fundraiser

Corporate Fundraisers

Finance Officers

IT & Quality Officer

Advocacy Officer

Database Analyst

Communication Officer

Accountant

HR Advisor

Finance Assistant

HR Officer

Knowledge Manager

Programme Coordinator special programmes

Gender Advisor

Programme Officer special programmes

Programme Coordinator

Programme Coordinator

Programme Officers

Programme Officers

Women Economic Empowerment & Business Development

Programme Manager

Programme Officer

Regionale Media Campaign Officer

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Appendix 2

Supervisory Council

The Supervisory Council of CARE Nederland is charged with overseeing policy of the Board and the general day-to-day business of the foundation and assisting the Director with advice. Specifically, the Council focuses on reporting of internal risk management and control systems and the risks involved in implementing programmes, efficient fundraising and the deployment of donations. The Supervisory Council’s duties are listed in the Articles of Association and in the Supervisory Council Rules.

Appointment and term of office of Supervisory Council

The Supervisory Council is made up of at least three and at most seven members, all of whom are appointed by the Supervisory Council itself. In the event of vacancies, the Supervisory Council is obliged to take measures to supplement its membership. Resolutions to appoint new members require a two-thirds majority of the votes cast in a meeting at which all Supervisory Council members are present or represented. The selection and appointment of new members take place on the basis of profiles

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drawn up by the Supervisory Council, which may be viewed upon request. Each member is appointed for a three-year term and is subsequently eligible for reappointment for one further three-year term. Within the Supervisory Council and between members of the Supervisory Council and the Board, no close (family) relations may exist. CARE Nederland employees are not eligible for membership.

Composition of the Supervisory Council

The Supervisory Council is composed in such a way that its members: • Have sufficient affinity with the organisation´s objectives; • Can spend enough time on their activities for CARE Nederland; • Have broad social ties and a relevant network; • Have diverse social backgrounds, disciplines and offer various areas of expertise; • Operate independently and critically towards each other and the Board; • Offer the Board adequate advisory and sounding-board capacity.

Supervisory Council compensation policy

Members of the Supervisory Council are entitled to have Incurred expenses reimbursed; reimbursement is identified and explained in the annual accounts. The travel and accommodation expenses paid to the Supervisory Council in the financial year 2014-2015 totalled € 7,566. These expenses were mainly incurred for participating in CARE International meetings.

Activities of the Supervisory Council in the past financial year

In the past financial year, the Supervisory Council convened on five official occasions. Furthermore, the Director consulted regularly with the Chair. The Supervisory Council approved the budget for the 2014-2015 financial year and adopted the financial statements and the Annual Report over financial year 2013-2014, as well as the new strategic plan for the years 2015 – 2020.


The Chair of the Supervisory Council represents CARE Nederland on the CARE International Board and on the CARE International Finance, Audit and Risk committee. The Chair and the Director also attended the two CARE International Board meetings of this financial year in November 2014 and June 2015. Members of the Supervisory Council attended several national events and conferences organised by CARE Nederland and actively took part in discussions. The Supervisory Council has two subcommittees: • The Remuneration Committee (Ms. Mariëtte Doornekamp and Mr. Jochem IJbema) held its annual evaluation with the Director in June 2015. • The Audit Committee (Mr. Jochem IJbema and Mr. Jan Broekhuizen) convened on three occasions in December (by telephone) and in January and June to discuss financial issues around the new strategic plan and the Annual Plan and Budget for the following financial year with the Director and the Financial Director. Ms. Baharak Sabourian and Ms. Petra Stienen both resigned from the Supervisory Council having completed their second terms as members of the Supervisory Council. I would like to thank them both for their commitment to CARE Nederland; Ms. Baharak Sabourian specifically for her invaluable advice about legal affairs and Ms. Petra Stienen for sharing her experience and network in the international field and for her role and activities as Vice-chair

and acting Chair. I am happy we were able to welcome Mr. Jan Broekhuizen to the Supervisory Council. After more than a decade with CARE Nederland, Guus Eskens retired as Director in September 2014. Under his inspiring leadership the organisation has grown and developed to what it is today. The Supervisory Council would like to thank Guus for his tireless contribution to CARE Nederland and his dedication to the organisation and the goals we fight for. Over the past year, the Supervisory Council participated in many discussions with the Director about the new strategic plan for the financial years 2015 – 2020. The Supervisory Council also discussed the Director’s plans to invest in the organisation and staff in order to prepare them for the new strategic plans, so the organisation is ready for its ambitious goals for 2020. During the meetings, the Supervisory Council paid special attention to new and existing CARE Nederland partnerships. These included partnerships with organisations such as with the ‘Samenwerkende Hulp Organisaties / SHO’, the H&M Conscious Foundation and MasterPeace. These partnerships differ from previous relationships and partnerships as these partnerships create both opportunities and risks for the organisation. Furthermore, a number of existing CARE Nederland partnerships are about to enter into a new phase. The existing five-year partnership between CARE Nederland

and the ‘Nationale Postcode Loterij /NPL’ was evaluated by the partners and by the Supervisory Council. With the MFSII grant scheme being replaced by the Strategic Partnerships scheme effective from 1 January 2016, we also expect a change in the relationship with the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA). Together with 13 humanitarian action organisations including CARE Nederland, MoFA established a new alliance in 2014, the Relief Fund for emergency aid. Supervisory Council members attended several events organised by CARE Nederland, such as the international conference The Power of Entrepreneurial Women Worldwide in Rotterdam. At the 2015 Dutch Humanitarian Summit in The Hague, members contributed to the overall programme and to a special session about the role of Supervisory Councils in humanitarian organisations. Furthermore, members participated the Walk in Her Shoes campaign.

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Another topic that featured prominently on the agenda of the Supervisory Council is the position of CARE Nederland and CARE International within the international network. For some years now, CARE International has been working on a transition of its governance structure. One key question in this regard is how this transitional process will affect CARE Nederland and the organisation’s strategic position within the confederation, both now and in the future. The Supervisory Council acknowledges that these changes will also be of major importance to CARE Nederland, and will be closely monitoring the proposals. The Supervisory Council also took note of the

Supervisory Council members Mariëtte Doornekamp (Chair) Petra Stienen (Vice Chair)

The field of humanitarian action and development cooperation is changing rapidly and so are the challenges CARE Nederland will need to address. The small team of CARE Nederland manages large-scale projects in challenging times within a complex and rapidly transforming field of beneficiaries, donors, private sector

First term

and other NGOs. The Supervisory Council has great respect for the way in which the organisation makes sure it is thoroughly prepared for the challenging tasks it sees itself faced with and is convinced that the new Director, Mr. Perry Heijne, will be able to lead the organisation in its ambitious plans to achieve lasting impact on the lives of our many beneficiaries. We would like to thank the Director and staff of CARE Nederland for their hard work, expertise and enthusiasm in fighting poverty worldwide. On behalf of the Supervisory Council, Mariëtte Doornekamp

Second term

Dec 2013 - Dec 2016 June 2009 – June 2012

June 2012 – June 2015

Dec 2008 – Dec 2011

Dec 2011 – Dec2014

Ed van Meeuwen

April 2010 –April 2013

April 2013 – April 2016

Peter ter Horst

April 2010 – April 2013

April 2013 – April 2016

Jochem IJbema

Sept 2011 – Sept 2014

Sept2014 – Sept2017

Anneke Slob

June 2012 – June 2015

June 2015 – June 2018

Baharak Sabourian

Jan Broekhuizen

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efforts of the Director of CARE Nederland and the other six European CARE organisations to identify possible ways to collaborate in order to increase efficiency and reduce costs. The Supervisory Council is pleased that the analysis and identification have given rise to several areas where collaboration will be intensified.

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January 2015 – January 2018

Audit Committee

Remuneration Committee


Mariëtte Doornekamp (chair) Effective 3 December 2013 Mariëtte Doornekamp is chair of the Supervisory Council of CARE Nederland. Mariëtte Doornekamp is a professional administrator and supervisor. She also holds the following positions:, Board Member at ABP, chair of the Public Interest Committee at BDO, chair and member of the Supervisory Board at Stichting Aandelen Beheer BDO Groep, chair of the Supervisory Board at Westland Kaas Groep BV, treasurer of the Amsterdam Sinfonietta string orchestra and treasurer of the Stichting Aandelen Remeha, Apeldoorn. As a result of her many positions, Doornekamp is one of the Netherlands’ most influential businesswomen. She is ranked 18th in the 2015 Management Scope Top-50 Most Powerful Women in the Netherlands. Mariëtte Doornekamp’s previous positions include a tenure as Director of Velocity Capital, CFO of MCB and CFO of Damen Shipyards.

Petra Stienen Petra Stienen, vice chair, is a publicist and advisor on democratization, diversity and democracy. She studied Arabic and Middle Eastern studies in Leiden, Cairo and London and worked in the Arab world for over a decade, including at the Dutch embassies in Egypt and Syria. She also worked as Deputy Head of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ North America Department. Following her departure from the Ministry she took up the position of Senior Advisor on Social Development at BCM Advies and Management.

Baharak Sabourian Baharak Sabourian graduated in Dutch law and financial law at Erasmus University Rotterdam. She was admitted to the bar and worked over five years as an Attorney. In 2007 Baharak moved to the financial markets directorate of the Ministry of Finance. She specialised in policy and legislation on corporate governance and the Financial Supervision Act. In 2013 Baharak started to work for NLFI. Her main focus is on legal topics, corporate governance, remuneration and appointments.

Ed van Meeuwen Ed van Meeuwen is Marketing, Communications and Brand Director (and Partner) at IdSells.com. Van Meeuwen served in various account management and board positions in both the Netherlands and abroad at a number of large and renowned agencies, where he was responsible for accounts including IBM, Heineken, Burger King, Zenitel, Time Magazine, Opel, Alfa Romeo, UPS, CMG, Van Lanschot Bankiers, Vespa, Otto, Gall & Gall, Voetbal International, and many others. He has also won several marketing awards, such as the FBTO and Time Magazine Direct Marketing Awards.

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Peter ter Horst Peter ter Horst is an independent communication and media consultant and debate leader. Currently he is Managing Partner at Hague Corporate Affairs. He previously worked as a Consultant for Meines & Partners, a Lobby and Public Affairs Consultancy, He worked as a journalist and correspondent for NRC Handelsblad newspaper and various radio and television programmes over the course of his career. After returning to the Netherlands, he became editor-in-chief of Dutch newspaper Haagsche Courant and later Intermediair, a weekly magazine for academic job seekers. Peter ter Horst is the author of the book ‘De Dag dat de krant viel’ [The Day the Newspaper collapsed], published in 2012, which revolves around the time he worked as editor-in-chief at Haagsche Courant.

Jochem IJbema Jochem IJbema is Finance Director at BSH Huishoudapparaten b.v. After completing his Business Economics studies at Utrecht University of Applied Sciences, he joined Siemens Nederland in 1989 and worked as Business and Division Controller. Jochem IJbema worked at Siemens IT Solutions and Services as Division Controller from 2006 to 2011, where he also assumed the role CFO between 2010 and November 2011. He also serves as a Supervisory Board member of Koninklijke Schouwburg in The Hague.

Anneke Slob Anneke Slob is an independent advisor on international policy, including development and governance issues. She is a senior Monitoring and Evaluation Specialist and has led many international evaluations for a variety of international organizations, including the European Union, Ministries of Foreign Affairs of various countries and international NGOs. Anneke was a Managing Partner and Director of Ecorys, a research and consultancy firm in the Netherlands. Prior to that Anneke worked at the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs in the Policy and Operations Evaluation Department (IOB). She is also chair and member of various Supervisory Boards.

Jan Broekhuizen Jan Broekhuizen, a specialist in financial supervision, joined Kennedy Van der Laan as a partner in 2015. He is an attorney specializing in financial regulation (Dutch Financial Supervision Act and related Dutch and European regulation) and advises clients on the development and documentation of their financial services, financial products and distribution arrangements, on license and exemption applications with the Dutch Financial Markets Authority and the Dutch Central Bank, as well as on ongoing regulatory compliance and governance requirements. Jan started his career as an attorney in 1997 and before joining Kennedy Van der Laan, he was a partner at Boekel. Jan is associated with the University of Groningen and the Groningen Centre for European Financial Services Law, where he is working on a dissertation on developments within “regulatory private law”. Jan is also member of the board of youth theatre group Kwatta.

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Appendix 3

Accountability statement This Annual Report was prepared in accordance with Dutch Annual Reporting Guideline 650 for Fundraising Institutions issued by the Dutch Accounting Standards Board. The Board and Supervisory Council of CARE Nederland subscribe to the following three principles: 1. To ensure supervision, administration and implementation; 2. To optimise the effectiveness and efficiency of expenditure; 3. To optimise stakeholder relations. Ensuring supervision, administration and implementation • The foundation has a Board and a Supervisory Council. The Board manages the foundation, while the Supervisory Council monitors Board policy and the foundation’s overall performance. • The Supervisory Council determines the number of Board members, which may be either one or two natural persons. If there is one natural person, he or she will hold the title of “Director”. If there are two natural persons, the Supervisory Council will appoint one of the two as the chair. • The Supervisory Council itself consists of at least three but not more than seven members, all of whom are natural persons. • Subject to prior approval by the Supervisory

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Council, the Board is authorised to adopt or amend one or more sets of rules providing for matters not covered by the Articles of Association. The Supervisory Council is authorised to adopt these matters with the prior approval of the Board. The Board and the Supervisory Council may also establish other committees as well as boards or councils after obtaining each other’s prior approval. The foundation has an Audit Committee and a Remuneration Committee. The former monitors the foundation’s financial performance. The latter advises the Supervisory Council on the selection criteria and appointment procedures applicable to members of the Supervisory Council and the Board. The Supervisory Council specifically monitors whether Board policy conforms to the approved and adopted long-term or other strategic plans and budgets. The Board and the Supervisory Council ensure that no conflict of interests occurs between the foundation, its employees, the Board and the members of the Supervisory Council. The Supervisory Council’s performance is evaluated periodically.

Optimising the effectiveness and efficiency of expenditure • The Board draws up a long-term strategic plan for a period of at least three years with a corresponding budget. The long-term strategic plan contains measurable prioritised objectives and provides an analysis of the operating environment. The strategic plan also sets out the principles for the provision of information, raising awareness, advocacy, fundraising and spending the funds raised effectively, and indicates how assessment and decision-making processes concerning fundraising and the allocation of funds are organised. • At the start of a new financial year, which runs from July 1 through June 30 of each year, the long-term strategic plan is specified in an annual plan containing a corresponding budget. • The Board is charged with the implementation and completion of the programmes and the activities incorporated in the annual plan. The Supervisory Council is responsible in particular for ensuring that implementation conforms to the long-term and other strategic plans and budgets. • The Board provides the Supervisory Council with all the relevant information in good time.


The Board reports to the Supervisory Council on the following: the performance of its role as a socially responsible organisation; strategy; fundraising and deployment of the funds raised; key figures; the quality of the care provided and how ethical issues have been addressed; the audit of the internal risk management and control systems; management of the foundation’s capital; and good employment practices. The Board is obliged to maintain records of the foundation’s financial position to ensure that its rights and obligations are clearly shown in these records at all times. The Board prepares a balance sheet and a statement of income and expenditure at the end of the financial year. These documents are accompanied by an auditor’s report. The Supervisory Council appoints the auditor. The auditor reports to both the Board and the Supervisory Council. The Annual Report and the financial statements are adopted and signed by the Board within six months of the end of the financial year following Supervisory Council approval thereof. Where necessary, the Board revises the long-term and other strategic plans and budgets after having obtained approval from the Supervisory Council.

Optimising stakeholder relations • The foundation’s key stakeholders are the beneficiaries, the CARE country offices and their partner organisations, institutional donors, and current and prospective donors and sponsors. • The beneficiaries are reached through the intermediary of the CARE country offices and their partner organisations. The foundation maintains relations with these stakeholders by issuing reports, holding meetings during visits to field offices, partner and other organisations and institutions, including local authorities. The foundation also has stakeholders who finance its activities, such as institutional donors, current and prospective donors, and sponsors. The foundation maintains relations with these stakeholders by issuing reports, holding meetings during visits, through the website, newsletters, publications and the Annual Report. • The foundation promotes and supports the work, activities and programmes carried out by the volunteers involved in achieving the foundation’s objectives. • The Board seeks to provide transparency in accounting for its policy and activities to the volunteers involved and other stakeholders. For this purpose the Board adopts policy for incorporation in the long-term strategic plan.

CARE Nederland structures its communication to ensure that the information is relevant, clear and accessible to its stakeholders. The Board offers stakeholders the opportunity to communicate their ideas, comments, wishes and complaints to the foundation to enable it to improve its services, where possible.

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This is a publication of: CARE Nederland Parkstraat 21 2514 JD Den Haag 070 - 310 50 50 general@carenederland.org

Profile for CARE Nederland

CARE Annual Report 2015  

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