Page 1

1


THE ULTIMATE GUIDE TO YOUR CAREER YOUR CAREER YOUR CHOICE

2 | www.careersuk.org


Copyright © 2019 by Careers Publishing & Media Ltd

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means, including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of the publisher, except in the case of brief quotations embodied in critical reviews and certain other noncommercial uses permitted by copyright law. For permission requests, write to the publisher, addressed “Attention: Permissions Coordinator,” at the address below. Careers Publishing & Media Ltd Millfields House Huddersfield Road Holmfirth HD9 3JL www.careersuk.org publication@careersuk.org Printed in Great Britain, 2019 by Micropress Printers Ltd First Edition 2019 ISBN-13 978-1-9161875-0-4

1


78 YOUR APPLICATION 80 Cover Letters 82 How to Create a Masterpiece CV 86 Writing a Successful Job Application 88 Psychometric Tests 90 Using LinkedIn to Get Headhunted

92 INTERVIEWS 4 STARTING OUT 6 Choosing a career path

10 ROUTES TO A JOB 12 Voluntary Work Experience 14 Traineeships 16 Apprenticeships 18 Higher and Degree Level Apprenticeships 20 Placements and Internships 22 How to Secure an Internship or Placement 24 What to Expect From a Graduate Scheme 26 How to Get a Job With No Experience 28 Why Choose Uni

30 UNIVERSITY 32 University Timeline 36 Is Studying Abroad Right For You? 38 Post-Graduate Education 42 Should I Do A Master’s Degree 44 10 Advantages of Doing An MBA 46 Balancing Work and Study 48 Managing Exam Stress 50 Essential Self-Care For Exam Season 52 Preparing For Life After University

54 KEY SKILLS 56 Employability Skills 58 SMART Goals 60 Managing Deadlines 62 Preparing For a Presentation 65 Networking 66 Making the Most of Your Team

EMPLOYABILITY 68 70 What Recruiters Want 72 Using Your Social Media to Boost Your Career Prospects 74 Transitioning From University to Work 76 Top 10 Tips When Thinking About Starting Your Own Business

2 | www.careersuk.org

94 Preparing for the Dreaded Interview 98 Interview Dress Code 101 20 Golden Interview Tips 102 How to Behave in an Interview 104 20 Most Frequently Asked Interview Questions 108 10 “Out of the Box” Questions Interviews May Ask You 110 Don’t Let Your Social Media Stop You From Getting Interview 112 How to Use the Star Interview Technique 114 Questions to Ask the Interviewer 116 Assessment Centres

118 THRIVING AT WORK 120 Buddying For New Starters 122 Secrets to Being a Better Boss 123 How to Maximise Your Potential In a New Role 124 How to Effectively Delegate Tasks 126 How to Resolve Conflict in The Workplace

128 WELL BEING 130 Mental Health in The Workplace 132 10 Ways to Build Your Confidence 134 Self-Esteem 136 Motivation 138 The Power of Positivity 140 Food For Productivity

142 PROFESSIONAL INSIGHTS 143 The UK’s Top Job Boards 144 Top Employers 146 Top Qualifications 149 Industry Insights

162 GET A HEADSTART 164 Top Tips for Getting Into a Law Firm 166 Top Tips to Get into Accounting Firms 168 How to Get Into Investment Banking 170 Top Tips to Get Into Medical School 172 Top Tips to Get onto a Graduate Scheme 174 300+ Graduate Schemes


WHO NEEDS THIS BOOK? You do! The Ultimate Guide to Your Career is a resource containing all the information you’ll ever need to excel in your career, from start to finish! It will guide you through each step of your career development and job-hunting journey by providing you with the skills and techniques imperative to success. Packed full of must-have industry insights, this guide provides every student & professional with top tips covering: •

Ways To Enhance Your Employability

Career Progression Guidance

Alternative Routes To A Job

What Recruiters Want

Wellbeing At Work

Top 300+ Graduate Schemes and Graduate Roles

YOUR CAREER. YOUR CHOICE. 3


STARTING OUT

4 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION

C H O OSIN G A CAR EE R PAT H ................................................

Starting Out | 5


CHOOSING A CAREER PATH PART 1

Are you wondering which career path is right for you? The path you do choose will determine a huge part of the rest of your life. You’ll spend a lot of your time at work, so it’s imperative you make the most informed decision. Choosing a career is one of the most important decisions you will make in life, because it’s more than just deciding what you want to do to earn a living. Think about the amount of time spent at work: we are on the job approximately 71% of the year. Over a lifetime, this comes to roughly 31 ½ years out of the 45 years an average person spends 6 | www.careersuk.org

working, from the beginning of the career up until retirement. Therefore, it is key to choose the correct career. Did you know if you choose a career path that you are interested in, it is more likely you will remain motivated? If you are passionate about the profession you’ve chosen, you will push yourself to achieve and therefore, you are more likely to be successful. A lot of steps should be considered when you’re deciding which route to take.

FOUR STEPS TO CONSIDER WHEN CHOOSING A CAREER Know yourself:

To make the right choice, you need to know yourself. Identify your strengths and weaknesses to know which career path is right for you. Assess your interests and values. Being aware of skills you have highlights the gaps in your knowledge that may need to be fulfilled in order to achieve your goals.


Explore your options:

Research the job market and career paths of interest to you and narrow down your options. Exploring career options develops your knowledge on the professional opportunities that are available.

Decide:

Combine what you’ve learned about yourself with the options you’ve discovered. Decide which profession interests you the most and select one or two alternatives to fall back on if you are unable to pursue your first choice.

Act:

Set achievable goals and have a career plan. A career plan is a practical approach to determine your expertise and interests. Your career plan should outline how you’ll get to your chosen career and what actions are needed.

OPTIONS FOR STUDENTS AFTER COMPLETING GCSE’s: If you intend to continue down the academic route and go on to further education, you can study vocational courses or A-levels at a sixth form or college. Universities will look at your GCSEs as part their application process, but their interest is more in A-levels. So, if you decide on a career that requires a degree, then you’ll need to continue studying for A-levels.

Apply for an apprenticeship:

An apprenticeship is when you work for an employer and are trained to do a specific job at the same time. Apprenticeships combine practical training in a job with study. They last between one and four years. As an apprentice, you work alongside experienced staff, develop skills and earn a wage.

Apply for a traineeship:

A traineeship is an education and training programme designed to help young people who want to get an apprenticeship or job, but don’t have the skills or experience. They usually last from six weeks up to a minimum of six months. Traineeships are unpaid and include English and Maths support, if required.

Starting Out | 7


CHOOSING A CAREER PATH PART 2

CHOICES TO PICK FROM AFTER COMPLETING A LEVELS A Levels are over, and school is now a thing of the past! But what do you do now? There are many options to choose from including university, apprenticeships, degree apprenticeships, full time jobs or you could even become a young entrepreneur.

will be doing it for 3 years plus.

Apply for an Apprenticeship:

If going back into education via university and studying more isn’t for you, then you could apply for an apprenticeship. As you have completed A Levels, you could head straight into a Level 3 apprenticeship instead of a lower level. Doing an apprenticeship will allow you to gain a qualification and work at the same time.

Apply for a Degree Apprenticeship:

There are several choices that you could pick from but if you feel like you could handle university whilst working, then a degree apprenticeship is for you. The employer is the one that would pay for the degree so you would essentially be getting a degree for free!

DON’T KNOW WHAT TO DO AFTER In your final year of sixth form/college, you UNIVERSITY? Going to University:

will have to decide on whether you want to be attending university next year. There are many courses to choose from just like how there are hundreds of universities to go to. Think hard and carefully about what course to do because you 8 | www.careersuk.org

Apply for a graduate scheme

This structured training programme allows graduates to gain practical experience with a company, giving them a head-start in the world


of work. Graduate schemes are paid positions and last between one and three years.

Get a graduate job

The majority of graduates will be looking for a job. Most universities provide support, so if you need guidance get in touch with your university careers service.

Apply for a Level 7 Apprenticeship

Once you have finished your degree apprenticeship or have attained your degree from university, Level 7 apprenticeships are always an option. These types of apprenticeships are for people that want to gain a master’s degree. For example, master’s degree apprenticeships are very popular with the accounting industry and help the people that undertake them on their way up the career ladder. Although most employers will pay above the minimum wage for level 7 apprentices, you should keep in mind that the apprenticeship national minimum wage is still the same across all the levels which is usually very low.

spend time living and working alongside a variety of people. You would also be able to improve your language skills if your gap year involves living in a different country. Many employers see speaking a different language as a huge asset.

Changing career paths

If you have ever considered changing career paths, you should carefully weigh up how this will benefit you. Sometimes you just need a change of scenery, not a career. It is important you don’t rush into this decision. Make sure you have the right set of skills and qualifications to change careers. Asses your experience. When deciding what career path to choose, or when considering a career change, ask yourself the following questions: • • • •

What am I good at? What are my interests, motivations and values? What kind of lifestyle do I want? What do I want from my career?

Do a master’s degree

A master’s degree would be ideal for those who want to further their knowledge in a particular subject, improve their employability or pursue an academic career. A master’s degree is a level 7 qualification, which falls above a bachelor’s degree but below a PhD. MPhil’s are for those who want to major in research, whereas the MA, MSc, Meng, MEng, MChem, MPharm, MBA are for those who want to pursue a career in industry or commerce.

Taking a gap year

If you are unsure what to do, don’t panic! Quite a few graduates are unsure about diving straight into a full-time career and instead consider taking a gap year. A gap year is a period of time off and could end up being the longest holiday in your life! During your gap year, you can fly off to sunnier climates and experience different cultures or stay closer to home.

Benefits of taking a gap year

Your confidence and independence would flourish after interacting with lots of new people from different backgrounds. Your cultural awareness would heighten if you choose to Starting Out | 9


ROUTES TO A JOB

10 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION

VOLUNTARY WO RK EX P ER I ENCE .................................................. TRAINEES H I P S ............................................................................. APPRE NTI CESH I P S ....................................................................... HIGHE R AN D DEG R EE A P P R ENTI CES HIPS....................................... PL ACEMEN TS A ND I NTER NSH I P S .................................................. HOW TO SECURE AN INTERNSHIP OR P LA CEMEN T......................... WHAT TO EX P ECT FR O M A G R A DUAT E SCHEME ............................ HOW TO GET A JO B WI TH NO EX PERIENCE .................................... WHY CHOO SE U NI? .......................................................................

Routes to a Job | 11


VOLUNTARY WORK EXPERIENCE

HOW VOLUNTARY WORK EXPERIENCE CAN HELP YOUR CAREER Volunteering gives you the opportunity to:

Some students and graduates want to make a positive contribution to society, while others want to gain the skills needed to pursue certain careers. One of the biggest benefits is that it goes a long way in impressing potential employers. Volunteering can demonstrate your commitment to a sector, your proactive and independent nature and your ability to communicate effectively and work as part of a team.

• •

• • •

Boost your CV Gain valuable transferable skills such as communication, teamwork, timemanagement, organisation and decisionmaking Build confidence Explore different areas of work Expand your network of contacts

How to apply Many voluntary opportunities are advertised and have set procedures that you need to follow. This may include completing an application form or submitting your CV and cover letter, followed by an interview if you’re successful. If you have an organisation and volunteer role in

12 | www.careersuk.org


mind, you could send a speculative application. You’ll need to explain why you want to volunteer with them, state any previous experience and outline what you have to offer. Make sure you find a contact so you can address your letter or email directly to them. Volunteering offers vital help to people and communities in need, both worthwhile causes, but the benefits can be just as great for you, the volunteer. Volunteering and helping others can reduce stress, combat depression, keep you mentally stimulated and provide a sense of purpose.

BENEFITS OF VOLUNTARY WORK EXPERIENCE Connects you with others One of the more well-known benefits of volunteering is the impact on the community. Volunteering allows you to connect with your community and help make it a better place. Even helping with the smallest tasks can make a real difference to the lives of people, animals, and organisations in need. Dedicating your time as a volunteer helps you make new friends, expand your network and boost your social skills.

Increases self-confidence Doing good things for others and the community will provide a natural sense of accomplishment. Your role as a volunteer can also give you a sense of pride and identity. The better you feel about yourself, the more likely you are to have a positive view on your life and future goals.

Brings fun and fulfilment to your life Volunteering is a fun and easy way to explore your interests and provides you with renewed creativity, motivation and vision that can carry over into your personal and professional life.

HOW TO FIND THE RIGHT OPPORTUNITIES There are numerous voluntary work experience opportunities available. The key is to find a position that you would both enjoy and be good at. It’s also important to make sure that your

commitment matches the organisation’s needs.

ASK YOURSELF THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS: • • • •

Would you like to work with adults, children or animals? Do you prefer to work independently or as part of a team? How much time are you willing to commit? What skills can you bring to a volunteer job?

GET THE MOST OUT OF VOLUNTEERING You’re donating your valuable time, so it’s important that you enjoy and benefit from your work experience. To make sure that your volunteering position is a good fit:

Make sure you know what’s expected You should be comfortable with the organisation and understand the time commitment. Consider starting small so that you don’t over-commit. Give yourself some flexibility to change your focus if needed.

Ask questions You want to make sure that the volunteering opportunity is suitable for your skillset, goals and free time.

Don’t be afraid to make a change Don’t force yourself into a role that doesn’t quite fit and don’t feel obliged to stick with a volunteering role you dislike. Talk to the organisation about changing your focus or look for a different organisation that could be a better fit.

Enjoy yourself The best volunteer experiences benefit both the volunteer and the organisation. If you’re not enjoying yourself, ask yourself why. Pinpointing what’s bothering you can help you decide how to proceed.

Routes to a Job | 13


TRAINEESHIPS

Traineeships include • • •

Traineeships are an ideal opportunity for young, motivated people to get a job or an apprenticeship when they lack the skills and experience employers are looking for. They are designed to help young people aged 16 to 24. A traineeship unlocks the great potential of individuals and prepares them for their future careers by helping them to become ‘work ready’. These are usually unpaid, or the trainee is paid a subsistence allowance. The length of a traineeship lasts from 12 weeks to 6 months. The duration of the course will depend on the level of training required to upskill the trainee. 14 | www.careersuk.org

Work preparation training provided by the training organisation. English and Maths support if required (provided by the training organisation). A high-quality work experience placement with an employer.

In addition to these basic elements, the employer and the training provider can add flexible additional content to meet the needs of the business. At the end of the traineeship, each young person significantly increases their chances of getting an interview if a role becomes available.

Benefits of a traineeship • • •

A traineeship will put you in a more competitive position for an apprenticeship or job Traineeships give you the opportunity to build your CV and get vital experience with regional and national employers Improving your English and Maths skills will boost your chances of getting a job, as well as improving your long-term prospects


• •

• • •

and earning-potential over your lifetime Employers are at the centre of traineeships to ensure they give you the skills you need to secure a job and succeed in employment Having a qualification and experience within an industry makes you an appealing candidate for any positions you apply for following your traineeship During a traineeship programme you have the same rights as all other employees in the workplace Above all, you will have gained valuable skills and experience within the specific working environment. By demonstrating your abilities in a traineeship, you are showing employers you have what it takes to succeed in a job or apprenticeship.

WHAT TO EXPECT FROM A TRAINEESHIP High quality work placements

You will learn what’s expected of you in the workplace and develop links with employers. The work placement element to your traineeship will help to broaden your CV when applying for future positions.

If you’re unsure whether you are suitable for a traineeship, contact your local college or training provider to see if you meet the requirements.

WAYS IN WHICH BUSINESSES CAN ALSO BENEFIT FROM TRAINEESHIPS • • •

A trainee can provide extra support to existing teams during busy periods All traineeships costs are met by Government funding Traineeships will allow businesses to shape the skills and experience of young people from the local community, helping the business to develop a loyal and talented workforce, whilst simultaneously supporting the community Working with trainees will give established staff members the chance to develop their skills in mentoring and coaching young people.

Flexible training

One unique aspect of the traineeship option is that it allows for flexibility. Your employers and mentors will tailor the training to your requirements, so you can get the most out of your traineeship. You will be trained in other relevant areas to help you get work-ready, such as job hunting techniques, interview skills, time keeping and teamwork skills.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER A TRAINEESHIP? Entry requirements for traineeships • • • •

To be eligible for involvement in a traineeship programme, you’ll need to meet a few essential requirements: You must be eligible to work in the UK You need to be unemployed and have little or no work experience Applicants must be aged between 16-24 have no qualifications above GCSE level (or equivalent)

Routes to a Job | 15


APPRENTICESHIPS

Why choose an apprenticeship?

An apprenticeship offers the chance to gain

Apprenticeships combine practical training in a job with study. You’ll be employed to do a real job whilst studying for a formal qualification. The study part is usually for one day a week either at a college or a training centre, and the rest of the time you will be working full-time like a normal employee. To apply for an apprenticeship, you need to be 16 or over, living in the United Kingdom and not in full-time education.

16 | www.careersuk.org

skills, qualifications and experience whilst earning a wage. It’s a great compromise between entering the workforce straight after school and earning a qualification to set you up in your chosen industry. It’s also a great opportunity to see whether this is the industry you want to pursue. As an apprentice, you’ll avoid student loans, as the government and your employer cover the entire cost of your training! Despite the low minimum wage for apprentices, you may find yourself financially better off than your friends who went to uni as you’ll be able to start putting money away without worrying about student debt.

Working hours and pay:

Apprenticeships are paid, and you are entitled

to the National Minimum Wage which the government can decide to change as and when they see fit. Apprenticeships hourly rate is a lot lower than a regular full time job. This is to help your employer cover the costs of your training. This rate applies to all apprentices in their first year, and apprentices aged 19 or over


are paid a higher minimum wage after their first year. You’ll work full-time and your study time is usually part of your paid hours.

Length of apprenticeships:

Apprenticeships usually take between one and four years to complete. The length of the apprenticeship depends on a number of factors, such as the level of education, your chosen sector, employer requirements and your individual ability.

QUALIFICATIONS What you’ll learn will depend on the role that you will be training for. Apprentices in every role follow an approved study curriculum, which means you’ll gain a nationally-recognised qualification at the end of your apprenticeship. These qualifications are available from the equivalent to GCSE-level all the way up to degree level.

• • •

‘89% of employers say they’d do an apprenticeship if they were starting their career again.’

The qualifications can include: • •

• •

Functional skills - GCSE-level

qualifications in English, Maths and IT National Vocational Qualifications (NVQs) - from Level 2 (comparable to five GCSEs) up to Level 5 (similar to a postgraduate degree) Technical certificates - such as BTEC, City and Guild Progression Award etc Academic qualifications - including a Higher National Certificate (HNC), Higher National Diploma (HND) foundation degree or the equivalent of a full master’s degree.

TYPE OF APPRENTICESHIPS

Law apprenticeships offered at legal executive or solicitor level. IT apprenticeships in roles such as software development and cyber security Healthcare apprenticeships in roles such as dental, nursing and youth work, in addition to NHS apprenticeships that can fall under other sectors, such as accounting and administration. Engineering apprenticeships in roles such as civil engineering, electrical engineering and mechanical engineering Construction apprenticeships in roles such as building, plumbing and quantity surveying. Media apprenticeships in roles such as journalism, live events and costume design.

Highest paid apprenticeships:

Apprentices in the Legal sector can expect

the highest pay, an average salary of £23,904. Engineering placements follow close behind, with an average salary of £22,512 on offer for apprenticeship schemes. The Accounting and Finance is a popular sector in apprenticeships, with advertised salaries starting from £17,988.

BENEFITS OF AN APPRENTICESHIP Apprenticeships are designed to enhance your competency and confidence by developing your practical skills and knowledge.

Apprenticeships are available in a wide range of different industries. Most job sectors offer apprenticeship opportunities in the UK, with a wide range of specific roles on offer within each.

By doing an apprenticeship, you benefit from the following:

These include:

• •

Business apprenticeships in roles such as accounting, marketing, people/HR administration, recruitment and sales. A lot of these will also be available in other sectors as everything from the NHS to engineering firms need the skills business apprenticeships offer.

• •

• • •

Working alongside experienced staff Gaining a nationally recognised qualification and experience, both of which are highly attractive to employers Taking a fast route into your career Getting paid holidays (including bank holidays) Learning how to behave in a professional environment Developing your independence in a supported environment Earning while you’re learning Routes to a Job | 17


HIGHER AND DEGREE APPRENTICESHIPS

Higher and degree apprenticeships are available at levels 4 to 7. They combine work with study and include a work-based, academic or combined qualification or a professional qualification relevant to the industry. Levels 4 and 5 are equivalent to a Higher Education Certificate/ Diploma or a foundation degree, level 6 is equivalent to a Bachelor’s degree and level 7 is equivalent to a Master’s degree.

HIGHER LEVEL 7 Higher Level 7 apprenticeships are the equivalent to a masters level qualification. They’re very competitive and to be considered for one of these apprenticeships, you should currently hold a degree, have completed a degree level apprenticeship or have enough relevant experience in the industry the Level 7 apprenticeship is in.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS Higher and Degree apprenticeship entry requirements depend on the employer or company. Generally speaking, they are as follows: •

18 | www.careersuk.org

To apply for an intermediate apprenticeship, you need to be over 16 years old and no longer in full-time education. For an advanced apprenticeship, you’re likely to be asked for prior work experience and at least three A*-C or 9-4


grade GCSEs or equivalent - such as an intermediate apprenticeship qualification. As higher apprenticeships are the equivalent of a foundation degree, (HNC or first year of a Bachelors) you’ll usually need at least five A*-C or 9-4 grade GCSEs, as well as some Level 3 qualifications in relevant subjects to apply. Level 3 qualifications could be AS-levels, a BTEC National or a level 3 NVQ. Degree apprenticeships entry requirements include three A-levels in a specified grade range or a higher apprenticeship qualification, on top of at least five A*-C or 9-4 GCSE grades. It’s likely you’ll be required to have prior work experience.

TOP COMPANIES OFFERING LEVEL 7 & DEGREE APPRENTICESHIPS

You can apply for apprenticeships at any time of the year - it all depends when an employer has a vacancy. You’ll be able to check the specific entry requirements of your chosen apprenticeship once the position opens.

POPULAR FIELDS Accountancy Business Engineering Health, Public Services and Care IT Law Retail Travel and Tourism

Routes to a Job | 19


PLACEMENTS AND INTERNSHIPS

have taken this chance, which will give you the edge when you’re looking for your first proper job. They can be done either through your course/school or arranged independently.

Differences:

Placements and internships are often mentioned, but we rarely hear what they actually consist of. Deciding to do a placement or an internship can be a difficult decision to make when you are unsure of how they work and what the benefits are. Having the chance to do one of these is an incredible opportunity that will allow you to increase your skills and knowledge, making it much easier to know what you’re good at and what is the best path for you to take in the future. Future employers also prefer candidates to have industry experience and your peers may not 20 | www.careersuk.org

When it comes to placements and internships there are some differences between the two: internships are usually a much longer commitment, and placements are shorter and more of an introduction to a particular workplace, designed to lead into a job at the end. However, on a day-to-day basis once you’re in the workplace, they’re pretty much the same. When beginning an internship or work placement you will be expected to have knowledge of the company you’re working for and some basic skills that are relevant to the role. You should also be treated the same as any other member of staff, including your duties, hours, holidays and staff privileges. While placements are low-level, temporary positions, you should be treated with respect and not taken advantage of.


Internships:

Internships can last from a few months to a year, as they tend to be a trial period for students to figure out if they like the industry and if they’d like to work somewhere like this in the future. These types of internships are usually done during gaps in your studies (such as summer holidays), giving you a taster of what you could be doing after you leave full-time education and what your day-to-day life could be like. It is also a good way to start networking within your industry and it may help you get your foot in the door for your first proper job. Some internships are actually created with the end goal of hiring the intern full-time when they’ve finished.

Placements:

applying your academic learning to work, and applying your workplace skills to your studies. How these are assessed varies.

Applying:

Arranging a work placement or internship depends on what you are studying. Some college courses require a work placement or offer it as a module, which usually means it will be arranged for you, and some schools help arrange these for students. If it’s not available through school or college but you feel that it will benefit you, then you can arrange one on your own. Some companies will advertise internship and placement positions or even recruit directly from schools and colleges.

As for placements, these differ from internships as they are much shorter (one to twelve weeks) and are usually done during term time. Taking on an placements will help you gain practical skills, work-place experience and an understanding of how to progress.

Finding one on your own will be a slower process, as you will have to complete a formal application, liaise with the company and do all the paperwork yourself. However, this extra effort can be very worthwhile if it means securing a foothold at a great company, or really feeling certain about what you want from your future.

At the end of an placements you will probably come out with a reference, which will help when applying for other jobs, and sometimes you can even land a job at the place you were doing an placement.

IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A PLACEMENT OR INTERNSHIP, SOME GREAT PLACES TO START ARE:

Pay:

Another major difference is that internships are usually paid, and placements generally are not. Receiving a wage always depends on what you do, the company you work for and the amount of time you are doing it for. However, it’s unlikely that you will be paid for the placement if it’s only short term or something you arranged for yourself. Placements arranged through a course often come with a wage. It is important that you discuss this with your employer after you receive an offer.

Assessment:

It is more than likely that you will be assessed during your placement, especially if it’s part of your course or arranged through school. Employers usually track the progress of their employees regardless of whether they’re on a course. There are a few things that you will be potentially assessed on by your school or college, which are your completed tasks,

Company websites - You can research companies you are interested in and approach them directly, and some that offer these opportunities regularly will advertise vacancies on their websites.

Graduate Talent Pool – A government website designed to help new and recent graduates find internships.

Placement Year International – Provides paid business, hospitality, medicine and healthcare, sports and leisure.

Intern Jobs – A global database of internships and entry-level positions for students, recent graduates and career changers.

Routes to a Job | 21


HOW TO SECURE AN INTERNSHIP OR PLACEMENT

need to have an idea of what you can afford before you start sending applications.

Research and Networking

Many students find it difficult to secure an internship or placement. However, there are several things you can do to give you the edge in this highly competitive market.

Personal Assessment

Looking for an internship requires many of the same steps as looking for a job. You must assess your goals and career aspirations and sketch out your ideal career path before you look at placements. This will help you when assessing whether an internship is suitable or not. You should also consider your financial needs – many internships are unpaid or pay low wages and you may need to travel or commute, so you 22 | www.careersuk.org

After personal assessment, research and networking are key. Information about companies is now available all over the internet and social media platforms, so there is no excuse for not doing your research. You should also network within your industry. This will help with gathering information about companies and vacancies in those companies. Job websites are also an essential resource for research and opportunities - it would be a good idea to set up job alerts.

Information Gathering

Some companies do not advertise vacancies

for internships, so you should contact companies you are interested in directly to ensure you don’t miss any opportunities. The HR department should be your first point of call when doing this. If there is an opening, you should request a meeting to gather more information on the role, either over the phone or in person. You will need information on the


application requirements, person specification, job role, and the application deadline. This is also a good opportunity to ask any questions pertaining to the needs you identified in your personal assessment, such as location and whether the role is paid.

Application Process

After gathering information and weighing the available options, it is time to begin applications. You must know the key requirements of every internship and company you intend to apply for and tailor your resume and cover letter to highlight how your experience and qualifications fit these requirements. Some companies do not require any cover letter, which makes customising your CV for each role even more important. It is also vital that you meet the application deadline in time, if not early. Some companies close applications early if they receive a sufficient number of suitable applications. In most Colleges and Universities, there are employability departments who can assist with the application process.

Follow Up

After completing the application process, you should contact the company to make sure that the company received your application and that you sent everything that was needed.

stages of the process. Even if you fail to secure the opening you originally applied for, you may find yourself applying for different opportunities with the same employer in future, so the impression you create now may help you later. After the interview, you should send an email to thank the company for the interview and for considering you.

Accepting the offer

If you are offered the role, it is crucial to communicate that you have been offered an internship or placement to other companies you interviewed with. You need to liaise with your new employer to find out what paperwork they need (such as tax forms or identification) and any other requirements they need before your start date. Preparing for your new position also includes arranging your commute, double-checking you have appropriate workwear, and making sure you have no conflicting commitments, in addition to fulfilling your employer’s requirements. Congratulations! If you’ve followed all of our steps you should be on your way to securing the internship or placement of your dreams and taking your first steps onto the infamous career lattice.

If you’ve submitted your application early, (ideally a week before the deadline) you will have plenty of time to get in contact with the company and make any adjustments based on their feedback. Don’t worry about irritating your prospective employers – a polite and respectful follow-up shows your motivation and perseverance and helps to hammer home your interest in the role. However, remember to respect their time when asking for feedback and be patient when waiting for their decision. Hiring new employees takes time, and they may be dealing with many applications.

Interview Process

The interview process takes place after the application has been accepted. Remember that internships can pave the way to full-time employment, so you need to impress at the interview and take the position seriously at all Routes to a Job | 23


WHAT TO EXPECT FROM A GRADUATE SCHEME A graduate scheme is one of the best ways to kick-start your career. Joining a graduate scheme is a great way to gain practical work experience and provides you with the practical skills you need to help fast-track your career. Not only does a graduate scheme work as a great entrylevel position for anyone recently out of university, the experience involved will also allow you to figure out what career path to follow. This will give you the essential expertise you need to get there.

1

3

2 24 | www.careersuk.org


Here are 6 points on what to expect from a graduate scheme: 1. Training and Support

Graduate Schemes are designed to deliver training and support and develop the essential skills needed to thrive at work. This ranges from training sessions on communication and confidence, to one-on-one mentoring.

2. Qualifications

Many graduate schemes offer the opportunity to gain professional qualifications, such as a Master’s, PhD, or an industry recognised course, whilst you work.

5

6

3. Job Security

4

Graduate schemes are usually offered on a fixed term basis lasting between one and three years. This means you’ll be able to benefit from a high level of job security, in a role that allows you to learn and grow at the same time. As graduate schemes are designed to train graduates, the structure of the scheme means you’ll become fully qualified and experienced to pursue more advanced opportunities.

4.Improved Career Prospects

With graduate schemes offering a range of learning and development opportunities, you’ll be able to boost your career progression and employability skills.

5. Opportunities

Graduate Schemes are available in a range of industries and professions. They involve a variety of roles, contract lengths, benefits and salaries, so you won’t be limited on choice.

6. High Earning Potential

Graduate Schemes offer rewarding salaries, especially the big businesses. Graduate starting salaries can be influenced by many factors including company, location and sector. Routes to a Job | 25


HOW TO GET A JOB WITH NO EXPERIENCE

Applying for a job with no experience may feel like you’re fighting a losing battle, but don’t give up - learn what you can do to boost your chances of success. You need experience to get a job, and a job to get experience. This can feel disheartening but remember that you’re not alone. Finding a job with little or no experience isn’t impossible - you just need determination to uncover the right opportunities. There are plenty of ways to give your CV a boost, gain the skills that potential employers are after and get your foot in the door.

26 | www.careersuk.org

Look for internships and apprenticeships

If you’re struggling to secure a long-term or permanent position, internships and apprenticeships are great ways to gain that much needed experience. They make it possible to earn a wage while acquiring firsthand knowledge of a job or organisation, and are useful for building a network of contacts and can sometimes lead to permanent employment. An internship looks impressive on your CV and can make you stand out from the crowd. Some larger companies may offer a formal internship programme, so check the websites of organisations you’re interested in to see what’s available. Internships can last from a couple of weeks to a year, and they’re very popular just expect to face a competitive application process, especially at larger companies. On an apprenticeship you’ll be employed to do a real job while studying for a formal qualification. You’ll sign a contract with your employer, who then trains you in a specific profession. Apprenticeships are a long-term agreement and can take from one to four years


to complete. Most apprentices are guaranteed a job on completion of their programme.

Start volunteering

Volunteering positions are more easily secured than an internship and they’re guaranteed to boost your employability, especially if you have no relevant experience. Although unpaid, you’ll profit from the skills and contacts you gain. Volunteering experience shows commitment, initiative and a strong work ethic - after all, you’re working for free - which are all valuable, appealing traits to prospective employers. You’ll also develop a range of sought after, transferable skills, such as teamwork, confidence, time management, adaptability, communication and organisation.

Build your network

When you’re starting out with no experience, who you know can be just as important as what you know. A recommendation to an employer from a personal contact can go a long way. But how do you build up a network of contacts if you’re struggling to enter the world of work?

rather than the ones you don’t. Analyse the job description and list all the skills and personal qualities that make you a good fit for the job. Be sure to emphasise soft and transferable skills such as communication, leadership ability, team working and attention to detail. However, if you lack direct experience in your chosen field, demonstrate your passion and motivation to learn. Highlight examples of your dedication and commitment to learning. These could include volunteering work, internships or work shadowing.

Target realistic roles

There’s nothing wrong with aiming high, but starting your job search by applying for senior roles is pointless if you’re lacking experience. Be realistic and instead target entry-level jobs and be prepared to start at the bottom and work your way up.

If you’re at university, utilise the contacts available to you before you graduate. Make the most of career fairs, recruitment networking events and employer talks or lectures. Visit your university careers service to see if they can put you in touch with employers in your area of interest. Keep in touch with lecturers and people you meet on work experience placements or internships and fellow volunteers - you never know when these contacts might come in useful. Social media is also an effective way of building and maintaining your professional network. Being present on sites such as LinkedIn and following and connecting with companies and individuals in your chosen field can yield impressive results.

Emphasise the skills you have

Work experience, internships and volunteering are crucial experiences that can ensure your CV doesn’t look empty at the application stage. Focus your CV on the skills you do have, Routes to a Job | 27


WHY CHOOSE UNI? Are you currently wondering whether or not to go to university? Well, you’re not alone. Many before you have asked themselves the very same question. People who go to university have a higher chance of earning more over their lifetime than those who have not been.

WHY YOU SHOULD GO TO UNIVERSITY Universities are an advanced educational institution in which people study for degrees and conduct academic research. They offer a 28 | www.careersuk.org

number of specialised courses that are taught by experts and have various research facilities that help students learn, such as libraries, laboratories and computer rooms. The courses and facilities available at universities enable students to pursue their academic goals in the field of their choice. The major benefit of university is improving your career prospects and earning potential in the long term. The major drawback is the cost of going to university – it’s important to weigh these up carefully. By going to university, you improve your career prospects in the long term. You develop specialist skills in a field, and some job roles require a university qualification (such as that of a doctor or architect). You also develop transferable skills such as communication, presentation and problemsolving skills, while enhancing your ability to work as part of a team. Finishing a lengthy qualification to a high standard also shows employers your ability to commit and persevere. Employers tend to look for university graduates


to fill positions that have great responsibility and high pay. University is a great opportunity for you to develop your social life and have new experiences as you have the chance to meet new people who come from different places and diverse backgrounds. Universities help you to build your self confidence and independence, and the supported living in student accommodation is a great stepping stone for learning those frightening adult skills like managing your bills and cooking for yourself.

WEIGH UP THE COSTS The major downside of university is the cost. Universities can charge thousands each year you study there. However, this can be paid back over a number of years. It’s quite normal to take out student loans to fund university. Student loans are split into two parts: tuition fee loans and maintenance loans. The tuition fee component is paid directly to the university to cover your course fees, and the rate differs depending on whether you are studying full-time or part-time. The maintenance loan is for funding your day-to-day expenses (like rent and food) and is paid directly into your bank account. When making the decision to go to university, it is important to research how many graduates from each course find employment in their field. We also recommend you look into the percentage of students that graduate from the courses as well as the amount of support available in case people find themselves struggling.

Routes to a Job | 29


UNIVERSITY

30 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION U NIVE RS IT Y TI M EL I NE ................................................................ IS STU DYI NG A B R OA D R I GH T FOR YOU? ...................................... POST-GRA DU A TE EDU CA TI O N ..................................................... SHOUL D I DO A M ASTER’S DEG R EE? ............................................ 10 ADVANTA GES OF DO I NG A N M B A ............................................ BALANCING WO R K A ND STU DY.................................................... MANAGING EX A M STRESS ........................................................... ES SENTIAL SEL F-CA R E FO R EX A M S EASON ................................. PREPARI NG FO R L IFE A FTER U NI V ERSITY ....................................

University | 31


UNIVERSITY TIMELINE What Happens at University

Are you starting university any time soon? Moving out of your parent’s house into student accommodation? You must have a bundle of questions about what you can expect from your time at university so look at our university timeline!

FIRST YEAR

1 2

Moving Day Trepidation

For those of you that are going to be moving into your own place, whether that be student dorms or a rented house, it is probably going to feel very strange and daunting at first. But worry not, give it a few weeks and you will get to know your roommates whilst making friends in the process.

Freshers Week

For many first-year students, Freshers Week is a time for socialising, partying, joining clubs and forming new relationships. Copious amounts of alcohol and late nights can leave you feeling rough but remember that it is okay to say ‘no’ if you don’t feel like going out or drinking. You should also consider your budget; you don’t want to spend all your money in one week.

3

Freshers Fair Freebies

You should head down to your universities Freshers Fair when you get the chance and look at all the societies they’re offering. Most stalls will give away free stuff like stationary, posters, food and drinks and you can also talk to the people that run the societies too. If anything, it is also a place to socialise and meet new people that share the same interests as you do.

32 | www.careersuk.org

4

Learning Begins

Once Freshers Week is over, the start of classes and lectures will roll around. Now is the time that you will have to get yourself in gear and start studying in your own time so that you remember everything from what your tutors have taught you. If you don’t revise, it will affect the outcome of your overall grade.

5 6

Assignments

Throughout the academic year, you will be getting assignments from your tutors. Don’t take these with a pinch of salt as they are serious and most of the time, do go towards your final grade at the end of the year.

Exam Season For some lucky people, they will only have coursework to complete but for others, there will be exams. If you are one of those people that has exams, then you must study hard in the weeks leading up to them. I know there are one million and one distractions that will be thrown at you, but it is important you pass them if you want to be allowed into the second year.


SECOND YEAR

1

Renting Your Own Accommodation Life in second year will be hard. You will most likely want to move out of student dorms and into your own place. Landlords and estate agents can be tricky to deal with if you don’t have a good one so always make sure to read the contract thoroughly before signing it. They also may claim to have your best interests at heart, but some are not as truthful as others. Your university should have an accommodation department that you can ask for advice if you have any problems.

2

Bills, Bills, Bills Now that you won’t be in student dorms, the university will no longer take care of your bills for you. You will need to learn how to find different utility providers and find out who is the cheapest. You can do this by either researching on the internet then ringing the company and negotiate a contract, or by going to a company that can do that for you. Keep in mind that they will take a small percentage of your money though. Remember that you will have to pay for a TV license if you’re going to watch TV and council tax as well.

3

The Second Year Slump

Once the first year is over, it can get harder. Many students find it difficult to stay on top of all the work that’s being handed to them; particularly as it’s much harder than the work in the first year. It’s easy to become less motivated when work gets harder and deadlines get shorter but it’s good to keep in mind that the grade you get in the second year will be going towards your overall grade.

4

More Library, Less Party The library is going to be like a second home come exam time. Unfortunately, your second year is going to be a lot harder than the first, so you will need to hit the books and study hard. You may also find that most people do not like to go out as much during the second year as it can be expensive and tiring. Also, you won’t want to be staying out until 4AM when you have a lecture at 9AM. So, leave the partying for when you don’t have any assignments, deadlines or exams coming up - for which you will need to put all your attention towards.

5

School’s out for Summer

Come May a lot of students will be finishing up for the year until they go back in September. Depending on what month you finish, you will have 2 – 5 months of summer to kick back and relax. However, for those that would like to get a head start into their careers, it’s a good idea to find a summer placement. You can do this by approaching companies and asking them if they have any internships available. This will put you ahead of the competition come graduation.

University | 33


THIRD YEAR

1 2

No More Nights Out Obviously, you’re still allowed to have the odd night out but you’re going to find that the mountain of work you will inevitably have is going take up too much of your time. Leave the nights out for birthdays and celebrations.

Dissertations

Depending on the course, not everyone will have to do a dissertation. However, most people do so. You need to keep in mind that this will be a huge essay that will go towards your overall grade. This is not something that can be done in a day so do not leave it until the night before. Doing well on your dissertation could be the difference between getting a 2:1 and a 2:2 so work hard on it.

3 4

Final Exams

Doing well in your exams at the end of the third year is crucial if you want to get a good grade. Months before your exams happen, you should have your head buried in books and studying hard. Everything else will have to take a backseat as these exams should be your number one priority.

Enjoy yourself

Exams are over, summer has begun, and you have time to chill out before you graduate. Have a BBQ, socialise with friends, host parties, go to festivals or maybe even go on a holiday. You should also investigate the job market now as well. Remember to have fun while you can because as soon as you graduate, it will be work, work, work.

5

Graduation

Once you receive your results, you will have the option to go to your graduation ceremony. This is optional so if you are not one for standing in front of a big audience and having your picture taken, then you don’t have to go. For those that do go, the full graduation robes will have to be worn, and yes, that includes the funny hat (otherwise known as a mortarboard).

34 | www.careersuk.org

BUT MOST OF ALL, HAVE FUN WHILST YOU STILL CAN!


University | 35


IS STUDYING

ABROAD

RIGHT FOR YOU?

Getting to study abroad is a once in a lifetime opportunity for students that are studying at university. It’s something that you should take full advantage of if you have the chance to do so. However, there are many things to consider before you decide to take the plunge. Read on to find out the pros and cons of studying abroad!

PROS 1

LEARN A NEW LANGUAGE

There is no better way to learn a language than by going to a country where the language is its mother tongue. Being able to speak a different language around the locals makes it so much easier to learn it. Local people will be able to help you pronounce words properly and just generally help you practice. It will also look great on your CV when presenting it to potential employers as these are the types of things that make you stand out from the crowd.

2

MEET NEW PEOPLE

Take studying abroad as an opportunity to form new friendships either with the other students that have travelled with you or the people native to the country. Having friends from other countries is an amazing thing; it means you get to learn about other cultures and backgrounds. Meeting new people means you will have more memories to look back at once you leave.

36 | www.careersuk.org

3

TRAVELLING

In between studying and any classes you may have, you will be able to go out and explore the country itself. You will be able to take trips to all those famous tourist destinations you have always wanted to see and experience more of the culture. Travelling around to different parts of the country will give you a good break from all the studying and help you make the most of the trip whilst you are there.

4

TAKING IN THE CULTURE

Learning about new cultures helps to enhance your knowledge and broadens your mind. Having more knowledge about the world around us never hurt anyone so it’s great to really immerse yourself into the culture before you go back to your own. Try some new food, take part in traditions and visit places you have never been to before.


CONS 1

LONG DISTANCE

If you’re a bit of a home bird that likes to stick with family and friends, then it might be a bit difficult for you to come to terms with how far away you will be from home. This goes hand in hand with the fact that once you return home, any friends you made with local people will have to be long distance friendships. However, there is always Skype, FaceTime or other apps that you can use so you can stay in contact with any family and long-distance friends you have whilst you’re not there.

2

EXPENSES

Depending on the country you go to and how expensive it is there, you could be looking at having to spend a lot of money. Flights, accommodation, tuition and living expenses all add up; especially if the country itself is dear as well. Not to mention that you will have to take spending money with you as well if you want to go on day trips or eat out.

3

ISOLATION

It can be a very lonely experience if you don’t manage to settle in well and make friends or meet new people. Some people may be more introverted than others and that could make it harder when trying to introduce themselves to others. It’s important to socialise, put yourself out there and connect with others.

4

CULTURE SHOCK

Not every country is the same and it is easier to see that when you go for a couple of months to study instead of a couple of weeks on holiday. It can be very overwhelming trying to speak to people that don’t understand you, trying strange food and figuring your way around everywhere so it can come as quite a shock to the system.

University | 37


POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION PART 1

As we approach the end of the academic year, many students find that graduation is looming, instead of a distant point somewhere over the horizon. It’s hard to know what options are out there, especially for those students considering staying on at uni. Postgraduate education is the catchall term for educational qualifications offered by universities after attaining a bachelor’s degree. A postgraduate degree or diploma offers students a progressive level of education in their chosen area of study, and usually requires obtaining a bachelor’s degree first. Some people progress straight into postgrad after their undergraduate degree and others pursue these 38 | www.careersuk.org

higher qualifications after already establishing themselves in their careers. Postgraduate courses are for people who want to continue their studies in higher education after they’ve graduated with a bachelor’s degree or equivalent qualification. They are normally studied as postgraduate certificates and diplomas or master’s degrees. A postgraduate course takes 1 year full-time and 2 years part-time. Postgraduate courses are designed to advance the knowledge attained at an undergraduate level. The benefits of earning a postgraduate qualification are gaining specialised knowledge, building on your current abilities and developing new skills, all of which give you a competative edge in the job market. When choosing a postgraduate course, make sure you know what you want to do. It is important to choose a course which suits your learning style. Ask yourself what kind of course you want and what you expect to achieve at the end of it. Many master’s and diploma courses are linked to specific careers. Be sure


to get as much information as possible. Course descriptions are useful, but your research should go beyond this. You can always return to uni to do one of these courses if it isn’t the best option for you right now, so there’s no need to rush into the commitment.

Type of Postgraduate Courses

The main types of postgraduate degrees are master’s degrees, diplomas, certificates, and doctorates, which come in the form of PhDs, integrated PhDs and professional doctorates. Some of these are taught courses, while others are primarily independent study and research. A taught course is run by lecturers and tutors and includes master’s degrees and postgraduate diplomas or certificates. Taught courses consist of seminars, lectures, practical assignments with work assessed through exams, essays, dissertations and projects. PhDs and their variants usually involve producing a thesis based on your own independent research, with the guidance of a senior professor.

Master’s Degree

A master’s degree is an academic degree

that takes place during postgraduate study. It is a Level 7 qualification - above a bachelor’s degree but below PhDs. A taught master’s usually takes place over 1 or 2 years and involves the completion of a dissertation or project. Research master’s degrees on the other hand are much more independent, as they are more intense and require advanced independent study. Some examples of master’s degrees are Master of Arts (MA), a Master of Business Administration (MBA), a Master of Engineering (MEng), a Master’s of Philosophy (MPhil) and a Master of Science (MSc). A Master’s degree usually costs between £5,000 and £12,000 but can be funded through a postgraduate loan.

Postgraduate Diploma and Certificate A diploma/certificate is a qualification issued by an educational institution, such as a college or university, that shows the recipient has successfully completed a level 7 course of study but not sufficient enough to earn a masters degree. A postgraduate diploma program can provide valuable specialised skills,

knowledge and experiences and is generally less commitment than a masters degree. A postgraduate certificate can give you the eligibility to practice a particular profession and/ or provides advanced skills in a specialisation. It is earned after taking a series of courses in a particular subject. 1 to 2 years of full-time study is generally required to complete a postgraduate diploma/certificate. The average cost of a postgraduate is around £5,000.

Doctorates

A doctorate is the highest level of academic degree. You can earn a doctorate in any subject area. Doctorates take 3 to 4 years to complete, but some can take longer. There are 3 types of doctorates: PhD - A PhD is a postgraduate doctoral degree awarded to students who complete a thesis. It is the highest level of degree you can achieve. PhD students independently conduct significant and original research in a specific subject, before producing a publication-worthy thesis of 60,00090,000 words. PhD qualifications are available in all subjects. The cost of a PhD falls between £3,000 and £6,000 per year for UK students. Integrated PhD - Also known as the ‘New Route PhD’, this 4-year qualification, involves studying a one-year research master’s degree before progressing onto a 3-year PhD. Integrated PhDs are supported by the Government and British Council. This qualification involves a combination of taught materials, practical experience and advanced research. This allows you to learn subject-specific methodologies while building the transferable skills that will enable you to become a leader in your chosen profession. Professional Doctorate - This type of doctorate includes a significant taught module and a smaller research project. They are often taken on a part-time basis and can last anywhere between 2 and 8 years. Professional Doctorates focus on a specific professional context and are designed primarily for current professionals in vocational sectors such as healthcare, teaching and education, and engineering and manufacturing. They’re structured so that they can be completed alongside working an existing professional job, and very attractive for those wishing to upskill without making the financial commitment of leaving work.

University | 39


POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION PART 2

Benefits of Postgraduate Education

Postgraduate education is not for everyone. However, you will develop skills that will support you through daily life, in addition to the specialised skillset developed during the course, such as time management, research, presentation and management. If you’re considering postgraduate study, here are some benefits: Enhance your prospects A postgraduate qualification is an excellent way to enhance your prospects. It will help you stand out from the crowd and shows your commitment and dedication to your field. Research degrees demonstrate your ability to think independently and work towards a goal, while taught courses highlight your ability to learn new skills and ideas. 40 | www.careersuk.org

Advance your career A postgraduate course can further your skills and knowledge in your chosen sector. Employers value the experience by entrusting postgraduate-qualified applicants with greater responsibilities. You can change your career Postgraduate courses provide the opportunity to change careers. You might have studied law at undergraduate level, but want to swap the courtroom for the classroom on a permanent basis. You can use postgraduate study to transition into the academic side of your industry or move into a brand new field altogether.

Paying for it

While postgraduate courses are not free, there are loans you can apply for. Bear in mind your postgraduate course won’t be all you have to pay for. You’ll have to cover accommodation expenses such as rent, food, transport, entertainment and other living expenses. Therefore, you’ll need to think carefully about how you will manage your living expenses in addition to the repayments you’ll be making in


years to come. If you want to reduce the size of your loan, you could take on a course that makes it possible to work part-time to support yourself or reduce your living costs drastically by sharing accommodaion with a friend, partner or family. If you’re starting a full or part-time taught or research master’s course, you could get a postgraduate master’s Loan. A postgraduate Master’s loan can help with course fees and living costs while you’re on a postgraduate masters course. Students can apply for a graduate loan of up to £10,000 from the Student Loans Company. Eligibility for a postgraduate Master’s loan depends on your course, university and personal circumstances.

Repaying your Postgraduate Loan

You’ll have to start repaying your postgraduate Master’s loan at the start of the tax year either four years after the start of your course or after you leave your course - or whichever comes first. You’ll repay 6% of whatever you earn over the income threshold, which is £21,000 a year or £1,750 a month. This means that if you earned £30,000 a year, you would pay 6% of the £9000 earned over the £21,000 repayment threshold, which would work out at about £540 a year. This doesn’t sound like much, but you’ll also have to pay any undergraduate student loans you have at the same time and you will be charged 6.3% interest from the day you get your first payment until your loan is fully repaid or cancelled. This means you could find yourself still making repayments decades after you graduate, so make sure to weigh the benefits of postgraduate education against the costs. If you are employed, repayments are taken from your salary before it hits your bank account, along with tax and National Insurance. If you’re self-employed, you’ll make payments at the same time you pay tax through selfassessment. If you already have a student loan, borrowing the postgraduate Master’s loan won’t affect the payment of any other student loans you already have for any undergraduate course. If you decide to leave your course early, you’ll still have to repay your loan, but the process of repayment might be different. University | 41


SHOULD I DO A MASTER’S DEGREE?

entry onto a programme. To make the most of postgraduate study it’s vital to have a solid reason for committing to a course. Here are some of the benefits of doing a master’s degree: • • •

In an increasingly competitive jobs market, a master’s degree has many benefits and can set you apart from other candidates - as well as increase your earning potential. Studying for a master’s degree is an exciting prospect and there are many reasons to consider taking a postgraduate course.

Why do a master’s?

A master’s degree can aid a career change, help you to gain chartership and provide you with useful industry contacts and connections. However, master’s study is intense and often comes with a hefty price tag. In most cases, you’ll need some relevant work experience for 42 | www.careersuk.org

• •

Progress in current career path Improve employment prospects Enable progression to a higher-level qualification Enter a particular profession Gaining specialised knowledge to advance in a field

Will a master’s degree help get a job? Master’s degrees in the UK are highly regarded by employers. For some roles, a master’s degree is an essential entry requirement, while for many others it is highly beneficial. Research job profiles and entry requirements of professions you are interested in. Having a relevant master’s degree under your belt could give you a crucial competitive edge in a crowded jobs market - employers are increasingly looking for ways to distinguish between candidates, and this extra higher-


level qualification shows your ability to commit to an intense period of work. Master’s study may also be extremely useful if you’re looking to change careers. If you’re already working in your preferred industry, a master’s degree could lead to rapid career progression. It could emphasise your drive, determination and willingness to increase your ability in a chosen area. You will only benefit fully from a master’s if it’s complemented by relevant work experience. Without this, your employability will be weaker, and you run the risk of getting into unnecessary debt.

it’s the right move, you’ll almost certainly lack the commitment to ensure that it’s a worthwhile investment. If you’re looking to study immediately after completing your undergraduate degree, you may want to reconsider. You shouldn’t pursue a master’s in the hope that it’ll automatically add to your CV or simply because you need more time to think about your career. Unless your goals are crystal clear, spending some time in the workplace or researching your options while taking a gap year may be more beneficial at this point.

Will I have time to do a master’s?

Master’s study must fit around your lifestyle, so

Is pursuing a master’s degree worth identifying the mode of study that’s right for you the cost? is essential. Obtaining a master’s degree can be expensive, time-consuming and emotionally draining. Therefore, you need to weigh up your reasons for studying a course carefully. Master’s study is cheaper than doing an undergraduate degree even though fees vary widely. On a positive note, postgraduates earn considerably more than their undergraduate counterparts.

You must think deeply about why you want to pursue master’s study before committing. Many applicants wrongly believe that a master’s degree will automatically enhance their career and allow them to earn more - yet this is only true if the qualification genuinely gets them closer to fulfilling their ambitions. To be certain that master’s study will meet your expectations, and that it’ll be worth the hard work and high costs, you should: • •

Be passionate about your subject Browse relevant job advertisements to identify what employer’s value most, as industry certifications and accreditations are important for certain roles • Consider everything in the context of your overall career plan, ensuring that the qualification offers the best way of achieving your ultimate career goals • Consider whether master’s study will boost your credentials significantly above your existing undergraduate education • Contact careers services, professional bodies or individual employers for further advice. There are situations where you should avoid master’s study. If you can’t convince yourself

Full-time study is most common and especially suits continuing students. You’ll work intensively for the duration of your programme, achieving your qualification as quickly as possible. Contact hours vary from course to course, but full-time study generally involves several lectures and seminars every week.

Am I ready to do a master’s?

Before committing to a masters degree, ask yourself: • • • • • •

Am I fully aware of the level of commitment required to undertake master’s study? Can I afford master’s study, in terms of tuition fees and living costs? Will the postgraduate qualification improve my career prospects? Does the qualification require me to possess specific skills? Will the qualification equip me with the specific skills needed for my ideal career? Am I certain that this course is right for me?

University | 43


10 ADVANTAGES OF DOING AN MBA

The master of Business Administration (MBA) is a postgraduate qualification that is highly valued by employers. MBA’s are often recognised as superior to other masters qualifications. They tend to be more expensive but graduates also generally earn higher upon completion. Whilst a lot of universities accept applicants without any experience, the majority of MBA students have a few years of professional or managerial experience. If you’ve already got some business experience and want to take the next step towards a promotion, pay rise or even a career change, studying for an MBA could make all the difference. 44 | www.careersuk.org

There are many advantages of doing an MBA.

10 advantages of doing an MBA: •

One key advantage of doing an MBA is that it improves your theoretical and practical knowledge of how businesses operate

You are differentiated in the crowded job market as you have earned a prestigious postgraduate qualification that is treasured by employers

It’s a great opportunity for top-level networking as it develops your communication and confidence skills. It broadens your knowledge as well as developing your leadership skills and critical thinking

An MBA creates an entrepreneurial mindset, as it helps you acquire business practices needed to start a new business or help existing organisations grow

It is a globally recognised degree


compared to most professional qualifications and is well respected in all fields all over the world •

Studying an MBA gives people with nonbusiness degrees a competitive edge as it courteously rounds up their education, giving them the all-important business knowledge

By achieving an MBA, you boost your chances of promotion and salary increment

An MBA opens up new avenues for many career options and provides you with new skills in the workforce.

Whilst studying for an MBA, you interact with individuals from all over the world, which enhances your experience by giving you an insight to different business practices, cultures and points of view

An MBA provides the skills and education needed to become a qualified successful leadership candidate

University | 45


BALANCING WORK AND STUDY

HERE ARE 3 TIPS AND TRICKS ON HOW TO BALANCE WORK LIFE AND STUDY Organise your time!

It’s hard being a student whilst working. Lots of people have been there and seen the struggles first-hand and how difficult it can be. In your first year it can be very tempting to immerse yourself in university life and completely forget about work. However, developing good work habits now rather than later will be very beneficial to you once you complete your degree.

46 | www.careersuk.org

Being efficient with your timekeeping works wonders when you’re struggling to keep up with both university and work. You must remember that the 6 or so hours that you spent in class during secondary school isn’t the same as how much time you will spend working on your degree. University is harder, so don’t squander away the precious hours that you could use to study. At the same time, you need to have a look at how many hours you can commit to a job. Being strapped for cash isn’t the greatest when you need to pay rent, food and any studying equipment. In fact, studies show 84% of university students have financial worries. However, it’s obviously not possible to manage 40 hours a week and still be able to make time for classes, studying and a social life. Look for part time work instead, ideally between 10 - 20 hours.


When you start your job, make sure to let your manager know that you are studying and make them aware of your schedule. The last thing you want to do is work more hours than you intended to or miss a class!

Dealing with stress!

If you’re working and studying, then things can start to become incredibly stressful. Trying to keep up with studying whilst keeping your boss happy is difficult; we know this and many others do too. However, there are many ways you can deal with this. The first is to avoid leaving work until the night before a deadline. It’s crucial that from the moment you receive an assignment, you plan everything out straight away. Planning out assignments, whether they are essays or physical projects means that you will understand the amount of work there is to do and will have an estimate of how long it will take to complete. It is incredibly important that you plan your work out effectively. By doing this, you will be able to organise the time you put into the assignment with the time you will be putting into your job. It’s always a good idea to allocate slots during the day for when you are going to be working on it. To summarise this point: plan, plan, plan.

certainly needs factoring in. Hang on, what about your social life? You have to go out, have fun and see friends! It’s understandable - the difficulty you have prioritising things that are important to you. But you need to have a look at what is the most important thing at a specific point in time. If you’re getting close to exam season, then it’s time for your social life to take a backseat. Keep the parties and socialising for after all your exams are over and get studying. You will thank yourself later when you get the grades that you were hoping for. As for your job, it’s going to be a hard to prioritise study over work. Obviously, your job is important; it keeps you afloat financially. As the previous points suggested, you could talk to your manager about your exams and let them know your schedule. Hopefully, they will take into consideration that you are a student and will need to focus on your exams. As you can see, work and study can be hard to balance if you are not sure on how to do it. But by using these 3 pointers, it should become easier for you to work out a schedule that fits you. Try these tips out for yourself and see the difference it makes to your work/studying schedule!

With regards to work, it’s always best that you let your manager know if you have any important assignments that have specific deadlines. That way, they might be more lenient when you need to change your shift times or they might even give you less hours, to allow you to concentrate more on university because in return, you’d be less stressed at work. Last of all, always remember to take care of yourself. There are only 24 hours in a day, so running around here, there and everywhere will only make you burn out. Learn that it is okay to unwind and relax every now and then to stop stress from creeping in. If you are still finding it difficult to deal with, consider visiting your universities student services and have a chat with them.

Prioritise the important things!

As you will be paying thousands each year you spend studying, you will want to get your moneys worth, right? So, try to prioritise attending classes and studying. But hang on, you also have a job? Well that University | 47


MANAGING EXAM STRESS EXERCISE

EAT WELL

Physical activity combats stress, boosts your mood and helps you to relax.

A balanced, healthy diet is crucial as it helps you to make progress.

CUT OUT CAFFINE Caffeine is a stimulant and increases your stress levels.

SLEEP It is essential to get a good amount of sleep so that you can focus. You should aim for at least 7-8 hours for a good night’s sleep.

DON’T MISS BREAKFAST! Breakfast is one of the most important meals of the day - it improves your concentration and productivity. Skipping breakfast leads to hunger, exhaustion and lack of focus.

48 | www.careersuk.org


If you are stressed about exams, you’re not alone. Exam stress affects every student in many different ways. It’s quite normal to feel overwhelmed or stressed, but you should be aware of strategies to manage how you feel. Knowing how to manage stress improves your health and allows you to become more productive. Follow our tips to manage your exam stress.

HERE ARE 10 TIPS PREPARE AND ORGANISE Being prepared reduces your stress levels, so follow a timetable and make a to-do list.

THINK POSITIVE Develop a positive mindset and believe in yourself.

TAKE REGULAR BREAKS Studies have shown that breaks increase your creativity and productivity.

DON’T DOUBT YOURSELF You are your own person with your own abilities and strengths.

TALK TO SOMEONE Discussing how you feel helps distract you from your stressful thoughts and releases built-up tension. University | 49


ESSENTIAL SELF-CARE FOR EXAM SEASON

TOP TIPS FOR SELF-CARE Be organised

Make a schedule and have a plan so you can manage your time more effectively.

Have a break Exam season is one of the most dreaded times of the year. Exams are a stressful time for students - trying to balance revision, meeting deadlines and staying positive. It does get tough, so it’s important to make sure you are looking after your physical and mental health during this period. So, here are some tips and advice for essential self-care throughout the exam season.

It is important to take a break so your mind can have a little rest. So, move around, go outside and take a deep breath or just have a stretch and look at a different view. Short, regular breaks will do more for your productivity than you think!

Eat and sleep well

Make sure you eat healthily and get a good amount of sleep. Aim to get preferably 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night. It is important to have a good, deep rest to give your body the rest it needs so your mind can function. It also requires the fuel to physically perform better.

Reach out for support

If you are struggling or find yourself getting anxious and stressed about the exams, ask for help and talk to someone about how you are 50 | www.careersuk.org


feeling, whether it be a friend or a professional. Most educational institutions have professional counselling available for free, and if not, your GP is trained to connect you to the help you need. Sometimes it can help just to have a good whinge and a laugh with your friends about what you’re going through.

Don’t panic

It’s easier said than done but try to relax and think positively.

REVISION TIPS Revision is a process. Start by reviewing how much content you already know and plan to cover what you don’t. Revising is important and beneficial as it develops your learning further. Follow these revision tips to guide you on how to get your revision done:

Understanding your learning style

It is important you know and understand your learning style. Once you understand whether you are a visual, auditory, reading/writing or kinaesthetic learner (learning by doing), remembering and recalling new information will become much easier.

Find a quiet place to revise

You don’t want to have be distracted or interrupted.

Create a revision timetable

This is a great way to organise your study time, ensure you cover everything, and help boost your motivation. Make sure you know which topics you need to revise for each subject. Use your exam board specifications as a revision list.

Repetition

Re-writing and repeating your notes will help you to remember the information, especially if you are a read/write learner.

Think positive

You are already doing great by revising as it will help your learning so keep up the good work! Remember to celebrate little victories, even if it’s just finishing a topic, or taking time to make a healthy snack.

REVISION TECHNIQUES There are different methods to help with revision and each person has a different method that suits them.

Active revision

This involves using your eyes, ears and hands in multiple ways. Active methods of revision include: writing revision notes, discussing topics and notes aloud, testing yourself or getting others to test you, attempting past exam papers and using revision websites. Revising actively is the best way to make sense of the material you’re revising and helps you to remember more.

Revision cards

They are usually postcard size. You can make your own by simply cutting a sheet of A4 card in four. Revision cards consist of simplified notes. Try putting possible exam questions on the front and facts/answers on the back.

Completing past papers

By completing past papers, you can identify gaps in your knowledge and practice showing the examiner what you know.

Staying motivated

Acknowledge your progress and maintain a positive attitude when faced with challenges. Rewarding yourself when you’ve achieved a goal is a great way to stay motivated.

Managing stress

High levels of stress hormone (cortisol) are known to have many adverse effects on your body, including your memory! Exercise has been shown to boost your mood and help you to relax.

Take regular study breaks

Take short breaks to increase performance and reduce stress. Research has shown that students who take regular breaks retain more information. Some people recommend a 25/5-minute work/break system, but others find a 45/15 works best for them. University | 51


PREPARING FOR LIFE AFTER UNIVERSITY

It’s safe to say that university is very much education-oriented. Most students who finish their last year feel like they’ve been thrown in the deep-end. University careers departments provide a lot of support but not every student takes advantage of their support and guidance. For those who do, the advice on how to navigate the working world provides them a useful foundation for their career. For those who miss out, we’ve written 5 tips to prepare you for when university has finished.

52 | www.careersuk.org

Take the initiative! If your degree is very broad with lots of routes your career could go down, you might need to start thinking about what you want to head into. Your tutor/lecturer/careers advisor is not going to decide for you, so you need to use your own initiative. University is only there so you can get a degree; after that, it’s up to you where your career will turn. If you haven’t decided already, you need to start researching where your degree can take you. Look online and read up on different career paths that may interest you, network with industry professionals and find out how they got to where they are now, or even talk to your university careers advisor.

Money management! Most people that come out of university are littered with debt and student loans that they must pay back. Once graduates do get a job, it’s hard not to splurge most of the first pay check on things they want over things they need. It’s okay to spend money on treats every


now and then but you must remember that if you are living independently, you will have rent, bills and other essential payments, which all need to come first. It might be wise to talk to an older friend or family member that is completely self-sufficient and ask them for tips to manage your money. There are also many support guides and articles online that can give you advice as well.

Network, network, network! Networking is something you should have started as soon as you joined your university. It is crucial that you meet people within the industry you want to work in and start building connections. If you don’t know the right person, you might have to put in a bit more work, especially compared to somebody that already has contacts to vouch for them. If you do not already have one, start by setting up a LinkedIn account and add any previous work experience, qualifications and anything else that you feel would be beneficial for potential employers to know. Build up your profile. Once your profile is looking professional, start connecting with others and build up trust and relationships.

Work on your soft skills! It’s all well and good being able to define what relative atomic mass is in detail, but can you explain it to a room of people without making them feel stupid? Many university students will come out of university with buckets-full of knowledge, but may not be able to efficiently communicate, work in a team, problem-solve and be organised. These are just some of the soft skills you will have to learn. You may have received the best grade in your year, but if you can’t communicate properly, then your chances of finding a job are slim. If you’re aware that your soft skills are not up to par with the working world, then it’s time to put some effort into improving them. Real world knowledge won’t come from an educational establishment; it is something you have to figure out for yourself. Prepare yourself for it now so it doesn’t come as bit of a shock once you do start working.

Be realistic! Studies show that 93% of students in the UK want to go into a job where they can ‘make a difference to the world’. While that’s a nice ideology to have, not all employers prioritise this. Some sharks out in the working world don’t care as much about being environmentally friendly or making our planet a better place as they do about profits and money. The same goes for salaries. You may be lucky and offered a job with an excellent starting salary for a graduate but most of the time, that is not the case. The average starting salary is £19,000 - £22,000 so take heed of your expenditures before you make decisions to buy something worth a significant amount of money. Work for graduates without any industry experience will be paid little for the first few years. However, as you gain new skills and experience, you will move up the career ladder and your salary will increase accordingly. University | 53


KEY SKILLS

54 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION EMPLOYA B I L I TY SKI L L S ............................................................... SMART GOA L S ............................................................................. MANAGING DEA DL I NES ................................................................ PREPARI NG FO R A PR ESENTA TI O N ............................................... NETWORK I NG .............................................................................. MAKING TH E M O ST O F Y O U R TEA M ...............................................

Key Skills | 55


EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS

HERE IS A LIST OF 6 EMPLOYABILITY SKILLS EMPLOYERS WANT YOU TO HAVE Communication

There are several key skills that employers look for when hiring someone. Along with good technical understanding and subject knowledge, employers often outline a set of skills that they want from an employee. These skills are what they believe will prove the employee can carry out their role.

It’s vital that you can communicate efficiently and effectively to ensure that people understand you. Communicating doesn’t just involve talking to people though, it includes having the ability to listen, being able to convey your thoughts through writing and the use of your body language. These are all things you will have to work on to improve your communication skills.

Initiative

Using your initiative means noticing and seeking out tasks that need to be completed and doing them without being asked. This can also involve thinking creatively to make improvements to the way things are done.

Technology

Having technology skills is a must. Most places of work will have technology that you will need to know and understand, so it is crucial that you know how to use it. Being able to use technology 56 | www.careersuk.org


can include knowing how to use a computer for word processing, using spreadsheets and sending emails, or knowing how to use office equipment like a photocopier. If you’re not sure how to do anything technology related, you should tell the employer you don’t know how to use it, but that you are enthusiastic and willing to learn.

Problem-solving

Problem-solving means finding solutions when you’re faced with difficulties or setbacks. It involves being able to use a logical process to figure things out. This is a vital skill that everybody should develop. Setbacks do happen and things go wrong in life. They are part and parcel of every job, so you will need to have the right, can-do attitude.

Teamwork

Teamwork means being able to get along with the people you work with. It involves working together to achieve a shared goal. Working with your colleagues is an essential employability skill that employers will be looking for. Being able to work with others shows that you can encourage and inspire other members of the team to work more efficiently. Teamwork also demonstrates leadership, collaboration and good communication skills. As well as pointing out that you work well with others, being able to show that you can work independently is also a beneficial characteristic.

Organising

Organising means working out what you need to do and how you’re going to do it. Organising involves things like developing project timelines and meeting deadlines. Having organised employees means that paperwork doesn’t get lost, deadlines are met and time isn’t wasted. Good organisational skills mean employers and teams will feel less stressed because they’ll have more time to get tasks done to a higher quality.

Key Skills | 57


SMART GOALS

S . M . A . R .T. Specific

Your goals should be clear and specific. You should be able to focus your efforts and feel motivated to achieve. When considering what goals to set, ask yourself the following questions:

Do you ever feel like you’re working hard, but not getting anywhere? Well, why not try setting S.M.A.R.T goals. Whether in the workplace, in business or in your personal life, having a goal gives you something to work towards. It pushes you forward and provides a constant reminder of what you want to achieve by giving you something to focus on. SMART is a popular technique used for guidance when setting goals. Planning and setting goals is a great way to explore the different paths for achieving your goals and choosing the best strategy.

58 | www.careersuk.org

• •

What do I want to achieve? What is the importance of this goal?

Measurable

It is important to have measurable goals, so you can track your progress and stay inspired. Assessing your progress helps you to stay focused. If your goal is not measurable, how will you know when you have achieved it?

Achievable

Fantasising is a wonderful characteristic about being a human. However, your goal needs to be possible to be successful. You should set


goals that you are able to accomplish, keeping in mind the resources, knowledge and time available. Goals should stretch your abilities but still remain possible.

Realistic

Your goals need to be in line with reality. If you have established a goal to win a singing contest by Tuesday, you may want to reconsider the path your goal is taking you on.

Timebound

Every goal needs a target date so that you have a deadline to focus on and work towards. This part of the SMART goal criteria helps to prevent everyday tasks from taking priority over your longer-term goals. Setting SMART goals is a smarter way of tracking your progress. It guides you to focus on your core goals and objectives whilst helping release your creative energy. If you have a goal you really want to achieve, think SMART.

Key Skills | 59


MANAGING DEADLINES

A deadline is the final time a task must be completed by. It’s crucial to create deadlines for yourself to help you achieve your goals. Whether you want to complete a project at school, university or work – or achieve a personal goal – it’s important to set realistic deadlines for yourself. Failing to work to a deadline can have considerable knock-on effects.

Why Deadlines Matter

It’s easy to delay or forget a task. When creating a deadline for yourself, it forces you to think through the steps you need to achieve it. Each step will require a certain amount of time – and that will mean you can work out how much time you need altogether. Visualizing all the steps involved (and finishing it) can help motivate you to start tackling each small step. Deadlines encourage you to think about what it takes to accomplish your goal and to set expectations for yourself.

HOW TO MEET DEADLINES Make sure it’s realistic

Agreeing to an unreasonable deadline can leave you feeling overwhelmed. If you are aware that a certain task is not achievable by the date it has been assigned to you, don’t agree to it. Approve deadlines that are doable.

Make a commitment

If you agree to a deadline, then you should 60 | www.careersuk.org


be committed to doing so. If you have a poor attitude towards delivering your work when expected, people won’t be able to rely on you.

Understand what the deadline requires

Before agreeing and committing to a deadline, make sure you understand the requirements. One of the important things you must know is the date and time of the deadline.

Make notes

When you’re assigned a task that needs to be completed before a certain time, make sure to take some notes. Make use of your notes by writing an effective task list that helps you to work more efficiently.

Break the task down

Breaking up tasks into a series of smaller

tasks makes them easier to complete and stops you from leaving it all until the last minute.

Use your time productively

Avoid trying to multitask, it isn’t time-effective. Keep track of your time to help you work more efficiently, especially when deadlines are looming.

Ask for help

There is nothing wrong with asking for help. If you need to, ask people for assistance.

Make meeting deadlines a habit

Start by working towards smaller deadlines in your daily practice and use this approach when bigger deadlines arise.

WHEN MANAGING DEADLINES CONSIDER THE FOLLOWING Evaluate what’s required

Make sure you understand the requirements of the tasks and deadline.

Have the right resources

Allocate a portion of each day to entirely focus all your attention on your goals and deadlines.

Make sure you have the correct resources to complete your tasks. Will you have the people, technical support, equipment, training or materials ready and available in time?

Work longer hours if necessary

Helping others meet deadlines

Divide your time

If you are committed to meeting a deadline,

you may have to work extra hours. This will involve commitment and perseverance, but as long as you meet the deadline, it’ll be worth it.

You can help others meet their deadlines by encouraging them to develop their self confidence and supporting them with the pressure that comes with the job.

MANAGING YOURSELF One important factor to be successful in meeting a deadline is managing yourself. Here are 4 tips on how to manage yourself when meeting a deadline:

Adjust your mindset

Adopt a positive mindset and attitude towards deadlines by recognising that they help you achieve your long-term goals.

Be assertive

Give yourself space to evaluate a deadline before agreeing to it.

Key Skills | 61


PREPARING FOR A PRESENTATION PREPARATION IS KEY FOR SUCCESS. The more prepared you are, the more chance of success you’ll have. Doing presentations at school or university is a great way to practice and gain confidence before doing one in an interview for a job or graduate scheme. During your time at school and university, you will be asked to give a presentation. Whatever the topic, you will be presenting to your tutor and fellow students. Some people may not find that too daunting, but others will be understandably anxious - getting up and making your case in front of an audience isn’t easy, especially when you’re not used to it. However you feel, it’s a good idea to improve your skills and become comfortable with the format, as many graduate employers use presentations as part of the recruitment process. To help ensure that your presentation stands out, follow our tips on preparing for presentations.

PREPARE CAREFULLY

USE VISUALS WISELY

last-minute rush will leave you flustered when it comes

Your slides should offer a summary of points or

Give yourself plenty of time to prepare thoroughly, as a to delivering your presentation. Gather the information you need and set it out in a logical order, with a clear

introduction and conclusion. Don’t rely on your notes

on the day of the presentation as reading from prepared text sounds unnatural.

CONSIDER YOUR AUDIENCE

To pitch your presentation well, it’s important to know

Visuals should complement your oral presentation. an illustration supporting the concept that you’re

discussing. Make sure you use a clear and suitable

sized font. Include short phrases and sentences so you don’t overcrowd your slides.

If you intend to provide hand-outs for your audience, distribute them at the beginning or end of your presentation. Doing it halfway through can be distracting and disrupt your flow.

your audience. Your presentation shouldn’t include content covered in lectures and readings. Spending the first half of your presentation telling an audience what they already know is impractical. Even if you go straight

PRACTICE

into detail, they could become confused, therefore it’s

You should run through your presentation in full more

key to get the balance right and show you have thought

than once, ideally in front of an audience. Visit the room

about the audience.

in advance if you can, and ask a friend to sit at the back, checking the speed and clarity of your speech. Make sure the visuals of your presentation are visible.

62 | www.careersuk.org


BE POSITIVE Develop a positive attitude leading up to the day of the presentation. This may seem obvious and easier said than done if you’re shy but pull it off and it will make a huge difference to how you perform. Acknowledge your

PLAN FOR SUCCESS Part of the preparation process is planning for success. This is about getting yourself into a state of belief. Believe in yourself that you can accomplish the task before you.

nervousness but don’t give in to negative thinking.

UNDERSTAND THE OBJECTIVE When preparing for presentations, there are objectives

FOCUS During your preparation concentrate on what you need to do to succeed.

that must be met. Make sure you understand what you are preparing for. Ask yourself questions, for example, “Do I know what it is I’m trying to accomplish?”.

DON’T RELY ON TECHNOLOGY

We’ve all witnessed the pain of a presenter struggling with a faulty USB stick or failing to get a projector to work. However, with a little bit of planning, you can

PACE YOURSELF

minimise the risk of technology tripping you up. If possible, test your presentation beforehand with the

Preparation isn’t all about seeing how fast you can get

same equipment that you’ll be using. Or try to arrive

it all done. It’s more important to focus on doing it right.

early on the day and have a run through.

Prepare for success by pacing yourself. This involves going over one area many times in order to get it right.

You should have back-ups of your documents and print out a few copies of the slides to share if things don’t go according to plan. However, don’t rely too much on your slides as you should be prepared to present without them if necessary, using your notes or index cards as memory aids.

Key Skills | 63


NETWORKING

Networking is interacting with others to exchange information and develop professional or social contacts. It is key to a successful and expanding career.

WHY? Networking is the art of sharing, creating trust and helping one another reach goals. Regularly engaging with contacts and finding opportunities to support them helps strengthen your connection. Networking isn’t always with ‘business people’, i.e. with work or business related contacts. You can network with friends and family as well. A good networker will invest their time in getting to know people. The more effort you put in, the more you will get out of the relationship. Your network includes everyone from family and friends to colleagues, professional connections, social media contacts and members of groups or organisations. Regularly interacting within your industry can set you up to progress far in your career. Developing relationships is mutually beneficial. You can raise your professional profile and increase your access to opportunities, and your contacts are likely to experience those same rewards from networking with you.

64 | www.careersuk.org

Social networking has become a significant opportunity for marketers.


HOW TO NETWORK There are 3 important things to consider when meeting someone for the first time.

1

FOCUS When you first meet someone, where is your focus? Don’t think about yourself - think about the other person and how you’re making them feel. Confidence and professionalism will set the tone as you get to know people.

2

CONFIDENCE The correct body language would be having a genuine smile, eye contact and a good handshake. Body language makes a huge difference to first impressions.

3

TALK You have to know when to introduce yourself. A simple thing to remember is the 3 ft | 30 second rule. If you enter a room and are three feet from someone, you should acknowledge them. If you have been near someone for thirty seconds or more, you should introduce yourself. Drive conversations with questions. Get people talking about themselves. Take interest in the other person by asking questions about family and occupation, for example.

SOCIAL MEDIA Social media networking is the use of internet-based social media sites to stay connected with others. It can either have a social purpose, a business purpose or both. Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn and Twitter are the most recommended sites for networking, but you may find others that work for you.

BENEFITS Strengthens business connections Networking is about sharing, not taking. It is about building trust and supporting one another. Engaging with contacts and finding opportunities to help them makes your relationship stronger. Builds confidence By regularly meeting new people and putting yourself out there, you are stepping out of your comfort zone and building self-confidence and valuable social skills. The more you network, the more these will develop. Advances your career Being noticed is a benefit of networking that is important in career building. Attending professional and social events will get you known. Being knowledgeable, reliable and supportive will build your reputation. This might be as simple as offering information or tips to people who need it. Hear a different perspective Exchanging information on experiences, challenges and goals allows you to gain new insights that you can use to enhance your own performance and can build your reputation as an innovative thinker.

It has become a significant opportunity for marketers to engage with customers, as they use can social networking to increase brand recognition and encourage brand loyalty. Companies use social media to drive sales through advertising and promotion, to regulate consumer trends and offer customer support. Social media is now full of so many possibilities that big companies employ whole teams of people whose jobs are to manage their social media presence.

Key Skills | 65


MAKING THE MOST OF YOUR TEAM Working as a team is significant for the success of a business. When incorporating teamwork strategies, you become more efficient and productive. A teamwork environment promotes an atmosphere that fosters friendship and loyalty. This motivates employees to work harder, cooperate and be supportive of one another.

66 | www.careersuk.org

HERE ARE 7 TIPS ON HOW TO MAKE THE BEST OF YOUR TEAM: Communicate effectively:

In order to be able to function as an efficient team, you need to develop effective team communication. Effective communication will help a business maintain a positive work environment.

Establish trust:

A team strongly relies on trust in the skills of one another to guide them to success and trust in the processes and systems. Being able to rely on other people builds confidence and establishes strong relationships.

Support:

A strong team environment is essential for the success of any business. During challenging times, rely on each other for support and guidance: everyone has different strengths and knowing you can count on your team members to fill in your missing gaps helps reduce stress and improve productivity.


Clarify purpose:

Ensure each individual in the team understands the overall goal and achievement of the business. Involve each team member in making decisions.

Recognise your team’s value:

Acknowledge good work and recognise resulting achievements. Consider rewarding employees for accomplishing goals, contributing to innovation and helping recruit new talent.

Train and develop your team:

Training and developing your team makes them more productive and engaged.

Evaluate team performance:

Asses the progress that is being made and provide feedback to help individuals improve and grow.

Key Skills | 67


EMPLOYABILITY

68 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION WHAT REC R U I TERS WA NT ........................................................... USING YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA TO BOOST YOUR CAREER PROSPECTS .. TRANSITIONI NG FR O M U NI V ER SI TY T O WORK .............................. TOP 10 TIPS WHEN THINKING OF ST A RT I N G YO UR O W N B USI N ESS

Employability 69


WHAT RECRUITERS WANT

Ready to enter the world of employment? Recruiters look for many qualities in candidates as specific skills are needed to do particular jobs or to be able to work in a specific industry. They search for candidates that can work in harmony with colleagues and can be an asset to the company.

ASSETS AND SKILLS THAT RECRUITERS WANT Inner strength

Have the quality of persistence when the going gets tough. One easy way to demonstrate your inner strength is during the interview just remain cool, calm and relaxed. This will give the recruiter a good indication of how you would appear when under pressure day-to-day.

Integrity

Recruiters prefer candidates who are honest and true to themselves. You should be willing to admit your strengths and weaknesses. Candidates should demonstrate loyalty never say anything negative about a previous employer or colleague. Even if you were fired from a previous job, don’t say anything critical.

Courage

Recruiters need candidates who have the courage to accept challenges and take risks. Having courage also means you’re willing to speak up and say exactly what you think.

70 | www.careersuk.org


Ambition

Candidates who are well prepared and determined to succeed are highly valued by recruiters. If channelled correctly, ambitious people excel in their career, earn higher levels of income, are more motivated and enjoy greater satisfaction.

Reliability

This is an important asset to have as it shows recruiters what they can expect of you going forward. Employers value reliability as a core trait that enhances employee trust. Reliable people have a track record of doing what they promised and you can count on them to deliver on time and to the expected levels of quality.

Leadership

Even if you’re not applying for a management position, you’ll still need to demonstrate to employers that you have the potential to motivate and lead others to achieve common objectives. True leadership skills influence, guide, motivate, boosts morale and shows confidence and initiative.

Good communication skills

This is how clearly you put your ideas across and how good you are at listening to others. Employers will be keen to see how you build rapports, as well as being able to persuade and negotiate with people.

Employability 71


USING YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA TO BOOST YOUR CAREER PROSPECTS

We all love using social media, whether you’re bragging about your cooking skills on Instagram, updating friends on Facebook or sharing your internal dialogue on Twitter. It’s fun, it’s easy, and it keeps us entertained when we’re bored. But what we always forget is that social media is one of the best tools for your career too. It’s great for advertising your personal brand, finding and landing a job, or moving up in your field. You can do a lot more with it than just playing games and using it for entertainment. Social media is becoming a valuable tool for jobsearching and to boost your job skills. 72 | www.careersuk.org

Did you know that 70% of employers use social media to identify and screen potential candidates? Most employers and recruitment agencies today are using social media to source the right employees, so you should recognise the power it holds. If you’re already spending most of your time online, why not put your social media accounts to good use and spring-board your career?

What is social job searching?

Social job searching involves using social media sites like LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter for job searching. Social media is used by both job seekers who are looking for employment opportunities and companies looking to hire.

How to use social media in your job search It’s important to build a social network before you need it. You should be prepared for employers finding you on social media, whether that’s with or without your knowledge. You need to do more than just have an online presence.


Make sure your LinkedIn is filled out comprehensively, with your most recent employment information at the forefront and take responsibility for keeping it up-to-date. Being proactive when it comes to social media can give you a competitive advantage - whether that’s when you’re finding a job or looking for a change. You could also ensure your social profiles remain work-appropriate if they are public.

managers and recruiters use social media to source candidates, to post jobs, and to accept job applications. Social media and job-searching sites can help hiring managers get a clearer sense of your personality and values before they even meet you. For example, they can study your likes, dislikes and how well you might fit with the company.

Beyond keeping your profile fresh and professional, you should also try to engage with people online. Talk to your connections on Twitter, join groups on LinkedIn and Facebook and join in the discussion. Be engaging and proactive on your social media.

Use social media to showcase your expertise The growth of the internet and social media has made it easy for recruiters and employers to look for prospective employees on social media platforms. To maximise on such a trend to your advantage, use social media to showcase your talent. There might be someone out there looking for a your exact skill-set! Using a blog or a website can also play a huge part in highlighting your gifts.

Take part in online job platforms

Checking in on online career platforms is a great way to build and grow your prospects. Online platforms are rich in career-related discussions, which focus on the trending topics in the corporate world. In most cases, you might find such communities influential and useful in building your career. Taking part in online communities on career and job search sites can offer you valuable information. In addition, you can also come across recruiters and other like-minded individuals who can be of significant help in your career advancement.

How employers use social media to recruit It’s very important to consider your online presence, as more and more employers have been expanding their hiring procedures to incorporate social networking sites. Hiring

Employability 73


TRANSITIONING FROM UNIVERSITY TO WORK

The term “welcome to the real world” has never been truer than in this case. It can come as quite a shock after having left the comfort of university to go into the working world. Going from writing essays, partying, taking exams and attending lectures and classes to a 9-5 job can be very hard to adjust to. But don’t worry, here are 5 tips and tricks to give you some guidance on how to transition from university to work.

74 | www.careersuk.org

Punctuality equals professionalism!

Being professional is part and parcel of any new job that you will have over the years. Unlike school or university, punctuality is expected and something you will not be praised for. Being late so many times could end up with you being spoken to by HR or management and a decision will have to be made on what to do about it. If you know that you have a partiality for being late, then make a schedule: A time for going to bed, a time for getting up in the morning and a time for leaving the house. If you know that you are not a morning person and struggle to get up, then try going to bed a bit earlier. It’s recommended that you get 7 to 8 hours of sleep every night.

Don’t second guess yourself!

You’ve finished your degree, started your new job and now the overwhelming sensation starts to set in. It won’t be like this for everybody, but some people are going to find it hard to transfer the knowledge and skills they have learnt from university and apply it to their job. The trick is don’t doubt yourself; you were hired for a reason. The manager believes that you


have the skills to efficiently do your job better than the other people that were interviewed. So be confident and stick with it. Besides, no one ever stops learning in life: everyone makes progress.

professionals that have been in the game for many years. Start by going to networking conventions such as Glug. This way you will be able to meet people that have gone down the same career path that you intend to go down as well.

University will not prepare you for everything!

If you are not one for going to meet people in person, then LinkedIn is great for getting in touch with other professionals via social media. You can post your information about what work experience you have, where you have studied and anything else you think industry professionals would benefit from knowing about you. Not only does LinkedIn allow you to message other professionals, but for professionals to message you as well. Some of them may even be offering interviews or jobs!

Education only tends to educate you with knowledge of the subjects you are learning or degrees you are studying. Unfortunately, it does not outright teach you about issues that you may find happen in your day to day work life. Sometimes, you may have to negotiate a salary before you start a job. Having the right communication skills along with patience is key to negotiating. You don’t want to ask for a starting salary that is completely ridiculous and would get you laughed out of the building. Instead, find out what they are offering you and start with a higher but reasonable counteroffer. From there, you will need to work with the negotiator until you reach a sum that you are both happy with. However, it’s not just negotiation that you will be unprepared for. Critical thinking, money management, etiquette, protecting yourself and managing failure are all things that university don’t teach you.

Colleagues or friends?

Depending on the size of the company you work for, you’re going to have many colleagues. Some of whom you will get on better with than others and that is totally fine. You’re allowed to be friends with your colleagues inside or outside of work but remember that they are still your colleagues in work.

For those of you that are reading this and will still be attending university next year, it will be a good idea to start networking now. It is never too early to engage with professionals and build up relationships with the people that could potentially be your next boss. It’s going to feel strange at first but once you get into the swing of things, it will start to become easier and less overwhelming. There are many changes that you will have to make to your lifestyle to help you kick the university mindset and for some, this may take a while. But don’t worry, as time goes by the transition will start to feel smoother and you will adapt to the weight of the working world.

Whilst the friendships you make with colleagues will make your day more enjoyable, it is vital to take note of the foundations and basis of which these friendships are formed. Not all colleagues are going to be friendly, some may even be a little competitive. But it is wise to remember that you will be in a place of work, so you must remain professional around others, even if they are your friends.

Networking is key!

If you haven’t started networking already, start now. Networking is great for talking to industry Employability 75


TOP 10 TIPS WHEN THINKING ABOUT STARTING YOUR OWN BUSINESS

Starting your own business could be the key to financial freedom, but there are fundamental steps to be followed in order to start-up and run a successful business. ‘If there is no career progression, remaining an employee in a dead-end job could mean that you will operate in the vicious circle of poverty in which you are given a salary that is just about adequate to cater for your day-to-day living costs’, points out Robert Kiyasoki in his bestselling book ‘Rich Dad Poor Dad’ points out that, at times, your salary is only enough to cover basic costs, so you might find yourself always waiting for your next payday.

76 | www.careersuk.org

1. Identify gaps in the market

The most powerful approach to create a successful business is solving problems being faced by people in the community. For example, Steve Jobs was instrumental in Apple’s revolutionary mobile phones as a way to shrink complex computing power down to manageable devices. As a result, people can now receive or send emails using their phones, search the internet and much more. The likes of Mark Zuckerberg solved the problems that come with long-distance friendships through his development of Facebook, and now he’s one of the most successful entrepreneurs in the world, with a net worth of more than US$40 billion according to Forbes.

2. Avoid Excuses

Most people delay starting their own business with poor excuses. Some of the most common excuses include, “I have no capital”, “I am afraid that I will suffer a loss”, “It’s not the right time to start my business”, “There is no one to show me the best path to follow” etc. Too many excuses have become the major hindrance to starting a company. Take a leap of faith and pursue your dreams.


3. Amass Information

Another powerful technique is doing as much research beforehand as possible. It is key to take heed of advice from friends, family, business experts and business reports. Whenever you come across relevant information that could be of help to you, take note of it so that you can reflect on it in the future. Convert your information into a detailed business plan which can help in driving the business venture and raising capital.

4. Keep it simple

Most entrepreneurs start their businesses as simple start-ups and develop them into empires later on. The idea is to keep learning at each stage so you can improve operations of the business. Create a simple product or service and then start running with it at small scale. Unnecessary features should be eliminated if they cost you money. As a small business, there is no need to have lots of revenues that could cause unnecessary distraction. They may reduce your chances for rapid growth, set your ideas aside for a point later down the line.

5. Evaluate the costs

When starting a new business, you need to keep in mind that there are going to be a lot of costs involved. These costs should be well considered, as somebody might want to review them at a later stage to evaluate your company’s efficiency. The most common costs include rent, electricity, salary and other unexpected costs. Some of the costs encountered as a small business can be untimely and some could be avoided if not necessary.

6. Expect losses

The most common mistake that the majority of entrepreneurs have is expecting to make profits straight away. For a start-up, it may take time to start making profits since the clientele is still limited. Furthermore, during early days your company’s customers don’t know whether they can trust you yet. It is therefore very critical that you raise sufficient capital to sustain the business during the loss making phase.

7. Talk about your business

A common problem for many business owners is not knowing how to sell and a lot of the time, they do not market their businesses sufficiently. If you are unable to convince customers to buy your products or services, then it will be difficult

to make money. Network with people via social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn to market your business. Take part in all sorts of networking events including the likes of BNI, FSB and many other business seminars and events.

8. Know the legal requirements of starting a business

The law may not be exciting, but the rules of starting a business must be known. The government has certain regulations that must be followed and failure to follow such instruction could lead to punitive penalties. Employment, copyright, data protection, tax and health & safety laws must be strictly followed at all times, to minimise risks of fines and lawsuits.

9. Earn as you build

If you have decided to start a business and can still manage to work for a bit, try to avoid quitting your job just yet. Earn as you build your business. It is difficult to start earning steady income in the early stages of the start-up. Build your business when you are off work and you use your dayjob earnings to cushion the impacts from losses during the early stages of business growth. When the business becomes more stable, seek out the best moment to pull the plug and quit your job so you can become a full-time ‘entrepreneur’! Alternatively you could use venture capitalists, business angels and lenders to raise capital.

10. Have passion and vision

The most powerful ingredients for success are passion and vision. They will continue to drive you and your business through everything. A vision propels each and every idea. As a business owner, never fail to remember why you launched this company and take a step back to appreciate how far you’ve come. Bill Gates, Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, Richard Branson, Arianna Huffington, James Dyson and JK Rowling all have one thing in common - passion and vision!

Starting is always the toughest part, but you’re stronger than your excuses.

THE MOMENT IS NOW! Employability 77


YOUR APPLICATION

78 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION COVER LE TTER S ......................................................................... HOW TO C R EA TE A M A STER P I ECE CV .......................................... WRITING A SU CCESSFU L JO B A P P L ICAT ION ................................ PSYC HOM ETR I C TESTS................................................................ U S ING LIN K EDI N TO G ET H EA DH U NTED.........................................

Your Application | 79


COVER LETTERS

detected by spam filters. Applications should always include a cover letter unless the job advert instructs you to do differently.

HOW TO WRITE A COVER LETTER Keep your cover letter brief, while making sure it emphasises your suitability for the job. It can be broken down into the following sections: A cover letter is a document sent alongside your CV when applying for jobs. It acts as your introduction and helps to sell the rest of your application.

First paragraph

A cover letter is necessary because it gives you the chance to explain to an employer why you’re the right candidate for the job. You do this by highlighting relevant skills and experience, so you should always write your cover letter with the position you’re applying for in mind.

Second paragraph

Cover letters should not duplicate your CV or exceed one A4 page. If sending electronically, consider putting the text in the body of the email rather than as an attachment, to avoid it being

Highlight relevant experience and demonstrate how your skills match the specific requirements of the job description. Summarise any additional

80 | www.careersuk.org

The opening statement should set out why you’re writing the letter. Begin by stating the position you’re applying for, where you saw it advertised and when you are available to start. Cover why you’re suitable for the job, what attracted you to this type of work, why you’re interested in working for the company and what you can bring to the organisation.

Third paragraph


strengths and explain how these could benefit the company.

Last paragraph

Use the closing paragraph to round up your letter. Reiterate your interest in the role and indicate your desire for a personal interview. Now is the time to mention any dates you’re unavailable. Finish by thanking the employer and mention that you are looking forward to receiving a response. Once finished, read through the document and cut out any unnecessary words and sentences. Don’t fill up space by repeating what’s already covered in your CV.

How to address a cover letter

Always try and address your cover letter directly to the person who will be reading it. Advertised positions usually include a contact name, but if not, it is worth taking the time to find out who the letter should be addressed to. You can do this by searching the company’s website for details of the hiring manager, or alternatively, you could call the organisation to ask who you should address your letter to. Don’t be afraid to do this, many employers appreciate you taking the time and initiative to do so.

Format

Presentation is important, so you’ll need to format your cover letter properly. Make sure the document is neat and use the same font and size as you use in your CV and if you’re sending it through the post or handing it in use good quality plain white paper to print it on.

Identify your USP

This is your unique selling point. Be positive about what you have to offer and clearly outline how your skills and experience meet those requested in the job description.

Include examples

Back up the claims in your cover letter with real evidence or examples that show how and when you’ve used your skills and experience. If you’re a student or recent graduate you can make an appointment with your university’s careers and employability service to access further help when writing your cover letter. You’ll be able to talk with specially-trained advisers, get advice on what to include and have a professional eye look over your application before sending.

5 TIPS TO WRITE A COVER LETTER With employers often receiving lots of applications for each vacancy, you need to ensure that your cover letter makes a lasting impression for the right reasons. Here are some tips to increase your chances of success:

Tailor to the organisation

You should rewrite your cover letter every time you apply for a position in order to target the company. Sending out a generic letter for all applications rarely yields positive results and recruiters can easily spot your lack of diligence and effort from a mile away.

Proof read

Never rely on a computer spellcheck program to pick up every mistake. Print off your cover letter and double-check for spelling and grammar errors before passing it to a family member or friend to look over. Also make sure that your own contact details and the company name are correct. Your Application | 81


HOW TO CREATE A MASTERPIECE CV PART 1

Layout:

Before a future employer reads anything, they are going to see the layout. It may sound cliché but less is more in terms of design and a clean and simple layout is needed to make you stand out.

Colour: Whether you’re hunting for your next upward move on the career ladder or just scoping out a side hustle, making sure you stand out to employers with a masterpiece CV is essential. Thanks to job searching sites, it has become much easier to cast a net into a world of employment, but with over 2 million CVs being uploaded a month onto Indeed alone, it’s easy to fade into the background. Here are the key things you need to remember when constructing your CV to ensure you get those offers rolling in:

82 | www.careersuk.org

It can be tempting to use eye-catching colours, tables and graphics, but when not utilised correctly this can take away from what is important, i.e. your work experience. When applying to creative roles, you should have a thought-out portfolio to accompany your CV.

Font:

Using an easy-to-read font (a plain sans-serif like Calibri or Arial is a good choice) and visual aids such as bullet points, subheadings and line breaks will make your CV easy to follow.

Contact details:

Your name and contact details (and professional title, should you have one) need to be at the top as these are what any employer is going to read first.


Getting started:

Templates are often a great way to lay out the foundations of your CV, but it is important to not rely on them too heavily. However, there is nothing wrong with getting that little bit of extra inspiration and guidance!

Personal statement:

Keep it concise. You don’t need to include your entire life story in your CV - a personal statement should be a few lines that give a brief overview of your work experience, your career plans and why you are the perfect employee. Aim to give them a sense of who you are as a person. Avoid stating your hobbies unless they are relevant to your desired career or provide information that is necessary to know, such as speaking a second language or volunteering.

Steer clear of buzzwords:

For example, overused phrases like ‘I am a hard-working and passionate individual’ may seem like they say a lot about you, but they say very little. Being a ‘hard worker’ should come across in your experience and shouldn’t be something you have to state. Letting future employers know what you can offer in three to four lines is much more effective and will ensure your CV doesn’t end up buried beneath a stack of other passionate, hard-working individuals.

Relevant experience:

Choose carefully. While there are no set rules regarding the length of your CV, it’s advisable you don’t exceed two pages. This can be tricky when you’ve got a lot of work experience under your belt, but this is where cherry-picking your most impressive and relevant achievements becomes necessary. Your employer doesn’t need to know about the two weeks you did a paper round when you have relevant experience for the roles you are applying to. Think outside the box. On the flip side, you may have left out important information. For example, if you are struggling to think of job titles that are relevant to your desired career, list your academic accomplishments and general skills under a separate heading. You may not have had a professional role but if you have built related skills through your hobbies, make sure the employer knows about them.

Your Application | 83


HOW TO CREATE A MASTERPIECE CV PART 2

that C to a B in their GCSE Maths, but it’s not unheard of for employers to ask for proof. Don’t invent work experience or exaggerate your qualifications as you may be in for a shock when the time comes for you to use the skills you claimed you had.

Explain gaps

Adapt your CV

Adapting your CV to suit specific job roles and employers is the best way of helping you land the job. You will stand a much better chance when you take the time to tailor your CV to fit a handful of jobs you would like, instead of using one CV to apply to hundreds. Even having one CV for roles in one industry and one for another is an improvement on a single jack-of-all-trades CV, for example, you could have one CV for customer oriented roles like retail and another for office based admin roles.

Be honest

When listing your experience, you have to be honest. Many people are guilty of extending 84 | www.careersuk.org

It’s also incredibly important to explain any gaps in employment or education as it is a red flag. Simply mentioning what you were doing during the gap (whether you were traveling, studying or out of work with an injury or illness) is enough. If you’re worried about revealing a health problem, remember that you are protected under the Equal Opportunities Act, and remember that an employer that discriminates wouldn’t make for a good employer anyway.

Cover letter

Any missed opportunity to sell yourself in your CV can be done in a cover letter. Here, you can go into specific detail regarding your experience, personal qualities and interest in the company you are applying to. A cover letter


is not usually required these days, but it is always advisable that you include one as it can supplement your CV and shows you care about the role you’re applying for.

Portfolios

Be sure to provide relevant links in your CV should your profession require it. Links to your portfolio, showreels, websites or professional social media pages may increase your chance of landing the job you want. These give your future employer a better insight into what you are capable of, even before the interview. This is especially useful for freelancers.

References

Often jobs will require three references. It is entirely up to you whether you include these in your CV but stating that ‘references are available upon request’ lets your employers know that you have them.

Keep it current

Now that you have completed your CV and landed a job, don’t think this will be the last time you will ever see it. You never know when you are going to need it again, so you should be regularly adding to your CV. Ensuring you have a current CV means that you are always ready, should an even better opportunity come along. A useful trick is to save each CV as a separate version with a date in the file name so that you can quickly cross-reference and improvise when tailoring your CV for different applications. More and more places now require you to fill out an online application form, but having an up-to-date CV will save you time on these, as you can often copy and paste directly from your CV with only minor edits.

Your Application | 85


WRITING A SUCCESSFUL JOB APPLICATION

BEFORE YOU START When you find a job you’d like to apply for, don’t start filling in the application form straight away. Take some time to prepare, as this will make the task much easier. Gather all the information that you’ll need, including details of your academic achievements, employment history and contact information for your references.

Employers have countless job application forms to sift through - to show you’re perfect for the role so you get an interview, you’ll need to demonstrate personality and confidence.

You’ll make a great first impression if you do your research - find out the aims of the company you’re applying for, the sector they operate in and who their main competitors are. Browsing their social media channels is a good place to start.

For some jobs, you are asked to send just a CV and cover letter. However, other jobs require filling in an application form instead. You’re more likely to complete most job application forms online via the company’s website, but paper forms are still accepted in some cases.

Study the job description so that you can refer to the specific skills and qualities that the employer is looking for as you complete the form.

86 | www.careersuk.org

Don’t forget to read the instructions carefully to ensure that you complete the correct sections of the form and so you know when the deadline is.


WHAT TO INCLUDE ON AN APPLICATION FORM The application form should make the employer want to meet you so they can find out a bit more.

Personal information

Give basic details, such as your name and email address.

Educational background

Provide information on your academic achievements, including the institutions you’ve attended, courses taken and qualifications gained.

Work experience

List your employment history and describe your main duties and responsibilities in each role, emphasising those most closely related to the job you’re applying for.

Competency-based questions

Give specific examples of times when you’ve demonstrated the skills required for the role. Avoid being vague, and don’t waste space writing about skills you have that aren’t relevant.

STYLE TIPS Refining your writing style will improve the quality of your application. Employers are looking for confident applicants who can convince them of their capabilities - demonstrate your suitability by giving short, to the point and positive answers. You should also: • • • • • •

Use power verbs such as transformed, delivered, achieved and inspired. Choose descriptive words like effective, consistent, determined and adaptable. Focus on answering the questions and avoid waffling or being too vague. Select appropriate examples of your achievements from experience. Demonstrate enthusiasm for the role. Ensure your spelling and grammar is correct.

Ask somebody else, such as a careers adviser, parent or friend to read through your application form. A second pair of eyes will help pick out errors that you may not have spotted.

Personal statement

Put forward a well-structured case for you being the right person for the job, again referring to the person specification set out in the advert.

Don’t be afraid to sell yourself

Demonstrate your passion for the company or job and any past achievements you can relate to the role. When writing your answers, always consider what skills employers want and how you can show that you have them.

References

Most application forms will also require you to provide details of at least two people who can provide references. You may sometimes be asked to attach a CV and cover letter as well.

Honesty

Never lie on your job application form. Not only is this dishonest, but there can be more serious consequences.

Your Application | 87


PSYCHOMETRIC TESTS

TYPES OF PSYCHOMETRIC TESTS There are several different tests that an employer could ask you to take. Here is a list with descriptions of different psychometric tests: •

When taking this test, candidates will have to answer questions on statistics, graphs, charts and figures

WHAT IS IT? A psychometric test is an assessment designed to show a candidate’s skills and knowledge in a specific field. The tests all have different ways of scoring the candidates and comparing their scores to determine who had the highest. The candidate does not need any prior knowledge to complete the test, as the employer only wants to see your natural ability.

Numerical Reasoning Tests

Verbal Reasoning Tests These tests will assess candidates on verbal logic and how quickly they can digest and retain information from passages of text.

In-Tray Exercises A business related assessment that assesses how well candidates can prioritise tasks.

Diagrammatic Tests Timed tests that assess your logical reasoning.

88 | www.careersuk.org


Situational judgement Tests Psychological tests that assess how candidates would deal with work-based problems.

Inductive Reasoning Tests Tests that determine how well the candidate can identify the logic within patterns.

Mechanical Reasoning Tests This test is often used for technical roles and applies mechanical and engineering knowledge into it.

8. It is advised that you become familiar with the types of questions that could crop up in the test.

Watson Glaser Tests

9. Use your time cleverly. If you are spending too much time on one question, leave it and move onto the next one.

Often used by law firms, it’s designed to think critically about arguments. •

Spatial Awareness Tests Often used in jobs for design, engineering and architecture, the test is designed to assess how well the candidate can mentally manipulate images.

6. If you have been told that you will have to do a psychometric test, you are encouraged to revise for them. We recommend you to go online and google “free psychometric tests” and you can revise as much as you want for free. 7. If you take a psychometric test that is designed to assess your personality, you should try to stay consistent when answering the questions.

Cognitive Ability Tests Measures general intelligence.

take several different psychometric tests, so it is recommended that you take breaks in between tests.

10. You should read more to increase your vocabulary. Try reading more careers related, newspapers, magazines and online articles. This will help you when you do a verbal reasoning test.

Error Checking Tests Considered unusual, this test assesses how well the candidate can identify errors.

TIPS TO HELP YOU PASS 1. You should aim to answer every question on the test, but don’t stress if you run out of time. 2. The most difficult questions in the tests are usually placed at the end. You don’t necessarily get bonus points if you answer the hard questions correctly, so don’t worry if you find some difficult to answer.

YOUR APPLICATION We recommend you to visit these websites to help your preparation for psychometric tests:

www.assessmentday.co.uk

www.practiceaptitudetests.com www.how2become.com/freepsychometric-tests/

https://www.psychometrictest.org.uk/

3. If time permits, check all the questions (if the exam allows that) and make sure your answers are correct 4. Some psychometric tests have questions that you cannot skip. If you don’t know the answer, then you will just have to guess. Most candidates waste a third of their time stuck on questions that they’re struggling to answer, so you will just have to make an educated guess. 5. In most cases, candidates will have to Your Application | 89


USING LINKEDIN TO GET HEADHUNTED

If you’re on LinkedIn, you’ll know that it has become one of the most important platforms for finding a job. Around 95% of recruiters use LinkedIn to scout for talent. It’s a great and easy way for you to search and make new business contacts If you don’t already have a LinkedIn profile and you’re serious about landing a new role, then now is the time to set up your profile. Here are some tips on how to use LinkedIn to get headhunted:

90 | www.careersuk.org

Update Your Profile

Dedicate some time every week to ensuring your profile is as recent as possible. If you are given more responsibilities at work, add these to your description. If you change jobs, make sure you put this on your profile. Even if you have a genuinely impressive achievement, be sure your connections know about it.

Define your personal brand

Make sure you solidify your personal brand in your own mind. How do you want to be perceived by the head-hunter?

Include a profile picture

Research has shown you are 14 times more likely to be viewed if you have a profile photo included.

Get Proactive

LinkedIn is a social network, so be social, engage with content, share your point of view and let those connections help you on your way to your career.


Make your activity feed visible

This allows people to view your interests and the content you engage with online.

Use keywords relating to your industry and line of work

Using keywords will help you get headhunted, as the more skills and job titles that match recruiter searches for candidates, the higher the volume of traffic your profile will receive. The important sections to include your keywords in are your professional headline, job title and your summary.

Network

Build strong connections and make sure you have an ongoing professional rapport with them.

Show Productivity

It may seem simple and obvious but the best way to get yourself noticed is to excel at what you do. Go the extra mile on projects and always look to take on responsibility. The harder you work and the better your output, the more word will get around.

Your Application | 91


INTERVIEWS

92 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION PREPARI NG FO R TH E DR EA DED I NTERVIEW .................................. INTERVIE W DR ESS CO DE ............................................................. 20 GOLDE N I NTER V I EW TI P S........................................................ HOW TO BEH A V E I N A N I NTER VI EW ............................................. 20 M OST FREQUENTLY ASKED INTE RVI EW Q UEST I O N S ................ 10 OUT-OF-TH E-BO X INTER V I EW Q UEST IONS ............................... D ON’T LET YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA STOP YO U F ROM G ET T I N G INTERVIE W S ................................................................................ HOW TO USE TH E STA R I NTERV I EW T ECHNIQUE ........................... QU E STIONS TO ASK TH E I NTER V I EWER ........................................ PREPARI NG FO R A SSESSM ENT CENT RES .....................................

Interviews | 93


PREPARING FOR THE DREADED INTERVIEW

BEFORE THE INTERVIEW Research the organisation

The thought of an interview strikes fear into the hearts of many experienced professionals at the peak of their careers.

Conducting thorough research is a good way of showing you are really passionate about the opportunity you are interviewing for. Knowing your stuff will show you’re committed and will also drive off any nerves – it’s a huge confidence booster. Use the internet to research as extensively as you can. You could use the official website, affiliated sites, what the media say, and review sites like Glassdoor. com.

Almost everyone has a horror story of their first interview, whether it was for a part-time job or a further education provider and it continues to haunt them. It doesn’t have to be this way!

Make sure you understand their: • Products and services • Target market • Core values and guiding principles • History and accomplishments

PART 1

Interviews are the first step to positive life changes. With the right preparation you will be able to breeze through interviews without a second thought.

94 | www.careersuk.org

Study the job description and person specification Make sure you know the job description and person specification inside and out. Fully understand the duties and responsibilities of


the role you are applying for. Do a self-evaluation. Make sure you understand your strengths, the gaps in your knowledge and even what skills you’ve learnt from your hobbies and extracurriculars. Spend half your life sorting out your scout groups’ squabbles? Make sure they know about your leadership skills. Watch an embarrassing number of documentaries for fun? Tell them about your curious mind and love of learning. A simple internet search can show you how to sell your personal qualities in a formal interview.

PREPARE Answers

Later in this book we have listed some common interview questions, so you have an idea of what to expect and how to respond. You should definitely know your CV inside and out, which should be easy as long as it’s true!

feel yourself in a pencil skirt when you could be wearing smart black slacks instead.

Sleep

Have a quiet evening and a good sleep the night before to calm your nerves and boost your confidence. Psychologists recommend avoiding distractions too, which includes heavy meals, intense exercise, alcohol, excessive caffeine or a late night.

Punctuality

In interviews, punctuality is critical – not arriving on time can reflect badly on you and should be avoided at all costs. Your arrival time at the interview tells your interviewer what to expect from you in future, so try to make it a good impression! Aim to arrive at least fifteen minutes prior to the interview and ensure the receptionist or somebody within the business knows that you have arrived. It might also be a good idea to switch off your mobile at this point in time.

Gear up

Make sure you prepare everything you need the night before the interview. This includes a good quality folder, pen and two copies of your CV, just in case you need to give the extra copy to the interviewer. It is perfectly acceptable to take a notebook with your research and prepared questions into the interview with you. Just make sure that you’re only using this as a prompt and a memory aid - you still need to engage with your interviewer and show you can think on the spot.

Location

Write down the address/location, work out how to get there and when you need to leave.

Outfit

Choose and iron your outfit. We generally recommend you look as smart and professional as possible and dress conservatively. How appropriately you dress for an interview tells the interviewer how seriously you take the opportunity and what they can expect from you in future. Make sure you are presentable and wellgroomed. It’s also worth considering an outfit that makes you feel confident and comfortable. If you’re a trousers person, you’re not going to Interviews | 95


PREPARING FOR THE DREADED INTERVIEW

Be a good listener – showing alertness and attention to detail reflects your enthusiasm and positive attitude and is likely to guarantee you higher scores. If there was any lack of clarity, politely ask the interviewer to repeat or clarify.

Confidently and clearly express yourself. You want to appear composed and assertive, without being too relaxed, aggressive or nervous, and to keep your responses concise.

PART 2

DURING THE INTERVIEW Some of the key things to do during the interview • •

Greet the interviewer(s) courteously, with a warm, friendly smile and a relatively firm handshake to show confidence and assertiveness. (But not too firm!)

Consistently maintain a reasonable level of eye contact throughout, spreading it evenly if being interviewed by a panel of interviewers. Good eye contact demonstrates focus, interest and confidence.

96 | www.careersuk.org

Avoid giving rushed and disorganised answers and take a moment to compose yourself when necessary. Use examples whenever possible to illustrate how your experience would fit the role. This is where your self-evaluation and research or total lack of preparation will really show! Demonstrate passion and enthusiasm in the way you express yourself. Show your eagerness and interest in the role, the company, its values and its products and services. Where relevant, asking questions


can further enhance your expression of keenness. It is often said in business that interviewers judge by attitude and personality first, because skills can be taught. Show them that you will be a good colleague to work with. Plan two or three questions to ask the interviewer at the end. Not having any shows a clear lack of interest. They must be simple and relevant. Good open-ended ‘what/where/will/ who?’ questions let the interviewer to happily elaborate.

It is ideal to ask questions relevant to the company/education provider you’re with, but here are few flexible questions to get you started: • • • • •

What do you personally like about working here? Where can this opportunity take me in future? What qualities would your ideal candidate possess? What are the organisation’s plans for the future? What opportunities will I have to gain new skills?

Things to avoid include • • • • • •

Criticising your previous employers Negative examples of your past experiences Expressing biases, prejudices or intolerance of any form Too much focus on career progression Asking about salary, holiday or sickness policies Arrogance

Remember:

You have been invited for an interview because they think you’re a capable candidate. This is also a chance for you to get to know the employer and work out whether you’d even want the job if you were offered it. There will be other opportunities out there, so this isn’t a ride or die situation! Remember your own worth and show them the best of you. want the job if you were offered it. There will be other opportunities out there, so this isn’t a ride or die situation! Remember your own worth and show them the best of you. Interviews | 97


INTERVIEW DRESS CODE How you dress for an interview makes a difference. First impressions matter and dressing up shows that you put some effort. The first judgment potential employers will make, is based on how you look and what you are wearing. Therefore, it’s important to dress professionally for a job interview. Hint: Dress in a manner that is professionally appropriate to the position for which you are applying. Follow our tips to look your best!

Try shopping around for a not-so-standard formal blazer. Forget the stuffy same old two-button black blazer and find something more unique. Consider a lapel-less version, or a blazer in a bright block colour and pair it with an interesting patterned blouse underneath.

Bla z ers A simple, chic dress can look smart, understated and can also mean you only have to worry about the dress and the shoes. Tip: don’t overdo it with the perfume, you don’t know what your interviewer will make of it.

Less Is Mor e There are plenty of wonderful colours out there, so potentially stray away from your go-to navies and blacks. This will lighten up your outfit, and the mood you emanate.

Mix I t Up Update your interview attire with items of clothing that have something slightly different about them, and pair them with other pieces that have different textures or colours. Mixing it up adds dimension to your outfit.

Tex tu r e

Be You

98 | www.careersuk.org

If you’re applying for a job with a more relaxed dress code, such as a new or creative company, don’t feel obliged to don the pencil skirt and polo shirt. Show off your personality, by focusing on feeling comfortable as well as looking presentable.


Don’t want to put too much thought into your office attire? Then this one is for you. Invest in a collection of high-quality, interesting blouses and shirts that will easily go with a pair of cigarette trousers, midi skirts or suits.

Grab-an d- Go

If you’re feeling ready to make the leap to a suit, commit to it. Try out a suit in a bold print or colour, that is both fashionforward as well as dapper. Accessorise with a pair of statement earrings and slip-on leather loafers.

S t an d Ou t

The brilliant thing about jumpsuits is that they can be dressed up or down, depending on what you wear them with. For example, you can’t get more office luxe than with a black collared jumpsuit worn with a pair of black leather backless heels and some elegant embellished earrings.

O n e-Piec e

If the job you’re going for is on the creative side, it might be a good idea to opt for a more casual look. Achieve this by swapping the suit trousers for a pair of smart, dark jeans. Avoid the just-out-of-bed look by choosing well-tailored pieces that aren’t distressed or sloppy. You can’t go wrong with an oversized, stripy top, high-rise jeans and smart trainers.

Fren ch Ch i c

Stay away from anything that shouts you’re trying too hard because this can be distracting. You want to look like you’ve made an effort with clean, crisp clothes that fit well and are impactful and powerful. Show your personal style without being too loud.

Clean & Cr isp

Interviews | 99


INTERVIEW DRESS CODE When going to an interview, making a good impression is very important- not only by how you present yourself but by how you look as well. Clothing plays a big part in the interview process. So, follow our tips on how to dress for a job interview and get ready to play dress up.

A FORMAL SUIT AND TIE Where to Wear It: Bank, investment institution or law office. These working environments are for the most part on the more moderate side, so a classic suit is the best way to go.

A BLAZER, OXFORD SHIRT AND DRESS SLACKS Where to Wear It: Corporate office, sales organisation or in an educational institution. This go-to suit is an appropriate outfit option for a business casual workplace. Business casual workwear is varied, so you can stick with the workwear essentials like dress slacks or dress shirts. Ties are optional.

A BUTTON-DOWN SHIRT AND CHINOS Where to Wear It: Creative ad agency, a tech start-up. Lose the tie and pick a jacket, printed conservative shirt and chinos. Not feeling a second layer? Include enthusiasm with a conversational print in your shirt or pair impartial catch ups with a chino in a cool shading.

POLO AND TWILL PANTS Where to Wear It: Restaurant interview, non-fashion retail, service or repair company. At even the most casual environment, leave the jeans and gym sneakers at home. A button-down or polo and chinos for an interview at a more laid-back office, while still casual, is a sign of respect and shows that you put some thought into preparing for your interview.

100 | www.careersuk.org


Plan – build a personalised interview strategy Practice – helps you put what you want to say right at the tip of your tongue Give credible, clear, concise answers Give answers that showcase how your skills can benefit the employer Focus on the advertised position requirements Think of examples from your past that zero in on the required skills and talents Put yourself in the right atmosphere and mood Maintain enthusiasm when answering questions Begin the interview effectively: Positive first impressions matter Non-verbal positive gestures and a smile Show that you appreciate the interview opportunity Be assertive, confident and prepared – show confidence in your skills set Where necessary establish rapport but avoid too much “small talk” Rehearsing answers that highlight your experiences Distinguish yourself! Stand out from the crowd Be honest - be completely truthful in all communications Tell them a story that illuminates transferable skills…. Use the STAR Technique Point out some of your key strengths and provide concrete examples Don’t be negative about anything e.g. past managers and jobs Watch the interviewer’s body language and align your responses accordingly

Interviews | 101


HOW TO BEHAVE IN AN INTERVIEW

HOW TO BEHAVE IN AN INTERVIEW Handshake

Studies say that handshakes play a significant role in first impressions, so make it count. Aim for a firm handshake, and as you shake, make eye contact and smile.

Maintain eye contact The purpose of a job interview is to give a potential employer the chance to talk to you in person and evaluate whether you would be a strong asset to their team. The interview also provides you with an opportunity to evaluate the company and decide whether you want to work for them. To get that job offer, you must make a good first impression. Present yourself in an appropriate, appealing fashion, communicate effectively, and show the interviewer politeness and respect.

102 | www.careersuk.org

Eye contact is one of the surest ways to convey confidence when speaking to someone. It shows you are paying attention. Maintain eye contact when speaking, but don’t stare! Glance down occasionally at your resume to break eye contact at times. Be careful about looking towards a clock or the door, or out the window – you might give off the impression that you’re bored or have somewhere else you’d rather be.

Sit up straight

First and foremost - No slumping. Lean forward slightly to indicate interest. Avoid crossing your arms or placing items in your lap as these habits indicate nerves.


Practice sitting on the front half of a chair with your feet flat on the floor. Lift your chin and roll your shoulders back so that your shoulder blades are tucked in alongside your spine. Your back should be straight and neutral, not arched in either direction.

in the reception area, you need to keep your posture perfect.

Avoid fiddling

During the interview, pay attention to the way the interviewer sits, moves and the hand gestures they use. When you mirror the interviewer’s body language, it sends the signal to them that the two of you are in sync. You can use this little psychological trick to make a better impression.

People who play with their hair or excessively touch or rub their noses can seem dishonest and untrustworthy. Also try to avoid rubbing your head or neck, it can give the impression of being bored or just not being interested. Same goes for sitting with your arms crossed, which will make you look defensive and unapproachable. All your personal gestures should be open and expressive. Keep your shoulders relaxed and facing the interviewer to ensure they’re always involved in what you’re saying.

Stay positive

Don’t fidget

Mirror the interviewers body language

The interviewer will no doubt ask you questions about your previous employer, or other experiences that may not be positive for you. Plan your answers ahead of time and be careful not to say anything negative or critical about previous employers or co-workers. If you focus on the negative, it sends signals that you might be difficult to work with or may not respond well to criticism. If you parted ways with a previous employer on bad terms, present it as a learning experience. Explain what you learned and how it made you a better employee.

This includes tapping your fingertips on the arm rest or jiggling your leg up or down. It’s a sign of boredom, nerves or impatience. Keep both feet firmly on the floor to avoid the temptation. It’ll help to keep your posture straight and focused on your interviewer, which in turn will make you seem more concentrated.

Show enthusiasm for the opportunity The interviewer needs to know that you want the position and are genuinely interested in working for the company. Show gratitude to the interviewer at both the beginning and the end of the interview. Thank them for their time.

Be prepared

Bring along a folder containing extra copies of your CV, a copy of your references and paper to take notes. You should also have questions prepared to ask at the end of the interview.

INTERVIEW DON’TS: Don’t slouch

Sitting hunched forward or lounging with arms and legs everywhere has the effect of looking a little too relaxed. You don’t want to sit there tightly clutching your fists in your lap, but you also don’t want to portray a casual, not really bothered attitude. From the moment you arrive Interviews | 103


20 MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED INTERVIEW QUESTIONS PART 1

Wouldn’t it be great if you knew exactly what questions a hiring manager would be asking you in your job interview? While we unfortunately can’t read minds, we’ll give you the next best thing: a list of the most frequently asked interview questions.

1. Can you tell me a little about yourself? This question seems simple, and yet so many individuals fail to answer it correctly. This question is not an invitation to recite your entire life story: It’s your chance to pitch your compatibility for the 104 | www.careersuk.org

role to the interviewer. Start off by talking about 2-3 accomplishments that you are proud of and the skills and experience you gained.

2. How did you hear about the position? Your response to this question should be kept short: something along the lines of “I found it on (wherever you found the job), and since I’ve been hoping to work for the company for a long time, I was excited to see that this position was open.’

3. What do you know about the company? Any candidate can read and repeat a company’s ‘About’ page. So, when interviewers ask this question they aren’t trying to see whether you understand their goals - they want to know if you care. Start with one line that shows you understand the company’s goals, using a couple key words and phrases from the website, but then go on to make it personal. Say, “I’m personally drawn to this mission


because…” or “I really believe in this approach because…” and share a personal example or two.

4. What are your strengths? This question is an open invitation for you to talk about your skills and accomplishments and to show how you match the position’s requirements. Demonstrate your unique value as a candidate by identifying key strengths and then match them to the requirements and skills that are needed to carry out the job.

5. What are your weaknesses? This is the interview question that nobody likes, but you should still be prepared for a well-thought-out answer. When answering this question, think about something that isn’t a strong skill - think about previous experiences. Talk about how you’ve taken steps to overcome it and mention that you still are working on it.

6. Why do you want to work for us? When interviewers ask this question, they want to learn about your career goals and how the position you are applying for fits into your plan. Make sure you are interested in the job and will be motivated to work hard. Your answer should demonstrate your knowledge of the company and the skills, talents, experience and strength you have.

7. What skills can you bring to the role? This interview question is one likely to make you think about the skills and experience you already have. Think about what skills you could contribute to the new role. These might consist of the standard required skillset for the position. To ensure you stand out from other job seekers attending the interview, make sure the examples you choose are relevant to the role and reflect you in a positive and professional light.

8. What is your greatest accomplishment? When the interviewer asks you this question, this is your opportunity to talk about your

proudest achievement. They want to know what sets you apart from other candidates to get a better sense of what you’ve done and what you value. Make sure you are comfortable talking about yourself and your work in a positive, natural way that conveys confidence.

9. Where do you see yourself in 5 years? Interviewers ask this question as they want to understand more about your career goals. They are interested in your career goals as they want to hire someone who is motivated to progress. This question should get you thinking about where the position could realistically take you and think about how that aligns with some of your broader professional goals.

10. Why should we hire you? Don’t just talk about why the company would be great to work for; talk about how the position is a perfect fit for what you hope to accomplish, both short-term and long-term. Quote the aspects of the job that you like and explain why it matches with your career path and your expectations.

11. Tell me about a challenging situation and how you overcame it? For this question, the interviewer is testing your ability to be resilient and cope under pressure. Your answer should focus on a work-related issue, explain clearly the measures you took to overcome the problem. This question gives you the opportunity to demonstrate how you can use your initiative and act with integrity. Don’t fall into the trap of criticising your previous company or colleagues and trying to present yourself in a superior light. This will come across as unprofessional and arrogant.

12. Do you enjoy working as part of a team? You should say that you do enjoy working as part of a team, but also that you aren’t afraid of taking on individual tasks, either. You want to show that you can indeed be a great team member and collaborate with others to produce excellent results. Interviews | 105


20 MOST FREQUENTLY ASKED INTERVIEW QUESTIONS PART 2

However, you also want to emphasise that you value the opportunity to share your own input.

13. How do you handle criticism? Mention the positive aspects of criticism and think of an experience you had where it was useful to get criticism. Your answer should be along the following lines: “I always think that it is important to get feedback on how I am performing so that I can improve my work.

14. How would you deal with conflict? In asking this question, the interviewer wants to get a sense of how you would respond to conflict. 106 | www.careersuk.org

Focus on talking about how you would handle the situation professionally and productively, and wrap up with a happy ending, like how you would come to a resolution or compromise.

15. Can you please explain the gaps in your CV? Having a gap on your CV won’t necessarily prevent you from being successful through the interview process, but potential employers will expect an explanation. Take the time beforehand to work out how you can address the gap in a way that projects confidence and positivity. You want to be truthful without going into unnecessary detail. A basic template for your answer could be: “I [reason you were not employed]. During that time, [what you did during the gap]. Returning to work was one of my priorities during the period and I’m ready to do that now.”

16. Why did you leave your previous position? This can be a challenging question to answer.


Keep things positive—you have nothing to gain by being negative about your past employers. Show the interviewer that you are eager to take on new opportunities and that the role you’re interviewing for is a better fit for you than your last or current position.

17. What are your salary expectations? Employers ask about your salary expectations to get a sense of whether they can afford you. They might also ask you this to see how much you value yourself and the work that you do. By doing some research and preparing an answer ahead of time, you can demonstrate to the employer that you are flexible with your salary, but that you also know what you are worth. Your answer can be something along the lines of: ‘My salary expectations are in line with my experience and qualifications.’ Or, ‘If this is the right job for me, I am sure we can come to an agreement on salary.’ If you are working with a recruitment agency it is a good practice to ask them to discuss salary issues on your behalf.

20. Do you have any questions? Always answer “yes” to this question. You’re there to find out information about your employer as much as they are there to find out about you – and the more details you know, the better you’ll be able to ascertain your suitability for the job. You’ll need to be prepared for when the tables do turn. Here are some questions you could ask at an interview: • • • • •

What are the skills and experiences you’re looking for in an ideal candidate? What training programs are available to your employees? Are there opportunities for advancement or professional development? What are the company’s plans for the future? When can I expect to hear from you?

18. What are your hobbies? Interviewers ask this question to see if you are a well-rounded person who will fit in with the company culture. Employers want to know if you are passionate about certain things. Your response should be honest and brief. You could mention your hobbies include: exercise and health-related activities, volunteering and community participation and professional development.

19. What do you believe makes a good team leader/manager? This is a difficult question as most people will have different ideas about what makes a good manager. If you’re applying for a managerial role, or if you might progress into one, you’ll need to show a good understanding of the most important qualities to manage people effectively. Setting realistic goals, giving constructive feedback and providing support to team members to help them work on their skillset are all good examples of excellent management qualities.

Interviews | 107


10 ’OUT-OFTHE-BOX’ QUESTIONS INTERVIEWERS MAY ASK YOU

Sometimes, interviewers like to ask questions that are not your typical, everyday interview question. It can be puzzling as to why they do this, but worry not, we’re here to explain to you why that is and what kind of “outside of the box” questions you could be asked. The simple answer as to why interviewers ask them is because they’re trying to see what sets you apart from the rest of the crowd. Anyone can answer a “why do you want this job?” question as it is probably the one everyone rehearses the most. However, questions that must make you think creatively shows the interviewer that you have personality and, in some cases, shows the way you think. 108 | www.careersuk.org

1. What weighs more; 100 tons of feathers or 100 tons of cement? Answer: They weigh the same. Most people would say cement because obviously cement weighs more than a feather. But as they both weigh 100 tons, neither one is heavier. This question is used to determine whether you listened to the full question and how good your listening abilities are.

2. If a movie were made about your life so far, what would it be called? This is used for the interviewer to find out more on your accomplishments and merits. It also determines what kind of work ethic you have and whether you can separate your personal life from your work life.


3. If you were alone in a dark cabin, with only one match, one lamp, a fireplace, and a candle, which would you light first? Answer: The match. To light the fireplace, candle or lamp you would need a match to light them first. This question is supposed to induce critical thinking and shows the employer that you are not just giving your opinion of what should be lit first but that you have genuinely given thought and analysed the question before answering.

4. What has been your biggest failure and who was responsible for it?

7. What’s one of the biggest risks you’ve taken? Try not to tell them about anything illegal or danger-related. It doesn’t make you sound like a good candidate to hire and will most likely jeopardize your chances of getting the job. Instead, talk about any leadership roles that you might have had to play in the past where, as a leader, you had to take calculated risks. Or point out any work experience you may have done that was out of your comfort zone. This will show the interviewer that you are proactive in your roles and willing to try things that you may not feel overly comfortable doing.

8. There are twelve eggs in a carton. Twelve people each take an egg, but Interviewers will be looking for open and there is one egg left in the carton. genuine answers rather than something that sounds like it is being made up on the spot. How? Take your time and think of something that you know you failed at and explain it honestly. If the person that was responsible for the failure was you, then own up to it and talk about it. Owning up to failures shows responsibility and proves that you are courageous and have integrity. The answer you have to this question will show a lot about your personality.

5. If you were an animal, what kind would you be? This question is supposed to let the interviewer determine what kind of personality you have. You need to be as creative as possible when picking an animal but make sure that it also reflects who you are as a person. Remember to give a description as to why you think you’re that animal as well. Example: An ant because they’re exceptional team players and work hard in their roles.

6. 10 years into the future and your name is on the front cover. What would the story be about? The key to answering this is to be creative. It could be because you flew over the world in a hot air balloon or you have climbed every mountain the world. Make sure your answer sounds creative, ambitious and interesting.

Answer: The twelfth person to take an egg did not take the egg out of the carton. Instead, they took the carton with the egg. This question challenges you to break the regular pattern of thinking by making you think beyond the obvious.

9. Describe the colour yellow to someone who can’t see. It is incredibly tricky to describe colours; especially when we use colours to describe other things. This question is supposed to test how big your vocabulary is whilst seeing how well you can communicate. To answer this question, you need to use very rich and creative descriptors. Tune into four of the senses – touch, taste, smell and sound.

10. What would you change about our office? This question allows the interviewer to see if you’re not worried about giving opinions on things you wouldn’t usually be asked for by an employer. The trick is to stay confident and believe in what you say. Stick to your guns if they ask you why.

Interviews | 109


DON’T LET YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA STOP YOU FROM GETTING INTERVIEWS

Social media is great for posting pictures, sharing things with friends, looking at memes and watching funny videos. However, social media is also where embarrassing pictures from Saturday nights drunken fun at the bar get shared by your friends which YOU get tagged in. That’s not great when it just so happens that the day before you just sent off loads of job applications. It’s no secret that employers tend to rout out your social media profiles to see if you are as professional as you seem on your CV. In fact, over a third of job applications get denied because employers don’t like what they see on the potential candidates’ profiles. So, do you need help re-organizing your social media profiles? Then read on to find out how! Be Thorough

accounts, access the settings

Go through your Facebook,

section and change them so that

Instagram, Twitter and any other

friends are not allowed to post or

social media accounts you may

share anything onto your profile.

have and check through every single post. If you have any photos

Google Yourself

that may be considered as vulgar,

By googling yourself, you’re able to

sexually explicit, rude or just

see any stray posts or old accounts

downright inappropriate, then you

that you don’t want potential

must delete them. That also goes

employers to see. Remember that

for likes, comments, shares or

blog you used to have? It may be

retweets.

old and forgotten about by you, but the internet remembers. Other

Change Your Settings

people can still access it and read

If you know your friends are prone

everything on there. Deactivate

to posting embarrassing pictures

any old accounts that you find

that could jeopardize your chances

whilst doing your search.

of getting an interview, change your settings. Go to all your social media 110 | www.careersuk.org


Update your LinkedIn Now that you have cleaned up your social media accounts, it’s time to update them. LinkedIn is extremely useful to show potential employers that you are professional and worth the time for them to interview you. If you don’t already have a LinkedIn account, make one. LinkedIn will usually be the firstplace employers look at to find out what you’re like in a professional manner. Make sure that your career history is completely up to date with your last job being the most recent. Look at your CV and check that the job titles, dates and job descriptions match what is on your profile. You don’t want employers having a copy of your excellent CV only to find your LinkedIn profile says that you were working for a different company at the last job you had. Lastly, remember that LinkedIn is not a regular social media platform for you to share pictures of family

business content. Keep it professional. Exhibit Your Skills As your social media may not be as full as it once was, now is as good a time as any to showcase any special skills or talents you may have. If the vacancies you are applying for are in the art field, post pictures of your paintings, drawings or graphic designs. You want to convey to any potential employers looking at your social media that you have the skills to do the job or are willing to learn and trying hard at it. The option of just making all your social media accounts private is viable. However, some employers prefer to see that you actively use social media as it shows that you are in tune with the modern world and all the technology that is in it.

outings and Christmas dinners. Use it to communicate with other professionals and share appropriate

Interviews | 111


how to use the star interview technique What is the STAR Interview Technique? Sample Behaviour Interview Questions The STAR technique offers a simple format you can use to answer behavioural or competency based questions in an interview. Usually, these are questions that ask you to provide a real-life example of how you handled a certain kind of situation in the past. Your response will reveal your skills, abilities and personality. The logic behind this interview tactic is that your behaviour in the past reflects and predicts how you will behave in the future.

How to use the STAR method to prepare for an interview Most behavioural interviews will focus on various work-related challenges that demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving, and situations that showcase leadership skills, conflict resolution and performance under pressure. To prepare for your interview, review the job description and required skills and consider what sorts of challenges might arise or what obstacles you may have to navigate in the position. You should then make a list of the various situations you’ve handled in your professional history that would display the sorts of strengths you’ll need to succeed in the role.

112 | www.careersuk.org

Here are a few examples of behavioural questions you might be asked during an interview. Practice using the STAR technique on these common behavioural interview questions:

1. Describe a situation in which you were able to

use persuasion to successfully convince someone to see things your way.

2. Can you give me a specific example of a time

when you used good judgment and logic in solving a problem?

3. Can you tell me of a time when you set a goal and were successful in achieving it?

4. Tell me about a time your responsibilities got a little overwhelming. What did you do?

5. Can you give me an example of a time you

faced conflict while working in a team? How did you handle that?

6. Describe a time when it was important to make a good impression on a client. How did you go about doing so?

7. Tell me about a time you failed to achieve a goal? How did you deal with the situation?


situation - describe a challenge you have been faced with? task - what were Your responsibilities for the situation? action - what Steps did you take to address or rectify the situation? result - What was the outcome of your actions? example Here’s an example of how you could respond to an interview question using the STAR method.

Q. Tell me about a time you had to complete a task within a tight deadline. a. Usually, I like to take my time doing projects to make sure they come out

perfect. However, I can also acheive high quality work under pressure, with a tight deadline. Once, I had to take on the work of an employee that went off sick days before our project deadline. It was very difficult, but I managed to complete within the time limit as I delegated tasks out to my colleagues and gave them goals to achieve. We managed to complete it with a day to spare. Interviews | 113


QUESTIONS TO ASK THE INTERVIEWER

what the organisation can do for you. Save questions about salary and holiday allowance for when you’ve got a job offer. Also, stay away from questions that require a yes or no answer. While it’s okay to ask the interviewer to clarify certain points, avoid asking about anything that has previously been covered. You don’t want them to think that you haven’t been paying attention.

Having a list of questions to ask an interviewer makes you look interested, enthusiastic and engaged - all qualities that the interviewer will be looking for. It also gives you one final chance to further highlight your relevant qualities and experience. Not having any questions to ask will give the impression of unpreparedness and a lack of interest in the role. Try to come up with at least four or five questions to ask the interviewer. That way, if one or two of them are answered during the earlier discussion you will have backups in place. Avoid asking questions that focus too much on 114 | www.careersuk.org

IF YOU NEED A LITTLE INSPIRATION HERE ARE SOME GOOD QUESTIONS TO ASK AT AN INTERVIEW: Can you tell me more about the dayto-day responsibilities of this job?

This is your chance to learn as much as possible about the role, so you can decide whether this is a job you really want. By learning more about the day-to-day tasks, you will gain insight into what specific skills and strengths are needed and you can address any topics that haven’t already been covered.


What do you think are the most important qualities for someone to excel in this role?

This question can often lead to valuable information that’s not in the job description. It can help you learn about the company culture and expectations, so you can show that you are a good fit.

you gain important information about the timeline for hiring so that you can follow up appropriately. If the employer doesn’t give an indication of what happens next, then a good way to wrap up the interview is by asking about the next steps and when you can expect to hear from them.

Are there opportunities for training and progression within the role/ company?

Enquiring about development opportunities demonstrates to the interviewer that you’re serious about your career and committed to a future with the organisation. You don’t want to be stuck in a dead-end job. So, if you’re unsure of the typical career path for someone in this role, asking this question will help you to assess whether a long-term career with the company is a possibility, or if you’d need to move on to gain further responsibility.

Can you describe the working culture of the organisation?

Asking this question is a great way to assess the working environment of the company and it gives you the opportunity to discover whether you’ll fit in. From the recruiter’s response you’ll learn if and how the organisation prioritises employee happiness, of any benefits on offer and what the work-life balance is like.

Where do you think the company is headed in the next five years?

The response you receive will give you an insight into the company’s progression plans and its place in the market, while giving you a general idea about job security. You may also get a heads-up on any major upcoming projects. Asking about future plans shows a real interest in the organisation and reiterates your commitment to the company.

What are the next steps in the interview process?

This question shows that you are eager to move forward in the process. It will also help Interviews | 115


PREPARING FOR

ASSESSMENT CENTRES What is an assessment centre?

An assessment centre is a combination of tasks and activities that test your suitability for the job. It gives you the chance to demonstrate a wider range of skills. Assessment centres generally last from an afternoon to two days. However, some assessment centres require overnight stay: this is usually arranged by the employer.

What happens at an assessment centre? Assessment days can be held anywhere from the employer’s offices to a hotel or training facility. You work both individually and as part of a group on a variety of exercises including: • Group discussions • Presentations • Case studies • Written tests • Social events • Role play • Psychometric tests •

In-tray exercises

116 | www.careersuk.org


Example of an Assessment Day Assessment centres vary in length and style. An example of a day at an assessment centre is: 09.00 - Arrival and introduction 09.15 - Employer presentation and group exercise 10.00 - Psychometric tests 11.30 - Individual task: In-tray exercise 12.45 - Lunch 13.45 - Group exercise: Case study 14.45 - Assessment interviews 16.15 - Individual presentations 17.15 - Evaluation 17.30 - Finish

How you are assessed Employers don’t just assess you against job competencies; they also aim to ensure that you’re the right fit. Key skills that employers look for include: Analytical thinking Communication Teamwork Time management Adaptability Creativity Organisation Negotiation Leadership

Assessment centre tips • • • • •

On the day, eat a good, healthy breakfast Maintain a friendly and polite manner Join in on group discussions Ensure that you understand the requirements of each task Don’t dwell on any mistakes, instead concentrate on performing well in the next task Put your talents and skills into practice

How to prepare

As with interviews, good preparation is essential.

Before the assessment day, it's important that you: • • • • • • •

Identify which skills, interests and experiences the employer is looking for by revisiting the job description Research the company/organisation Review your CV and application form Give yourself time to complete and practise any material that you've been asked to prepare Practice potential exercises with a friend or family member Choose your outfit the night before and get plenty of sleep Plan your journey and aim to arrive at least 15 minutes early Interviews | 117


THRIVING AT WORK

118 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION BU DD YING FOR NEW STARTERS ................................................... SECRETS TO BEING A BETTER BOSS ............................................ HOW TO MAXIMISE YOUR POTENTIAL I N A N EW ROLE HOW TO EFFECTIVELY DELEG ATE TA SKS .................................... HOW TO RESOLV E CONFLICT IN THE W O RKP LA CE .......................

Thriving At Work | 119


BUDDYING FOR NEW STARTERS

Buddying is assigning a member of staff to be a first point of contact for a new-starter while they are settling into their role. Having a “buddy” at work can make a huge difference to the enjoyment and speed at which new recruits manage to settle into the role, the department and the organisation. Just knowing there is someone there to listen who is genuinely interested in helping them can make new staff members feel supported and welcomed.

120 | www.careersuk.org

Benefits of buddying for new staff Assigning a buddy to a new member of staff can really make a difference to the success of their induction. Having a buddy gives a new member of staff a friendly face they know they can seek support from, especially in terms of explaining how things work and answering questions. This can help them to settle into their new role more quickly and reduce the chance of them feeling isolated or unsupported. Acting as a buddy also provides a good developmental opportunity for existing members of staff, giving them the chance to develop their communication skills and share their knowledge and experience.

The role of the buddy The role of the buddy is to provide informal support and guidance to a new member of staff, which includes: • •

Accompanying and showing the new starter around. Introducing the new member of staff to other colleagues.


• •

Helping the new starter understand working practices and activities. Being able to provide information and guidance in a friendly and supportive manner.

Personal attributes of a good buddy include: • • • • •

The ability to listen. Openness and commitment to being a buddy- it can be a learning experience for both parties. Good time management and selfmanagement skills. Relevant knowledge and experience to be able to provide the right level of support. An honest and considerate approach to giving feedback and asking or responding to challenging questions.

Who can be a buddy? The buddy should be someone who is experienced in the role that the new starter is undertaking, and preferably from within the same team. The individual should be enthusiastic, engaging and should also be trusted to support new members of staff. They should be aware of the induction plan for the new starter. The new starter should be introduced to their buddy on the first day of employment.

Thriving At Work | 121


SECRETS TO BEING A BETTER BOSS LEAD BUT DO NOT DICTATE

No one likes being bossed around. If no one respects you, then your employees will only work at the minimum requirement needed; they will not go above and beyond. You must inspire and motivate your employees to work efficiently. Help everyone to understand what it is they should be working on and let them know they can come to you for guidance.

LISTEN AND COMMUNICATE

Listening to an employees thoughts and concerns will help you to come across as friendly and approachable. It’s great to be on good terms with employees rather than being the kind of boss that only talks at people, rather than with them. Communicating isn’t just one-on-one conversations, it’s as broad as writing emails, leading group discussions and managing conflict.

MICROMANAGEMENT IS BAD MANAGEMENT

When you micromanage every tiny detail of your employees’ jobs, it makes them feel like they are constantly being observed and always under pressure. This can lead to stress and anxiety and can make employees feel demoralised. Try to stop constantly hovering over your employees shoulders and watching everything they do. You must learn to trust that your employees can get their jobs done without you checking on their progress every 5 minutes.

SET A REASONABLE WORKLOAD

You can’t pile loads of work onto your employees and expect them to get through each task effectively without any problems. As a boss, you must manage the workload and hand it out equally among your employees. If you see that some people can manage more work than others, ask them if they’re okay with doing a little more. This creates confidence knowing that they are productive and can get everything done on time.

RECOGNISE YOUR TOP PERFORMERS

Good bosses know when their employees are going above and beyond and will do everything to keep them happy. By recognising how well they’re doing and rewarding them, it creates a sense of accomplishment. It’s never pleasant doing lots of work that is never recognised by those higher up, so let your employees know that they are doing well by rewarding them through bonuses, pay rises, extra holiday, and other kinds of perks.

122 | www.careersuk.org


HOW TO MAXIMISE YOUR POTENTIAL IN A NEW ROLE 7 TIPS TO MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR NEW JOB BE COMPETITIVE

To maximise your full potential, you need to have a competitive spirit. This means challenging your self each and every day. Your objective should always be the pursuit of excellence in everything you do.

SET GOALS

Goal setting is a powerful process for thinking about your ideal future, and motivation to turn it into reality. It is a process that starts with careful consideration of what you want to achieve. If you want to succeed, you need to set goals. Without goals you lack focus and direction.

IDENTIFY YOUR STRENGTHS

You need to figure out what you are best at, as these are things where you have the most potential to excel. We perform better in doing things we are interested in and enjoy.

COMMIT

To maximise your potential, you must be committed. In order to be truly committed, you must find a purpose in what you’re doing. If it’s something that you are truly passionate about, it is easier to maintain a high level of dedication.

MAKE MISTAKES

ADJUST YOUR PERCEPTION

SELF-BELIEF

Everybody has dreams, goals and aspirations with a diverse range of strengths, weaknesses, and personality traits. It’s often difficult for people to know their true potential because they haven’t yet uncovered their purpose. There is always room for growth and improvement and there are many ways to accomplish your goals.

Learning how to grow from your mistakes every day is an important factor in maximising your potential. It shows that you are able to use those downfalls as lessons for the future, and in the end, go further.

Don’t think of your mistakes as failures: accept failures as learning experiences. Failure should be thought of as an opportunity for learning. Take valuable insights from every error you make and apply it to your future endeavours. To maximise your potential, be confident about your ability. Look at what you have achieved so far and believe in yourself that you have the capacity to do more. Having a positive mindset is a useful way to improve or boost your confidence levels. Thriving At Work | 123


HOW TO EFFECTIVELY DELEGATE TASKS

The term ‘delegate’ means assigning the responsibility and authority (but not accountability) to do something, such as a task or project, to an individual (normally from a manager to an employee/ individuals). Delegating tasks is a common practice among business leaders and managers as it allows them to focus on more impactful tasks that require their full attention. Delegation keeps your team challenged and motivated, helps them to build new skills and feel like they’re having a greater impact on the business as a whole.

124 | www.careersuk.org

HOW TO DELEGATE EFFECTIVELY Learning how to delegate effectively is the key to leveraging yourself and enhancing your value to the company. There are three elements to consider and assimilate when deciding to delegate. These are: Authority - When work is assigned to individuals, authority has to be delegated in order for the task to be completed. The authority must be equal to the responsibility. Responsibility - This means assigning the work to an individual. Managers should be clear and specific when delegating tasks as it helps individuals to understand why they have been given this responsibility. Managers must retain control and authority as they are still responsible. Accountability - This is the process of checking whether individuals perform their responsibilities in the correct manner and to the expected standards. The manager in the company/business must accept the consequences of actions and decisions.


WHEN WANTING TO DELEGATE TASKS EFFECTIVELY, FOLLOW THE BALM PRINCIPLE.

B

reak the goal down to specific tasks. Make a list, in order of importance, of all the tasks to be completed.

A

nalyse and make a list of the various abilities required to perform the tasks you have listed.

L

ist the members of the team and identify each individual’s capabilities and specific skillset.

M

atch the individuals to the tasks that need to be done and assign the right person to the right task.

Thriving At Work | 125


HOW TO RESOLVE CONFLICT IN THE WORKPLACE

Healthy workplace relationships are essential to the success of any business or organisation. There may be disagreements between individuals or between an employee and manager, but when there is conflict in the workplace, other employees are affected as well as the business. Therefore, conflict in the workplace is something we all want to avoid and know how to handle.

126 | www.careersuk.org

TIPS FOR EMPLOYERS •

Don’t assume situations will resolve themselves. When conflict in the workplace is brought to your attention, it is past the point of resolving itself.

Train employees on teamwork skills.

Have clear discipline and dispute handling procedures for dealing with conflict.

Train managers in conflict resolution techniques so they are able to handle situations when conflict arises.

Set clear expectations as to what behaviour is not tolerated in the workplace and enforce these expectations.

Take conflict as an opportunity to learn and grow.


TIPS FOR EMPLOYEES Talk - Acknowledge the conflict and individuals about the situation. Listen - Avoid interrupting one another and listen to what the other person has to say instead of retaliating. Ask questions to clarify your understanding. Find an agreement - Looking for agreement demonstrates your willingness to find common ground. Perhaps you can agree that each individual needs to do something to create resolution. Forgive - Apologise for your wrongdoing in the conflict. Develop a plan - Once you have talked over the problem, propose possible solutions. Focus on the future and how you can respond better. Follow the plan - Each individual must follow through the solutions that were agreed upon. Participate and discuss ways to stay accountable.

Thriving At Work | 127


WELLBEING

128 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION M E NTAL HEALTH IN THE WORKPLAC E ......................................... BU ILD ING CONFIDENCE .............................................................. SEL F-E S TEEM ............................................................................. M OTIVA TION ............................................................................... THE P OWER OF POSITIV ITY ......................................................... FOOD FOR PRODUCTIVITY ...........................................................

Wellbeing | 129


MENTAL HEALTH IN THE WORKPLACE

A recent Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development study highlighted the impact that mental ill health can have on organisations. The study found that: •

Mental health includes our emotional, psychological, and social wellbeing. It affects how we think, feel, and act. It also helps determine how we handle stress, relate to others, and make choices. Mental illnesses can range from anxiety and depression, to more severe conditions such as bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

130 | www.careersuk.org

• • • •

37% of sufferers are more likely to get into conflict with colleagues 57% find it hard to complete multiple tasks 80% find it difficult to concentrate 62% take longer to do tasks 50% are potentially less patient with customers/clients

The study also found that, for the first time, stress can be a major cause of long-term absence. For many of us, work is a major part of our lives. It is where we spend much of our time, where we get our income and often where we make our friends. Having a fulfilling job can be good for your mental health and general wellbeing.


LOOKING AFTER YOUR MENTAL one basis to get their thoughts. HEALTH AT WORK Dealing with stress in the workplace

Talk about your feelings

Talking about your feelings can help you maintain your mental health and deal with times you feel troubled. When wanting to talk to someone, find somebody who you feel comfortable with and who can be supportive. Sometimes it can be hard to talk about feelings at work. If you have colleagues you can talk to, it can really help. If you don’t feel comfortable talking to someone at work, talk to family and friends.

Keep active

Regular exercise boosts your self-esteem, helps you concentrate and perform to a higher standard. Experts say that most people should do at least 30 minutes of exercise, 5 days a week!

Take a break

A change of scene is good for your mental health. It could be taking a little break from what you are doing or just simply going away for the weekend. A few minutes can be enough to de-stress you. Give yourself some ‘me’ time.

Reducing work-related stress can be hugely beneficial to an employer as it reduces absence levels and improves overall performance. Employers also have a legal obligation to ensure the health, safety and welfare of their employees. Research shows that two thirds of employees have suffered stress and anxiety in the workplace in the past year. Organisations should be thinking about the causes of workplace stress, how to reduce it and how best to support staff when they do experience stress.

Further support if you are experiencing mental ill health MIND is the leading mental health charity. Their helpline and website provide information and support to empower anyone experiencing mental illnesses and general advice on mental health. For more information, go to www.mind.org.uk or call 0300 123 3393. NHS choices has a website that offers information and practical advice for anyone experiencing mental illnesses. For more information, go to

Promoting positive mental health in www.nhs.uk/livewell/mentalhealth. the workplace Mental health costs employers £30 billion

every year through lost production, recruitment and absence. Promoting positive mental health in your workplace can therefore be hugely beneficial. Staff with good mental health are more likely to perform better, have good attendance and be engaged with their work.

Rethink Mental Illness is the largest national voluntary sector provider of mental health services, offering support groups, advice and information on mental health problems. For more information, go to www.rethink.org or call 0300 5000 927.

Take steps to improve the workplace

It is important to identify what areas of the workplace might be a cause of mental illnesses. Gathering information on staff turnover, sickness absence and performance can be a good starting point. Staff should also be involved so they are aware of what the organisation is doing to help and what needs to improve. In larger organisations, this might be done through team meetings or an employee survey. In smaller organisations, the owner may simply talk to staff on a one-toWellbeing | 131


Confidence is feeling assured about yourself and your abilities. It’s important for positive social interactions, performing well in school, and

Engage in positive self-talk Positive daily affirmations help you to be more confident; turn your “can’ts” into “cans”. Take a few moments before you go to work or school to look at yourself in the mirror and say something encouraging to yourself. You can either say something that you believe about yourself or something that you would like to believe about yourself.

advancing in your career. Being confident helps us prepare for life’s experiences. When somebody is confident, they are more likely to move forward with people and opportunities.

Maintain a positive support network Connect with those close to you, whether they are family or friends, to keep your perspective uplifted. Take some time to think about which people in your life really make you feel great. Make a goal to spend more time with people who are supportive and uplifting.

Individuals with low confidence are less likely to reach out to people and try new things. A lack of confidence can hold people back from reaching their full potential.

Achieve your goals Confidence is built on accomplishment. If you achieve small and big goals, you’re going to feel much better about yourself. Begin with your day-to-day goals, what do you need to accomplish today?

EVERYONE IS GOOD AT SOMETHING 132 | www.careersuk.org


Monitor your progress The best way to reach your goals, big or small, is break them into smaller goals and to monitor your progress. Monitoring your progress helps you stay focused and boosts your confidence as you see your performance improving.

Acknowledge and challenge your negative thoughts Negative thoughts are common in all people, but they may be even more common if you lack confidence. It is important to acknowledge and challenge any negative thoughts that you have in order to be confident.

Visualise yourself as you want to be Visualisation is the technique of seeing an image of yourself that you are proud of, in your own mind. When we struggle with low self-confidence, we have a poor perception of ourselves that is often inaccurate. Practice visualising a positive version of yourself, accomplishing your goals.

Identify situations that affect your confidence Many people have triggers that affect their confidence in negative ways. Try to identify the situations and places that seem to have a negative effect on how you feel about yourself. Being aware of these situations may help you to better address the way that they make you feel.

Don’t compare yourself to others Everyone has their own qualities and talents that make them unique. Focus on yourself and establish your own identity: you will always know who you are. Spend some time to reflect on your values.

Take care of yourself Exercise, healthy food, rest, and relaxation are all important components in boosting confidence. By taking good care of yourself, you are sending your mind signals that you deserve to be taken care of. Make sure that you are devoting enough time to meeting your basic needs for exercise, food, sleep, and relaxation. When you look good, you feel good.

Identify your talents Everyone is good at something: discover the things you excel and focus on your talents. Find something you enjoy and cultivate a talent to go with your interest. When you’re following your passion, you feel unique and accomplished, which builds your confidence.

Wellbeing | 133


SELFESTEEM Self-esteem is the opinion we have of ourselves. When we have healthy self-esteem, we tend to feel positive about ourselves and about life in general. It makes us better able to deal with life’s ups and downs. When our self-esteem is low, we tend to see ourselves and our life in a more negative, critical light. We also feel less able to take on the challenges life throws at us. People with high self-esteem believe in themselves. Those with low self-esteem think they are not good enough.

134 | www.careersuk.org

YOUR SELF-ESTEEM CAN AFFECT WHETHER YOU: • • • • • • • • •

Like and value yourself as a person. Are able to make decisions and assert yourself. Recognise your strengths and positives. Feel able to try new or difficult things. Show kindness towards yourself. Move past mistakes without blaming yourself. Take the time you need for yourself. Believe you matter and are good enough. Believe you deserve happiness.

WHAT CAN CAUSE LOW SELF-ESTEEM? The things that affect our self-esteem differ for everyone. Your self-esteem might change suddenly, or you might have had low selfesteem for a while​– which might make it hard to recognise how you feel and how you can make changes.


Difficult or stressful life experiences can often be a factor, such as: • • • • • • • • • •

Being bullied or abused. Experiencing prejudice, discrimination or stigma. Losing your job or difficulty finding employment. Problems at work or while studying. Ongoing stress. Physical health problems. Mental health problems. Relationship problems, separation or divorce. Worries about your appearance and body image. Problems with money or housing..

WHY SELF-ESTEEM IS IMPORTANT Self-esteem plays a significant role in your motivation and success throughout life. Having low self-esteem can hold you back from succeeding at school or work because you end up not believing in yourself to be capable of success. Having positive self-esteem helps you achieve your goals because you navigate life with a positive, assertive attitude and believe you can accomplish your goals.

HOW TO HAVE HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM We all have times when we lack confidence. When it comes to your self-worth, only one opinion truly matters — your own. To boost your self-esteem, you need to identify the negative beliefs you have about yourself, then challenge them. Here are 3 steps you could take: Be mindful As soon as you find yourself going down the path of self-criticism, gently note what is happening, be curious about it, and remind yourself, “These are thoughts, not facts.” Recognise what you’re good at Everyone is good at something, whether it’s cooking, singing, dancing or being a good friend. Enjoy doing what you’re good at to help boost your mood. Build positive relationships If you find certain people tend to bring you down, try to spend as little time as possible with them, or tell them how you feel about their words or actions around you. Build relationships with people who are positive and appreciate you. Practice mindful meditation Meditation just means letting go of the racing thoughts in your mind. Take a few moments every day to simply be still, focus on your breathing and watch your worries drift away like clouds.

Wellbeing | 135


MOTIVATION

Motivation is a set of psychological forces that compel individuals to act towards their goals. It leads a person to putting in effort and having the desire to influence the outcome of their goals. A motive is an impulse that causes a person to act. Motivation initiates, guides and maintains goaloriented behaviour. It is an important life skill and key to achieving goals. Without motivation in life, it’s hard to strive for success.

THE IMPORTANCE OF MOTIVATION

• Motivation enhances your performance: When an individual is motivated, it leads to an increase in their productivity and work performance.

• It helps you manage your time more effectively: For example, highly motivated people are organised, and they assign set times in their schedules to different tasks, setting themselves a deadline to complete each one.

• Motivation inspires others:

It is an attractive trait that encourages others to make things happen in their own life.

• Motivation builds your confidence:

Lack of motivation leads to lack of confidence. People that lack confidence are generally scared to move out of their comfort zone and try something new. If you don’t take risks, you’ll have a limited chance of success.

136 | www.careersuk.org

• Motivation helps you to become

committed: When you are driven, you are more committed to achieving your goals.

• It increases your energy levels:

When you are motivated, your entire body is pumped with adrenaline to help you complete the goals that you have set for yourself.

• Motivation enhances self-development:

As you set yourself personal goals and you reach them, you’ll feel more inspired to push yourself further and achieve greater things. It helps you grow as a person and strive through setbacks and fears.


TIPS ON BECOMING AND STAYING MOTIVATED Establish goals that will motivate you.

Give yourself breaks.

they motivate you and there is value

burning yourself out, and a much-

When you set goals, it’s important in achieving them. Set goals that

relate to the high priorities in your life.

Sometimes even the most determined people get overwhelmed. You may be needed break might be just what you need.

commitment, so to maximise the

Don’t be too hard on yourself.

in effort and have a “can do” attitude.

week, take it as a lesson. Try to

Goal achievement requires

likelihood of success, you need to put

Maintain passion about your goals. Being passionate about your goals

If you fail to meet your goals for the complete your next target before time, so that you can use the saved time to complete the pending work.

Passion about your goals will also

Eliminate your distractions.

tough and when you feel like giving up.

causing you to procrastinate. You

keeps you energised and inspired.

help you persevere when times get

Fight against fear. Refrain from worrying too much about failure. Think of your catastrophes

as an opportunity to learn and grow. Success often requires many failed attempts. Don’t dwell on failure;

continue working towards your goals.

Identify and avoid anything that is can’t become motivated if you’re careless with your time.

Track your progress.

If you want to stay motivated, track

your progress. If you see that you are on track or even excelling every time

you check your development, you will be motivated and pleased that you are getting there. If you see you’re

lacking on accomplishing your goals, it may be the kick start you need to help get you back on track.

Wellbeing | 137


THE POWER OF POSITIVITY

Happiness psychologists (‘Happiologists’) have conducted many studies on the benefits of happiness and have found far more than you might think: •

• Harnessing the power of happiness psychology can play a big part in enhancing your well-being, studies and career. Focussing on the bright side of life not only helps you perform at your best, it also generates brilliant ideas and philosophies that can make you flourish in your studies and career. Happiness can help you stand tall and outshine the rest.

• • • •

• •

138 | www.careersuk.org

Happiness can fuel innovation and creativity. This can help you to be more productive and achieve more in your career or studies. Happiness unleashes an energetic mentality. This leads you to be more confident and assertive in in your studies and personal life Happiness boosts motivation and satisfaction. It makes you more engaged with whatever you’re doing. Happiness is the key to progression. It widens the possibilities of what you are capable of achieving, which leads to more opportunities, and even promotion and career enhancement. Happiness enhances your leadership. This makes it easier to influence your peers. Happy people are also friendlier and are able to transform the atmosphere, making


those around them feel great too. It’s easy to find yourself constantly moaning and bringing yourself down, especially when social media makes it so easy to compare our lives with others’.

TRY OUR 5 ‘CANNONS OF HAPPINESS’ 1. Take life one day at a time – you will never reach the tomorrow you’re worrying about if you don’t take positive steps today to get there.

CHOOSE HAPPINESS; IT PAYS OFF. CELEBRATE ANY LITTLE WINS. STAY CALM IN THE MIDST OF ADVERSITY. CHEER YOURSELF UP AND CREATE POSITIVITY WITHIN YOURSELF.

2. Stay positive and see the possibilities – take a ‘half-glass-full’ approach. Avoid ‘blackand-white’ thinking and find the possibilities hidden in the grey areas. 3. Tell yourself you are too busy to be angry, distressed or worried – You have better things to be focusing your energy on. While it is normal to experience setbacks and negative feelings sometimes, dwelling on bad feelings won’t make the situation any better. 4. Avoid negative generalisations sometimes called gloom-tinted spectacles! Replace ‘awfuls’ with ‘awesomes’: ‘I’m looking forward to lunchtime’ instead of ‘This class sucks’ ‘I feel prepared and I can do this’ instead of ‘I’m going to fail this exam’ 5. Share your happiness: Share a smile Praise and motivate friends Be a champion of ‘random acts of kindness’ In addition to all these tips, it is important to remember that if you find yourself unable to look on the bright side or constantly stressed, there may be deeper issues you need to deal with. This could mean making positive changes in your life, such as finding a job you enjoy more or consulting an expert (such as your GP, counsellor, psychologist or career advisor). Everyone should be able to choose happiness, including you! In conclusion, your choices make you who you are. Wellbeing | 139


FOOD FOR PRODUCTIVITY

We all know that the food you eat is fuel for your body and brain, and that eating well will help your performance in all areas of life. The difficult part is making healthy choices on a day-to-day basis.

considering a nap at 3pm; and foods that are high in fat and difficult to digest, like fast food, will leave us groggy for the whole afternoon. Wholesome food may take more time and effort to shop for and prepare, but we often make up for the extra few minutes with improved productivity later.

TRY OUT THE FOLLOWING AND SEE IF YOU NOTICE A DIFFERENCE IN YOUR MEMORY AND PERFORMANCE: Salmon - Rich in omega-3 - try adding a little to your sandwiches. You can also take a fish oil supplement.

This often means we end up with an afternoon slump after gorging on unhealthy food for lunch, just because it’s easy.

Berries - Rich in antioxidants, and the darker the berry the better - try keeping a punnet on your desk to graze on, or making a smoothie out of frozen berries.

Instead, we should look for foods packed with nutrients and that release energy slowly. Foods which release it too fast (like a cheap sandwich or worse still, an energy drink) will leave us seriously

Green tea - Rich in antioxidants and a natural energy enhancer - try replacing one of your daily coffees with green tea for a week and see how the slower-release caffeine affects you.

140 | www.careersuk.org


Dark chocolate - A low-sugar treat - indulging your sweet tooth with a few squares of dark chocolate can help keep sugar cravings at bay and be a great motivational tool. Nuts - Full of healthy fats, protein, vitamin E, antioxidants and amino acids - try keeping a pot of almonds or walnuts within reach for easy grazing. Avocados - Contain natural fats that are great for circulation - more than just a delicious millennial trend, the improved circulation will increase your alertness. Bananas - Contain sugar and potassium they’re a filling snack with the sugar packaged in a healthy, digestible form. Eggs - Full of protein and B-vitamin choline, which are useful building blocks to stimulate your brain and muscles. Brown rice - full of vitamins and high in magnesium - this is also a slow-burn fuel hitting that middle zone between easy digestion but slow release. The other key ‘side dish’ to all of this is drinking lots of water. I know we’ve heard it over and over again, but it really is important when our body is 70% water! It keeps all our cells working well and helps flush through any waste and toxins. Keep a glass of water or a water bottle within your line of sight and it’ll be easier to remember. The most difficult part of reforming our lunch habits is making changes practical. Psychology Today says that our self-control is at its lowest when we are hungry, so it’s key to decide what we’re having for lunch beforehand. This can mean planning where you are ordering from or bringing a packed lunch with you. Grazing on fruit and nuts can also be a beneficial alternative to something from a vending machine. Keep a pot next to your water bottle and you’ll nibble on these instead - the key is making it easier to eat healthily. Getting a productivity boost from eating well is all about making realistic changes that work for you.

Wellbeing | 141


PROFESSIONAL INSIGHTS

142 | www.careersuk.org


THE UK’S TOP JOB BOARDS

Professional Insights | 143


TOP EMPLOYERS

144 | www.careersuk.org


Professional Insights | 145


TOP QUALIFICATIONS

TRANSPORT LOGISTICS AND SUPPLY CHAIN:

MARKETING MANAGEMENT AND CONSULTING:

IT:

SOCIAL SCIENCE

146 | www.careersuk.org


HR:

BANKING AND FINANCE:

ACCOUNTING:

Professional Insights | 147


LOOKING FOR

YOUR NEXT JOB? 195,000 jobs available!

REGISTER YOUR CV w w w. c a r e e r s u k . o r g / j o b s

In partnership with

148 | www.careersuk.org


PURCHASING & SUPPLY CHAIN

WHAT PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS ARE NEEDED TO WORK IN THE PURCHASING AND SUPPLY CHAIN INDUSTRY?

Vacancies in the Purchasing and Supply Chain industry are open to all, but it’s common to hold a degree, an HND (Higher National Degree), or a foundation degree in a relevant subject such as: Supply Chain Management Business Management Computing Information Systems Transport, Distribution or Logistics There are postgraduate degrees available in transport planning, supply chain management and logistics. Qualifications through the Chartered Institute of Procurement and Supply (CIPS) or the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT UK) might be necessary to advance your career. CIPS run qualification and training programmes equipping new students with the knowledge and skills needed to practice proficiently, successfully and confidently.

SALARY Starting salaries for supply chain managers are between £20,000 and £25,000. With increased responsibility and managerial duties, salaries can increase to between £25,000 and £45,000. Larger companies may pay more and advancing will depend on experience. Middle to senior managers can earn up to £60,000. Top executives and directors, at the most senior level, can earn more than £100,000 annually.

CAREER PROSPECTS As a supply chain manager, you can enter the industry in a variety of career pathways. There are entry opportunities at age 16-18, as well as a wide range of graduate trainee roles. From here, you can progress across all sectors to senior management and to board level. The sector is characterised by career pathways that lead directly to senior management roles for those who have the right skills and determination.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Level 2: GCSEs (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, Apprenticeship Level 5-6: Degree Apprenticeship, University Degree, Foundation Degree, HND, Intermediate Professional Qualifications Level 7: Masters Degree, Institute Membership - CIPS, CILT.

BECOME A PURCHASING & SUPPLY CHAIN PROFESSIONAL A purchasing and supply manager, a business service buyer, or procurement professional purchase goods and services and take a strategic approach to business goals. Whatever the organisation needs – whether it’s raw materials for manufacture, obtaining marketing services or getting more profitable agreements in place, it is their responsibility to get the best goods, at the best price, while maintaining good relationships with suppliers in a sustainable and ethical way.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A PURCHASING & SUPPLY CHAIN PROFESSIONAL Your tasks will vary depending on which sector you work in, but typically include: • Deciding what goods, services and equipment is needed • Monitoring and forecasting stock levels • Researching and identifying new products and suppliers • Assessing tenders from potential suppliers • Negotiating prices and agreeing contracts • Making sure that suppliers deliver on time • Processing payments and invoices • Keeping up with market trends • Managing and motivating a team of supply chain staff • Improving the overall supply chain performance and look for any possible innovations to the process • Implementing new technologies and staying alert to new trends in the sector.

Professional Insights | 149


HUMAN RESOURCES

WHAT PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS ARE NEEDED TO WORK IN THE HUMAN RESOURCES INDUSTRY?

The Human Resources Industry is open to all graduates and those with a HND, the following subjects may be particularly relevant: • Business with Languages • Business or Management • Human Resources Management • Psychology • Social Administration

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, Apprenticeship Level 5-6: University Degree, Degree Apprenticeship, HND, Intermediate Professional Qualification Level 7: Masters Degree, Institute Membership - CIPD, CIPP.

BECOME A HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER Human Resources (HR) officers are responsible for hiring, developing and looking after employees. This involves functions such as training and monitoring performance. HR Officers develop, advise and implement policies relating to the effective use of staff in an organisation. The aim of their role is to ensure the organisation they work for employs the right balance of staff in terms of skill and experience, and that training and development opportunities are available to colleagues to enhance their performance and achieve the company’s business aims. HR officers are involved in a range of activities whatever the size or type of business. These cover areas such as: • Conditions of Employment • Equality and Diversity • Negotiation with External Work-Related Agencies • Pay • Recruitment • Working Practices

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER HR Officers add value to the organisation they support and perform a broad range of duties. The exact nature of the work varies according to the organisation, but their day-to-day responsibilities include: • • • • • • • • • •

Recruiting, training and developing staff Looking after the health, safety and welfare of all employees Organising staff training sessions and activities Monitoring staff performance and attendance Negotiating salaries, contracts and working hours with staff and representatives Assisting line managers to understand and implement policies and procedures Undertaking regular salary reviews Administering payroll and maintaining employee records Preparing staff handbooks 150 | www.careersuk.org Analysing training needs in conjunction with departmental managers.

SALARY HR officers, or those working toward CIPD Level 5 Intermediate or above, earn in the region of £22,000-£25,000. There are opportunities for progression & salary increases as you gain experience, particularly if you have a CIPD qualification. HR officers with experience can expect to earn above £25,000.

CAREER PROSPECTS Individuals are likely to begin their career in human resources by working in a general HR role. Many enjoy the breadth of this work and choose to remain in this environment or move into a more senior position with responsibility for several HR officers. In the longer term, HR managers may move into more senior roles within an organisation and be promoted to a HR director role, possibly as far as board level. Promotion depends on ability and career prospects are enhanced by completing the highest level of CIPD qualifications.


ENGINEERING

WHAT PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS ARE NEEDED TO WORK IN THE ENGINEERING INDUSTRY?

To get into engineering you’ll usually be required to have a degree. Relevant subjects include: Aeronautical engineering Agricultural engineering Computer-aided engineering Engineering science Manufacturing engineering Mechanical engineering Nuclear engineering

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3 - 4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, Apprenticeship Level 5-6: Degree Apprenticeship, University Degree, HND, BSc (Bachelor of Science Engineering), Intermediate Professional Qualifications Level 7: Master Degree.

SALARY Starting salaries for mechanical engineers, and for those on graduate training schemes, are in the range of £20,000 to £28,000. With experience this can increase to between £25,000 and £35,000. At a mid-level for lead or principle engineers, salaries are around £35-£50,000. Senior positions, such as chief engineer, can earn £45,000 to £60,000+.

BECOME A MECHANICAL ENGINEER Mechanical engineers create solutions and solve problems, playing a central role in the design and implementation of moving parts in a range of industries. They provide efficient solutions to the development of processes and products, ranging from small component designs to extremely large plants, machinery or vehicles. Mechanical engineers need to be technically minded, able to demonstrate numerical and scientific ability and have problem-solving skills.

CAREER PROSPECTS Most careers in engineering lead to a senior position with responsibility for other staff or larger projects and budgets. If you’re required to lead teams or manage projects, developing people management skills will be helpful. Gaining chartered status (CEng) is a significant help in career progression - this is proof that you’ve met a standard of experience and knowledge in the engineering profession. Once you have developed your technical skills, you can move into senior engineering posts, such as engineering director.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A MECHANICAL ENGINEER The day-to-day responsibilities of a mechanical engineer they perform are the following: • • • • • • • • • •

Analyse problems to see how mechanical and thermal devices might

help solve the problem Design or redesign mechanical and thermal devices using analysis and computer-aided design Develop and test prototypes of devices they design Analyse the test results and change the design as needed Oversee the manufacturing process for the device Monitor and commission plant and systems Work with other professionals, within and outside the engineering sector Manage projects using engineering principles and techniques Research and develop products Make sure a product can be made reliably and will perform consistently in specified operating environments. Professional Insights | 151


ARCHITECTURE

WHAT PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS ARE NEEDED TO WORK IN THE HUMANITIES AND ART INDUSTRY?

There’s a wide range of positions in the Humanities and Art industry. This creative industry provides you with an adaptable set of skills that can give you entry to a vast range of occupations leading in many career directions. It offers employment opportunities for Humanities and Art graduates who can particularly utilise their creative problem-solving abilities and expertise in connecting different ideas and concepts.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS

Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-level, BTEC, Diploma, Apprenticeship Level 5-6: Degree Apprenticeship, University Degree, HND Level 7: Masters Degree.

BECOME AN ARCHITECT Architecture offers an inspiring and innovative career for those with the right technical and creative aptitude. An architect designs new buildings, extensions or alterations to existing structures, and advises on the restoration and conservation of old properties. Architecture offers an inspiring and innovative career for those with the right technical and creative aptitude. Architects work closely with clients and users, making sure that projected designs match requirements and are functional, safe and economical. Architects control a project from start to finish and work with several construction professionals, including surveyors and engineers. In addition to the professional experience required, any pre-entry work experience in an architectural, design or construction environment is desirable and highly regarded by recruiters. Architects should regularly practice drawing to enhance skills. Model-making skills are also an advantage. It’s important to take an interest in publications or TV programmes about buildings, and to keep up to date with the current trends in architecture and design.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN ARCHITECT • • • • • • • • • • •

Discussing ideas, objectives, requirements and the budget of a project Consulting with other professionals about design Assessing the needs of a building and its users, advising the client on the practicality of their project Keeping with financial budgets and deadlines Producing detailed workings, drawings and specifications Specifying the nature and quality of materials required Preparing presentations Negotiating with contractors and other professionals Carrying out regular site visits to check on progress and ensure that the project is running on time and to budget Resolving problems and issues that arise during construction Ensuring that the environmental impact of a project is managed.

152 | www.careersuk.org

SALARY The starting salary for an architect ranges from £1822,000. Individuals with experience can expect a salary rising to £25,000. A fully qualified architect, depending on experience, could earn between £32-45,000. At senior associate, partner or director level, an architect can expect to earn from £45,000 to £70,000.

CAREER PROSPECTS Gaining chartered membership of RIBA (Royal Institute of British Architect Studio) and undertaking agreed levels of CPD (Continuing Professional Development) are key parts of career development and will enable your progression into more senior posts. Architects who have demonstrated distinguished achievement in architecture with more than 5 years of chartered membership, may be awarded Fellow of RIBA status.


MEDICINE

YOU CAN MAKE A REAL POSITIVE DIFFERENCE TO PEOPLE’S LIVES BY PURSUING A CAREER IN THE HEALTH INDUSTRY.

In the Health industry, there are several specialities to choose to work in. Some of the common areas include: Anaesthetics Obstetrics and Gynaecology Paediatrics Psychiatry Trauma and Orthopaedics

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS

Medical degrees are available at undergraduate level (taking five years to complete) and graduate level, which typically takes four years. Entry into medicine is very competitive and your motivation and commitment are rigorously assessed. You may be required to complete the UK Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT) or Biomedical Admissions Test (BMAT). The BMAT has two test dates, which fall in September and October. Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, Apprenticeship Level 5-6: University Degree, Degree Apprenticeships, HND Level 7: Masters Degree

SALARY Junior doctors in Foundation Year 1 (F1) earn a basic starting salary of £26,614. In Foundation Year 2 (F2) this rises to £30,805. A hospital doctor in specialist training starts on a basic salary of £36,461 and can go up to £46,208. Once training is finished, speciality doctors can earn from £35-£70,000. Consultants earn between £76,761-£103,490 depending on experience.

CAREER PROSPECTS Most hospital doctors aspire to become a consultant. As a consultant, you’ll be responsible for your own work and for supervising the work and training of all doctors on your team. You can apply for consultancy roles six months before you achieve your Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) at the end of your specialist training. You may need to wait longer than this though as extra experience and research is often needed for competitive posts.

BECOME A HOSPITAL DOCTOR Hospital doctors work in many areas. They work at different levels from trainees to specialists to consultants. Being a hospital doctor is a rewarding but demanding role that will suit you if you enjoy caring for others, have good stamina and can work under pressure. To become a hospital doctor, you must complete: A degree in medicine, recognised by the General Medical Council (GMC) A two-year foundation programme of general training Specialist training in your chosen area of medicine

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A HOSPITAL DOCTOR Hospital doctors examine, diagnose and treat patients who’ve been referred to hospital by GPs and other health professionals. They apply their medical knowledge and skills to the diagnosis, prevention and management of disease. As well as treating patients, hospital doctors refer them to a range of other healthcare professionals. The day-to-day duties of a Hospital Doctor consist of the following: • • • • • • • • •

Monitoring and providing general care to patients on hospital wards and in outpatients clinics Admitting patients requiring special care, followed by investigations and treatment Examining and talking to patients to diagnose their medical condition Carrying out specific procedures, for example, performing operations and specialist investigations Making notes and preparing paperwork, both as a legal record of treatment and for the benefit of other healthcare professionals Communicating with other medical and non-medical staff in the workplace to ensure quality treatment Promoting health education Undertaking managerial responsibilities, such as planning the workload Carrying out auditing and research.

Professional Insights | 153


INFORMATION & TECH

The IT industry covers many information technology-oriented organisations. It is currently an important industry for the creation of technology that will shape humanities future. It has become of the most robust industries in the world. IT has an increased productivity and is a key driver of global economic growth. A technology career provides you with long-term job security in today’s world. Experience and education in the information technology field, as well as keeping current on changes in the industry, makes you sought-after by employers.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS

You can get into the IT industry without a degree: through an Apprenticeship Programme, and work your way up through Technician, Engineer and Manager levels. To get onto an Apprenticeship Programme you will need to have 5 GCSEs (A-C), including Maths and Science.

Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, Apprenticeship Level 5-6: University Degree, Degree Apprenticeship, HND Level 7: Masters Degree, Institute Membership: Institute of Analysts and Programmers, Microsoft Certificate.

BECOME A SOFTWARE ENGINEER Software engineer jobs combine highly complex, technical work with computer science and mathematics. Software Engineers work in a constantly evolving environment, due to technological advances and the strategic direction of organisations. They create, maintain, audit and improve systems to meet needs, often as advised by a systems analyst or architect, testing both hard and software systems to diagnose and resolve system faults. The role also covers writing diagnostic programs and designing and writing code for operating systems and software to ensure efficiency.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A SOFTWARE ENGINEER Software Engineers are responsible for designing, developing and maintaining software systems including operating systems, business applications, mobile and web applications, games, connected hardware devices, networking systems and more. The day-to-day duties of a Software Engineer are of the following: • • • • • • • •

Analysing user requirements Researching, designing and writing new software programs Evaluating the software and systems that make computers and hardware work Developing existing programs by analysing and identifying areas for modification Creating technical specifications Maintaining systems by monitoring and correcting software defects Consulting clients and colleagues concerning the maintenance and performance of software systems with a view to writing or modifying current operating systems Investigating new technologies

154 | www.careersuk.org

SALARY Typical graduate software engineer salaries start from £18,000 a year. The average annual salary for a software engineer is between £25,000 and £50,000. At senior or management level, software engineers can earn £45,000 to £70,000 or more per annum. The exact salary you’ll receive is dependent upon the company, location and nature of your employer’s business.

CAREER PROSPECTS There are different levels of software engineering and promotion is usually dependent upon both your ability and experience. An entry-level post typically involves working under supervision, formulating the scope of, and objectives, for systems and designing code. Progression is mainly into management via team leadership roles, or to consultant via technical specialisation. Transfer between organisations for advancement is often possible.


LAW

Throughout history, societies have established systems of law to govern people. The Law industry directs what we can and cannot do. Laws play a central role in social, political and economic life and provides inspiring, intellectual challenges. Law firms have many employees besides attorneys. They employ legal secretaries, paralegals, interns, junior associates and partners, as well as employees responsible for assembling legal documents and transporting files to courthouses and clients. Skills essential for law firm employees are as varied as their jobs. However, some basic qualifications are necessary to work in a law firm, regardless of the firm’s size.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS

SALARY Salaries for those undertaking pupillage (final stage of qualification for the Bar) must be no less than £12,000 per year, set by the Bar Standards Board (BSB). However, some chambers offer substantially more than this. Qualified barristers with five years’ experience can earn anything from around £50,000 to £200,000. For those with over ten years’ experience, earnings can range from £65,000 to £1,000,000.

CAREER PROSPECTS Challenges to career development for self-employed barristers may include long hours required to cover cases and hefty workloads. Because of this, career development is very much dependent on your cases, your approach to work and your ability to successfully build up a reputation. Getting involved with professional bodies such as the Young Barristers’ Committee (YBC), from an early stage can help to raise your profile and develop your professional skills.

Law firms have many employees besides attorneys. They employ legal secretaries, paralegals, interns, junior associates and partners, as well as employees responsible for maintaining the firm’s records, assembling legal documents and transporting files to courthouses and clients. Skills essential for law firm employees are as varied as their jobs. However, some basic qualifications are necessary to work in a law firm, regardless of the firm’s size, location or practice areas. Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma Level 5-6: University Degree, Degree Apprenticeship, HND Level 7: Masters Degree, Institute Membership: LLM (Master of Law), LPC (Legal Practice Course).

BECOME A SOLICITOR

This demanding, highly rewarding field requires an analytic mind, a logical approach and excellent attention to detail to succeed. Barristers are specialists in advocacy and representing individuals or organisations in court. They are generally hired by solicitors to represent a case in court and only become involved once advocacy before a court is needed. Barristers specialise in different areas of the law, such as commercial law, chancery law and environmental law.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A SOLICITOR Many barristers work on a self-employed basis, while others work in government departments or agencies such as the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and the Government Legal Profession. • • • • • • • • • • • •

Following instructions from clients and their solicitors Understanding and interpreting the law Managing legal briefs (cases) Undertaking legal research into relevant points of law Writing opinions and advising solicitors and other professionals Preparing cases for court, including holding client conferences and preparing legal arguments Representing clients in court Presenting arguments in court Examining and cross-examining witnesses Drafting legal documents Negotiating settlements Carrying out auditing and research.

Professional Insights | 155


MANAGEMENT

The Management industry is a great profession for individuals good at building strong connections. This industry provides you with the opportunity to implement the goals of a business and help build other individuals strengths and talents. An important institute for qualifications is the CMI (Chartered Management Institute). CMI qualifications provide a progressive framework that enables you to develop and broaden your management skills.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS

CMI offers qualifications from Level 2 [ideal for aspiring managers], to Level 8 [suited to C-level senior managers]. •

• • •

Levels 2-3: Designed for aspiring, supervisory or first line managers, Levels 2 and 3 offer a broad range of knowledge ranging from team leading to project and resource management. Levels 4-5: For mid managers, Levels 4 and 5 are more appropriate as they focus on developing core management skills such as managing resources, recruitment and information management. Levels 6-7: Levels 6 and 7 are developed for Directors and Senior Managers who have the responsibility to translate organisational strategy into effective performance. Level 8: CMI is the only organisation that offers Level 8 which is suited to C-level senior managers.

More than 80% of managers say that a CMI Qualification is a key part of becoming a professional manager, and that transferring their new skills also improves the performance of the team.

BECOME A MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT

Management consultants help organisations to solve issues, create value,

maximise growth and improve business performance. They use their business skills to provide objective advice and expertise and help an organisation to develop any specialist skills that it may be lacking. The role of a Management Consultant is to identify options for the organisation and suggest recommendations for change, as well as advising on additional resources to implement solutions.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT Management consultants help businesses grow and improve their performance. Consultancy firms offer services across all areas of business – from HR and marketing, to IT and finance. The broad span of consulting work makes it an attractive career, offering a variety of projects, challenges and opportunities for

personal development. The day-to-day responsibilities of a Management Consultant are the following: • • • • • • • • • • •

Carrying out research and data collection to understand the organisation Conduct analysis Interview the client’s employees, management team and other stakeholders. Run focus groups and facilitate workshops Prepare business proposals and presentations Identify issues and form hypotheses and solutions Present findings and recommendations to clients Implement recommendations or solutions and ensure the client receives the necessary assistance to carry it out Manage projects and programmes Lead and manage a team Liaise with clients to keep them informed of progress and to make relevant decisions.

156 | www.careersuk.org

SALARY Starting salaries for junior consultants can be in the region of £25,000 to £30,000 with large firms. However, smaller consultancies may offer lower levels of pay and salaries do vary depending on the location, type and size of consultancy. With around three to five years’ experience, it’s possible for management consultants to earn up to £50,000. At senior level, with significant experience, it’s possible to above £80,000.

CAREER PROSPECTS As a new graduate you’ll usually begin your career in an analyst role. Once you’ve gained some experience, you’ll move on to the full consultancy role. From here you’ll typically progress to senior consultant or manager level, and this is usually achieved within about three years. Once you reach senior consultant or manager level, you can go on to become a partner or director of a firm where you’ll have responsibility for generating new business, developing client relationships and overseeing the strategic growth of the firm.


MARKETING

Elements of marketing exist in most businesses and across all sectors. Employees help clients to connect with their audiences, promoting brands, products and sending messages using a range of techniques. The Marketing industry covers fields such as: Management, Analytics, Product Design, Social Media Management, Advertising and many more. The Chartered Institute of Marketing (CIM) supports, presents and develops marketers, teams, leaders and the profession. Whether you’re starting out or you’ve worked in the industry for over twenty years, the Chartered Institute of Marketing helps support and inspire you at every stage of your marketing career.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Achieving Chartered Marketer Status recognises your experience, knowledge and commitment to your career and the Marketing profession. It is the highest certificate you can be awarded. Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, Foundation Degree Level 5-6: University Degree, Degree Apprenticeship, HND Level 7: Master’s Degree

SALARY Marketing assistants start on salaries of around £18,000 to £22,000. As a marketing executive, you can expect to earn in the region of £20,000 to £30,000. Senior marketing executives (with around five years’ experience) can earn between £30,000 and £45,000, with marketing managers earning up to £60,000. Marketing directors can earn from £60,000 to more than £80,000.

BECOME A MARKETING EXECUTIVE

Marketing Executives contribute and develop integrated marketing campaigns to promote a product, service or idea. The exact nature of your role will vary depending on the size of the organisation and sector and whether the focus is on selling a product or service, or on raising awareness of an issue that affects the public. Marketing executives may also be known as marketing officers or coordinators.

It’s a varied role that includes: Planning Advertising Public relations Event organisation Product development Distribution Sponsorship Research

CAREER PROSPECTS Taking relevant professional qualifications can help your career prospects and is becoming essential for senior marketing roles. After 3 to 10 years you can expect a promotion to marketing manager, with a move to marketing director after 10 to 15 years. Gaining chartered status with the CIM can help provide evidence of your skills and experience. To increase your experience, you could move between in-house departments or work in a marketing agency or consultancy for several different clients. There are also opportunities to become a freelance marketing consultant.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A MARKETING EXECUTIVE Create awareness of and develop the brand your marketing • • • • • • • • • • •

Communicate with target audiences and build and develop customer relationships Help with marketing plans. Advertising, direct marketing and campaigns Support the marketing manager in delivering agreed activities Work closely with in-house or external creative agencies to design marketing materials such as brochures and adverts Write and proofread marketing copy for both online and print campaigns Produce creative content Organise and attend events such as conferences, seminars, receptions and exhibitions Liaise with designers and printers and organise photo shoots Maintain and update customer databases Conduct market research Develop relationships with key stakeholders.

Professional Insights | 157


ACCOUNTING

Accounting is a fulfilling industry- whether you choose to work in the private or public sector. The skills of analysis, interpretation and adaptability are required to communicate accurate financial information, put forward realistic targets and drive business growth. A variety of finance qualifications are available to those interested in accounting careers.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS • • • •

AAT (Association of Accounting Technicians) accounting courses - made up of three qualifications across three levels, they combine industry knowledge and practical work skills. ACCA (Association of Chartered Certified Accountants) qualifications - comprise of two levels; Fundamentals and Professionals. Modules cover a variety of topics from corporate and business law to audit and assurance. ICAEW (Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales) chartered accountant status - also referred to as the ACA, this qualification consists of three to five years of practical work experience and the completion of 13 modules. CIMA (Chartered Institute of Management Accountants) business finance award oversees the widely-recognised CGMA (Chartered Global Management Accountant), which requires you to have already gained the postgraduate-level Certificate in Business Accounting.

Many accountancy firms will accept qualifications from any board, but if you have a definite career path in mind it’s worth looking into the preferred qualifications of that specialism. Other qualifications:

Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, AAT Level 5-6: Degree Apprenticeship, University Degree, HND, AAT Level 3 Level 7: Masters Degree, Institute Membership - AAT, ACCA, ICAEW, CIMA.

BECOME A CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT

A Chartered Accountant gives advice, audits accounts and provides reliable information about financial records. This sometimes involves: financial reporting, taxation, auditing, forensic accounting, corporate finance, business recovery and insolvency, or accounting systems and processes. You’ll have the choice of many different settings to work in, including public practice firms and industry and commerce, as well as in the not-for-profit and public sectors. Working strategically, your aim will be to maximise profitability on behalf of your client or employer.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT • • • • • • • • • • •

Managing financial systems and budgets Undertaking financial audits (an independent check of the financial position of an organisation) Providing financial advice Liaising with clients, businesses or individuals and providing financial information Reviewing the company’s systems and analyse risk Performing tests to check financial information and systems Advising clients on tax planning Detect and prevent fraud Prepare financial statements Advise on tax and treasury issues Negotiate terms with suppliers.

158 | www.careersuk.org

SALARY Starting salaries for accountants vary depending on the location, sector, size and type of firm. Graduates entering the career can expect to earn salaries of up to £25,000. The average earning potential (salary + bonus) of chartered accountants with two to four post-qualification years of experience is around £56,000. After 5 or more years, the average annual salary for a chartered accountant in business rises to £90,200, with an average yearly bonus of £20,600.

CAREER PROSPECTS Progression is often structured and opportunities for development and promotion are plentiful. You may become a manager two years after qualification and a senior manager three years after that. Progress to partnership is competitive but is achievable between eight and 15 years after qualification. In small firms, progression may be more rapid. It’s possible to attain the position of finance director of a major company within 10 to 15 years of qualification.


FINANCE

The financial industry covers many types of businesses involved in managing money and plays a vital role in the world’s economy. The industry is vast and includes companies engaged in activities such as investing, lending, insuring, securities trading and issuance, asset management, advising, accounting, foreign exchange, and more. Many people study while working - many part-time and distance learning options are available in accounting, banking, investment management, insurance and risk management, and financial management and tax. For this industry, a Bachelors degree in finance or business is usually required.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS Professional qualifications in finance - for example, CFA, ACT, CFP, CII - can open employment opportunities, while guiding you down a clearly mapped-out career path.

SALARY Typical starting salaries for entrylevel graduates range from £15,000 to £28,000. After five to eight years, salaries rise above £30,000. Salaries vary significantly according to the nature and size of the company and the location.

CAREER PROSPECTS Within the investment banking sector new graduates tend to spend their first three years as analysts, after which the bank considers you for promotion to associate level. General career development routes include: •

Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma, Apprenticeship Level 5-6: University Degree, Degree Apprenticeship, HND Level 7: Master’s Degree

BECOME AN INVESTMENT ANALYST An investment analyst provides research and information to help traders, fund managers and stock brokers make decisions about investments. The information provided ensures investment portfolios are well managed and that potential investment opportunities are highlighted. Some analysts work for investment management companies, providing information to inhouse fund managers: others work for stockbrokers and investment banks, where research is needed by portfolio managers or by clients who make their own investment decisions. Some Investment Analysts are likely to research investments globally. Principle types of investors include: Banks and large corporations Charitable organisations Life insurance companies Pension funds Wealthy individuals

Continuing your career as an investment analyst with the aim of becoming a lead analyst in a sector, perhaps starting with some of the smaller listed companies Progressing into management, supervising others and taking on responsibility for an investment area or type of fund Becoming a manager in charge of investment in a specific organisation, e.g. An insurance company or inhouse pension fund Moving into investor relations.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF AN INVESTMENT ANALYST Investment Analysts become involved in a broad range of activities and disciplines, which vary according to the nature of the employer. They should have a developed understanding of financial information, such as financial statements, company accounts and sector data. A day in the life of a Investment Analyst consists of the following: • Analysing financial information relating to specific companies, e.g. company results, profit and loss, balance sheet and cash flow statements to determine how an organisation is positioned to deliver for investors. • Keeping up to date with market developments, new investment products and other areas that can affect the market • Drafting and writing research reports for fund manager or client use. • Meeting with and providing information to fund managers- summary of research, investment ideas and key events • Making recommendations for fund managers. • Ensuring that all compliance regulations are met.

Professional Insights | 159


SCIENCE

The Science industry makes a huge difference to the world by solving the problems of today and developing the technology of tomorrow. Working in this industry, you develop skills such as time management, patience , teamwork and communication. Although the Science industry is demanding, individuals are surrounded by others who are open-minded and want to make a difference.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS MSc - Master of Science A Master of Science degree (MSc) is a degree awarded at universities around the world for completion of graduate-level study in a science- or technology-related field. Enrolling in an MSc degree programme translates to making a significant investment in one’s professional career. In addition to the enhanced career prospects that can be gained by taking a Master of Science, valuable personal skills are developed. Biological and Life Sciences, Business, Engineering and Technology, and the Natural Sciences are the key academic fields of study that offer Master of Science degree programmes. Master of Science candidates must normally do independent research and present a thesis as a requirement for graduation. Other Qualifications: Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma Level 5-6: Degree Apprenticeship, University Degree, HND Level 7: Masters Degree - MSc, MEng, MChem

BECOME A BIOMEDICAL SCIENTIST

A Biomedical Scientist carries out a range of laboratory and scientific tests on tissue

samples and fluids to help clinicians diagnose and treat diseases and evaluate the effectiveness of treatments. The Biomedical Scientist profession requires strong analytic skills and practical laboratory experience. Biomedical scientists usually specialise in 1 of 4 areas:

• Infection sciences • Blood sciences • Cellular sciences or genetics • Molecular pathology For example, some Infection Sciences include Medical Microbiology - identification of microorganisms causing disease and their antibiotic treatment and Virology - identification of viruses, associated diseases and monitoring the effectiveness of vaccines.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A BIOMEDICAL SCIENTIST • • • • • • • • •

Perform routine and specialist analytic test on a range of biological samples Give test results to medical staff, who use the information to diagnose and treat the patient’s illness Process patient samples Prioritise workload and perform urgent analytic testing when required Maintain and run specialist lab equipment Maintain and order stocks of materials Answer telephone enquiries about test results and other general lab issues Support, mentor and supervise trainee biomedical scientists and other staff Keep professional knowledge up to date.

160 | www.careersuk.org

SALARY Starting salaries range from £22,000 to £28,000. With experience or specialist knowledge, a salary of £26,000 to £35,000 can be earned. The starting salary for a senior biomedical scientist salary ranges £31,000 to £48,000. Salaries for consultant biomedical scientists, who have reached the top of their profession, are higher.

CAREER PROSPECTS Opportunities for career development are generally good. Upon qualification, many biomedical scientists choose to specialise in an area of biomedical science and progress to senior and specialist roles. With further experience and qualifications, for example an MSc or PhD, it’s possible to reach the top of the profession by becoming a consultant biomedical scientist. Senior roles often involve managing a team or department within a laboratory or managing an area of service provision such as health and safety, quality management or service delivery. You may also become involved in advanced specialist scientific work, clinical research or training and education.


SOCIAL SCIENCES

The Social Science industry covers fields such as sociology, psychology, criminology, politics and many more. A career in the Social Science industry ensures you have plenty of learning opportunities and develops transferable skills such as communication, organisation, networking and team building.

PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATIONS British Psychological Society (BPS) The British Psychological Society is a representative body for psychologists and psychology and is responsible for the promotion of excellence and ethical practice in the social science industry. The BPS support and enhance the development and application of psychology for the greater public good, setting high standards for research, education and knowledge. Level 2: GCSE (5 C-A*) Level 3-4: A-Level, BTEC, Diploma Level 5-6: University Degree, Degree Apprenticeship, HND Level 7: Masters Degree, Institute Membership:

SALARY Trainee clinical psychologists start at £26,000. After qualification, salaries progress up to £31,000. More experienced clinical psychologists can earn between £48,000 and £55,000. Consultant clinical psychologist roles typically range from £56,000 to £79,000. Heads of psychology services can earn above £80,000.

BECOME A CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST

A clinical psychologist is a mental health professional with highly specialized training in the diagnosis and psychological treatment of mental, behavioural and emotional illnesses. The aim of a clinical psychologist is to reduce the distress and improve the psychological wellbeing of clients, using physical methods and research. They work in partnership with clients to diagnose, assess and manage their condition. The patients may have a variety of mental or physical health issues, such as: Anxiety Depression Mental illness Adjustment to physical illness Neurological disorders Addictive behaviours

CAREER PROSPECTS You may choose to specialise in an area of clinical psychology such as: • • • •

Clinical health psychology Forensic clinical psychology Oncology and palliative care Psychosis and complex mental health.

You’ll usually need a minimum of six years’ experience to be eligible to apply for consultant-level positions.

With experience, you may choose to move into clinical academic research and teaching. There are also opportunities to train as a high intensity therapist, providing cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to patients with complex issues related to anxiety and depression.

You must be registered with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) to work as a clinical psychologist. This involves completing three years of postgraduate training leading to a Doctorate in clinical psychology, or equivalent, approved by the HCPC.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST • • • • • • • •

Assessing client’s needs, abilities or behaviour using various methods, including psychometric tests, interviews and direct observation Monitoring appropriate treatment programmes, including therapy and counselling Working as part of a multidisciplinary team alongside doctors, nurses, social workers, health visitors, psychiatrists, occupational therapists and education professionals Offering therapy and treatment for issues relating to a range of mental health conditions Developing and evaluating service provision for clients Providing consultation to other professionals: encouraging a psychological approach in their work Counselling and supporting carers Carrying out applied research.

Professional Insights | 161


GET A HEAD START

162 | www.careersuk.org


IN THIS SECTION TOP TOP TOP TOP TOP TOP

TIPS FO R G ETTI NG I NTO A L A W FIRM..................................... TIP S FOR GETTING INTO ACCO UN T I N G F I RMS........................ TIP S FOR GETTING INTO INVEST MEN T B A N KI N G F I RMS.......... TIPS FO R G ETTI NG I NTO M EDI C AL SCHOOL............................ TIPS TO G ET O NTO A G R A DUA TE SCHEME............................. 300+ G RA DU A TE SCHEM ES ...................................................

Get a Head Start | 163


TOP TIPS FOR GETTING INTO A LAW FIRM

Law firms are by far one of the trickiest places to get a job. There is a very lengthy interview process where you will most likely be interviewed by a panel of the law firm’s partners and you will also have to take many tests. Law firm’s will only want the best of the best and you have to make sure that you are one of them. If you’re having trouble getting interviews with law firms, carry on reading to find out some tips that could help you.

164 | www.careersuk.org

1) Apply for Everything Ever heard of the phrase ‘don’t put all your eggs in one basket’? Well this is exactly the time where you definitely should not be doing that. Don’t restrict yourself when applying for jobs as the only person you are doing damage to is yourself. Unfortunately, it is hard getting a job no matter what field of work you are in so you should be applying for everything that you are qualified for. The more opportunities you apply for, the more likely you are to get a job.

2) Be Flexible with Travelling Many law firms are going to be in big cities where there is a lot of hustle and bustle. If you live outside of a city, you’re going to have to be willing to travel. Good opportunities don’t come to everyone all the time so don’t let distance get in your way of finding a job; especially if it is with a top law firm. If travelling isn’t good for you, you may even have to look into relocating.


3) Stay Motivated and be Enthusiastic one-word answers doesn’t make you look good Losing willpower is part and parcel of job searching when no one seems to be responding to your applications. Unfortunately, many people struggle to stay motivated when this occurs and decide that giving up is the easier route. But you can’t let those 4-5 years of studying for that law degree go to waste. You have to keep trying until you do get a job because from then on it only gets easier. Getting the experience is the hardest part of job searching but once you have it, finding new jobs will become a whole lot easier.

4) Network If you haven’t already, start networking. It’s absolutely crucial that you make contacts with people that are in the field of law as it will help your job search. Knowing the right people means that you can be referred to other companies by contacts that know when they are hiring. Having someone put a good word in for you will put you one step ahead of all the other candidates. Make an account on LinkedIn and start talking to other professionals.

and can ruin your chances of getting the job.

7) Check Your CV for Errors Many law firms will throw away your CV and not even entertain the idea of interviewing you if you have typos and errors in it. Top law firms are going to have hundreds of CV’s sent to them and the first thing that interviewers are going to check is if you are literate. One misplaced comma could result in you losing your chance at getting an interview so check your CV several times both slowly and carefully before you send it. It would also be a good idea to get other people to check it as well, just in case they catch things that you miss.

5) Talk to Career Advisors About Interviews Lots of people think that they do fantastically well when they have been interviewed and that’s why it can come as a big shock when that rejection email gets sent. If you are constantly being rejected after interviews, something is wrong. Talk to a career advisor and find out what it is that you need to improve on and how to get better at it. It will take some time to adjust the way you answer questions during interviews but it will get easier.

6) Act and Look Professional This might seem like an obvious point but you would be surprised at how many people go to interviews looking scruffy and behaving badly. Law firms are a prestigious place to work at and you will need to not only act the part but look the part too. Research what business wear is and put together an outfit for interviews that best matches a formal look. Remember to be polite and courteous to the interviewer and answer their questions to the best of your ability. Giving Get a Head Start | 165


TOP TIPS TO GET INTO ACCOUNTING FIRMS

If you want to work for an accounting firm, you must have strong numerical skills, an analytical mind and be able to manage finances. Some of the top accounting firms in the UK, for example KPMG hires around 1,000 people in the UK and receives around 20,000 applications. Deloitte receives around 30,000 applications for 2,000 entry level positions. EY receives 12,000 applications for 800 UK graduate positions. If you want to pursue a career in a top accounting firm, then follow our tips to help kick-start your career:

166 | www.careersuk.org

1) Be organised To thrive in your career with an accounting firm, you must have good organisation skills and be able to manage a load of responsibility. You could have a system in place to keep track of your responsibilities - such as the transactions you handle, any important dates and deadlines you need to meet to ensure that you fulfil all of your duties to the best of your ability.

2) Time management A system for managing your workload is only effective if you know how to manage your time. The ability to work within deadlines and manage your to-do list will take you far. Not only will it impress your boss, co-workers and clients, it will also help you to maintain a healthy work/life balance and keep your day-to-day productive.

3) Show adaptability The accounting industry is highly dynamic, so accountants who can adapt quickly and easily are at a distinct advantage. Adaptable


individuals are more likely to learn and grow in their careers because they see each new challenge as an opportunity to learn and test their skills.

4) Communication is key Strong communication skills are incredibly valuable. Being able to communicate well in writing and in person will help you to get a job, work as a team with your colleagues, interact with clients and advance professionally. Welldeveloped interpersonal skills will also be useful for networking. Whether you must attend a corporate function or are simply welcoming a new co-worker to the office, the ability to assert yourself when meeting new people in order to establish profitable relationships will serve you well.

5) Leadership Being a good leader means knowing how to mentor and teach, making yourself approachable and available to the people you’re responsible for. You have to balance being a role model and the person in charge with being part of the team.

6) Be open Honesty and integrity are highly valued in the accounting world. Accountants – and the firms they work for – pride themselves on adhering to the strictest ethical standards. It’s why the public, other businesses and the government know that they can trust accountants to always look out for their best interests.

Get a Head Start | 167


How to get into

Investment Banking (City/Wall Street)

The indisputable three stages of a fulfilling life are; Learn, Earn and Serve. Most successful politicians and business leaders who are serving on FTSE 100 and Fortune 500 boards have all been through these three stages. Investment banking is a unique profession that allows you to use what you have learnt to earn so well in the early part of your life, giving you a chance to serve and give back to society in the latter stages of your career without have to worry about bills. Mark Carney is a typical example of someone whose ‘Learn’ phase included an Economics Bachelor’s degree at Harvard and Master’s and Doctorate degrees at Oxford. His ‘Earn’ phase saw him rewarded with seven-figure earnings during an illustrious 13-year career at Goldman Sachs. His ‘Serve’ phase includes leading the Banks of Canada before taking the helm at the Bank of England. Sajid Javid, the current Chancellor of the Exchequer is also another notable example. From studying Economics at Exeter, to board level (£3m per year) positions at Chase Manhattan and Deutsche Bank, before taking a 98% pay-cut to serve as a politician. So, what does it take to break into investment banking? Start your preparation early For most city/wall street investment banking roles, early preparation helps you to build an ideal profile. 168 | www.careersuk.org

Once you have made up your mind early in your career, you will need to choose the ideal subjects and push for the right grades at College and Uni. Subjects like finance, economics, accounting, mathematics, and engineering tend to be natural fits for city jobs, but most investment banks are now open-minded and accept candidates from practically any academic background. Allow enough time for the typically lengthy recruitment process. The entire process can be tedious and very time-consuming. Start networking Expand your network by connecting with recruiters at campus recruitment fairs and investment banking clubs. Connect online with investment banking seniors, recent graduates and alumni who have just joined city / wall street firms. As insiders, they would know where the hidden ‘unadvertised’ opportunities are, the key contact in the firms, the rules of the game and the buzzwords that will impress interviewers. Use your network to ask questions to help prep yourself on potential questions asked in interviews and what the key things are to make you outshine your peers.


Cast your net wide Apply to as many top investment banks as well as middle-market firms and smaller brand boutique investment banks. This will increase your chances of getting more interviews, and in the process, this can also help fine-tune your interview skills. Don’t forget some smaller elite firms may have more attractive unique opportunities and can act as a steppingstone before joining bulge-bracket global banks. What can make your application shine Apart from your top grades or your mathematical, economics or finance acumen, there are other things which can help set you apart. Even if you are not coming from Oxbridge, a Russell Group Uni, an elite school or typical investment banking feeder school/ college, you can still enhance your CV unique by: • Join college/university clubs and extracurricular activities that can highlight your analytical prowess. • If you participated in any clubs or sports, especially at an elite or professional level, put on emphasis on this. • Highlight any achievements or leadership roles at school or university as they demonstrate your assertiveness and confidence track-record. Prepare a top-notch CV and cover letter Most City/Wall Street investment banks look out for the following on your CV and cover letter when evaluating candidates: • Top grades in the ideal subjects and degrees • Knowledge of the organisation, their core values and unique features. If you have met or are connected with any key insiders, try to mention them in your cover letter • A high level of enthusiasm both for the profession as well as for the bank itself • Any outstanding extra-curricular performance including athletic achievements or club leadership • Attendance to a feeder school, college or university can enhance your chances of success • Placement or internship experience in an investment banking or related environment

strengths but still being honest. Knowledge of the industry and the bank is key It is crucial that you build extensive knowledge of the industry. Get to know: • Who the key players are • Industry insights and latest developments. • What the bank you are applying to specialises in • What their current market position is Prepare to explain why you are applying Every interviewee must find a way of clearly highlighting that the bank they are applying for is their first choice. Make sure you don’t appear as too confident or too humble – find a way of striking a balance – showing a keen interest but not being overly zealous. Prepare for questions like: • Why do you think you are the right person for this role? • How do you see yourself adding value to the business? Prepare for some Investment Banking Technical Skills questions Be prepared to answer technical Investment Banking questions to prove familiarity or proficiency in areas such as: • Financial modelling and advanced Excel • Valuations • Financial Statement Analysis • Mergers and Acquisitions • Financial sales and corporate communication

Make the most of your placement/internship Internships and summer placements are a crucial sweetener that can significantly give you a competitive edge. Most recruiters believe that candidates with junior role experience in the profession have a competitive edge over their peers.

Lastly • Be prepared for a strict recruitment process: • Prepare yourself for long working hours (sometimes 50+ hours per week)

Expect a thorough scrutiny of your placement/ internship experience in the interview. You could be quizzed on anything including; types of clients, transactions values involved, key achievements, how you fitted within your team and challenges encountered. Remember to emphasise on your

Differentiate yourself from fellow competitors by doing an MBA or qualifications such as the ACT, CFA, CFI or CISI Get a Head Start | 169


TOP TIPS TO GET INTO MEDICAL SCHOOL

Medicine is one of the most competitive courses in the UK to gain entry on to and every year thousands of international students are accepted into medical school. If your grades are of the highest standard and you can prove that you have set your heart on working in this field, then follow our top tips to help you get into medical school:

1) Transfer your skills to medicine Extracurricular activities are highly valued by medical schools – they are a great indication that you have interests outside of academia, that 170 | www.careersuk.org

you will be able to cope with the pressures of medical school and that you have developed the key skills needed for medicine. You could transfer your skills to medicine in your application. Have your extracurriculars allowed you to work well in a team, or develop your communication skills with a range of people?

2) Be hardworking People who are hardworking are motivated to set and complete ambitious goals. They have a passion to excel in the field they choose to work in.

3) Don’t Be Afraid to Self-Promote It’s OK to highlight the accomplishments you’re proud of; put these in your required personal statement or find a way to work them into conversation during interviews. The key is to do it humbly but confidently.

4) Do Research Projects Demonstrate your hands-on science


knowledge. Undergraduate research experience really shines through on medical school applications. Most medical schools prefer students who are interested in research.

5) Be dedicated and focused To get into medical school, you must be dedicated and focused. A significant amount of personal sacrifice comes along with the training, and if you don’t have great motivation, you won’t find the sacrifice worth the reward.

6) Get Some Medical Experience on Your CV Shadow doctors and other medical professionals. Job shadowing is a great way to get some medical experience and shows recruiters you’ve taken time and interest in the industry.

Get a Head Start | 171


TOP TIPS TO GET ONTO A GRADUATE SCHEME

Graduate schemes are very popular and hard to come by if you are in a competitive field. You will need a stellar CV and you must have great interview skills. University provides you with many paths to take and routes to go down but ultimately, it will be difficult having to set yourself one choice. However, university does not prepare you for everything and getting a top graduation scheme with a good company is something you will have to figure out for yourself. If you’re unsure of how to get into a top graduation scheme, read these tips.

172 | www.careersuk.org

1) Research If you haven’t done so already, you need to start researching as much as possible. Find out which graduate schemes have the best benefits and are within travelling distance of where you live. It’s vital that you research before you apply as you may get to the interview and realise that actually, this graduate scheme is not what you wanted at all. Visit websites such as Glassdoor or Indeed and read the reviews of what it is like working for that company. You may also get some insight into what the company looks for in successful candidates.

2) Tailor Your CV to Their Wants There is absolutely no point in applying for a graduate scheme within finance and writing in the skills section that you are good at making coffee on an industrial coffee machine. Employers want to see the skills you have that relate to the sector and how your skills will benefit the company. If they require you to be able to talk to clients often, then talk about how good your communication skills are in writing and in person. If you’re going for a more


artsy position then add some flair to your CV and show off your art skills. You have to tailor your CV to companies otherwise you can kiss goodbye to any chance of an interview.

3) Find Out What the Interview Process is Some companies will require you to do several different things before you are offered the job. This could include aptitude tests, video interviews, written tests, group activities, presentations, interviews with one person and interviews with a panel. Don’t be surprised if you do one interview and you get called back for a second. This is standard procedure with a lot of companies nowadays; especially when they have a high number of applicants. Do some research online and see if anyone has talked about what the interview process is like at the particular company you are applying for. Being prepared before you’re even offered an interview means you will already be one step ahead of the competition.

4) Start Early As soon as you start university, you should already be contacting companies and networking with them. A good way to do this would be through LinkedIn. Networking is critical if you want to have a head start in the working world, so set up a profile on LinkedIn and start following and talking to people that are within the field of work that you would like to step into. By the time that you start applying for graduate schemes, you will have made many contacts and people will start to vouch for you. Or better yet, offer you a place on a graduate scheme. It would also be a good idea to ask for some work experience with companies whilst you are still studying.

Get a Head Start | 173


GRADUATE SCHEMES Company

Entry Requirements

Application Process

£20,000+, 25 days holiday, flexible working, discounts

300 UCAS points, or 2:1 in relevant degree

Online application, online aptitude tests, telephone interview, assessment centre

UK

£25,000+, 4 weeks holiday

Minimum 240 UCAS points, or 2:1 degree

Online application, form and tests, video application, group interview, one-to-one interview

Law

London

£400 per week

2:1 (or equivalent) in any discipline, minimum 340 UCAS points

Full details available on website

50+

Actuarial, Finance, Claims, IT, Marketing, Operations, Pricing & Portfolio, Underwriting

UK

Competitive salary, holiday, training & development

300 UCAS points, (340 for Actuarial), and predicted 2:1 in any discipline

Application, tests, telephone interview, assessment centre

Card Issuing

30+

Marketing, Finance, Consulting, Technology, Operations

London, Brighton, Burgess Hill

Competitive salary, 22 days holiday, pension, flexible working, work-life balance

2:1 (or equivalent), minimum 320 UCAS points, eligibility to work in the UK

Online application, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Retail, Technology

20+

Buying, Merchandising, Technology, Design, Software, Engineering, Marketing, Finance

Camden, London

Competitive salary, flexible benefits, discounts

N/A

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Biopharmaceutical

45+

Research & Development

Cambridge, Cheshire, Sweden

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 in a Chemical, Analytical, or Biological discipline

Online application, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering

180+

Aerospace, Defence, Energy, Infrastructure, Transportation, Security, Technology, Cost Control

UK

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, discounts

Predicted 2:1 in relevant degree

Online test, face-toface or telephone interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Defence

99+

Engineering, Business, Finance, Management, Consulting

UK

£15,000

2:1 degree, specific degrees may be required for specific roles

Full details available on website

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Financial Services

65+

Supervision, Policy, Operations, Analytics, Risk, Compliance, Communication, Management, IT

London

Competitive salary

300 UCAS points, or 260 UCAS points for IT roles

Online application, online tests, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Banking

299+

Banking, Technology, HR, Compliance, Risk Treasury, Finance, Marketing

London

Full details available on website

Each application is considered on merit

Full details available on website

45+

Audit, Tax, Advisory, Financial Services

UK

Competitive salary, comprehensive benefits package

2:2 in any degree, 3 A-Levels A*- C in any subject

Online application, online testing, interview, assessment centre

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering, Manufacturing

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

20+

Business, IT, Research & Development, Engineering

UK

Retail

40+

Management, Corporate Buying, eCommerce, IT

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

70+

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Insurance

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Placement years, Accountancy, summer internships, Advisory, Tax & short-term insights Finance

174 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, Manufacturing, summer internships, Automotive, short-term insights Engineering

199+

Manufacturing, Engineering, HR, IT, Purchasing, Finance, Logistics, Sales, Marketing, Communications

Oxford, Swindon, Birmingham, Goodwood, Farnborough

£17,000+

2:1 degree

Online application, online ability tests, assessment centre, face-to-face interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Oil, Gas

100+

Engineering, Science, Business & Trading

UK

£25,000, access to share scheme, lunch allowance, 25 days holiday, training & development

Predicted 2:1 in any degree, (for trading programmes 320 UCAS points)

Full details available on website

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Charity Sector

40+

Fundraising, Marketing, Communication, Digital, Health Evaluation, Business Analysis, Research Funding

London, UK, work from home

Unpaid, flexible working, reasonable travel, lunch expenses reimbursed

N/A

Application form, competency-based interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Energy, Services

60+

Analysts, Operations, Engineering, Finance, HR, Customer Insight, Marketing, Procurement & Supply Chain

UK

£14,000, free housing, 25 days holiday, gym

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, psychometric tests, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

100+

Law

London, Bristol, Aberdeen

Competitive salary

2:1 degree, or 320 UCAS points (at A-Levels)

Full details available on website

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Investment Banking

200+

Investment, Banking & Capital Markets, IT

London, Europe, Middle East

Competitive salary

2:1 degree

Online application, numerical & verbal reasoning tests, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering

100+

Engineering, Finance, Marketing, Supply Chain, HR, IT, Quality, Management

UK

£18,000, 25 days holiday, bonus, subsidised food

2:1 in relevant degree

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Real Estate

50+

Commercial Property, Surveying, Management, Interior Design, Residential, Planning

UK

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, travel loan, private medical insurance

2:1 in any degree

Online application, first round interview, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Consulting, Finance, Professional Services

500+

Audit & Risk Advisory, Tax Consulting, Financial Advisory, Consulting

UK

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, free mobile, cycle scheme, travel insurance, discounts

Vary for each service line

Online application, online tests, first round interview, final round interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Manufacturing, Engineering

35+

Engineering, Operations, Supply Chain, Finance, Quality, Product Management, Marketing, HR

UK

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Utilities, Science, Engineering

40+

Science, Engineering, Supply Chain, Digital, Research & Development

UK

£16,000+, holiday allowance, discounts

Predicted 2:1 in relevant degree

Online application, Online testing, face-to-face or telephone interview

Get a Head Start | 175


Company

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

500+

Accounting, Finance & Consulting

UK

Competitive salary, benefits

Studying a degree

Online application, online strength tests, telephone interview, assessment centre, final interview

Investment, Management

40+

Equity Research, MultiAsset Solutions, European Sales, Marketing, Technology, Management

UK, Europe, Asia, Pacific

Competitive salary, life assurance, pension

Any degree discipline, minimum 320 UCAS points, or 2:1 degree

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Investment Banking

500+

Banking, Finance, Investment Management

London, Europe

Competitive salary, benefits package

All qualifications considered

Online application, interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Accountancy, Business, Finance

100+

Audit, Tax, Advisory

UK

Competitive salary, Intern-specific development

N/A

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Pharmaceutical, Healthcare

350+

Engineering, Manufacturing, Science, IT, HR, Sales, Marketing, Communication, Finance, Procurement

UK

Competitive salary, bonuses, 28 days holiday

Minimum 2:1 degree

Application form, online tests, video interview, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT

120+

Business, Finance, IT, Sales, Support, Marketing, PR

Bracknell, Bristol, London, Erskine, Cambridge

£15,000, £1,000 sign-on bonus

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Business, Technical

30+

Business Analysis, Marketing, Technical

Bracknell, Bristol, London

25 days holiday, pension, flexible benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Banking

150+

Commercial & Global Banking, Markets, Private Banking, Retail Banking, Wealth Management

UK

Competitive salary

2:1 in relevant degree

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT, Consulting

350+

Business, Finance, HR, IT, Marketing, Software Development

UK

£15,000, £1,000 sign-on bonus, 5 days holiday

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, test, assessment centre, final interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Investment Banking

200+

Corporate & Investment Banking, Asset Management, Corporate Functions

Edinburgh, Glasgow, London, Europe

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Automotive, Engineering, Manufacturing

200+

Engineering, Finance, HR, IT, Marketing, Purchasing, Engineering, Quality, Design, Research & Development

Warwickshire, West Midlands, Liverpool

£15,000+

Enrolled in penultimate year as a full-time university student

Assessment centre, psychometric testing

Placement years, Medical Devices, summer internships, Pharmaceuticals, short-term insights FMCG

60+

Engineering, Marketing, Sales, Finance, Supply Chain, Medical

Thames Valley, Leeds, Inverness

Competitive salary, pension, healthcare

2:1 in relevant degree

Online application, numerical testing, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, Consumer Goods summer internships, short-term insights

120+

Sales, Marketing, Operations, Finance, IT, HR Digital Marketing

London, Manchester, East Croydon, Watersmead

£16,000+, 23-25 days holiday, training programme

2:1 in any degree

Online application, assessment centre, psychometric testing

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Professional Services

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

176 | www.careersuk.org

No. Jobs


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, Retail summer internships, short-term insights

22+

1 scheme rotating through various business departments

UK

£20,000+

Studying degree in Online application, Business or Retail group interview Management, other disciplines considered

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Banking, Finance

200+

Retail Banking, Commercial Banking, Digital, HR, Finance

UK

£18,000+, location allowance

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, strength tests, numerical tests, video interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Research & Development

29+

Engineering, Chemistry, HR, IT, Business Support, Purchasing, Marketing, Global Communication,

Hazelwood, Derbyshire, Blackley, Manchester

Competitive salary, benefits package

Minimum 2:2 in relevant degree

Online application, telephone screen, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT, Technology

40+

Software Engineering, Test Engineering, Support Engineering

London, Edinburgh, Coventry, Chester, Cambridge

£35,000

360 UCAS points

Online application, online tests, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Sales, Marketing, Business, IT

70+

Business, Consulting, Technical

Reading, London, Edinburgh

£17,000

N/A

Online application, test

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Global Financial Services

450+

Institutional Securities, Investment Management, Infrastructure

London, Glasgow, Europe, Middle East

Competitive starting salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree or equivalent

Online application, psychometric testing

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Corporate & Commercial Law

55+

Law

London, Sheffield

£200-£300+ per week

340 UCAS points, minimum 2:1 in any degree

Online application, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering, Business Management

50+

Civil, Electrical & Mechanical Engineering, Business & Project Management, Finance, Business Technology, HR

UK

£17,000, 28 days holiday, subsidised rail travel

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, online tests, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Banking, Markets, Technology, Finance

100+

Banking, Sales, Trading, Research, Structuring, Operations, Technology, Finance, Risk, Compliance

London, Europe

Competitive salary, onsite gym & canteen

Minimum 2:1 in any degree discipline

Online application, online tests, interview, case study

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Recruitment

N/A

Recruitment, Business Development, Sales

UK

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:2 in any degree discipline

Application form, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Professional Services, Consulting, Technology

800+

Actuarial, Assurance, Consulting, Deals, HR, Tax, Technology, Legal, Marketing

UK

Competitive salary, holidays, healthcare, pension, study support, cycle scheme

Minimum 2:1 in any degree discipline

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Financial Services

100+

Global Investment Banking, Global Markets, Finance, Operations, Risk, Technology

London

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 in any degree discipline

Online application

Get a Head Start | 177


Company

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Chemical, Mechanical, Engineering

8+

Engineering

Surrey, UK

£18,000, onsite gym, social/ company organised events

Minimum 2:1 degree in Mechanical or Chemical disciplines

Video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT Services, Consulting

40+

Business, Finance, HR, IT

UK

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, flexible benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, numerical and verbal testing, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT, Mechanical, Engineering

14+

Software Engineering, Application Engineering

Birmingham, UK

Competitive salary, subsidised lunch, paid holiday, social events

300 UCAS points, or minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Actuarial, Consultancy

15+

Actuarial Consultant

London, Leeds, Liverpool, Glasgow

Competitive salary, 22 days holiday, flexible benefits

300 UCAS points, or minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering, Construction

15+

Engineering, Environmental, Science, Construction, Management

London, South East

Competitive salary, holidays

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

FMCG

10+

Chemistry, Engineering, Science

Cambridge, Southampton

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, gym, subsidised lunch

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, telephone interview, face-toface interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT

7+

Software Developer, Network Engineer, Technical

Newbury, Berkshire

£15,000, plus £1,000 bonus, 25 days holiday, healthcare, cycle scheme

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT Services, Solutions

15+

Service Management, HR, IT Infrastructure, Operations

UK

£17,000, 23 days holiday, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Application, video assessment, assessment centres

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Energy

35+

Commercial, Engineering

Nottingham, Coventry

£17,000+, graduate fast track opportunities

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, telephone interview, face-toface assessments

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Supply Chain, Logistics

10+

HR, Consulting, Operational Management

UK

£17,000, 25 days holiday, bonus scheme, pension, healthcare

Minimum 2:2 degree, A*-C Maths and English GCSE, UK driving license

Online application, telephone interview, depot day, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Travel, Tourism

25+

Sales, Customer Service, Marketing, Finance, IT

Berkshire

Competitive salary, 20 days holiday, social events

N/A

Telephone interview, assessment day

Placement years, Investment Banking summer internships, short-term insights

20+

Senior Management

London

Competitive salary 300 UCAS points, or minimum 2:1 in any degree discipline

Online application, Online tests, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, Sales, Marketing, summer internships, HR, short-term insights Communications, Press

10+

Sales, Marketing, HR, Marketing Communications, Customer Service, Press

Hertfordshire

£18,000, 25 days holiday, car scheme, subsidised lunch

300 UCAS points

Online application, telephone interview, SHL tests, assessment centre

Placement years, IT, Software summer internships, short-term insights

10+

Marketing, Sales, Technical Support, Web Developer

Stokenchurch

£15,000+, 21 days holiday, social events

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, Automotive summer internships, short-term insights

10+

Commercial, IT, Parts, Logistics, Finance, HR

Coventry

£17,000, 26 days holiday, car scheme, gym

A-C Maths & English GCSE, and minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, ability testing, telephone interview, assessment centre

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

178 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, Public Sector summer internships, short-term insights

250+

HR, IT, Marketing, Sales, Purchasing, Logistics

UK

27,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, strength test, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

150+

Finance, HR, IT, Marketing, Media, Research & Development

UK

£18,000 - £20,000

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Real Estate

170+

Surveying, Rural, Capital Allowances, Urban Design, Building Surveying, Town Planning

UK, Europe

Competitive salary

RICS/RTPI accredited course

Online application, telephone interview, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Oil, Gas, Engineering

50+

Engineering, Geoscience, Research, Software

UK, Worldwide

Competitive salary, 23 days holiday, housing allowance

Minimum 2:1 degree in Engineering, Science, Maths, Computer Science, or Geoscience

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

60+

Law

UK

£275 per week

Minimum CCC, and degree in any discipline (or equivalent)

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering

50+

Engineering, IT, Business, Finance, Project Management, HR

UK

£15,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, psychometric tests, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Professional Services

15+

Audit, Business Tax, Private Client Tax, Forensic Accountancy

UK

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 in any degree discipline, 300 UCAS points, A*-B Maths and English GCSE

Online application, numerical testing, verbal testing, assessment centre, first round interview, final round interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Education, Technology

8+

Content Science, Software Development, Marketing

Exeter

Competitive salary, 5 days holiday, free housing

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online assessment, video interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Financial Services, Investments

35+

Accountancy, Actuarial, HR, Investments, Marketing, Operations, Risk, Technology

Edinburgh

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

70+

Law

London, Worldwide

£275 per week

ABB at A-Levels, and minimum 2:1 degree

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Retail, Supply Chain

40+

Technology, Finance, Buying, Merchandising, Supply Chain, Property, Marketing

Hertfordshire

Competitive salary, 20 days holiday, pension, discounts

300-320 UCAS points, or minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, psychometric test, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Retail

25+

Merchandising, Buying, Finance

Watford

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, benefits

All degrees considered

Online application, online assessment, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Marketing, Sales

10+

Marketing, Social Media, Finance, Press, PR

Surrey

£17,000+, 25 days holiday, car scheme, onsite gym

Student placement as part of undergraduate degree

Online application, ability tests, interview with line manager

Get a Head Start | 179


Company

Entry Requirements

Application Process

£19,000 - £25,000

All degree disciplines considered, with relevant experience

Online application

Worldwide

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, flexible benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, numerical and verbal testing, assessment centre

Retail, Sales, Marketing, Purchasing, IT, Logistics, HR, Finance, Engineering

Worldwide

Competitive salary, sign-on bonus, RSU’s

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online tests, telephone interview, assessment centre

10+

Sales, Marketing, Finance, Retail, Finance

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Retail

200+

Sales, Finance, Management, Marketing

London, UK

Competitive salary, holidays

Minimum 2:2 degree in any discipline, Buying requires a fashion-related degree

Online application, numerical test, video interview, assessment centre, brand interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

645+

Engineering, General Management, HR, IT

UK

£30,000+

180 UCAS points

Online application, assessment centre

Graduate schemes

Public Sector

30+

Designing, Engineering, Planning, Technology, Consulting

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline, for Engineering roles preferably a masters degree

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

33+

Law

UK

£40,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online testing, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

120+

Engineering, General Management, IT, Media, Research & Development

UK

£20,000+

Varies on programme

Online application, online test, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

35+

Pharmaceutical, Healthcare, Retail, Finance, Marketing, Logistics

UK

£20,000+, £1,000 bonus

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, face-to-face interview

Open days, workshops, traineeships

Law, Science, 10+ Technology, Media, Communication, Real Estate

Lawyers

London, Brussels

£38,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline, academic achievements

Full details available on website

Internships, graduate schemes, entry-level roles

Public Sector

Varies

Marketing, Sales, Management, Education, Arts

UK

£30,000+

300 UCAS points

Vary for each programme

Training contracts, work experience, vacation schemes

Law, Real Estate, Acquisitions, Financial Services, Litigation

40+

Law

North America, Europe, Middle East, Asia

£42,000+

340 UCAS points (AAB) at A-Levels, minimum predicted 2:1 degree

Online application, verbal test, assessment centre, partner interview

20+

Law

Worldwide

£40,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, AAB at A-Levels

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Internships, graduate schemes

Marketing, Finance, HR, Product Creation, Supply Chain, Management

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

1000+

Marketing, Global Sales, Finance, HR, Corporate Communication, Product Creation, Supply Chain, Management

UK, Worldwide

Consulting, Engineering, Finance, Property

350+

Business, Finance, HR, IT

Internships, graduate schemes

Public Sector

250+

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Technology

Placement years, graduate schemes, internships

Placement years, Law summer internships, short-term insights

180 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Graduate schemes, internships, Placement years

Distribution

£18,000+

Minumum 2:2 degree in any discipline, and strong communication skills

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

UK

£25,000 - £28,000

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, numerical testing, video interview, assessment centre

Finance, Management

London

£29,000+, 3-6% bonus, flexible benefits

Minimum 2.1 degree, and 300-320 UCAS points

Online application, numerical and verbal testing, video interview, face-to-face interview

100+

Accountancy, Finance, Management, HR, Investment Banking, IT, Sales

UK

Competitive salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, face-to-face interview

Law

70+

Law

UK, Europe

£27,000 - £44,000

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, psychometric test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

99+

Accountancy, Engineering, Finance, HR, IT, Marketing, Sales, Media

UK

£26,500, plus £2,000 bonus

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant disciplines

Online assessment, telephone interview, assessment day

Placement years, graduate schemes

Law

20+

Law

UK

£40,000+

Second EU language

Online application, online test

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering

25+

Software Engineering, Development, IT, Management

UK

£38,500+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, video interview, assessment day

Graduate careers programme

IT, Engineering, Aerospace, Banking, Defence, Education, Energy, Media, Life Sciences, Transport

1100+

IT, Engineering, Media, Consulting, Admin, Sales

Europe, Asia, America

£21,880+

Varies depending on programme

Varies depending on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

75+

Law

UK

£40,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, psychometric test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law, HR, Management

350+

Sales, Marketing, Finance

UK

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, video interview, assessment day

Training contracts, summer Placements

Law

10+

Banking & Financial Services, Corporate, Employment, Pensions

UK, Dubai

£28,000+, health insurance, gym membership

Predicted Mminimum 2:1 degree, or pass on accelerated LLB course

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

200+

Consulting, Engineering, Finance, Management, IT

UK

£25,000+, bonuses, allowances

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, online test, interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

60+

Law

UK, Europe

£40,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships

Travel, Tourism

80+

Finance, Management

Worldwide

£20,000+

Degree in relevant discipline

Initial screening, aptitude test, online interview, assessment centre

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

15+

Engineering, Supply Chain & Distribution, Management, Marketing

UK

Finance

1000+

HR, IT, Marketing, Purchasing, Management

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Marketing, Sales

15+

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Get a Head Start | 181


Company

Entry Requirements

Application Process

£37,000+

Varies on programme

Online application, (‘blind cv’ process so applicants are judged on merits alone)

UK

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, video interview, assessment day

Law

UK

£44,000

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, interview, assessment day

20+

Technology, various disciplines

Hertfordshire

£27,000+

Degree in relevant discipline

Full details available on website

Law, Transport, Trade, Energy, Infrastructure, Insurance

20+

Law

London, Hong Kong

£42,708+

Minimum 2:1 in any discipline, and AAB A-Levels

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

45+

Law

UK

£25,000+, GDL/LPC fees, maintenance grant

Minimum 2:1 degree, 320 UCAS points

Online application

Placement years, internships, graduate schemes

Retail, Sales, Management

20+

Finance, Marketing

UK

£27,000 - £29,000

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline, for Engineering roles preferably a masters degree

Online application, video interview, assessment centre, final interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

1000+

Accountancy, Consulting, Finance, HR, IT, Marketing

UK

£29,000+, preferential banking

Minimum 2.1 degree, 300 UCAS points

Online application, online test, video interview, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

110+

Law

UK, Europe

£40,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

200+

Retail, Purchasing, Management, Supply Chain, Logistics

UK

£23,000 - £28,000

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

35+

Engineering, Finance, Sales, Marketing, Purchasing, IT, Logistics

UK, Europe

Up to £32,000, £2,000 bonus

Minimum 2:1 degree, 280-300 UCAS points

Online application, psychometric test, video interview, assessment day

Placement years, Management, Sales, summer internships, Marketing short-term insights

50+

Finance, Supply Chain

UK

£20,000+

Varies on programme

Online application, assessment centre, final interview

Placement years, Consulting summer internships, short-term insights

100+

Management, Sales, Finance, Marketing

UK, Europe

Competitive salary Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, assessment day

Internships, graduate schemes

Management, IT

100+

Science, Technology, Finance, Marketing, Logistics

UK, Worldwide

£25,000 - £30,000, bonus payments

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, interview

Vacation scheme, training contracts

Law

6+

Financial Services, Technology, Real Estate, Finance

US, Asia, Europe

£46,000+, healthcare, dental, disability insurance

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline from a top university

Online application, interview

250+

Engineering, Property, Sales, Finance, Marketing

UK

£25,000 - £28,000

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, assessment day

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Training contracts, vacation schemes

Law, Aerospace, Commodities, Construction, Energy, Insurance, Mining

Graduate schemes

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

30+

Lawyers, trainees for various disciplines

America, Middle East, Asia, Europe, Australia

Tax

30+

Marketing, Sales, Finance

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

60+

Work experience, graduate jobs

Technology, Graphics, AI, Processing

Training contract, trainee recruitment, Placement schemes

Placement years, Public Sector summer internships, short-term insights

182 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, Public Sector summer internships, short-term insights

25+

Sales, Marketing, Finance, Logistics, HR, Engineering

UK

£27,000, plus £2,000 bonus

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Consulting

39+

Sales, Finance, Marketing, Management

UK

£45,000 - £50,000, plus £3,000 bonus

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, video interview, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

150+

Accountancy, Finance, HR, IT, Law, Media, Property, Research & Development

UK

£23,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

45+

Law

UK

£44,000

Minimum 2:1 degree, 340 UCAS points

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Accountancy, HR, IT, Marketing, Retail

50+

Sales, Finance, Management

Worldwide

Unpaid

Varies on programme

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Marketing, Sales

20+

Finance, Media

UK

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, video interview, assessment day

Placement years, graduate schemes

Public Sector

Varies

Healthcare, Biopharmaceutical, Supply Chain, Management, Logistics, Sales

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Policing

350+

Law, Management

Worldwide

£29,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, A*-C English GCSE

Online application, online test, video assessment, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, graduate schemes

Consumer Goods

20+

entry level roles

UK

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

600+

Accountancy, Engineering, Finance, HR, IT, Law, Logistics

Worldwide

£30,000+

Relevant degrees required for roles

Online application, aptitude test, health tests, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

150+

Engineering, Finance, HR, IT, Logistics, Law, Media

UK, Europe

£25,000+

Relevant degrees required for roles

Online application, formal interview, medical test, fitness test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Finance, Management, Retail

50+

Sales, Marketing

UK, Europe

£29,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, 280 UCAS points

Online application, assessment day

Internships, graduate schemes

Management, IT

150+

Engineering, Development

UK, Europe

£30,000+, flexible working, work-life balance

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

60+

Engineering, Finance, Management, HR, IT, Logistics, Marketing, Research & Development

UK

£33,000, Competitive bonus

Relevant degrees required for roles

Online application, online assessment, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Finance

90+

Sales, Marketing, Management, Engineering

UK, Europe

£25,000 - £32,000

Varies on programme

Online application, online test, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships

Law

80+

Law

UK

£40,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, assessment day

Get a Head Start | 183


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, summer internships, graduate schemes

Public Sector

15+

Consulting, Strategy, Client Delivery, Software Engineering, Technology Architecture, Analytics

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate schemes, internships

Public Sector

30+

Sales, Marketing, Finance, Travel

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate schemes

Consultancy

Varies

Sales, Marketing, Finance

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:2 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships

Public Sector

20+

Sales, Marketing, Finance, Management, Engineering, IT

UK

£28,000+

Minimum 2.1 in relevant discipline, 128 UCAS points, masters degree in Engineering, minimum of 1 year’s work experience

Online application, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, graduate schemes

Public Sector

40+

Analytics, Investment Banking, Corporate Audit, Technology, Global Capital Markets

Worldwide

£35,000+

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate schemes, internships

Science, Research, Development

5+

Sales, Marketing, Consumer Health, Animal Health, Crop Science, Pharmaceuticals, Business

Reading, UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Graduate schemes, internships

Investment

150+

Client Services, Analytics, Risk, Business Operations, Investment, Management, Sales, Technology

UK, Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, coding test, first round interview, in-person assessment

Training contracts, traineeships, vacation schemes

Law

70+

Law, Management, Marketing, Finance

UK, Ireland

Varies on programme

All qualifications considered

Varies on programme

Graduate schemes, internships

Public Sector

10+

Sales, Finance, Marketing, HR Management,

UK, Worldwide

£35,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, AAB A-Levels

Online application, interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

600+

Banking, Financial Services, Corporate & Commercial, Employment, Energy, Litigation, Pensions, Property, Tax

UK, Brussels

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

26+

Commercial & Corporate Banking, Dispute Resolution, Employment, Client Services, Real Estate

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2.1 degree in any discipline, 340 UCAS points

Varies on programme

184 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, graduate schemes

Law

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree, 340 UCAS points

Online application, critical thinking test, assessment day, 2 hour-long interviews, (competence based and case study)

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Worldwide

ÂŁ39,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, 300 UCAS points from top 3 A-Levels

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Counter Terrorism, Security, Land, Sea & Air Technology, Cyber & Information Systems, Defence & Security Analysis, Science

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, 3 online tests, assessment day, interview, presentation

Varies

Science, Marketing, Finance

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2.2 degree in relevant discipline

Varies on programme

Financial Services

550+

Enforcement & Market Oversight, Supervision, Economics, Strategy, Competition

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Varies on programme

Placement years, graduate schemes, short-term insights

Law

25+

Construction, Intellectual Property, IT, Litigation, Planning, Environmental, Real Estate

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate programs, placements

Public Sector

2+

Sales, Marketing, Finance, Supply Chain

London, South East

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate programs, internships, apprenticeships

Construction, Civil Engineering, Surveying

350+

Building Services, Railway Engineering, Design, Project Controls

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, interview, assessment

Placement years, graduate schemes, short-term insights

Public Sector

100+

Science, Technology, Engineering, Marketing, Management, Commercial, Operations, Healthcare

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships

Law

70+

Law, HR

Worldwide

ÂŁ37,000+

Minimum predicted 2:1 degree in relevant disciplines, AAA in A-Levels

Online application, psychometric test, video interview, assessment day

Placement years, graduate schemes, short-term insights

Public Sector

80+

Business, Finance, Supply Chain, HR, Technology, Research & Development

UK, Ireland, Europe

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, aptitude test, video interview, assessment centre

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

95+

Corporate, Finance, Capital Markets, Real Estate, Litigation, Tax, Pensions, Employment Law

UK, Worldwide

Law

70+

Law, Marketing, Health

Graduate programs, placements

Science, Technology Research, Analytics, Defence

90+

Placement years, graduate schemes, short-term insights

Science, Technology

Graduate programs, summer internships

Get a Head Start | 185


Company

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online assessment, online test, video interview, assessment centre, group exercise, presentation

Woking, UK

£32,000

Varies on programme

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Marketing, Engineering, Finance, Sales, Electronics

Brixworth, UK

£19,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application

20+

Law, HR

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2.1 degree, BBB at A-Levels

Online application, assessment centre

Construction, Infrastructure, Design

12+

Construction, Management, Quantity Surveying, Engineering, Building Services, Architecture

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate schemes

Accounting, Finances

70+

Accountancy

London, Newcastle

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, online assessment, telephone interview, assessment centre

Graduate schemes

Science, Research, Development

45+

Nuclear Power, Defence

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, online test, interview, presentation

Placement years, graduate schemes, internships

Computing, Software, Technology, Infrastructure, Data Services

50+

Sales, Marketing, Management, IT

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Degree in relevant discipline

Online application, assessment day

Graduate schemes

Engineering

30+

Sales, Marketing, Finance, Management

UK, Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate jobs

Technology

13+

Technology, Marketing, Finance

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, assessment centre

Entry-level roles, graduate schemes

Retail, Media

20+

Animation, Development, IT

UK, US, India, Canada

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, graduate schemes

Public Sector

30+

Sales, Marketing, Sustainability, Finance, Service Operations, Legal

UK

Competitive salary, 25 days holiday, discounts

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online assessment, assessment centre

Work experience, open days, vacation schemes, internships

Law

19+

Law

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Minimum 2.1 degree in any discipline, AAB at A-Levels

Varies on programme

Placement years, graduate schemes, internships

Public Sector

500+

Engineering, Management, Transportation, Infrastructure, Aerospace, Defence, Security

UK, Worldwide

£29,000+

Degree in relevant discipline

Online application, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Retail, Management

200+

Management, Training

UK, Ireland

Competitive salary

Any degree discipline

Online application

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Graduate programs, placements

Construction, Civil Engineering, Surveying

Placement years, internships, graduate schemes

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

65+

Civil Engineering, Quantity Surveying, Planning, Construction, Management

UK

Public Sector

25+

Healthcare, Energy, Transportation, Consumer Brands

Placement years, graduate schemes

Public Sector

50+

Placement years, graduate schemes, short-term insights

Law

Placement years, internships, graduate schemes

186 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Placement years, graduate schemes, internships

Law

Internships, graduate schemes

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

15+

Law, HR, Management, Marketing, Sales

Birmingham, Leeds, London, Manchester,

Competitive salary Varies on programme

Online application, critical thinking test, assessment day, 2 hour-long interviews, (competence based and case study)

Public Sector

30+

Marketing, Science, Technology, HR, Engineering, Computing

Swindon, UK

£17,000+

Minimum 2.1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, telephone interview, video interview, assessment centre

Graduate programs

Energy, Utilities

30+

Specialist Finance, Engineering, Technology

London, UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2.2 degree in any discipline

Online assessment, online test, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Social Work

100+

Management, Healthcare

UK

£16,000-£18,000, tax free bursary

Minimum 2.1 degree

Online application, assessment day

Training contracts, vacation schemes

Law, Energy, Financial Services, Housing, Leisure, Public Sector, Technology, Media

25+

Law

UK

£31,377+

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline, 300 UCAS points made of A & B grades

Online application

Internships, graduate schemes

Energy, Gas, Oil, Renewable Energy

29+

Technical, Commercial

International

Varies on programme

Minimum 2.1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Technology

20+

Finance, HR, Data Analytics, Marketing, Business Support

Langley, Berkshire, Swindon, Wiltshire

£17,000, 25 days holiday, bonus plan, social club

Minimum predicted 2.1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Travel & Tourism

7+

Product, Trading, E-Commerce

Bedfordshire

£17,000, 20 days holiday, travel benefits, gym discount

300 UCAS points

Online application, numerical test, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Investment Banking

300+

Investment Bank, Corporate Centre, Global Asset Management

London, Europe, Africa, Middle East

Competitive salary

Minimum 2.1 degree, 300 UCAS points

Online application, online test, interview, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, graduate schemes

Engineering

Varies

Engineering, Business, Quantity Surveying, Management

London, South East, East Anglia

Varies on programme

Minimum 2.2 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, video interview, assessment centre, final interview

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

50+

Retail, Sales, Finance, Marketing, Logistics, IT, HR, Engineering

UK, Ireland

£30,000, benefits, opportunities

Minimum 2.1 degree

Online application, online test, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Automotive Manufacturer

97+

Business, IT, Engineering, HR, Finance, Purchasing, PR, Sales, Marketing

Ellesmere Port, Luton

£16,000+, 21 days holiday, subsidised lunch, discounted gym

Minimum 2.1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, psychometric test, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

40+

Finance, Sales, Marketing, Management, Engineering, Retail

UK, Ireland

£29,000, £2,000 bonus, performance related bonuses, benefits

Minimum 2.1 degree

Online application, phone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Financial Services

20+

Finance, IT, Marketing, HR, Customer Operations, Business, Legal, Digital

Milton Keynes

£16,000+, 27 days holiday, pension, healthcare, subsidised gym

Minimum 2.1 degree in relevant discipline

telephone interview, assessment centre

Get a Head Start | 187


Company

Entry Requirements

Application Process

£18,000 per annum

3rd year sandwich course students only

Telephone interview, face-toface assessment

UK

£26,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, assessment day

Law

UK

£46,000

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, assessment day

25+

Actuarial, Finance, Claims, IT, Marketing, Operations, Pricing & Portfolio

UK, Worldwide

Competitive salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application

Marketing, Media

30+

Sales, Finance

UK, Europe

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, assessment day

Work placements, training contracts

Law, Digital, Energy Utilities, Financial Services, Health Care, Industrials, Real Estate, Retail, Transport

116+

Law

UK, Middle East, Asia

£43,000

Minimum 2:1 degree, ABB at A-Levels, (excluding General Studies)

Online application, video interview, partner interview, group exercise

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Public Sector

Varies

Engineering, Manufacturing, Finance, Marketing, Sales

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Business

20+

Mining, Management, Oil & Gas

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

50+

Engineering, Science, Business, Supply Chain & Logistics

England, Wales

Varies on programme

Degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Law

100+

Business, Law

UK

£30,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Graduate schemes, summer internships, industrial placements

Risk Management, Insurance & Reinsurance, Brokerage & Human Capital, Consulting

90+

Insurance, Risk Management, Actuarial, Investment, Reward & Remuneration, Cyber Security

Worldwide

£28,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree or equivalent

Online application, judgement test, numeracy test, video interview, assessment centre

Placement years, Retail summer internships, short-term insights

35+

Retail, Operations, Commercial, Marketing, Supply Chain, Logistics, Sales, Finance

UK

£15,000+, staff discounts

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

500+

Technology, Private & Commercial Banking, Marketing, Business

UK

Competitive salary

Varies per programme, UCAS points not required

Online application

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Entertainment, Media, Retail

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

170+

Business, Finance, IT, HR, Legal, Commercial, Production, Creative, Marketing

West London

Public Sector

50+

Finance, Management, HR, Investment Banking, IT, Marketing, Media

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

50+

Internships, graduate schemes

Insurance

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Banking, Technology

188 | www.careersuk.org


Company

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Law, Banking, Finance, Capital Markets, Digital Economy, Dispute Resolution, Employment, Financial Regulation, Insurance & Reinsurance

45+

Law

London

£44,000+

N/A

Online application

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Public Sector

11+

Business, IT, Marketing, Finance, Sales, Management

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Public Sector

30+

Science, Engineering

Worldwide

£26,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Gas

35+

Science & Technology, Marketing, HR

UK

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

64+

Banking, Finance, Construction, Education, Health & Social Care, Retail & Leisure

Southern England, Wales

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline, ABB at A-Levels

Varies on programme

Graduation schemes

Processor of Sugar, Food & Beverage Markets, Manufacturing

10+

Science, Engineering, Business Management

UK

£21,662+

Minimum 2:1 degree, industrial work experience desirable but not essential

Online application, online assessments, competency interview, assessment centre

Training contracts, summer vacation scheme

Law, Retail, Technology, Finances, Education, Public & Independent Health, Government, Insurance

15+

Law

UK

£26,000+

N/A

Online application, psychometric test, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Engineering

13+

Engineering, Business

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

25+

Health, Social Care, Housing, Management, Finance

Birmingham, London, Leeds, Winchester

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Construction, Technology

21+

Engineering, Research & Development, Purchasing, Sales, Oil & Gas, Marketing

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

IT

100+

Software Development, Marketing, Technology

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Vacation schemes, internships, training contracts

Law, Energy, Infrastructure, Finance, Sciences, Healthcare, Real Estate, Technology, Media & Communications

65+

Law

Europe, Middle East, Asia, Latin America

£25,000+

Minimum predicted 2:1 degree, ABB at A-Levels (or equivalent)

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Oil & Gas Operations

20+

Business, Engineering, Finance, HR, IT, Management & Supply Chain

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Graduate schemes

Get a Head Start | 189


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

£39,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, 128 UCAS points

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

UK

£22,000

Minimum 2.1 degree, or minimum 2.2 degree with a masters degree, STEM, numerical or business disciplines preferred

Online application, numerical test, interview

Business, Finance, Marketing, Technology, IT

Worldwide

£28,000+

Degree in Business, Technology or Engineering

Online application, telephone interview

40+

Law

Africa, Asia, America, Latin America, Australia

£42,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, ABB at A-Levels

Online application

Logistics

50+

Finance, Supply Chain, Logistics, Business, Technology, HR

Worldwide

£20,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering

25+

Technology, Finance, Marketing

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Online application, online test, telephone interview, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

11+

Law

UK

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Training contracts, vacation schemes

Law, Corporate & Banking, Insurance & Litigation, Energy & Industrials, Financial Services, Real Estate, Retail, Technology, Food & Hospitality, Transport

40+

Law

UK

£28,799+

Minimum 2.1 degree, AAB at A-Levels (or equivalent)

Online application, video interview, assessment centre, meet the senior partners event

Placement years, graduate schemes, short-term insights

Public Sector

15+

Retail, HR, Marketing, Technology, Finance, Sales,

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate schemes

Mobile Communications & Mobile Network

33+

Hr, Marketing, Customer Servic, Business Operations, Management & Finance

UK

£27,000+

N/A

Online application

Placement years, graduate schemes, short-term insights

Travel

15+

Technology, Marketing, HR, Management

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, Public Sector summer internships, short-term insights

15+

Law, Media, Entertainment, Finance, Property

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree, AAB at A-Levels (or equivalent)

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, Software summer internships, Development, short-term insights Finance, Sales

150+

Global Data, Software Development, Financial, Client Services & Sales

London

Competitive salary Varies depending on programme, EU languages an advantage

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

13+

Law, Management, HR

London, Beijing, Shanghai, US

Banking

19+

Finance, Credit Risk Analytics, Technology, Audit & Treasury

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Technology

15+

Trainee contracts

Law, Mobile, Gaming, Software, Cloud, E-Commerce, Health, IT, Cleantech, Biotechnology, Medical Devices, Financial Services, Technology

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

190 | www.careersuk.org

Online application, CV submission


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Transport, Business

20+

Finance, Management

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Science & Technology

25+

Engineering, Management, Science

UK, Germany, Belgium, France, Switzerland

£25,000+

Varies on programme

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Media & Entertainment

15+

Media, Retail, Logistics

UK

£15,000

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Construction, Manufacturing

41+

Business, Finance, Engineering

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Varies on programme

Training contracts, vacation schemes

Law, Insurance & Reinsurance, Liability

18+

Law

Europe, Asia, America, Middle East

£26,000+

Minimum predicted 2:1 degree in any discipline, 300 UCAS points at A-Levels

Online application, video interview, critical thinking test, assessment day, group task, written exercise

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

Varies

Engineering, Healthcare, Marketing, Finance, Logistics & Supply Chain

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

15+

Technology, Finance, Marketing, Advertising, HR

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Graduate schemes, vacation schemes

Law, Debt, Finance, Investment Funds, Real Estate, Tax, Financial Services, Arbitration & Litigation

10+

Law

Europe, Asia, America,

£28,000+

All relevant qualifications considered

Online application, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

Varies

Law

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree, AAB at A-Levels

Varies on programme

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Public Sector

10+

Engineering, Technology, Business, Aerospace, Manufacturing

Worldwide

£20,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

29+

Marketing, Management, Sales, Finance, HR, Technology

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Training contracts

Law, Finance, Real Estate, Construction, Litigation, Employment, Pensions, Insurance & Reinsurance, Tax

15+

Law

Europe, Asia, Middle East, Latin America, America

£44,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline, AAB at A-Levels (or equivalent)

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Graduate schemes

Defence, Weapons, Technology & Mechanical

80+

Finance, Supply Chain, Project Management & Procurement

UK

£26,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Training contracts

Law, Corporate, Commercial

30+

Law

UK

£44,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, and a Commendation in LPC and CPE/GDL (if applicable)

Online application, assessment day, partner interview, written exercise, group exercise

Get a Head Start | 191


Company

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Competitive salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, assessment centre

London, New York

£36,000+

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Sales, Law, Finance, Marketing, Management

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Online application, telephone interview, assessment centre

76+

Business, Development, Finance, Management

UK

£23,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree or masters

Online application, online test, assessment day

Retail

Varies

Sales, Marketing, Retail

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Gas & Electricity

30+

Finance, IT, Marketing, Business, Management

UK

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:2 degree

Varies on programme

Training contracts

Law, Digital, Energy, Financial Services, Life Sciences, Real Estate, Recruitment, Transport

20+

Law

UK

£36,750+

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline, A & B grades at A-Levels

Online application, verbal reasoning test, assessment day, panel interview

Vacation schemes, training contracts

Law, Energy, Infrastructure, Financial Services, Real Estate, Advanced Manufacturing, Technology

68+

Law

UK

£41,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree, minimum 300 UCAS points at A-Levels

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

Varies

Law

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Healthcare & Biopharmaceutical

25+

Marketing, Sales, Research & Development, Finance, Supply Chain

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Training contracts

Law, Litigation, Dispute Resolutions, Financial Services, Technology, Media, Health Care, Advertising, Shipping, Energy, Real Estate

25+

Law

Europe, America, Middle East, Asia

£43,000

Minimum predicted 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, strength assessment, interview

Graduate schemes

Accounting & Financial Management, Audit, Tax, Consulting Services

280+

Audit, Tax, Consulting, Risk Advisory, Corporate Finance, Accounting, IT

UK

£21,000+

Full details available on website

Online application, online assessment, video interview, assessment day

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Gas & Power

15+

Marketing, Engineering, Management, Finance

UK

£15,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree in any discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Public Sector

15+

Construction, HR, Plant Engineering, Project Management

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline, or masters degree in Engineering

Varies on programme

Opportunities

Industry Focus

Graduate schemes, summer internships

Consultancy, Health & Benefits, Wealth & Investments, Workforce & Careers, Mergers & Acquisitions

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

15+

Health, Wealth, Career

UK

Law

12+

Law

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

8+

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Banking

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

192 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Public Sector

30+

Supply Chain, Logistics, Marketing, Management, Business, Finance

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Degree in relevant discipline

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

20+

Law, Marketing, HR

UK

£37,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, assessment day

Winter, spring and summer vacation schemes

Law, Healthcare, Life, Science, Technology, Media & Communications

25+

Law & Non-Law Students

Europe, Asia, Middle East

£38,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering

Varies

Construction; Civil, Structural & Building Services, Engineering; Environmental & Sustainability, Management; Commercial & Quantity, Surveying; Planning & Architectural Design

Birmingham, Bristol, Cardiff, Glasgow, Leeds, London, Manchester, Newcastle, Woking

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Construction

12+

Engineering, Business, IT, Health & Safety

Europe, US

£19,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Finance

15+

Global Banking, Investment

UK, Europe

£24,000+

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships

Law

30+

Law, Management, HR

Worldwide

£39,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, assessment day

Summer internships, graduate schemes

Law

6+

Law

UK, Europe

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Full details available on website

Graduate schemes

Steelmaking, Manufacturing, Construction, Automotive, Packaging, Lifting & Excavating, Energy

100+

Electrical & Mechanical Engineering, Environmental, Manufacturing, Research & Development, Supply Chain, Finance, IT

UK

£25,000+

N/A

Online selection process, shortlisting, competency interview, presentation, verbal & numerical testing

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Science & Technology

15+

Data Analytics, Finance, Marketing, Sales, Software Engineering

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Technology & Communications

60+

Security, Aerospace, Transportation, Engineering, Business, Finance

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Minimum 2:2 degree in relevant discipline

Varies on programme

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Law

25+

Law, Finance

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline, AAB at A-Levels

Online application, assessment day

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Public Sector

15+

Construction, Engineering, Marketing, Finance

UK

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Get a Head Start | 193


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Retail

16+

Merchandising, Business Analyst, Finance, Visual Merchandising, Sourcing, Supply Chain, IT

Worldwide

Competitive salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Placement years, internships, short-term insights

Property

30+

Engineering, Technology, Corporate

UK

Competitive salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, assessment day

Graduate schemes, placements, internships, apprenticeships

Financial Services

40+

Sales, Marketing & Distribution

UK, Worldwide

Competitive salary

Degree in any discipline

Online application, strengths test, critical reasoning test, video interview, assessment day

Graduate schemes, placements, internships

Consulting

Varies

Strategy, Marketing, Mergers & Acquisitions

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Varies on programme

Online application

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Construction & Property

70+

Construction, Architecture, Engineering

UK

£13,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Graduate schemes, aspire rotational schemes

Construction

40+

Construction

UK

£24,000 - £27,000 depending on location, plus benefits

Built Environment degree preferred but not essential

Online application

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Law

15+

Law

Worldwide

Competitive salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, phone interview, assessment day

Graduate schemes, placements, internships

Financial Services

150+

Sales, Trading, Structuring, Research, Quantitative Research, Electronic Market, Commerce

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, strengths test, critical reasoning test, video interview, assessment day

Graduate schemes, placements, internships

Manufacturer

150+

Engineering, Technical Sales, Software Engineering

UK

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, assessment centre, interview

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Public Sector

19+

Sales, Marketing, Supply Chain, Engineering, Logistics, HR

Worldwide

Competitive salary, benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Construction, Civil Engineering, Surveying

200+

Engineering, Business, Management

Worldwide

Competitive salary, plus benefits

Varies on programme

Online application, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships

IT, Software

120+

System, Network, Security & Software Engineering, Sales, Management, Business Analysts

UK

£21,000 - £24,000, depending on experience

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline, also highly ambitious and driven

CV & cover letter

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Finance & Banking

23+

Investment Banking, Commercial Banking, Technology, Finance, HR

Worldwide

£20,000+, plus benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, phone interview, assessment centre

Placement years, summer internships, shortterm insights

Engineering, Built Environment

20+

Mechanical & Civil Engineering, Railway, Electrical

London

£17,000+, free travel on TFL’s networks for you and 1 other

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application, online testing, video interview, assessment centre

194 | www.careersuk.org


Company

Opportunities

Industry Focus

No. Jobs

Roles Recruiting

Location

Salary / Benefits

Entry Requirements

Application Process

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Public Sector

39+

Marketing, Sales, Finance, HR, Supply Chain

UK

Competitive salary, plus benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, phone interview, assessment day

Internships, graduate jobs

Social Media

14+

Management, Marketing, HR

Worldwide

£29,000

Minimum 2:1 degree or PhD

Online application

Graduate schemes, placements, internships, apprenticeships

Car Manufacturing

Varies

Business HR, Finance, IT, Software Engineering, Product Development, Marketing, Sales & Service, Design

Worldwide

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:2 degree

Online application, telephone interview, online test, assessment centre

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Technology

14+

Engineering, Finance, Risk Management, IT, Operations

Worldwide

£16,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Internships, placement years

Technology

23+

Sales, Marketing, IT, HR, Finance

Worldwide

£19,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, video interview, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Consultancy & Construction

33+

Building, Surveying, Sustainability, Management, Risk

UK

Competitive salary, plus benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, phone interview, assessment day

Graduate schemes internships

Public Sector

16+

Sales, Marketing, Law, Management, Finance

UK

£24,000+

Minimum 2:2 degree, must meet security requirements

Online application, online test, assessment centre

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Pharmaceutical & Chemical

35+

Science, Business, Finance, Healthcare

Worldwide

£22,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Digital & Technology

34+

Finance, Technology, Data Analytics, Management

UK

Competitive salary, plus benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline

Online application, online test, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Consultancy

44+

Defence and Security, Finance, Healthcare, Travel, Logistics

Worldwide

Competitive salary, plus benefits

Minimum 2:1 degree, 300 UCAS points

Online application, online test, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Pharmaceutical & Healthcare

50+

Business, Finance, HR

UK

£24,000+

Varies on programme

Online application, online test, phone interview, assessment day

Graduate schemes, internships

IT

15+

Management, Material Control, Supply Chain, Manufacturing, Engineering, IT, Finance, HR, Marketing

Worldwide

£21,000-£24,000, depending on experience

Minimum 2:1 degree in any discipline, also highly ambitious and driven

CV, cover letter

Graduate schemes, internships, placement years

Insurance

49+

Actuarial, Business Management, Finance, Technology

Worldwide

£25,000+

Minimum 2:1 degree in relevant discipline, AAB at A-Levels

Online application, online test, phone interview, assessment day

Graduate schemes, international internships

IT

20+

Programming, Project Management & Design

UK

Competitive salary

Minimum 2:1 degree

Online application

Placement years, internships, short term insights

Energy

15+

Oil & Gas, Energy Services

Worldwide

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Varies on programme

Get a Head Start | 195


196 | www.careersuk.org


Get a Head Start | 197

Profile for Careers UK

The Ultimate Guide to your Career by Careers UK