Page 1

PART II FORM I

Application for Workforce Development Funding Checklist Date: June 15, 2013 Enhancements

Brief Description of Project: Drake State Manufacturing Technology Program

Requesting Organization: J. F. Drake State Community and Technical College PART A: The application package must be submitted in original and one photo copy and will include each completed form, the project narrative, and attachments (if applicable) in the order listed below: X Form I: This Checklist X Form II: Project Proposal Cover Page and Signatures X Form IIA: Regional Council Certification Statement (Signed by the Chairperson for each Region) X Form III: Project Summary (Not to exceed 3 pages) X Form IV: Project Budget X Form IVA: Project Budget Backup X Form V: Project Narrative (Not to exceed 10 pages) PART B: The application should specifically address the following criteria: 1. Y / N / NA Does this application address priorities identified by regional WFD council strategic plan (Attach a signed certificate from each regional council affected; cite the strategy or strategies in the regional council strategic plan addressed by the proposed activities) 2. Y / N / NA Does the relationship of proposed actions and outcomes directly address the solicitation for grant proposals (Applicable only if RFP was issued in solicitation by the Governor’s Office of Workforce Development) 3. Y / N / NA Evidence is attached or otherwise declared that the stated need is based on objective and current data 4. Y / N / NA Evidence is attached or otherwise stated that the applicant is capable and willing to carry out planned activities with maximum efficiency and effectiveness. (Use past performance on WFD projects/grants, if applicable.) 5. Y / N / NA Evidence is attached or otherwise declared that community resource leveraging is available to maximize impact of grant funds on application 6. Y / N / NA Evidence is attached or otherwise acknowledged that the project is part of an overall workforce development plan and that there is collaboration with regional and community service providers and stakeholders GOWD Form I (Version – March 6, 2013) Page 1 of 2 


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative 7. Y / N / NA Evidence is attached or otherwise declared that the activities can be sustained by the grant recipient beyond the grant period. Not applicable for dual enrollment applications. 8. Y / N / NA Evidence is attached demonstrating support for the application from area employers, economic developers, and elected officials 9. Y / N / NA Evidence is attached or otherwise declared that the proposed activities are practical and will effectively address the stated needs 10. Y / N / NA Anticipated outcomes align with stated needs 11. Y / N / NA Do proposed performance measures and target levels of performance address meaningful and realistic goals (e.g., number obtaining employment, number retaining employment, average wage increases). Remarks: ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________ GOWD Form I (Version – March 6, 2013) Page 2 of 2 

2


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative FORM II: COVER PAGE This Application for Funding is for the following (please check only one category per application): _____ Dual Enrollment (For “Credit” Courses Only) _____ Short-Term / Non-Credit Training _____ Customized Training / Incumbent Worker Training _X__ Other Workforce Development Initiatives I.

Project and Contact Information

Project Title: Drake State Manufacturing Technology Program Enhancements Amount of Funds Requested: $ 273,694.00 Service Provider/Fiscal Agent: J. F. Drake State Community and Technical College Mailing Address: 3421 Meridian St. N., Huntsville, Alabama 35811 Name and Title of Project Contact (Knowledgeable individual and responsible for grant negotiation): Dr. John Reutter FAX: 256 551-3151

Email: john.reutter@drakestate.edu

Phone: 256 551-3117

Physical Address(s) of Training / Equipment (include County): 3421 Meridian St. N., Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama 35811 Name and Title of Fiscal Contact (if different from above): Mr. Horace Franklin, Business Manager FAX: 256 551-3135

Email: horace.franklin@drakestate.edu

Phone: 256 551-310

Name of State Board of Education Member(s) of the location where training will take place: Mary Scott Hunter II.

Authorization

As the person authorized to act on behalf of the service provider/fiscal agent, I certify that the information submitted in this application is accurate. I also certify that the service provider will carry out the proposed activities as stated and will follow accountability and reporting requirements.

Helen T. McAlpine Printed or Typed Name Authorized Official

President Title

_____________________________ Signature Authorized Official

6/18/2014 Date

GOWD Form II (Version – March 6, 2013) 

3


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative FORM IIA: WORKFORCE DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL CERTIFICATION NOTE: If project covers multiple workforce development regions, certification must be provided by all regional councils. The exception is for a state-wide project application, which requires certification from one regional council - typically the council where the project is headquartered. I certify that the Drake State Manufacturing Technology Program Enhancements (name of project) proposed by J. F. Drake State Community and Technical College (service provider/fiscal agent) addresses workforce development priorities, strategies, and targeted occupations identified by the Region 2 Workforce Development Council or addresses immediate priority training needs not initially identified through the strategic planning process. I also certify that the Region 2 Workforce Development Council or its applicable committee has reviewed the project application and recommends funding the proposed activities. This project directly addresses workforce development in the following industry and targeted occupations identified as priorities in the regional council’s strategic plan: Industry or industries: Target occupation(s): welders, industrial maintenance technicians, machinists, assemblers, mechanics, mechanical system designers, robotics technicians This project directly addresses the following strategy or strategies identified in the regional workforce development strategic plan: Advanced Manufacturing Workforce Development The Regional Council assigns this application a priority rating of (ranging from 0-5, using the ranking system below): 5 – Meets strategies and targeted occupations identified as critical (limited to 2 applications per funding cycle) for this Fiscal Year (FY) and has excellent projected outcomes to address our WFD needs. 4 - Meets strategies and targeted occupations identified as very important for this FY and has very good projected outcomes to address our WFD needs. 3 – Meets strategies and targeted occupations identified as important for this FY and has good projected outcomes to address our WFD needs. 2 – Meets strategies and targeted occupations identified but is less important for this FY. 1 – Meets strategies and targeted occupations identified but is not important for this FY. 0 – Does not meet strategies or targeted occupations identified for this FY. NOTE: All applications must be submitted to GOWD for documentation purposes, even if application is not recommended or receives a 0 rating. Proposal recommended in the amount of $

_____________________________________ Printed or Typed Name & Date

by Region

Council.

_____________________________________ Signature Regional workforce development council chair or

designee (must be voting member of the regional council) GOWD Form IIa (Version – March 6, 2013) 

4


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative FORM III: PROJECT SUMMARY Provide a brief overview of the project, responding to each item listed below. Summary must be no more than three (3) pages and must provide a clear, concise, well-constructed, and to-the-point description of the project in areas indicated. I.

Project title: Drake State Manufacturing Technology Program Enhancements

II.

Service provider/fiscal agent: J. F. Drake State Community and Technical College

III.

Total funds requested: $ 273,694.00 (Projects are funded on FY basis, Oct1 – Sep30)

IV.

Estimated start date of training (based on start of semester, receipt of equipment, etc.) and length of course(s) (i.e. standard / full semester schedule; 3 weeks short term non-credit training, etc.): 10/1/2013

V.

Identify the industry sector(s) and targeted occupation(s) and how this project will address each: (Must meet the strategies identified in the regional council’s strategic plan) The purpose of this project is to secure and install state-of-the-art training equipment and upgrade curriculum in Drake State’s manufacturing-related technology programs: welding, industrial systems technology (robotics, mechanics, hydraulics, pneumatics, PLCs, motor controls), machine tool technology (machinists, CNC programs, setters), and engineering graphics (3-D mechanical systems design, rapid prototyping). The occupations affected include a full range of technician positions in local manufacturing industries, including aerospace, defense, medical equipment, automotive, and mechanical design, Positions include, but are not limited to, assemblers, machine operators, parts designers, maintenance technicians, and quality control testers.

VI.

Target population(s) to be addressed by proposed activities (e.g. High School, Dislocated Worker, Adult, Youth, Other): The new equipment and upgraded curriculum will be integrated into existing programs that already provide technician training for dually enrolled students, high school graduates, unemployed workers, underemployed workers, veterans, and others seeking entry into highpaying positions in advanced manufacturing industries.

VII.

Proposed activities: (Summarize how this project addresses specific and immediate training needs in the service provider’s area, documented demand data, hiring and expansion announcements, etc., if applicable): The upgraded training that this grant will facilitate will ensure that workers in training at Drake State will be able to develop immediately marketable skills utilized in Huntsville/Madison County manufacturing operations.

VIII.

Anticipated outcomes and targeted levels of performance (based on start date & ending 30 Sep): State the applicable outcomes (Respond with NA where appropriate): a. Total number of participants to be served 135 # b. Of those in a. above, Completers 81_# 60% of those participating 5


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative c. Of those in b. above, Completers earning college credits 100% # e. Of those in a. and b. above, Entered related employment 57 # 70% of completers f. Of those in h. below, Retained related employment 6 # 75% of completers g. Of those in b. thru f. above, Continuing in training past end the of grant period 20_# 25% h. Of those in b. above, Currently employed - Skills upgrade only _8_# 10% of completers i. Equipment installed or upgraded 10/30, 2/28, 4/30 date(s) (Only if critical to this project.) j. Credential(s) to be earned by completers: 27-hour certificate, 30-hour certificate, associate degree in applied science, AWS certification, OSHA-10 certification, OSHA-30 certification, NCCER Levels 1 and 2 in Industrial Maintenance IX.

Is there expressed legislative interest in this specific proposal? Yes / No (If answered Yes, please identify the legislator(s) and corresponding House and/or Senate district(s).)

X.

Has there been or will there be other funding solicited from other sources for this project (i.e. Perkins funds, line item or earmark in ETF, etc)? Yes / No (If answered Yes, please provide background to include the source, amount, date requested, outcome if known, etc.)

XI.

Identify all anticipated sources of revenue and estimated amounts (e.g. tuition/fees paid by Individual Training Accounts (ITA), Pell Grant, Scholarships, etc.) N/A GOWD Form III (Version – March 6, 2013) 

6


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative FORM IV: PROJECT BUDGET

Provide a detailed project budget in the categories listed. Include requested grant funds and leveraged funds, and total funds by line item. Leave blank if no funds are budgeted for a particular line item. See Form IIIA for a description of each line item. Budget Item

Cost (Requested)

Salaries Benefits Individual Training (scholarships/tuition/fees) Staff Development/Training Travel In State Computers/Technology Public Relations/Outreach Materials/Supplies Renovation/Construction Equipment Books Other – Non-capitalized Equipment *Projected Revenue TOTAL

NOTES:

Leveraged/Donated (Non-requested)

$ 254,800.00 $ 18,894.00 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX $ 273,694.00

$

*List all sources of projected revenues (tuition, fees, other grants, etc.) – does not include funds requested in this application. Unused budget lines and/or line item titles may be changed to reflect items unique to projects. Additional budget line Items may be added as needed.

GOWD Form IV (Version – March 6, 2013) 

7


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative FORM IVA: PROJECT BUDGET BACKUP Each budget line item on Form III must be supported by a detailed description. This form explains what budget details are required for each line item. Complete the budget backup providing as much detail as possible. All staff costs listed should include title/function, salary/wage, and percentage of time charged to project. Other costs should be detailed by type of activity, unit cost, and total units. I.

Program Staff Salaries (Position title/function of staff assigned to project-specific program services activities, salary/wage, percentage of time charged to project.)

II.

Program Staff Benefits (Type and cost of fringe benefits for each position included in project budget.)

III.

Cost of Individual Training (Scholarships, tuition, training fees; and other costs related to training of individuals. Indicate the projected cost of the course(s), regardless if requesting funding)

IV.

Staff Development/Training (Detail of consultants; tuition/fees, other costs related to providing and/or attending; staff members attending training for new equipment, etc.)

V.

In-State Travel (Costs and justification of mileage, lodging, meals and other travel-related expenses.)

VI.

Computers and Technology (Itemized listing of computer hardware & software and how it is used in relation to the proposed activities.)

VII. Public Relations, Outreach (Details of media advertising and other public outreach costs, e.g., newspapers, radio/TV, direct mail, etc.) VIII. Materials & Supplies (Office supplies, training supplies and materials, other supplies required to carry out project, detailed by type and costs, and the intent for retention/accountability of durable items.) IX.

Renovation / construction costs (Itemized estimate of building expenses, if applicable.)

X.

Equipment (If applicable, attach a vendor price & specifications sheet for proposed equipment purchases for use during negotiation phase and indicate the intent for reusing durable items in subsequent classes.) Capitalized equipment: 2 Faro Edge Portable measuring systems ($64,900 each): one of these will go into the Engineering Graphics Lab and the other into the Precision Machining Lab. The system can be used to create 3D drawings of existing parts as well as to measure new parts produced by either digital fabrication or by traditional CNC equipment. 2 TIG-welders ($5,500 each); These machines utilize new, green welding technology. They are more efficient than the older trainers utilized by the College, resulting in energy savings and less wastage of consumables during the welding process. 8


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative 1 Pipe bevel machine ($5,000): Pipe welding is becoming increasingly important. The College does not presently have a pipe bevel machine. Students need to learn how to operate the equipment as well as to utilize it in their pipe welding lab exercises. XI.

Books (attach itemized list if applicable).

XII. Other (Other items and related costs not included in the above line items that are required to implement the project included as a grant funded item in the budget page.) Non-capitalized equipment: 2 MIG-welders ($2,250 each): The current welding lab does not have enough MIG-welders to support current training demands. These two welders will enable students to have more training time while completing MIG welding training during the lab time allotted for the classes. This expansion of welding equipment will result in higher skill levels attainable by the students before graduating from the program. 6 Cube 3D printers ($1,399 each): These 3D printers will be utilized in the Engineering Graphics Lab to enable students to create prototypes faster and more frequently than is feasible using the College’s current, single 3D printer. Having multiple printer stations means that students do not have to have for long periods of time until their designs are generated and more practice of design work will be feasible with these printers. XIII. Projected revenue (list all sources of projected or potential revenues, e.g., tuition, fees, other grants – does not include funds requested in this application) N/A

9


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative FORM V: PROJECT NARRATIVE Respond to each item as directed. Respond with NA if an item is not applicable to the proposed project. Responses must be in the order of the items listed and labeled as each item is labeled. The narrative must be no more than ten (10) pages. Attachments, including letters of support and data documentation, should follow the project narrative and be separately labeled. An index listing attachments and page numbers is recommended if attachments are referenced in the project narrative. I.

Statement of Need a. Describe the needs to be addressed by the proposed project; include applicable data and research-based information. (Recommend: Expansion and hiring announcements, regional workforce development council strategic plan, the Alabama State of the Workforce Report available at www.owd.alabma.gov/downloads.htm , and Labor Market Information available at http://www2.dir.state.al.us/vlmi/.) b. Describe how the proposed project will address the needs. c. Provide a list of businesses/organizations for prospective job placement and attach letters of support from area employers (letters are not counted against the 10 page maximum).

II.

Project Activities a. Provide a timeline and description of project activities, including purchases, recommended training provider(s), start date of training, etc. b. Provide the Classification Instructional Program (CIP) codes for training activities involving “for credit� courses. c. Describe the skills, knowledge, and abilities that will be gained by the targeted group.

III.

Individuals and Industries Served a. Identify the population(s) to be served by the project. b. Identify the industry sectors and occupations to be served by the project. c. Describe how those businesses or industry sectors will benefit from the project.

IV.

Project Outcomes and Performance Targets a. State the anticipated outcomes of the project in measurable terms. Include a target level of performance for each outcome. b. Describe how it will be known if the proposed project was an overall success.

V.

Non-duplication a. Describe how the service provider and the regional workforce development council have ensured that the proposed activities do not unnecessarily duplicate activities in area. Evidence must be given that funds will be used efficiently and that duplication is avoided. b. Explain if this is a capacity building expansion of an existing program (describe current capacity, how much will this project expand current capabilities, how will the current class schedule change (e.g. Currently the lab has 12 welding booths, adding these 12 additional booths will double our training capacity; Propose to add a night class)

VI.

Collaboration a. Identify other stakeholders and workforce development partners and describe their roles in meeting the goals of this project. 10


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative b. Describe how this project was planned with active involvement from stakeholders, particularly the regional workforce development council(s). VII. Leveraged Resources a. Describe other programs, organizations, and resources that will be supporting this project State specifically what aspects of the project will be supported by these leveraged resources. Assign a monetary value to each resource. b. Describe other funding sources that will support this project (e.g. DOL grants, corporate donations, Perkins funds, etc.) VIII. Sustainability a. Describe how the benefits or activities of this project will be sustained beyond the funding period. NOTE: Funding is for current fiscal year only. IX.

Capacity of Service Provider a. If applicable, describe the outcomes that were realized with grant funds provided by the Department of Postsecondary Education or otherwise through the Governor’s Office of Workforce Development over the past three years. Describe the degree to which the goals of the funded projects were achieved.

X.

Marketing Strategy a. Describe the public relations, promotion and outreach plan to meet enrollment goals, promote job placement for completers, ensure public awareness, etc.

XI.

Special Characteristics of Project a. Describe any unique characteristics of the proposed project that are not addressed above. This may include characteristics such as: 1. Measures of employer benefits or other exceptional levels of employer participation and commitment. 2. Unique inter-program coordination relationships. 3. Development of career pathways or more effective practices. 4. Addresses an immediate hiring or training demand.

11


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative I. Statement of Need According to the Alabama Labor Market Information System, the annual growth rate forecast for Region 2 from 2010 to 2020 is 1.4% from 395,680 workers to 454,790. This growth will sustain Region 2’s position as the second largest labor force in Alabama with 19.51% of the state’s total workforce. During that time, the region’s manufacturing workforce will grow 4.59% from 60,420 to 63,196 workers. The age group of 25 – 34 years of age has decreased nearly 30% since 2003 (attached Alabama Labor Market data chart). This dramatic shift highlights a crisis in forming the labor market pool for manufacturing. It is incumbent upon the educational systems of Region 2 to enhance outreach and training opportunities to attract new workers into this pool. This effort will require colleges to shift more training emphasis to high-tech equipment matching that currently being adopted in aerospace, automotive, defense, and medical equipment manufacturing industries located in the Huntsville/Madison County area. New technologies, such as digital fabrication, mobile measurement systems, 3D design, 3D image capture, are necessarily being utilized by north Alabama industries to maximize productivity to keep product pricing competitive with global competition. These new technologies enable Alabama industries to bring products to market faster, with higher precision, and cost-effective, low run rates to meet rapidly changing customer demands. The College seeks to add new technology equipment to its engineering graphics technology program (3D printing, 3D image capture, 3D graphics design software), machine tool technology (portable, highprecision measuring system, additive manufacturing equipment using advanced 3D printing technology), industrial systems technology (3D printing for robotic parts replacements), and welding technology (green welding equipment). These new laboratory training systems represent the state-of-the-art manufacturing technologies utilized in high-tech manufacturing firms. Future workers seeking entry into these industries will need to be competent in operating this equipment and using it for design, fabrication, and maintenance work. Growth in Drake State manufacturing training programs, engineering graphics (DDT), industrial systems (INT), machine tool (MTT), and welding (WDT) shown in the table below illustrates growth rates in those programs ranging from 1% to 271% Growth in Drake State Manufcturing Training  over that time. Student interest and job Programs (2007 ‐ 2012) attraction for industrial mechanical designers is reflected in the 271% growth rate in Students engineering graphics. This exciting field Program 400 MTT utilizes smart 3D design systems that enable 300 technicians to identify product design WDT 200 problems before manufacturing actually INT occurs. The transition of designs to 100 DDT manufacturing is rapid and essentially error 0 free with the rapid prototyping facilitated by 2007‐08 2008‐09 2009‐10 2010‐11 2011‐12 digital fabrication systems using 3D printers that can produce production parts using composite materials that are stronger than standard metal parts shaped by CNC mills and lathes. This technology is being increasingly utilized by NASA and defense contractors located in Huntsville/Madison County. Technicians are needed who understand the technology, can assist in design, R&D projects, as well as in the operation of production equipment and maintenance of that equipment. 12


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative Equipment descriptions are enclosed in this proposal. Because of the newne3ss of the technology and its rapid adoption nationally, pricing of the equipment is declining at a rapid rate. The cost estimates included in this proposal are current pricing, but there has been significant shift in this pricing over the past six months. It is anticipated that by the time the funds are available, the prices will have declined additionally. Consequently, the prices identified in the budget are expected to be at the upper limit. If prices do drop further before purchase, the difference will be utilized to stock up digital fabrication raw materials, enabling more student projects to be completed during the training process, resulting in potentially higher skill levels of the graduates. Businesses who are interested in hiring graduates with the training described above include Boeing Aerospace, Northrup Grumman, Lockheed Martin, Toyota Motor Manufacturing Alabama, PPG, and numerous Tier 1 and Tier 2 suppliers to the automotive and aerospace OEMs located in Madison County. II. Project Activities Upon approval of funding, the College will submit RFPs for the capital equipment. The welding equipment is readily available and will be installed and in use by the end of the first quarter of the fiscal year. The Faro Edge Portable CMM equipment has a longer lead time and will be installed and in use by the end of the 2nd quarter of the fiscal year. The Cube 3D printers will be ordered by the end of October, 2013 and are expected to be installed and in use before December 2013. The Stratasys Fused Deposition Modeling System is targeted for the Machine Tool Technology laboratory and is expected to be installed and in use by students before the end of April 2014. Upon installation of the equipment and manufacturer training of the faculty members on the equipment, the students will be immediately trained on the equipment and be able to utilize it in their laboratory assignments. The curriculum revisions will be relatively minor as this equipment does not require the development of new courses. Instead, the equipment enables students to obtain additional skills in areas that are already covered by the existing curriculum. III. Individuals and Industries Served All students enrolled in the programs targeted for this equipment (machine tool, engineering graphics, industrial systems, and welding) will receive training on the new equipment. In addition, the Drake State Workforce Development Division will create opportunities for incumbent workers to receive training. The director of workforce development is planning on introducing the availability of this training during the first quarter of 2014 calendar year. All local manufacturing industries will be included in the informational campaign that will be developed by the director. IV. Project Outcomes and Performance Targets Currently the College measures the following student success factors in each of its technical programs: 1. Enrollment growth rate (this information captures the level of interest of prospective students in learning the technologies involved. The availability of this new, high-tech equipment is expected to make the targeted programs more attractive to high school graduates). 2. Retention rate (this information captures the level of commitment and ability of students to sustain their participation in the programs. An anticipated impact of having the high-tech training 13


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative equipment is that students will want to stay engaged in the learning process until they have completed all of their training, thus improving the retention rates of the targeted programs. Potentially, retention rates could be improved by 2 or 3 percentage points as a direct result of the equipment in the labs). 3. Completion rate (this information indicates the level of competencies achieved by the Drake students enrolled in the targeted programs. While many students find jobs or receive promotion or increases in pay as a result of achieving new competencies in a limited number of skills, ultimately completers realize the largest gains in employability benefits. It is expected that this new equipment will directly result in 2 to 3 percentage point gains in completion rates). 4. Placement rate (this information indicates the value of the well-trained student in the hiring process. Current placement rates for Drake State graduates in the targeted programs are 78% for welding, 82% for machine tool, 78% for industrial technology, and 70% for engineering graphics. The expectation is that the new lab equipment will result in a 1 to 3 percentage point gain in placement rates for these programs). V. Non-duplication There are no other technical programs of this type available in Huntsville/Madison County. Consequently, there is no duplication of capabilities resulting from the implementation of this proposal. VI. Co0llaboration Through its dual enrollment and articulation agreements with the Huntsville City Schools, Madison City Schools, and Madison County Schools, the College has a strong degree of collaboration in technical training activities. This collaboration is further reinforced by university articulation agreements with UAHuntsville, Athens State University, Oakwood University, and Alabama A&M University that enable students to transfer technical coursework in addition to general education courses into university programs at the junior level. These programs are enabling students to advance their careers at the engineering level and business management level, often by utilizing tuition reimbursement programs made available to them by their employers. Such collaboration is a highlight of the Drake State educational philosophy as applied to technical degree programs. VII. Leverage Resources While Drake State prefers not to tie in leveraged resource claims to specific programs, the College utilized Perkins funds, Title II-B funds, National Science Foundation funds, and Homeland Security funds where appropriate to enhance the learning experience of the students, including opportunities for internships to further advance the training outcomes for its students. VIII. Sustainability Because this grant will be utilized to purchase training equipment with expected lifetimes ranging from 5 to 15 years, sustainability is an inevitable outcome of the use of these funds. There are no requests for staff or instructor costs or consumables in this proposal, therefore sustainability will be established upon the delivery and installation of the equipment itself.

14


Part 2: Application Forms and Narrative IX. Capacity of Service Provider The College currently administers over $18 million in grant funded projects, including Perkins, Title IIIB, four National Science Foundation projects, a Walmart Foundation-funded project, a US Department of Homeland Security project, and several projects funded previously by the Alabama Governor’s Office of Workforce Development (dual enrollment, career coaches, Ready-to-Work, and targeted technical training projects). Successful administration of prior funded projects led to the addition and renewal of projects funded by the agencies listed above. The capacity of Drake State to effectively administer and utilize funded projects has been demonstrated annually for the past several decades. X. Marketing Strategy The programs for which the requested equipment is targeted are incorporated in the College’s multiple outreach initiatives, including College-sponsored career fairs, college fairs, newspaper and radio/ television advertising, as well as targeted newspaper and web site advertising for specific workforce development initiatives. The equipment requested with these funds will be highlighted in future marketing efforts as it is believed that the high-tech nature of this equipment will be very attractive to the prospective student market. XI. Special Characteristics of Project As already noted in several paragraphs of this proposal, this equipment is highly sophisticated and growing in increasing popularity in local manufacturing industries. The use of this equipment in Drake State laboratories will ensure that Drake State is meeting the unique demands of local manufacturers. In addition, the very nature of the equipment facilitates inter-department cooperation. For example, use of 3D design printers in engineering graphics enables engineering graphics students to transfer their designs electronically to the machine tool department for regeneration by the CNC laboratory equipment. Students and faculty alike will be able to interact across programs, facilitated by the electronic transfer of designs. This capacity will also enable students to select from a larger selection of career paths, as they learn how to take advantage of cross-discipline skill sets and team-oriented project activities made possible by the new equipment.

15


Workforce Development Regional Council 2 Projected Employment by Major Industry Average Annual Growth (%)

Employment NAICS

21 23 31-33

22 42 44-45 48-49 51 52 53 54 55 56 61 62 71 72 81 90 91 92 93

Industry Total Employment Total Wage and Salary Employment Goods Producing Natural Resources and Mining Construction Manufacturing Durable Goods Nondurable Goods Service Providing Trade, Transportation, and Utilities Utilities Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Automobile Dealers Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Other Services (Except Government) Government Total Federal Government Employment Total state government Total local government All Other

2010 395,680 354,650

2020 454,790 412,380

Net Change 59,110 57,740

Percent United Change (%) Alabama States 14.94 1.40 1.30 16.28 1.52 1.38

Location Quotient

89,690 590 14,840 60,420 36,300 24,120 278,800 60,520 420 10,790 39,920 2,950 9,400 3,830 8,110 3,220

95,750 620 17,980 63,190 40,260 22,930 330,590 68,740 520 12,370 45,010 3,530 10,840 4,100 8,950 3,590

6,060 40 3,140 2,770 3,960 -1,190 51,790 8,220 100 1,580 5,090 590 1,450 270 840 370

6.76 5.98 21.16 4.59 10.91 -4.93 18.58 13.58 24.76 14.65 12.74 19.93 15.40 7.13 10.38 11.35

0.66 0.58 1.94 0.45 1.04 -0.50 1.72 1.28 2.24 1.38 1.21 1.83 1.44 0.69 0.99 1.08

1.19 0.71 2.20 0.82 1.47 -0.34 1.45 1.08 0.86 1.19 0.98 1.28 1.39 0.56 0.85 1.31

0.00 0.00 0.15 0.78 0.92 0.99 0.80 0.82 0.60 0.77

36,570

49,100

12,540

34.28

2.99

2.77

2.01

1,750

1,890

150

8.37

0.81

0.87

0.58

20,750

25,430

4,680

22.55

2.05

1.93

1.08

25,620 37,810 2,190

29,790 53,680 2,630

4,180 15,870 440

16.31 41.98 20.15

1.52 3.57 1.85

1.23 2.83 1.76

0.81 0.82 0.70

13,570

15,900

2,330

17.18

1.60

1.35

0.82

37,360 19,630

36,140 18,060

-1,220 -1,570

-3.27 -8.00

-0.33 -0.83

0.08 -0.79

1.11 2.05

3,080 14,660 41,030

2,890 15,200 42,410

-180 530 1,370

-5.98 3.64 3.35

-0.61 0.36 0.33

0.15 0.45 0.44

0.42 0.84

0.30 0.88 1.32

This data is developed and provided by the Alabama Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Division in cooperation with the Projections Managing Partnership of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. 1. Natural Resources and Mining includes NAICS 1133 logging. 2. Employment data is rounded to the nearest 10 and may not add due to rounding. Percentages may not add due to rounding. 3. Average Annual Growth Rate is compounded. 4. For projections purposes Government only includes Government administration. It does not include post office, education, or hospitals. 5. All Other includes agriculture, self-employed, unpaid family workers, and private household that are not covered by unemployment insurance. 6. N/A - National Data is not available at this detail. 7. Location quotient is the comparison of respective area to the nation

Page 10


Workforce Development Region 2 Employment By Age Group Manufacturing 90,000 14-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55+

80,000

70,000

60,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

0 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Source: Local Employment Household Dynamics Partnership between the Alabama Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Division, and the US Census Bureau, Quarterly Workforce Indicators.


Workforce Development Regional Council 2 Projected Employment by Major Industry Average Annual Growth (%)

Employment NAICS

21 23 31-33

22 42 44-45 48-49 51 52 53 54 55 56 61 62 71 72 81 90 91 92 93

Industry Total Employment Total Wage and Salary Employment Goods Producing Natural Resources and Mining Construction Manufacturing Durable Goods Nondurable Goods Service Providing Trade, Transportation, and Utilities Utilities Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Automobile Dealers Transportation and Warehousing Information Finance and Insurance Real Estate and Rental and Leasing Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services Management of Companies and Enterprises Administrative and Support and Waste Management and Remediation Services Educational Services Health Care and Social Assistance Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation Other Services (Except Government) Government Total Federal Government Employment Total state government Total local government All Other

2010 395,680 354,650

2020 454,790 412,380

Net Change 59,110 57,740

Percent United Change (%) Alabama States 14.94 1.40 1.30 16.28 1.52 1.38

Location Quotient

89,690 590 14,840 60,420 36,300 24,120 278,800 60,520 420 10,790 39,920 2,950 9,400 3,830 8,110 3,220

95,750 620 17,980 63,190 40,260 22,930 330,590 68,740 520 12,370 45,010 3,530 10,840 4,100 8,950 3,590

6,060 40 3,140 2,770 3,960 -1,190 51,790 8,220 100 1,580 5,090 590 1,450 270 840 370

6.76 5.98 21.16 4.59 10.91 -4.93 18.58 13.58 24.76 14.65 12.74 19.93 15.40 7.13 10.38 11.35

0.66 0.58 1.94 0.45 1.04 -0.50 1.72 1.28 2.24 1.38 1.21 1.83 1.44 0.69 0.99 1.08

1.19 0.71 2.20 0.82 1.47 -0.34 1.45 1.08 0.86 1.19 0.98 1.28 1.39 0.56 0.85 1.31

0.00 0.00 0.15 0.78 0.92 0.99 0.80 0.82 0.60 0.77

36,570

49,100

12,540

34.28

2.99

2.77

2.01

1,750

1,890

150

8.37

0.81

0.87

0.58

20,750

25,430

4,680

22.55

2.05

1.93

1.08

25,620 37,810 2,190

29,790 53,680 2,630

4,180 15,870 440

16.31 41.98 20.15

1.52 3.57 1.85

1.23 2.83 1.76

0.81 0.82 0.70

13,570

15,900

2,330

17.18

1.60

1.35

0.82

37,360 19,630

36,140 18,060

-1,220 -1,570

-3.27 -8.00

-0.33 -0.83

0.08 -0.79

1.11 2.05

3,080 14,660 41,030

2,890 15,200 42,410

-180 530 1,370

-5.98 3.64 3.35

-0.61 0.36 0.33

0.15 0.45 0.44

0.42 0.84

0.30 0.88 1.32

This data is developed and provided by the Alabama Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Division in cooperation with the Projections Managing Partnership of the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. 1. Natural Resources and Mining includes NAICS 1133 logging. 2. Employment data is rounded to the nearest 10 and may not add due to rounding. Percentages may not add due to rounding. 3. Average Annual Growth Rate is compounded. 4. For projections purposes Government only includes Government administration. It does not include post office, education, or hospitals. 5. All Other includes agriculture, self-employed, unpaid family workers, and private household that are not covered by unemployment insurance. 6. N/A - National Data is not available at this detail. 7. Location quotient is the comparison of respective area to the nation

Page 10


Workforce Development Region 2 Employment By Age Group Manufacturing 90,000 14-24

25-34

35-44

45-54

55+

80,000

70,000

60,000

50,000

40,000

30,000

20,000

10,000

0 2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

Source: Local Employment Household Dynamics Partnership between the Alabama Department of Labor, Labor Market Information Division, and the US Census Bureau, Quarterly Workforce Indicators.


J. F. Drake State Community and Technical College Equipment for Manufacturing Technology Program Enhancements June 7, 2013

Item # 1

Qty 2

2 3 4 5 6 7

2 2 2 1 2 6

8

1

Description Faro Edge portable CMM machine: 1 for  Engineering Graphics lab and 1 for Machine  Tool Technology lab FARO Laser Line Probe for Edge 64‐bit power user laptop system for Edge TIG‐welding machines Pipe bevel machine MIG welding machines Cube 3‐D printers for ABS and PLA materials Stratasys Fortus Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) System

Price each Total Cost  $        49,900.00   $      99,800.00 

$        12,000.00   $          3,000.00   $          5,500.00   $          5,000.00   $          2,250.00   $          1,399.00 

$      24,000.00   $         6,000.00   $      11,000.00   $         5,000.00   $         4,500.00   $         8,394.00 

$     115,000.00   $    115,000.00   $    273,694.00 

Capitalized Equipment Non‐capitalized Equipment

$      254,800.00 $        18,894.00


STRATASYS WHITE PAPER

3D PRINTERS VS. 3D PRODUCTION SYSTEMS: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System By Joe Hiemenz, Stratasys, Inc. When planning to purchase an additive manufacturing system, buyers will find capabilities and a price range wider than products from most any industry. Systems can range from several hundred dollars for a hobbyist unit to nearly $1 million for some high-performance systems. It’s no wonder there is confusion with respect to the product segments. This paper addresses the capabilities, roles and positioning of systems geared for professional use. Beginning with the most basic information — the definition of 3D printers — this white paper positions the two product classes.

3D Production System


While clarifying the “typical” roles and strengths of each, it also shows that there is overlap between the 3D printers and their bigger brothers, sometimes referred to as 3D production systems. As additive manufacturing system prices have decreased, interest has swelled in owning a system to produce rapid prototypes, patterns, tooling and manufactured goods. Further fueling that interest is an increase in the number of technologies, systems and options available. Choice is the operative word, and those choices include entry-level systems priced below $15,000 (USD) as well as machines selling for more than $900,000 (USD). With so many options, how do organizations know which is the best choice? How do they know what is a reasonable investment for an additive manufacturing system that will do their job right? To answer these questions, they begin with an understanding of the differences between 3D printers and 3D production systems. Knowing the distinctions between the two classes of systems allows informed decision-making that balances needs, wants, and budget. It is important to note that 3D printers and 3D production systems, at their core, work on the same principle. The term 3D production system is used because these higher performance systems are used to produce finished goods as opposed to making only prototypes. There are 10 general factors that distinguish 3D printers from 3D production systems. For some, the first factor, price, may be the only consideration. But for those with some flexibility in their capital equipment budgets, the other nine factors will guide the selection process. But this does not necessarily

mean that more money will be spent. Many companies are pleasantly surprised to find that they can do all that they want with a low-price 3D printer. Many others happily invest more in a 3D production system that offers higher performance. And countless others invest in both—running 3D printers and 3D production systems side-by-side. 3D Printers: • Compact • Low price • Easy to use

3D Production Systems: • Many materials • High performance • Large Capacity

Figure 1

What are 3D Printers and 3D Production Systems? Additive manufacturing systems were once called rapid prototyping machines and simply labeled as “low-end” or “high-end,” and distinguished by price. When opting for a “low-end” machine, there was a big price to pay in quality or performance. As the market and technologies matured, a new term, “3D printers,” sprang up. But instead of replacing “low-end” as a class descriptor, it became an over-used catch phrase that muddied the waters. To this day, there isn’t universal agreement on the definition of 3D printers. For some, the term covers all additive manufacturing technologies. However, the majority defines 3D printers as compact, low cost, and easy to use. With this understanding, a 3D printer is analogous to a desktop paper printer that is dedicated to one person or shared among a small team of co-workers. Conversely, a 3D production system is similar to a centralized copy machine with

3D Printers Vs. 3D Production Systems: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System

Page 2 of 8


higher document output, more controls, and which serves an entire company’s needs. They are the “high-end” systems in 1990s lingo. In general, they offer more capability and higher performance with a larger price tag. Yet, the distinctions between the two classes are not that clear cut. To appreciate the subtle differences, consider the 10 distinguishing characteristics. Keep in mind that these characteristics are general and typical, but there are exceptions. FDM® TECHNOLOGY 3D Printers:

3D Production Systems:

Dimension® line

Fortus® line

Figure 2

10 Distinguishing Characteristics 1. PRICE: XX 3D printers: $10,000 to $50,000 XX 3D production systems: $50,000 and above The base price of machines is the simplest and most obvious differentiator between the two classes. Low-price is essential to the 3D printer definition, so price is a primary distinguishing characteristic. Generally, 3D printers have a base price — for just the machine — that ranges from $10,000 to $50,000. Anything over $50,000 typically moves an additive manufacturing system into the high-performance system class. In the additive manufacturing market, low price does not translate to low value. Value is determined by considering all the

characteristics to find the system that can do the job while bringing the best return on investment.

2. CAPACITY / BUILD ENVELOPE: XX 3D printer: Normally less than 10” x 10” x 10” XX 3D production system: Normally greater than 1’ x 1’ x 1’ The size of a machine’s build envelope determines its capacity, typically both in terms of part size and total throughput. 3D printers, which are designed more for office use or desktop operation, have smaller build envelopes suited for small- to mid-sized parts. These devices typically have build capacities that do not exceed 12 inches in any dimension. 3D production systems, on the other hand, have the capacity to build parts that are measured in feet. In this class, two to three feet is a common measurement for the length, width or height of the build envelope. Capacity is an important consideration because it is best to avoid building parts in pieces that have to be bonded together. Sectioning parts to fit in a build chamber adds time, labor and cost while decreasing quality. Also, running an additive manufacturing system multiple times to make one part decreases efficiency and machine availability. To increase operational efficiency and total throughput, consider systems with the capacity to build many parts in a single run. So, even if a smaller 3D printer can handle a product’s biggest parts, it can be a smart decision to go with a 3D production system that can build complete assemblies or dozens of parts. As more parts are

3D Printers Vs. 3D Production Systems: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System

Page 3 of 8


consolidated in each run, operational costs decrease while efficiencies rise. A bonus is that a lot of parts can be packed into a single run that is launched Friday night and left to run unattended over the weekend.

3. MATERIALS: XX 3D printers: One or two XX 3D production systems: Eight or more Material properties play a role in every process selection. Whether the application is for a “down-and-dirty” concept model or a high-caliber production part, there will be some degree of consideration given to the materials that are available. In every case, the application needs a material that will perform well. 3D printers typically do not offer broad material selections. Most give users a choice of just one or two general-purpose materials. In this class, the systems offer adequate, rather than exceptional, mechanical and thermal properties. In stark contrast, a strength of 3D production systems is the number of materials offered and the breadth of properties available. 3D production system users can specify a material that matches the specific needs of an application by selecting from a range of options that include specialized, highly engineered thermoplastics like ULTEM® 9085. In general, the material offerings of 3D production systems make them better suited for functional testing, field testing, product trials, and creating manufacturing tools or finished goods. Each part in an assembly can be produced from a different material that is selected for the right combination of advanced material properties.

4. SPEED: XX 3D printers: Not applicable XX 3D production systems: Not applicable The speed of the additive manufacturing process is an important consideration, but it is not one that clearly distinguishes 3D printers from 3D production systems. In this area, bigger investments do not guarantee shorter build times. For example, there are 3D printers that for one-tenth the price can build parts ten times faster than some 3D production systems. On the other hand, there are 3D printers that take days to build what can be completed in hours with certain 3D production systems. For a manufacturer that offers both 3D printers and 3D production systems that do not share a common technology — there is no correlation between the speed of the process and the price tag. However, for a manufacturer with a technology that spans both classes, there is a direct link between speed and price. FDM (fused deposition modeling®) is one example in which 3D printers and 3D production systems share a common technology. In this case, the higher performance systems’ software offers sophisticated build parameter options, allowing the user to optimize the machine and wring out efficiencies that add up. Depending on these build parameters and the part geometry, the FDM 3D production system will outpace the FDM 3D printer by roughly 2 to 10 times. If speed is measured in terms of throughput, 3D production systems will again outpace 3D printers. Combining build speed with capacity, the larger systems will, in general, deliver higher production rates on a weekly

3D Printers Vs. 3D Production Systems: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System

Page 4 of 8


or monthly basis. This is an important point when faced with high-volume prototyping demands, and it is a critical factor when considering the technology to manufacture end products.

5. EASE-OF-USE: XX 3D printers: Occasional user XX 3D production systems: Trained operator If a 3D printer isn’t easy to learn and easy to use, it should not be called a 3D printer. Ease-of-use is imperative for these devices since they are intended to be used as a CAD-output tool. The occasional user is not a skilled machine operator and cannot afford to spend days in training or hours preparing and operating a machine. From start to finish, the process must be simple, straightforward and effortless. A vision shared by most 3D printer manufacturers is to make their machines as transparent and unnoticed as the process of printing a document. Admittedly, these systems are not quite to this level, but some are close. From CAD output to finished parts, some are almost as labor-less as the process of printing a few dozen two-sided pages on a standard paper printer. In other words, it’s not quite as simple as clicking print, but it requires only a few extra steps and minimal thought. To gain higher performance and greater functionality, 3D production systems generally sacrifice ease-of-use. The advances in processes, materials and controls place additional demands on the user. To get the most out of 3D production systems, there will be operators who are responsible for the oversight, maintenance and operation of the machines. These technicians will have

NOTE: Always evaluate the total process time for a technology. Build times alone are deceiving. So, include all time and labor needed on the front end to prepare a machine and on the back end to remove and finish the parts. Figure 3

undergone advanced training on the system and will continue to learn the subtle nuances of operations with each part that it produces. The technicians will also learn the unique processing requirements for each of the materials they use. There is an exception, however. For the scalable technologies, like FDM, that are used in both 3D printers and 3D production systems, ease-of-use is possible in both classes. For everyday parts, the 3D production system can be run as easily as a 3D printer. However, when advanced capabilities are needed, someone other than a casual user may be called upon to leverage all that the system offers.

6. USER OPTIONS: XX 3D printers: Minimal XX 3D production systems: Substantial In return for ease-of-use, 3D printers remove most of the operator control and user options. Instead of a computer screen filled with user-defined variables and selections, the casual user is presented with a limited number of pre-programmed routines and only a few options. And the choices must be applied globally to a part or across the entire job. In this way, 3D printers are analogous to point-and-shoot cameras.

3D Printers Vs. 3D Production Systems: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System

Page 5 of 8


3D production systems, on the other hand, are more like the sophisticated digital SLR cameras that have swappable lenses, variable flash settings, F-stop adjustments and ISO settings. 3D production systems, like their camera counterparts, give operators control of a multitude of variables to fine-tune part quality, adjust part characteristics and influence production rates. Unlike their 3D printer counterparts, the most advanced systems in this class allow the user to apply many control parameters at the feature level of the part. For example, to save time and material, the machine can make an ornamental feature hollow and a functional feature solid. This level of control, combined with material selection, is why 3D production systems are the likely candidates for advanced applications in prototype development and manufacturing.

7. ACCURACY: XX 3D printers: Acceptable to Good XX 3D production systems: Good to Excellent “Geometry dependent” is the qualifier on any statement of dimensional accuracy and repeatability for additive manufacturing systems in both technology classes. Yet, it is safe to assume that in the case of accuracy and repeatability, buyers will get their money’s worth. Overall, 3D production systems are more accurate and offer greater repeatability than their lower priced 3D printer siblings. This is not to say that 3D printers cannot make parts with reasonable dimensional accuracy. They can. There is just less emphasis on this attribute and less user influence over it. 3D printers are designed to be simple, cost-effective machines targeted

for early models and prototypes where looser tolerances are acceptable. With this target in mind, 3D printer manufacturers place less priority on accuracy. And as noted previously, the simplified user interface removes the option of fine-tuning to dial in parts for better quality. With higher expectations of part quality, the manufacturers of 3D production systems are investing in high-grade components, tight process controls and precise calibration. No longer just for prototyping, the best 3D production systems are designed and manufactured as if they were any other machine on the manufacturing floor. Tight and repeatable tolerance is a reasonable expectation when investing in this class of additive manufacturing technology. Although the quality difference may be difficult to see with the naked eye, they will show up when parts are scrutinized by quality control. It will also become apparent when seeking confirmation of a machine’s accuracy capabilities. For 3D printers, there are general tolerance claims but no exhaustive studies that qualify accuracy and repeatability. For 3D production systems, it is reasonable to expect a study that is thorough, rigorous and statistically sound. Without this level of data, buyers would find it difficult to trust that a 3D production system could actually be used for production.

8. FACILITIES: XX 3D printers: Office-like environment XX 3D production systems: Lab or shop environment The allure of 3D printing has been the vision of producing models and prototypes where

3D Printers Vs. 3D Production Systems: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System

Page 6 of 8


the design and engineering work is being done. To make this vision a reality, the 3D printing process must be clean, quiet, cool, and odorless. Requiring no more than a wall outlet and network connection, the 3D printing process becomes an in-office output device. Major advances toward this goal have been made in recent years. Although the vision for 3D printers is not quite a reality, there are several units on the market that fit nicely in an office environment. But even the most officefriendly 3D printer will likely have a separate workspace in a nearby room for part finishing. Access to a water supply and drain; well-lit and roomy work surfaces; and supply storage areas are conveniences that are likely to be located outside of the engineering offices. 3D production systems, for the most part, are located in workshops and labs or placed on the manufacturing floor. These machines are big, not something that most want in their offices. They often have shop-oriented requirements for power, compressed gas, temperature control, humidity control, vibration dampening or debris containment. For most 3D production systems, the projects often dictate that the parts go through secondary operations that may employ a variety of shop tools and supplies. This work must be kept in the shop. The added facility requirements for 3D production systems will have an effect on the initial system investment and ongoing operating expenses.

9. CENTRALIZED OPERATIONS: XX 3D printers: Distributed XX 3D production systems: Centralized Additive manufacturing offers two modes of operation: centralized and distributed. Companies may choose to distribute machines throughout the organization or centralize them in one area that is managed by a dedicated staff. Some want the flexibility and independence that a distributed network of systems offers. Others prefer the control, oversight and efficiencies of a centralized grouping of systems. The distributed network is the domain of 3D printers. In this operating mode, designers and engineers have direct access to their prototyping tools. Instead of sending jobs off to be scheduled and built, the engineering team gains the independence and control that comes from deciding its own priorities and making its own parts. In a centralized operation, the shop staff receives all part requests, schedules production, manages runs, and oversees post processing. This department takes on the work of making models and parts for the whole organization. With responsibilities to maximize efficiencies, minimize cost, and maximize responsiveness, the build schedule has priorities beyond the urgent need for a single part. So, a rush job may be bumped to a later time because there are other priority jobs already in queue.

3D Printers Vs. 3D Production Systems: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System

Page 7 of 8


10. OVERHEAD:

Subtle Differences

XX 3D printers: Minimal XX 3D production systems: Moderate to high Distributed, self-serve operations do not place additional overhead burdens on an organization. The staffing remains the same since those who need the parts are those who build and finish them. Centralized operations require someone to manage day-to-day operations, including the production schedule. When applying the 3D production systems to advanced applications, such as tooling and finished goods production, there will be additional demands for skilled technicians that can leverage the controls that these systems offer. Finally, depending on the complexity of the system, there may be a need for someone to perform post processing, part finishing, and secondary operations.

With additive manufacturing, organizations can get a lot of capability affordably. Being less expensive does not mean that a 3D printer is an inferior solution to a 3D production system. It is simply a different solution. Using the 10 differentiating factors, a solution may be found to best match the organization’s needs, budgets, and operating style. Choosing between 3D printers and 3D productions systems is not like picking a two-wheel scooter or an 18-wheel big rig. It is more like picking from a selection of compact cars, luxury sedans, SUVs and pickup trucks. The application will drive the decision. And continuing with this analogy, ultimately companies may find the need to have one for commuting and another for towing the pleasure boat, which is to say that they may find themselves running both 3D printers and 3D production systems.

As the application progresses from simple concept models to advanced manufacturing, more is expected from the additive manufacturing systems and more is needed from the team that tends to their operations.

Stratasys Incorporated 7665 Commerce Way Eden Prairie, MN 55344 +1 888 480 3548 (US Toll Free) +1 952 937 3000 +1 952 937 0070 (Fax) www.stratasys.com info@stratasys.com

Stratasys GmbH Weismüllerstrasse 27 60314 Frankfurt am Main Germany +49 69 420 994 30 (Tel) +49 69 420 994 333 (Fax) www.stratasys.com europe@stratasys.com

©2010 Stratasys Inc. All rights reserved. Stratasys, Fortus, Dimension, uPrint and FDM are registered trademarks and Real Parts, Fortus 360mc, Fortus 400mc, Fortus 900mc, Insight, Control Center and FDM TEAM are trademarks of Stratasys Inc., registered in the United States and other countries. *ULTEM 9085 is a trademark of SABIC Innovative Plastics IP BV. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. Product specifications subject to change without notice. Printed in the USA. SSYS-WP-3DPrintvs3DProduction-04-11

ISO 9001:2008 Certified

3D Printers Vs. 3D Production Systems: 10 Distinguishing Factors to Help You Select a System

Page 8 of 8


Mission: To enable our customers’ products and processes to be the best in the world.

Proposal


Company Overview FARO® is a global technology company that develops portable 3D measurement instruments for inspection, imaging, reverse engineering, and surveying. Our focus is on simplifying our customers’ work with tools that empower them to dramatically reduce their on-site measuring time and lower overall costs. As the pioneer in portable computer-aided measurement, we apply our unique knowledge and understanding of our clients’ business goals to help them succeed. We empower our clients to exceed the demands placed upon them by applying the latest advances in technology to make our own industry-leading product offerings more accurate, reliable, and easier to use. Our commitment to our customers extends well beyond product performance – with FARO you have 3D measurement peace of mind. Each FARO team member is completely focused on simplifying our customers’ work, championing their innovation and ours, so our customers and their businesses can be more prosperous.

Certifications and Accreditations ISO 9001 Certified ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board (ANAB) Accredited (Applies to FARO Laser Scanners) GSA Contract Holder Partner of the National Center for Defense Manufacturing and Machining


Product Suite Accuracy and reliability when you need it, where you need it. These are just two of the many reasons why FARO has some of the world’s best selling measurement instruments in their categories. The FARO family of portable, premium measurement and imaging solutions encompasses point-topoint contact instruments, non-contact imaging scanners, and computer-aided measurement software. All are designed to provide easy workflows for your inspection, alignment, surface modeling, asset management, and documentation needs.

FaroArmsÂŽ and ScanArms Improve production, quality, and reverse engineering processes by rapidly and accurately verifying or scanning parts.

FARO Laser Trackers Build products, optimize processes, and deliver solutions by measuring more quickly, simply, and accurately than previously possible.

FARO Laser Scanners Provide a faster, simpler method for the 3D data capture, imaging, and measurement of large objects and environments with exceptional detail.

Software High performance, userfriendly software packages, ranging from measurement and inspection, CAD-to-part comparison, modeling, and point cloud visualization.


What is a Portable CMM? A portable CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine) allows for measurements right at the part, eliminating operator and machine downtime. Instead of shutting down production to take parts to a fixed CMM room, portable metrology allows for true in-process inspection and eliminates quality control bottlenecks.

Flexible Mounting Options

Multi-Probe

Infinite Rotation

Common Applications: Dimensional Analysis • Calculate geometric and GD&T measurements. • Compare complex geometry, surfaces, and feature positions to nominal data. • Automatically generate reports. CAD-Based Inspection • Measuring directly against CAD data lets the operator see real-time deviations from nominal. • Allows parts to be produced with an inspection report certifying the part has been manufactured within acceptable tolerances. On-Machine Inspection • Quickly and easily inspect parts on the machine tool producing them. • Reduce the time and cost of inspections. • Achieve tighter tolerances with fewer errors and less production waste. Alignment • Position small parts on the machine tool producing them with high precision to ensure quality. • Perform alignments faster, more accurately, and with less effort than traditional measurement methods. • Real-time measurement confirms tolerances and validates design. Reverse Engineering • Digitize a part or object to create a fully surfaced CAD model. • Rapid prototyping allows engineers to reproduce complex shapes in a fraction of the time. • The need to create hard masters and the space they require is eliminated. Non-Contact Inspection • Allows for inspection of soft, deformable, or complex shapes. • Easily align data to the nominal in order to compare virtuality to reality. • Ideal for inspection, point cloud-to-CAD comparison, rapid prototyping, reverse engineering, and 3D modeling.


The FARO Edge The FARO Edge improves production, quality, and reverse engineering processes by rapidly verifying or scanning parts with confidence and accuracy. Key Features Measuring Range Options: Available in sizes ranging from 6ft. (1.8m) to 12ft. (3.7m). Precision up to 0.024mm (0.0009in): Often more accurate and consistent than conventional measurement (calipers, micrometers, etc.) methods and more flexible than traditional CMMs. Intuitive On-Board Measurement System: With a built-in touchscreen computer and “SmartArm” technology. Smart Sensor Technology: Sensors warn against excessive external loads, correct for thermal variations, and detect possible set-up problems – all warn against factors that may compromise measurement performance. Ergonomics: Internal counterbalancing provides comfortable, stress-free use and superior weight distribution and balance for reduced strain and improved ease-of-use. Smart Connectivity: Bluetooth, WiFi, USB, and Ethernet-ready options for enhanced networking. Multi-Function Handle Port: Quick-change handle allows for seamless and interchangeable accessory integration. Multi-Probe Capability: Compatible with a wide range of probing attachments such as standard and touch probes, FARO iProbes, and even custom probes. Basic Tool Measurement: Quickly measure basic geometric features or length and angular dimensions without a separate computer. On-Board Diagnostics: Available tests to ensure proper device setup, improve measurement stability, and verify device performance.

The Edge ScanArm The Edge ScanArm is the perfect contact/non-contact measurement system. It is the ideal tool for inspection, point cloud-to-CAD comparison, rapid prototyping, reverse engineering, and 3D modeling. Key Features Design: Light weight, amazingly compact, and completely unobtrusive. Performance: Wide laser stripe significantly increases scan coverage and feature definition without sacrificing accuracy. Value: The best performance at the lowest price for a handheld laser scanner.


FARO Edge Specifications Volumetric Maximum Deviation

Single Point Articulation Performance Test (Max-Min)/2

Weight

7

7

7

6 ft.

±.034 mm

.024 mm

10.7 kg

9 ft.

±.041 mm

.029 mm

10.9 kg

12 ft.

±.091 mm

.064 mm

11.3 kg

Range

(1.8 m)

(±.0013 in.)

(2.7 m)

(.0009 in.)

(±.0016 in.)

(3.7 m)

(.0011 in.)

(±.0035 in.)

Accuracy

Repeatability

±35µm

±35 µm, 2σ

(23.6 lbs.) (24.1 lbs.)

(.0025 in.)

Effective Scan Width (Near Field | Far Field)

(24.9 lbs.)

Points Per Line

(60fps x 752pps)

Scan Rate

Weight

752

45,120 pps

222.4 g

L

P

E D G E

axis

(±.0014 in.)

53 mm (2.09 in.)

100 mm (3.94 in.)

(7.8 oz.)

L

(±.0014 in.)

Hardware Specifications Operating Temp range: Temperature Rate: Operating Humidity Range: Power Supply:

10°C to 40°C (50°F to 104°F) 3°C/5min. (5.4°F/5min. Max) 0-95%, noncondensing Universal worldwide voltage 100-240VAC, 47/63 Hz

Meets OSHA requirements, NRTL Listed, MET-C Listed, Complies with Electronic Code of Federal Regulations 47 CFR PART 15 and 21 CFR 1040 Performance standards For Light-Emitting Products. Complies with the following EC Directives: 93/68/EEC CE Marking; 2004/108/EC ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; 1999/5/EC R&TTE Directive; 2002/95/EC – RoHS. Conforms to the following standards: EN 61010-1:2001 / CSA-C22.2 No. 61010-1; EN 61326-1:2006; IEC 60825-1:2007; FDA (CDRH) 21 CFR 1040.10 / ANSI Z136.1-2007; IEEE 802.11 b/g; FCC Part 15 Subpart C / IC RSS-210 and ESTI EN 300/301 (WLAN and Bluetooth). Patents: 5402582, 5611147, 5794356, 6366831, 6606539, 6904691, 6925722, 6935036, 6973734, 6988322, 7017275, 7032321, 7043847, 7051450, 7069664, 7269910, 7735234, 7784194, 7804602, 7881896, RE42055, RE42082

FaroArm Test Methods - (Test methods are a subset of those given in the B89.4.22 standard.) Single Point Articulation Performance Test (Max-Min)/2: The probe of the FaroArm is placed within a conical socket, and individual points are measured from multiple approach directions. Each individual point measurement is analyzed as a range of deviations in X, Y, Z. This test is a method for determining articulating measurement machine repeatability. Volumetric Maximum Deviation: Determined by using traceable length artifacts, which are measured at various locations and orientations throughout the working volume of the FaroArm. This test is a method for determining articulating measurement machine accuracy.


Page : 1 SQ036783-0 FARO Technologies, Inc. 250 Technology Park Lake Mary, Florida 32746 Phone No.: (866) 319-7012 Fax No.: (407) 562-5271 Email: marykay.gray@faro.com

Bill To : J F Drake State Technical Colleg Bob Grissim 3421 Meridian St N North Huntsville, AL 35811 Qty Item No. 1

14000-002

Remit Payment To : FARO Technologies, Inc. P.O. Box 116908 Atlanta, GA 30368-6908

Ship To : J F Drake State Technical College Bob Grissim 3421 Meridian St N North Huntsville, AL 35811

Quote Date : Expiration Date : Regional Manager : Account Manager : Sales Support : Shipping Agent: Ship : Payment Terms : Delivery Terms : Delivery Date PO Number :

Description

Unit Price

Edge, 9 ft (2.7m), 7 Axis

49,900.00

05/21/13 06/18/13 Brian Rasbach John Marino Mary Kay Gray

BESTWAY 3 Day-Saver Net 30 Days with approved credit FOB Origin 2-4 Weeks

Unit Disc.

Ext. Price 49,900.00

Edge, 9 ft (2.7 m), 7 Axis. FARO's most advanced measurement system featuring a built-in touch -screen with basic metrology apps. Includes: Arm, base plate, standard probe kit (3mm, 6mm), rechargeable battery, cables, custom cover, heavy-duty case and 1 year standard warranty.

1

1

14161

FARO Laser Line Probe for Edge

COMP0115X64

FARO Laser Line Probe for Edge is the smallest, lightest and fastest handheld laser scanning probe. Ideal for non-contact measurement applications, inspection and reverse engineering. For use with the FARO Edge arm. Includes: Laser Line Probe, calibration kit, case and 1 year standard warranty. When purchasing a laser line probe, Please consult your FARO representative for the recommended PC specifications based on your application. Notebook-Power User 64bit

16,900.00

3,000.00

4,900.00

12,000.00

3,000.00

Notebook-Power User. Power User notebook computer for use with ScanArm and Laser Scanner systems. Optional upgrade for FaroArm and Laser Tracker systems. Contact your FARO representative for current specifications.

PURCHASE AGREEMENT AND CONDITIONS OF SALE Customer will pay any federal, state and local taxes. All conditions of sale, service and warranty as described in FARO's standard purchase conditions currently on file with FARO are made as part of this Quotation and are incorporated herein by reference (f/control/04/ref198-012). DR12 PLEASE REFERENCE FARO'S QUOTE NUMBER ON ALL DOCUMENTS. BY REFERENCING FARO'S QUOTE, CUSTOMER AGREES TO SAID TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS LISTED ON FARO'S QUOTATION.


Page : 2 SQ036783-0

Qty 1

Item No.

Description

13402-002

Vacuum Mount - USB Arms/Laser Trackers

Unit Price

Unit Disc.

Ext. Price

2,000.00

2,000.00

10,000.00

10,000.00

7,300.00

7,300.00

Vacuum Mount. Vacuum mount designed for every size and model of USB FaroArms and Faro Laser Tracker. Quickly, easily and rigidly mounts the FaroArm or Tracker to granite surfaces without a degradation in accuracy. Includes mount, hand pump, oil and case. Dimensions: Diameter=10.75" (273mm), Height=1.75" (44.4mm). 1

SOFT60017

Rapidform Academic Suite

1

TR-RFI-3D-XOR-O

Rapidform XOR - Customer Site Customer Site Training for XOR. 3 days are required for XOR-only training. RFI will send a trainer to any North American Location (US, CA, MX). No additional costs are incurred by customer; RFI covers all travel expenses for trainer. Up to 8 trainees allowed.

Order Total: Discount Amount: Shipping Total:

89,100.00 -4,900.00 560.00

Total in USD:

84,760.00

PURCHASE AGREEMENT AND CONDITIONS OF SALE Customer will pay any federal, state and local taxes. All conditions of sale, service and warranty as described in FARO's standard purchase conditions currently on file with FARO are made as part of this Quotation and are incorporated herein by reference (f/control/04/ref198-012). DR12 PLEASE REFERENCE FARO'S QUOTE NUMBER ON ALL DOCUMENTS. BY REFERENCING FARO'S QUOTE, CUSTOMER AGREES TO SAID TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS LISTED ON FARO'S QUOTATION.


Page : 3 SQ036783-0 Suggested Optional Items Qty Item No. 1

TR-RFI-3D-XOR-F

Description Rapidform XOR - Facility

Unit Price

Unit Disc.

Ext. Price

2,200.00

2,200.00

Rapidform XOR Training for new users in Sunnyvale, CA. The course is 3 days long and teaches all the essentials a new user needs to start using XOR. Covers all XOS functionality as well. Tuition fee covers up to 2 trainees (additional trainees $499 each). Visit www.rapidformsuccess.com/live-training for dates and additional info. 1

1

ACCS0134

Portable Folding Tripod for FaroArms

4,700.00

4,700.00

ACCS0164

Designed specifically for the FaroArm, the folding tripod includes patented stabilizing struts that mount to the actual work surface, retractable wheels, base plate mount for FaroArm and laptop support, and heavy-duty case (Laptop support sold separately). Dimensions: Height 25" to 41" (0.6m to 1.0m), maximum spread 61" (1.5m). Granite Rolling Cart for USB Arms

3,400.00

3,400.00

1,250.00

1,250.00

Granite Rolling Cart. Complete mobile measurement workstation. Provides a solid work surface for all USB Series FaroArms. Includes granite surface plate with toe clamp inserts, two integrated FaroArm mounts, locking heavy duty casters, locking cabinet doors and a 52 piece toe clamp set. Dimensions: LxWxH= 36x24x35in (89x63x91cm). Additional shipping

charges apply. Recommended for high precision measurements. 1

PROBE0073

Probe Extension Kit-USB Arm Probe Extension Kit-USB Arm. Specifically for the Platinum, Titanium, Advantage and FaroGage, this probe extensions kit contains 2-3" straight, 1-4" straight, 1-60 degree angle, and 1-90 degree angle probe extensions, as well as 1-3mm Zirconia and 1-6mm Zirconia probes. Not intended for high accuracy applications or for use with new series probes.

PURCHASE AGREEMENT AND CONDITIONS OF SALE Customer will pay any federal, state and local taxes. All conditions of sale, service and warranty as described in FARO's standard purchase conditions currently on file with FARO are made as part of this Quotation and are incorporated herein by reference (f/control/04/ref198-012). DR12 PLEASE REFERENCE FARO'S QUOTE NUMBER ON ALL DOCUMENTS. BY REFERENCING FARO'S QUOTE, CUSTOMER AGREES TO SAID TERMS AND CONDITIONS AS LISTED ON FARO'S QUOTATION.


Page : 4 SQ036783-0 Additional Information QUOTE TERMS To accurately and promptly process your order, the following information is required with your Purchase Order: 1. Purchase Order Number (PO#) 2. Bill To AND Ship To Address (even if they are the same) 3. Net 30 or Sooner Payment Terms 4. Prepay and Add Freight Charges OR Collect (with your shippers Account #) 5. Method of Shipment (Best Way, Ground, Overnight, 2DAY) 6. FOB Origin or Destination (for GSA and Warranty ONLY Customers) 7. FARO Quote Number 8. PO Signed and Dated 9. Ship To State Tax Exemption Certificate OR acknowledgement to charge tax 10. Signed Credit Application (New Customers ONLY) Quoted delivery terms are contingent upon timely receipt of all above listed items. CALIBRATION CAPABILITIES FARO meets the calibration requirements of ISO 17025. If another calibration standard is required please discuss with your sales contact.


FARO Product Warranties FARO guarantees the quality and performance of our instruments. Each product purchase comes with a standard 1-year warranty. We also understand that your business needs are critical, and therefore we offer a variety of warranty options for your convenience.

Standard Warranty 1-year included; 3-year optional Includes: Annual product certification / calibration Parts and labor Return shipping Expedited service requests

Premium Warranty 1-year optional; 3-year optional Includes: Annual product certification / calibration Parts and labor Shipping (all charges) Loaner equipment shipped next business day (excluding annual certification / calibration) Expedited service requests

Premium Warranty PLUS 1-year optional; 3-year optional Includes: Annual product certification / calibration Parts and labor Shipping (all charges) Loaner equipment shipped next business day (including annual certification / calibration) Expedited service requests

Contact your FARO sales representative to learn more about specific warranty pricing for your product as well as warranty renewal information.


Training FARO’s training equips you with the knowledge necessary to execute measurements with confidence. From product setup, basic measurements, working with alignments and nominals, to advanced procedures and programming — FARO offers basic and advanced level classes at 10 training centers, or directly on-site.

Training Course Offerings Included with system purchase: FARO Facility - Basic CAM2 Training - Three-day course with two days of basic product fundamentals and a third day of advanced and application specific topics. Discusses FaroArm setup and compensation, CAM2 basic measurements, working with nominals, CAD-to-part inspection and programming. Note: Basic CAM2 Training may be completed on-site for a nominal fee. Available for additional cost: FARO Facility or On-site Basic Plus - Encompasses a Basic class, plus an extra day for learning one or more of the following topics: Inspection to CAD, Programming, Iterative Alignments, Surface CAD Inspection, Scanning for reverse engineering, Advanced Coordinate Systems. Note: Additional training options, including application-specific training can be scheduled for a nominal fee.

Scheduling For your convenience, within a week of order entry, a FARO Training Administrator will send a FARO Facilities Training Schedule and Training Registration Forms to the company representative listed on the Sales Order. On-site training dates will be scheduled based upon trainer availability and customer needs.

Expiration No cost or included training courses not booked within 90 days of receiving the product will expire.

Third-Party Software Training FARO’s Training Administrator will provide the company representative listed on the Sales Order with the necessary contact information to coordinate third-party training for the third-party software purchased with your system (if applicable).


Your purchase is just the beginning of your relationship with FARO. FARO Portal At FARO, we are always working to enhance our customers’ experience with us. As a part of this effort, we are proud to offer the FARO Portal, the first and only online customer access portal in our industry. The Portal provides you with an in-depth view of your FARO account, including the ability to create and monitor support cases, access to information regarding your FARO assets, the ability to update contact information, submit ideas for product enhancements, and more.

Online Support Center FARO’s online Support Center offers hundreds of solutions to a wide variety of technical issues, 24/7. FARO.com also provides access to videos, user stories, technical specification sheets, white papers, and more than 100 application instruction sheets. For direct assistance, FARO’s experienced customer service representatives offer telephone support for equipment or application-related questions.

Applications Engineers For custom solutions, our technically-trained staff of Applications Engineers can visit your facility and provide you with resolutions to your specific measurement challenges.

Service and Calibration Centers Direct support for North American customers is available through the following means: 1-800-736-2771 | support@faro.com FARO operates service and calibration centers in Brazil, China, Germany, India, Japan, Singapore, and three within the United States – Florida, Michigan, and Pennsylvania. All facilities are ISO 9001:2001 certified and ISO-17025 laboratory registered to service FARO products. Our goal is to service, inspect, calibrate, and return your equipment within a timely manner.

FARO provides you with the support you need to get the most out of your system. “I would like to thank FARO for the world-class support. It is a big plus...to know you have equipment suppliers you can trust.”

Adam Dabbs, TS Tech Alabama

“FARO has been exceptional in the support they have provided.  It proves we made a great choice with FARO.”

Peter Adams, Burloak Engineered Solutions

“FARO customer service and support makes a strong statement about the quality of the company. Obviously no one wants their equipment to falter; in the real world life happens. It is comforting to know when it does, you are not alone.”

Elgin Air Force Base


When you purchase a FARO measurement solution, you expect to improve process efficiencies, achieve a good return on investment (ROI), and receive exceptional support. As your partner, FARO will provide support after your purchase to help you achieve these goals. A key to this support is the FaroBDA (Before, During, and After) training process. When your system includes FARO software, the FaroBDA partners our trainer with your leader to design a training program that meets your needs. This ensures the measurement solution you purchased will be used after training, on the job, effectively. FARO Applications Engineers are trained to guide your leader through the FaroBDA. Requiring less than a half day of your leader’s time, the FaroBDA: •

Ensures the training accommodates your employees’ existing skill levels

Gears the training to meet your specific needs ensuring that your employees are able to immediately use the FARO product in your work environment

Engages your leader in the process to ensure: → Your employees are appropriately prepared for the training experience → What your employees learned in the classroom is reinforced when they return to work

The FaroBDA includes: •

A pre-training interview with your employees’ leader

A customized “Leader’s Kit” describing training outcomes specific to your work environment as well as steps your leader can take to ensure continued skill development on the job

A training program that ensures your employees can apply the FARO solution to your measurement challenges the day they return from training

A follow-up with your leader after training to identify next steps to maximize your employees’ ability to use the FARO measurement solution

The FaroBDA provides the foundation for our ongoing relationship with you to develop measurement practices that help you make your processes and products the best in the world.

© 2012 FARO

SFDC_04MKT_0182 Revised: 10/11/2012


When you purchase a FARO solution with any FARO or 3rd Party software package, you expect to improve process efficiencies, achieve a significant return on investment (ROI), and receive exceptional support. As your partner, FARO will provide support after your purchase to help you achieve these goals. A key to this support is the FaroCheck. The FaroCheck is a planned method of collecting information about your current measurement performance and processes. Performed 60 – 150 days after training, its purpose is to help you maximize your return on investment from your FARO product as quickly as possible. A FaroCheck: •

Provides a detailed evaluation of your measurement processes

Validates your measurement requirements

Ensures your equipment is operating within specifications

Evaluates your measurement techniques and recommends best practices

Provides an assessment of your environment

FARO Applications Engineers have the specialized skills and knowledge to guide you through the FaroCheck process. Completed in less than a day, a FaroCheck will help you make informed choices, saving you time and money, ensuring that you make the best use of your FARO measurement solutions. Upon completion of a FaroCheck, you will receive a written summary that will present any appropriate corrective actions, best practice recommendations, and potential alternatives to your current measurement methods. The FaroCheck is another step in our ongoing partnership with you. We look forward to working with you in the future to help develop measurement processes and practices that you and your company can use for years to come.

© 2012 FARO

SFDC_04MKT_0181 Revised: 10/11/2012


250 Technology Park Lake Mary, FL 32746

Credit Application Customer Information Legal Company Name Corporation

(“Applicant”)

Proprietorship

LLC

Partnership

Annual Revenues $

Address

City

County

State

ZIP

Fed. Tax ID

E-mail Address

Phone

In Business Since

Current Ownership Since

Sales Tax Exempt?

Y

N

Fiscal Year End

Co. Website Credit Limit Requested

If yes, attach certificate.

Terms: Net 30

Trade References 1.

Account Number

2.

Account Number

3.

Account Number

Business Banking Relationship

Bank Name

Bank Officer

Account Number

Telephone Number

Principals Information 1. 2. 3.

Name/Title

% of Ownership

SS Number

Home Address

Name/Title

% of Ownership

SS Number

Home Address

Name/Title

% of Ownership

SS Number

Home Address

Are there any suits, judgments or tax liens against the Applicant or any of the above principals, or has the Applicant or any of the above principals ever declared bankruptcy? Y N If yes, explain on a separate page.

Authorization Applicant hereby authorizes FARO Technologies, Inc. and its agents (1) to obtain more credit information about Applicant and its principals and/ or co-owners and to make inquiries in connection with this Application; (2) to share credit information with its affiliates and agents, as well as Applicant’s other creditors, bureaus and persons who have or expect to have financial dealings with the Applicant or its principals named above; (3) to share collection information with Applicant’s other creditors. All the information in this Application is true, complete and correct. The person signing below on behalf of Applicant is authorized to make this Application on its behalf and to agree to the foregoing, and also has the authority to act for Applicant’s principals and co-owners in instructing FARO Technologies, Inc. and its agents to obtain credit reports on them.

Signature

Title


Appendix B: Purchase Conditions All Purchase Orders (hereafter, the “Order”) for FARO-provided products and services (hereafter, the “Product”) are subject to the following terms and conditions, which are agreed to by the Purchaser. All capitalized terms are defined in Section 8.00 Definitions hereafter. 1.00 Payment of Purchase Price 1.01 Purchaser hereby promises to pay to the order of FARO all deferred portions of the Purchase Price, together with interest on late purchase price payments payable at 1.5% per month (18% per annum). Terms are Net 30. 1.02 The Purchaser grants to FARO a security interest in the products sold pursuant to the Order, which may be perfected by UCC- 1 Financing Statements to be recorded in the applicable County of the Purchaser’s business location and filed with the Secretary of State’s Office, which security interest will remain in effect until payment in full of the purchase price together with interest on late purchase price payments payabl thereon had been received by FARO. 1.03 If the Purchaser fails to make full payment of the purchase price within the period set out in the Order, FARO shall at its option have the following remedies, which shall be cumulative and not alternative: a) the right to cancel the Order and enter the Purchaser’s premises to re-take possession of the Product, in which event the Purchaser agrees that any down payment or deposit shall be forfeited to FARO as liquidated damages and not as a penalty, and all costs incurred by FARO in connection with the removal and subsequent transportation of the Product shall be payable by the Purchaser upon written demand; b) the right to enter the Purchaser’s premises and remove any Software, components of the Product or other items necessary in order to render the Product inoperative; c) the right to withhold all services which would otherwise be required to be provided by FARO pursuant to the Warranties set out in Section 5 hereof; d) terminate any existing software license agreement; and e) pursue any other available remedy, including suing to collect any remaining balance of the purchase price (i.e. accelerate the payment of the purchase price causing the entire balance to immediately become due and payable in full). 1.04 Customer will be charged a 25% restocking fee for refusal to accept equipment as delivered. Equipment must return unopened within 30 business days of receipt at customer facility. There will be a 15% restocking fee for equipment returned within 15 days of ship date if unopened. 1.05 If Purchaser fails to make payment(s) in accordance with the terms of this Order, the Purchaser’s Products may be rendered inoperable until such payment terms are met. No waiver by FARO of its rights under these conditions shall be deemed to constitute a waiver of subsequent breaches or defaults by the Purchaser. In the event more than one Product is being purchased pursuant to the Order, unless otherwise set forth herein, each payment received by FARO from Purchaser shall be applied pro rata against the cost of each product rather than being applied to the purchase price of any product. 1.06 Purchaser shall pay FARO all costs and expenses of collection, suit, or other legal action brought as a result of the commercial relationship between them, including, but not limited to, all actual attorneys’ and paralegal fees and collection costs, incurred presuit, through trial, on appeal and in any bankruptcy proceedings. Any cause of action that FARO has against Purchaser may be assigned without Purchaser’s consent to FARO Technologies, Inc. or to any affiliate, parent or subsidiary of FARO Technologies, Inc. 2.00 Delivery and Transportation 2.01 Delivery dates are estimates and not guarantees, and are based upon conditions at the time such estimate is given. 2.02 FARO shall not be liable for any loss or damage, whether direct, indirect or consequential, resulting from late delivery of the Product. The Purchaser’s sole remedy, if the Product is not delivered within 90 days of the estimated delivery date, shall be to cancel the Order and to recover from FARO without interest or penalty, the amount of the down-payment or deposit and any other part of the purchase price which has been paid by the Purchaser. Notwithstanding the foregoing, such right of cancellation shall not extend to situations here late delivery is occasioned by causes beyond FARO’s control, including, without limitation, compliance with any rules, regulations, orders or instructions of any federal, state, county, municipal or other government or any department or agency thereof, force majeure, acts or omissions of the Purchaser, acts of civil or military authorities, embargoes, war or insurrection, labor interruption through strike or walkout, transportation delays and other inability resulting from causes beyond FARO’s control to obtain necessary labor, manufacturing facilities or materials from its usual sources. Any delays resulting from such causes shall extend estimated delivery dates by the length of such delay. 2.03 Responsibility for all costs and risks in any way connected with the storage, transportation and installation of the Product shall be borne entirely by the Purchaser. If any disagreement arises as to whether or not damage to the Product was in fact caused in storage, transit or on installation, the opinion of FARO’s technical advisors, acting reasonably, shall be conclusive. 2.04 All Deliveries are considered FOB Origin. 3.00 Installation and Operator Training 3.01 The Purchaser shall be responsible for installation of the Product, including, without limitation, the preparation of its premises, the uncrating of the Product and setting up of the Product for operation. Purchaser may elect to order contract services from FARO to perform. 4.00 Warranties and Limitation of Liability 4.01 FARO warrants that (subject to Section 4.06); the Product shall be free from defects in workmanship or material affecting the fitness of the Product for its usual purpose under normal conditions of use, service and maintenance. 4.02 FARO warrants that the Software shall operate according to specifications and the System shall operate and perform in the manner contemplated in connection with the usual purpose for which it is designed. 4.03 The maintenance/warranties set out in paragraphs 4.01 and 4.02 above (together called the “Maintenance/Warranties”) shall expire at the end of the twelve (12) month period commencing on the last day of the month it was purchased in. (The Maintenance/Warranty Period”). 4.04 Subject to the limitations contained in Section 4.06, the Warranties shall apply to any defects found by the Purchaser in the


operation of the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, or the Software reported to FARO within the Maintenance/Warranty Period. If the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, or the Software is found by FARO, acting reasonably, to be defective, and if the defect is acknowledged by FARO to be the result of FARO’s faulty material or \ workmanship, the FARO Gage, FARO Arm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, or the Software will be repaired or adjusted to the extent found by FARO to be necessary or at the option of FARO, replaced with a new FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, Software are or parts thereof at no cost to the Purchaser. 4.05 Claims under the Warranties shall be made by delivering written notice to FARO of the defect in the System, the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, or the Software. Within a reasonable time of receipt of such notice, FARO shall have the System, FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, or Software diagnosed by its service personnel and maintenance/warranty service will be provided at no cost to the Purchaser if the System, FARO Gage, FARO Arm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, or Software is found by FARO to be defective within the meaning of this Section. If, in the reasonable opinion of FARO after diagnosis of the system, the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, and Software are not defective, the Purchaser shall pay the cost of service, which shall be the amount that FARO would otherwise charge for an evaluation under a non-warranty service evaluation. 4.06 The Warranties do not apply to: a) Any defects in any component of a System where, if in the reasonable opinion of FARO, the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, Software or System has been improperly stored, installed, operated, or maintained, or if Purchaser has permitted unauthorized modifications, additions, adjustments and/ or repair to any hard drive structure or content, or any other part of the System, or which might affect the System, or defects caused or repairs required as a result of causes external to FARO workmanship or the materials used by FARO. As used herein, “unauthorized” means that which has not been approved and permitted by FARO. b) The Warranties shall not cover replacement of expendable items, including, but not limited to, fuses, diskettes, printer paper, printer ink, printing heads, disk cleaning materials, or similar items. c) The Warranties shall not cover minor preventive and corrective maintenance, including, but not limited to, replacement of fuses, disk drive head cleaning, fan filter cleaning and system clock battery replacement. d) Any equipment or its components which was sold or transferred to any party other than the original Purchaser without the expressed written consent of FARO. 4.07 Factory Repairs a)IF SYSTEM IS UNDER MAINTENANCE/WARRANTY: The Purchaser agrees to ship the Product to FARO in the original packing containers. FARO will return the repaired or replacement Product. FARO will incur the expense of the needed repair and all return shipping charges. FARO may authorize the manufacturer of a component of the Product to perform the service. b)IF SYSTEM IS UNDER PREMIUM SERVICE PLAN: When practical and subject to availability, FARO will make available to the Purchaser substitute component parts or FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner’s (“Temporary Replacements”) as appropriate while corresponding parts of the Purchaser’s system or FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner are undergoing repair at FARO’s factory. Shipping charges for these “Temporary Replacement” parts or FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner’s will be the responsibility of FARO. c)IF SYSTEM IS NOT UNDER MAINTENANCE/WARRANTY: The Purchaser is responsible for the cost of the replacement part or software, and all shipping charges. All charges shall be estimated and prepaid prior to commencement of repairs. 4.08 Nothing herein contained shall be construed as obligating FARO to make service, parts, or repairs for any product available after the expiration of the Maintenance/Warranty Period. 4.09 Limitation of Liability FARO shall not be responsible under any circumstances for special incidental or consequential damages, including, but not limited to, injury to or death of any operator or other person, damage or loss resulting from inability to use the System, increased operating costs, loss of production, loss of anticipated profits, damage to property, or other special, incidental or consequential damages of any nature arising from any cause whatsoever whether based in contract, tort (including negligence), or any other theory of law. FARO’s only liability hereunder, arising from any cause whatsoever, whether based in contract, tort (including negligence) or any other theory of law, consists of the obligation to repair or replace defective components in the System or FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner LS subject to the limitations set out above in this section. In no event will FARO be liable or responsible for any damages in excess of the purchase price received by FARO under this order. This disclaimer of liability for consequential damage extends to any such special, incidental or consequential damages which may be suffered by third parties, either caused directly or indirectly resulting from test results or data produced by the system or any component thereof and the Purchaser agrees to indemnify and save FARO harmless from any such claims made by third parties. 4.10 The foregoing shall be FARO’s sole and exclusive liability and the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy with respect to the system. THE SOLE RESPONSIBILITY OF FARO UNDER THIS ORDER IS STATED HEREIN AND FARO SHALL NOT BE LIABLE FOR CONSEQUENTIAL, INDIRECT, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, WHETHER THE CLAIM IS FOR BREACH OF WARRANTY NEGLIGENCE, OR OTHERWISE. OTHER THAN THE EXPRESS WARRANTIES HEREIN STATED, FARO DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES INCLUDING IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PATICULAT PURPOSE. 4.11 FARO does not authorize any person (whether natural or corporate) to assume for FARO any liability in connection with or with respect to the Products. No agent or employee of FARO has any authority to make any representation or promise on behalf of FARO, except as expressly set forth herein, or to modify the terms or limitations of the Warranties. Verbal statements are not binding upon FARO. 4.12 The Maintenance/Warranties extend only to the Purchaser and are transferable, only under the following conditions: 1. The FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner is currently under maintenance/warranty.


4.13 4.14

5.00 5.01

6.00 6.01

7.00 7.01 7.02 7.03 7.04 7.05 8.00 8.01 8.02 8.03 8.04

8.05 8.06 8.07 8.08

2. New owner is, or becomes, a certified user. 3. A FARO maintenance/warranty transfer form is completed, and submitted to Customer Service. All claims under the Warranties must originate with the Purchaser, or any subsequent owner, and the Purchaser will indemnify and save FARO harmless from any claims for breach of warranty asserted against FARO by any third party. Oral representations of FARO or its sales representatives, officers, employees or agents cannot be relied upon as correctly stating the representations of FARO in connection with the system. Refer to this purchase order, any exhibits hereto and any written materials supplied by FARO for correct representations. PURCHASER ACKNOWLEDGES THAT IT HAS PURCHASED THE SYSTEM BASED UPON ITS OWN KNOWLEDGE OF THE USES TO WHICH THE SYSTEM WILL BE PUT. FARO SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMS ANY WARRANTY OR LIABILITY RELATED TO THE FITNESS OF THE SYSTEM FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR ARISING FROM THE INABILITY OF THE PURCHASER TO USE THE SYSTEM FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Design Changes The FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, the Software are and the System are subject to changes in design, manufacture and programming between the date of order and the actual delivery date. FARO reserves the right to implement such changes without the Purchaser’s consent, however, nothing contained herein shall be construed as obligating FARO to include such changes in the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, Software, or System provided to the Purchaser. Non-Disclosure All Software including, without limitation, the Operating System Program and any FARO special user programs, provided to the Purchaser as part of the system, either at the time of or subsequent to the delivery of the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, is the intellectual property of FARO. The Purchaser shall not reproduce or duplicate, disassemble, decompile, reverse engineer, sell, transfer or assign, in any manner the Software or permit access to or use thereof by any third party. The Purchaser shall forthwith execute any further assurances in the form of non-disclosure or licensing agreements which may reasonably be required by FARO in connection with the software. Entire Agreement / Governing Law/Miscellaneous / Guarantee These Purchase conditions constitute the entire agreement between FARO and the Purchaser in respect to the Product. There are no representations or warranties by FARO, express or implied, except for those herein contained and these conditions supersede and replace any prior agreements between FARO and the Purchaser. No representative of FARO has any authority to modify, alter, delete or add to any of the terms or conditions hereof. Any such modifications shall be absolutely void unless made by instrument in writing properly executed by an actual authorized employee or agent of FARO. The terms and conditions hereof shall be binding upon FARO and the Purchaser, and shall be construed in accordance with the laws of the State of Florida, United States of America. FARO shall be entitled to recover all of its reasonable fees and costs including, but not limited to, its reasonable attorneys’ fees incurred by FARO in connection with any dispute or litigation arising there under or in connection herewith, including appeals and bankruptcy or creditor reorganization proceeds. These conditions shall not be construed more strictly against one party than another as a result of one party having drafted said instrument. Definitions “FARO” means FARO Technologies, Inc. “Purchaser” means the party buying the Product and who is legally obligated hereunder. “Software” means all computer programs, disk drive directory organization and content, including the diskettes containing such computer programs and disk drive directory organization and content, sold pursuant to the Order. “Product” means the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, the Software, operating manuals and any other product or merchandise sold pursuant to the Order. If the Purchaser is buying only a FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner LS., or the Software, “Product” will mean the product being purchased by the Purchaser pursuant to the Order. “System” means a combination of the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, FARO Laser Scanner, the Software, the Computer, and optional parts associated with the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, and FARO Laser Scanner. “Certified user” means any person who has completed at least one full session of product specific training for the FARO Gage, FaroArm, FARO Laser ScanArm, FARO Laser Tracker, or FARO Laser Scanner. “Purchase Order” means the original document issued from the Purchaser to FARO, listing all parts and/or services to be purchased and the agreed purchase price. “Maintenance/Warranty Transfer Form” means a document to be completed for the transfer of the FARO Maintenance/Warranty. This document is available from FARO upon request.

FARO, THE MEASURE OF SUCCESS and the FARO Logo are registered trademarks and trademarks of FARO Technologies, Inc. © 2012 FARO Technologies, Inc. All Rights Reserved. SFDC_04MKT_0331.pdf Revised: 11/9/12


Cubify - Express Yourself in 3D

My Cart(0)

Marketplace

3D Printers

Cloud printing

Create

Cube

How it works

Community

®

Creativity reimagined A home 3D printer for you. Starting at $1399. Financing available now with

ORDER NOW

What you can do with your Cube Make your own toys

ORDER SUPPLIES

Learn More:

FAQS

TECH SPECS

ACTIVATE MY CUBE

   Download software for

MAC

WHICH 3D PRINTER IS BEST FOR YOU

WINDOWS

1st generation Cube owner?

ORDER SUPPLIES

CUBE FEATURES

Plug and play simplicity Voted MAKE magazine’s “easiest to use” and “most reliable” 3D printer. Straight out of the box - you can get started immediately with the Cube's simple setup. Just plug it in and start. The only 3D printer certified for safe at-home use by adults and children.

Print in ABS and PLA Now the Cube prints in two materials. Not only in strong recyclable ABS, but also compostable PLA. Learn about recycling Cube materials here.

Print in vibrant colors The Cube uses material cartridges in 16 different colors including vibrant colors, neutral colors, metallic silver and glow in the dark. ORDER CARTRIDGES

http://cubify.com/cube/index.aspx?gclid=CLOitoLo7rcCFZNj7AodIAcAig[6/18/2013 7:02:16 PM]


Cubify - Express Yourself in 3D

Print anything up to 5.5" x 5.5" x 5.5" ... or 140mm x 140mm x 140mm. You get 25 free 3D files with your Cube. You can also browse the shop, or get files online.

Goodbye cables, hello Wi-Fi The Cube 3D printer has Wi-Fi so loading is a breeze. Send your prints to the Cube from your computer.

Choose from 5 colors Pick the Cube body color that suits you - classic Silver or new White, Magenta, Blue or Green.

Cube software The Cube ships with easy to use software that preps your files for printing. Available for Mac or Windows.

25 designs with every Cube printer Your Cube 3D printer comes with 25 free 3D files designed by professional artists.

About us

Learn more

Store

Support

Follow us

What is Cubify?

FAQ

Creations

Contact Us

Blog

3D Systems

Be a Cubify Artist

Apps

Other printers

Newsletter

Press

3D print your ideas

Cube 3D printer

Terms of service

Tutorials

CubeX 3D printer

Privacy policy

Developers Become a reseller Sustainability

WARNING: Some printed parts may present a CHOKING HAZARD or may be SHARP; not for children under 3 years old. Use of the Cubify.com Web site constitutes acceptance of our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Copyright 息 2013 3D Systems速, Inc. All rights reserved. Cubify速, Cube速, and the 3DS logo are trademarks of 3D Systems, Inc.

http://cubify.com/cube/index.aspx?gclid=CLOitoLo7rcCFZNj7AodIAcAig[6/18/2013 7:02:16 PM]


About Fortus 900mc 3D Prototyping Machine | Stratasys

RedEye

Solidscape

3D Printers

DDM Group

Materials

Login

Find a Reseller

Applications

Search

Industries

Resources

Customer Support

Fortus 900mc The ultimate 3D production system The Fortus 900mc is the most powerful Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) System. It’s remarkably agile, accurate and cost-effective. Two big advantages: all the material options of the Fortus line of 3D Production Systems, and a massive build envelope. Its only competition is the old way of doing things. Get a sample part

3D Printers

Find a reseller

Production Series

Fortus 900mc

Related Information Details

Specifications

Production Series

Software

Rethink Everything

What is FDM Technology?

Fortus 250mc Fortus 360mc Fortus 400mc Fortus 900mc

Download Fortus 900mc Spec Sheet

The Fortus 900mc 3D Production System builds durable, accurate, repeatable parts as large as 914 x 610 x 914 mm (36 x 24 x 36 in.). With nine material options, it’s suitable for building fixtures, factory tooling and end-use parts, as well as the most demanding 3D prototyping. This machine features two material bays for maximum uninterrupted production. Materials include highperformance thermoplastics for biocompatibility, static dissipation and resistance to heat and chemicals. With three layer thicknesses to choose from, you can strike just the right balance between fine feature detail and FDM’s fastest build. Fortus 900mc throughput is more than twice that of the Fortus 250mc.

Webinar: Justify FDM With Jigs and Fixtures? Video: Thogus Products Reinvents Itself White Paper: Bust the Accuracy Myth

Smooth FDM Parts Without Labor

Materials The Fortus 900mc builds parts in nine production-grade engineering thermoplastics: ABS-ESD7 for static dissipation ABSi for translucence ABS-M30 for great tensile, impact and flexural strength and environmental stability ABS-M30i for biocompatibility PC for superior mechanical properties and heat resistance PC-ABS for the highest impact strength, plus the mechanical properties and heat resistance of PC and the surface appeal of ABS

The Finishing Touch Smoothing Station polishes Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) parts to near injection-molded quality with minimal operator intervention. Learn more

Next Steps

PC-ISO for biocompatibility and superior strength PPSF for highest heat and chemical resistance

Where to Buy

ULTEM 9085 for best mix of mechanical, chemical and thermal properties Get a Sample Part

Contact Us

http://www.stratasys.com/3d-printers/production-series/fortus-900mc[6/18/2013 7:59:51 PM]


About Fortus 900mc 3D Prototyping Machine | Stratasys

More Stratasys Production Series Machines

Share this page Email

Facebook

Google +

Tweet

LinkedIn

ShareThis

Fortus 250mc Digital manufacturing in a compact size

Fortus 360mc Mid-size parts in 3 materials

Fortus 400mc Mid-size parts in 9 materials

Get a sample part

Where to buy

DDM GROUP

INDUSTRIES

CORPORATE

PARTNERS

COMMUNITY

Metal Forming

Aerospace 3D Printing

About Us

FDM Resource Center

Blog

Composite Tooling

Automotive 3D Printing

Investor Relations

Partner Zone

Guidelines

Jigs and Fixtures

Commercial Products 3D Prototyping

Newsroom

Thermoforming End-Use Parts Test Reports ULTEM Calculator About DDM Group

Dental

Careers REACH Compliance

Consumer Products 3D Prototyping Education 3D Printing Medical Device Prototyping Defense 3D Printing

Stratasys Ltd. Š 2013. All rights reserved. | Legal | Privacy Policy

http://www.stratasys.com/3d-printers/production-series/fortus-900mc[6/18/2013 7:59:51 PM]

CONTACT US Contact Stratasys Locations Find a Reseller Get a Sample Part Customer Feedback Recycling Center


It is with great pleasure that I write this letter of support and commitment for the J. F. Drake State Technical College proposal to enhance its manufacturing-related technical programs, including machine tool technology, welding, industrial systems technology, and engineering graphics. The college has trained 1,424 students in these programs with over 75% of these students finding jobs in manufacturing-related positions. During this time, the local manufacturing industries have undergone a transformation in manufacturing technologies, necessitating an upgrade in much of the training equipment utilized in order to ensure that students are being trained in the state-of-the-art equipment currently being used in these industries. We thank the Department of Postsecondary Education, the Governor’s Office of Workforce Development, the State Board of Education, and the Alabama legislature for providing the valuable funds and guidance needed to sustain these important training programs. Preparing the future workforce for manufacturing industries is a vital investment in the future of our state and deserves the continued support of our public officials. Drake State’s programs provide an opportunity to accelerate the development of our local workforce through targeted training, use of dual enrollment opportunities with local high schools, and the use of innovative, hybrid instructional delivery systems that provide students with 24/7 access to learning materials and out of the classroom interaction with our faculty members. We appreciate the role you play in moving these programs forward and increasing the number of individuals who can take advantage of these opportunities to become prepared for well-paying jobs in our local workforce. Thank you for your serious consideration of our request to enhance the Drake State manufacturing-related programs.


Dr. Amy Brabham Vice Chancellor for Career & Technical Education and Workforce Development Alabama State Department of Postsecondary Education P.O. Box 302130 Montgomery, AL 36130-2130 Dear Dr. Brabham:

Drake state manufacturing technology program enhancements  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you