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2016 CARE PERU ANNUAL REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION

03

THE WORLD OF CARE: 2016

04

HOW DO WE WORK IN CARE PERU?

06

CARE PERU'S HISTORICAL RECORD

10

2016 HIGHLIGHTS

14

WATER AND SANITATION PROGRAM

16

EDUCATION PROGRAM

20

HEALTH AND FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION PROGRAM

EMERGENCIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

36

ONE YEAR IN THE LIFE OF CARE PERU

40

2016 - 2017 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

44

2016 MANAGEMENT TEAM

45

OUR HUMAN RESOURCES

46

ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY

48

2016 FINANCIAL REPORT

50

24

OUR 2016 DONORS

56

CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAM

28

CORPORATE ALLIES AND MARKETING ALLIES

57

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

32

MARKETING AND RESOURCE GENERATION

58

VISIoN

MISSION

We seek a world of hope, tolerance and social justice where poverty has been overcome and people live with dignity and security.

CARE wWorks around the world to defeat poverty, save lives and achieve social justice.

FOCus

VALUES

We put women and girls in the center because we know that we cannot overcome poverty until all people have equal rights and opportunities.

> Respect > Integrity > Commitment > Excellence

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INTRODUCTION INÉS TEMPLE

MILO STANOJEVICH

BOARD OF DIRECTORS CHAIRPERSON

NATIONAL DIRECTOR

For more than 70 years of work at global level, CARE has always shown its integrity, commitment and dedication to improving the living conditions of the most vulnerable people. CARE was founded in 1945, originally intended to provide humanitarian assistance to the victims of World War II. Since then CARE has evolved into one of the most important international NGOs in the fight against poverty and for emergency relief. In 2016, CARE worked in 94 countries, implementing 1,033 projects that benefited more than 80 million people.

I am pleased to present CARE Peru's 2016 Annual Report. This document gathers the main actions and achievements of our organization, a global leader within a movement dedicated to eradicating poverty, through our different programs. It also includes the testimonies of people whose lives have changed as a result of our interventions. During 2016, our work and commitment in the fight against poverty have focused on 6 programs: (i) Water and Sanitation (ii) Education, (iii) Food Security, Nutrition and Health, (iv) Economic Development, Climate Change and (vi) Risk Management. We have directly benefited more than 416,000 people in poor and marginalized communities in Peru, and indirectly benefited more than 4.8 million people through the strengthening of our partners involved in the replication and scaling up of validated social development interventions and the promotion of public policies.

CARE has been in Peru formore than 46 years. CARE's first intervention was to support the reconstruction processes after the Ancash earthquake. Since then, we have actively worked with the poorest communities. Since 2011, CARE Peru has been an autonomous national NGO - one of the largest in the country - and remains affiliated with CARE International. This enables us to access the organization's global experience and have a greater impact on our local actions. However, it also presents new challenges, since we must seek local and international funding for our projects.

At CARE, we prioritize our interventions on women and girls because we know that we cannot overcome poverty unless all people have equal rights and opportunities. Our experience at home and internationally shows that the best way to eradicate poverty is through the education and empowerment of girls and women. Focusing on them is strategic to achieve the development of the country.

In 2016, we began tackling the issue of school dropout rates through our flagship project "Girls with Opportunities." Currently, 51% of adolescent women in rural Peru do not complete high school. That is why at CARE, we are focused on having more impoverished girls finish school, on breaking the circle of poverty, and on accessing the opportunities offered by education.

We have more than 46 years of continuous work in the country and we are proud of the results we have obtained. The impact achieved is possible thanks to the generous efforts of our private and institutional donors, partners, companies and individual donors.

To continue our impact and appeal to the spirit of solidarity in our fellow citizens, I ask you to trust CARE Peru and support our projects. Together we can give opportunities to more Peruvian men and women to escape poverty and have a decent life every day. Also, I call for more companies in the country to engage with us and to see in us a key ally in their corporate social responsibility projects.

In this report we want to share our achievements during 2016 with you. It responds to an exercise of transparency and accountability towards donors, partners, the Government and the participants in our projects. I hope that this will inspire them to stand in solidarity with our cause and to renew their commitment in the fight against poverty and inequality in Peru.

I want to thank our partners, the organizations and people who support us, and especially the CARE Peru team for their dedication and commitment. I would also like to thank all the members of the Board of Directors, which I chair, who actively and unselfishly support us to make our country fairer and more inclusive.

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81

THE WORLD OF CARE: 2016

90

CARE is a global leader in the world movement devoted to eradicating poverty. We are acknowledged by our stark commitment in favor of the dignity of people.

44 29

18 27

50

94 COUNTRIES

+

962 PROJECTS

=

80 MILLION PEOPLE REACHED

20

30 53

21

LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

55

965,705 PEOPLE 93 PROJECTS 12 COUNTRIES

9 7

19.4 milLION PEOPLE improved their food security and nutrition status.

We reach more than 11 million people through humanitarian response actions. More than 750,000 adapted their lifestyles and livelihoods to prevent disasters in view of a changing climate.

50 millION WOMEN AND MEN have information and access to sexual, reproductive and maternal healthcare in 51 countries.

More than 660,000 pEOPLE who live in disaster-prone areas got ready to become protected from disaster impacts.

More than 2.3 millION PEOPLE accessed drinking water and sanitation. They were trained in good service management and improving hygiene practices.

More than 780,000 PEOPLE improved their revenues through value-chain-strengthening activities, and articulation with markets, among others.

2.5 millION PEOPLE got involved in promoting active participation of women in economic activities and resource control.

We facilitated access to quality education and training for more than 3.8 millION PEOPLE.

04


MIDDLE EAST, NORTH AFRICA AND EUROPE

88

3,616,754 PEOPLE 194 PROJECTS 32 COUNTRIES

82 89 92 87

83

84 85 91

93 80 17

57 8 59 45 2 36

25 3 4

71 38 75

46

66

86 1

33

34

52

22

43

51

28 60 40 16

26

70

14 58

72

74 56

42 77

47 78

39

56,738,386 PEOPLE 329 PROJECTS 19 COUNTRIES

32

EAST, CENTRAL AND SOUTHERN AFRICA

67

5,072,468 PEOPLE 137 PROJECTS 13 COUNTRIES

37

64

35

11

WEST AFRICA

48

68

61

23

63

19

ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

5

31

12

6 13

49

76

65

15 10

94

41

54 69

13,726,989 PEOPLE 280 PROJECTS 18 COUNTRIES

73

79

62

CARE International Country Presence for FY16: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26.

27. 28. 29. 30. 31. Afganistán 32. Albania¥ 33. Armenia¥ 34. Azerbaiyán¥ 35. Bangladesh 36. Benín 37. Bolivia 38. Bosnia y Herzegovina 39. Brasil 40. Burkina Faso 41. Burundi 42. Camboya 43. Camerún 44. República Centroafricana¥ 45. Chad 46. Costa de Marfil 47. Croacia¥ 48. Cuba República Democrática del Congo 49. 50. República Dominicana 51. Ecuador 52. Egipto 53. Etiopía 54. Fiyi ¥ 55. Georgia 56. Ghana

Guatemala Guinea¥ Haití Honduras India* Indonesia Irak¥ Jordania Kenia Kósovo Laos Líbano Lesoto Liberia¥ Madagascar Malawi Mali México¥ Montenegro¥ Marruecos Mozambique Birmania Nepal Nicaragua Nigeria Pakistán Panama Papúa Nueva Guinea Perú* Filipinas

57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78.

¥

* ◊ Ø

^

Rumanía¥ Ruanda Serbia Sierra Leona Somalia Sudáfrica Sudán del Sur Sri Lanka Sudán Siria Tanzania Tailandia* Timor Oriental Togo¥ Turquía Uganda Vanuatu Vietnam West Bank & Gaza Yemen Zambia Zimbabue

CARE International Members: 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. -86. 87. 88. --89. 90.

Australia Austria Canadá Dinamarca Francia Alemania-Luxemburgo◊ India* Japón Países Bajos Noruega Peru* Tailandia* Reino Unido Estados Unidos

Sub-offices: -- BélgicaØ (de CARE Francia) 93. República ChecaØ (de CARE Austria) 94. Emiratos Árabes UnidosØ (de CARE Estados Unidos)

CARE International Secretariat: 91. Ginebra, Suiza^ 92. Bruselas, Bélgica^ -- Nueva York, Estados Unidos^

Limited CARE presence or working through strategic partnerships. CARE India, CARE Peru and CARE Thailand are all members of CARE International and countries with significant poverty-fighting programs. CARE Germany-Luxemburg has offices in both Germany and Luxemburg. Sub-offices in Belgium, the Czech Republic and the United Arab Emirates have a focus on fundraising. CI Secretariat offices in Switzerland, Belgium and the United States are critical for CARE’s advocacy roles, as well as for other important functions.

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Š Miguel Moran / CARE

HOW DO WE WORK IN CARE PERU? We seek a world of hope, tolerance and social justice where poverty has been overcome and people live with dignity and security. To this end, we develop programs and projects that are aligned with the UN's Sustainable Development Objectives (SDOs) and help contribute to positive changes in society, such as reducing chronic child malnutrition, raising educational quality and access to health services, safe water and sanitation. We focus on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls as agents of change. In this way, we support the government and other institutions to replicate successful strategies validated by our team.

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Š Miguel Moran / CARE

OUR INTERVENTION MODEL CARE Peru has three main strategies that it applies in its programs and projects: Generating and validating pilots and innovative models that strengthen social processes and local, regional and national development. Supporting government and other actors to replicate, adapt and scale up successful and validated strategies. Advocating for and defending the definition, implementation and institutionalization of public policies in favor of the poorest and most vulnerable people. 07


OUR PROGRAMMING VISION Our programmatic actions are progressively aligned with the current framework of the Sustainable Development Objectives (SDOs) and the Post 2015 Agenda. It is a consensual work that seeks to promote the participation of the public and private sector, civil society, youth and communities.

Š Willie Cervan / CARE

Thus, the CARE Peru agenda seeks to empower women and girls, realize the right to an inclusive and quality education for the country's children and adolescents, guarantee food security in the face of climate change, protect water, improve the economic income of families, and address social conflicts in relation to the proper use of natural resources throughout the national territory.


© Jana Koerner / CARE

OUR INTERVENTION AREAS:

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CARE PERU’S HISTORICAL RECORD

WE ARRIVED IN PERU IN 1970

IN THE EIGHTIES

FROM 1983 TO DATE

After the Ancash earthqauke.

We promoted access to credit for the purpose of forming women-led microenterprises. Together with the Ministry of Health, we worked on systems and development of technologies to supply drinking water to rural areas.

We have developed water and sanitation projects for more than 1,800 rural communities in Peru for more than 30 years. This makes of us a Swiss Cooperation ally to carry out a comprehensive model of interventions in 14 regions.

IN THE NINETIES

IN THE 2000

FROM 2000 TO 2005

We provided food support to more than 7 million people a day through soup kitchens during the food crisis.

We worked with the regional and local governments to promote the decentralization of the country. The national government validated our regional development model to design the participatory budgets of the local governments. We also promoted food safety strategies to generate the development of local products.

We contributed to the reduction of maternal deaths in Ayacucho by more than half, thanks to a model of efficient health service management. The methodology has been replicated by the Ministry of Health throughout Peru.

IN 2001

FROM 2001 TO 2006

FROM 2003 TO 2012

Together with the Florecer Network, we succeeded in having the Law for the Promotion of Education of Rural Girls and Adolescents enacted. The law seeks gender equality in curricular contents.

Thanks to the "Sustainable Networks for Food Security" program (REDESA), we reduced child malnutrition by 9% in eight regions of the country.

We fought against HIV and tuberculosis with the support of the Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. We impacted more than one million people and we transferred capacities to the government to treat these diseases.

We participated in the reconstruction of Trujillo, Cajamarca and Chimbote.

We founded EDYFICAR, a financial entity, to provide small loans to low-income Peruvians.

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Since 1970 we have developed various actions, in which the results have been taken as a basis for proposing public policies at the national level in Peru. In that process, we have responded to the needs of the country in order to maximize the scope and scalability of our interventions.

FROM 2003 TO 2014

FROM 2007 TO 2010

FROM 2007 TO DATE

We worked with the Puno Regional Government and with various actors in developing a bilingual intercultural education curriculum and its adoption in schools in the region.

We mobilized US $ 10 million to rehabilitate affected areas after the 2007 Pisco earthquake. We built more than 4,000 safe houses and installed temporary classrooms. We advocated for the creation of a public policy model of healthy and anti-seismic rural housing.

We led the creation of the Initiative Against Child Malnutrition (IDI), an alliance in which we called on various organizations to position child chronic malnutrition (DCI) as a national priority.

IN 2009

IN 2014

Banco de CrĂŠdito (BCP) bought EDYFICAR with the commitment to maintain and enhance the social impact on the beneficiaries who are looking to start their own businesses.

With the Initiative Against Child Malnutrition (IDI), we contributed to the reduction of child chronic malnutrition (DCI) by more than 50% in Peru, an indicator that dropped from 28% in 2007 to 13% in 2014.

IN 2016 we celebrated 45 years in Peru and 71 years in the world contributing to and generating a world of hope, tolerance and social justice. 11


CARE IN THE NATIONAL CONTEXT 1970

198 0

The north of the country fights to become rehabilitated after the Ancash earthquake.

Political violence shakes the country. There are emergencies due to the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

1990

200 0

The country is pacified. The new economic model attracts large investments.

Economic growth and decentralization. Climate change impacts are evidenced.

2010

201 3

Companies assume greater social responsibility and commitments with their surroundings. There are more demands among the population for private and public accountability.

Peru is considered a mid-to-highincome country. There are more possibilities in the private sector to support sustainable development through social projects under a Corporate Social Responsibility approach.

CARE APPROACHES UNTIL THE 80’S

DURING THE 90’S

Basic need approach.

Sustainable development and human rights approach.

FROM 2006 TO 2015

FROM 2015 AHEAD

Millennium Development Goals approach.

Sustainable Development Objective approach. CARE Peru seeks to innovate to achieve quick changes in adverse contexts.

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© Willie Cervan / CARE


2016 HIGHLIGHTS WATER AND SANITATION

EDUCATION

Three dispersed rural communities on the coast, highlands and jungle, located in Piura, Ancash and Ucayali respectively, are taken as references for implementing new water and sanitation models for villages of less than 200 inhabitants in the most remote localities of Peru.

The first year of our flagship project, "Girls with Opportunities", is successfully implemented. It begins with 8,543 girls and boys from 5 Educational Institutions (IIEE) in HuaytarĂĄ-Huancavelica and 14 Educational Institutions from Chincha-Ica, whose objective is to have 100,000 girls complete high school with quality education by 2021, thus breaking the circle of poverty.

HEALTH, FOOD SECURITY AND NUTRITION

CLIMATE CHANGE

During the 2016 election campaign, advocacy actions were carried out with the eight presidential candidates to have them sign a commitment to reduce chronic child malnutrition to less than 10%, and anemia to less than 20% during their government.

We implemented the "Mechanism of Remuneration for Water Ecosystem Services" in the Shullcas watershed, a tool that facilitates generation, transfer or investment of economic resources through an agreement between contributors (suppliers) and rewarders (consumers) aimed at conservation, and sustainable use of ecosystem service sources.

EMERGENCIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

We lead the consortium made up by eight NGOs to prepare for the El NiĂąo Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the most exposed and vulnerable communities in the regions of La Libertad, Lambayeque, Piura and Tumbes, especially in the areas of roofing, water, sanitation and hygiene, and protection.

More than 3,600 women strengthened their leadership and business management capacities and 36 groups of women could benefit from seed capital that helped them leverage their businesses.

IN 2016, WE DIRECTLY IMPACTED THE LIVES OF 212,524 WOMEN, AND INDIRECTLY OF

2,231,803 WOMEN THROUGH PROJECTS EXECUTED IN OUR SIX PROGRAMS.

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Colombia

Ecuador

Tumbes Piura

Lambayeque

Loreto

Amazonas

Cajamarca

San Martín

Brasil

La Libertad Ancash Huánuco

In 2016 more than 416

Ucayali

Pasco

thousand people

Junín

Lima

were impacted

IN 22 REGIONS

Madre de Dios Huancavelica

Cusco Apurímac

Ica

Puno

Ayacucho

WATER AND SANITATION

Bolivia Arequipa

EDUCATION HEALTH, FOOD SAFETY AND NUTRITION

Moquegua

Tacna

CLIMATE CHANGE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Chile

EMERGENCIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT 15


16

© Willie Cervan / CARE


WATER AND SANITATION

Almost 7 million Peruvians do not have potable water services and 9.7 million do not have sanitation services. (National Plan of Investments on Water and Sanitation, 2015)

For more than 30 years, we have been working on the right of all Peruvians to have adequate water and sanitation services. To do this, we provide technical assistance and develop innovative solutions in water and sanitation, overcoming the difficulties of rural, Andean and Amazonian contexts.


Our challenge is to reach scattered rural populations and jointly build an adequate model of water and sanitation service supply. Water and sanitation in scattered rural communities

Three Swiss institutions (Eawag, Seecon, Swiss TPH) and four Peruvian institutions (CARE, GEA Group, IPES and UNALM) make up the consortium responsible for project implementation.

The communities of Nuevo Cucungarรก (Piura), Romatambo (Ancash) and Atahualpa de Tabacoa (Ucayali) are representative of the scattered rural communities of coast, highlands and jungle where water and sanitation projects are carried out for villages of less than 200 inhabitants. We have a profile, portfolio and intervention strategy designed to implement these models and have trained three local promoters who accompany the processes of health education and local management.

Water and sanitation for scattered communities (SABA plus phase 2) The SABA plus phase 2 project, developed in 14 regions of the country, will be completed in 2017. In preparation of the project closure, SABA has systematized its tools, an outcome of 21 years of intervention in the rural area of Peru, and will transfer this knowledge in an orderly and effective way to the National Rural Sanitation Program (PNSR).

The lessons and good practices in this experience will be put into to a strategy focused on closing the water and sanitation gaps in the country. My Solar Water

SABA has, within its key quality water supply activities, 1,925 potable water systems with residual chlorine, as well as 909 technical, social and trained implementers.

The Ashaninka community in Bellavista, located in the buffer zone of the El Sira Communal Reserve in Ucayali, is the protagonist of this research project to improve water quality. The promotion and use of the solar bag, which disinfects water, has begun and there has been good receptivity among user families. Its operational principle is based on solar radiation and a nanotechnology mesh.

There are 14 regions of the country where water and sanitation management has been strengthened among public authorities, especially the Housing, Construction and Sanitation Departments / Directorates, which work in coordination with local governments.

Studies of water quality, social acceptance and commercial opportunity will be the variables to evaluate the performance and potential of this disinfection method for scattered Amazonian communities.

3,899 people were benefitted directly from the SABA project and 608,024 also benefitted indirectly

Safe Resource Recovery and Reuse (RRR) The use of resources from wastewater treatment plants for irrigation of green areas, plant waste from markets for the production of compost, and cooking oils for biodiesel production, are the basis for promoting entrepreneurial opportunities linked to the recovery and safe reuse of these resources. This innovative Safe Resource Recovery and Reuse (RRR) project develops training components, sanitation safety planning, and technical-political dialogue platforms.

CONTACT:

LOURDES MINDREAU

Water and Sanitation Program Manager LMINDREAU@CARE.ORG.PE

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Three dispersed rural communities located in Piura, Ancash and Ucayali will serve as references for implementing new water and sanitation models in the most distant localities of Peru.

Individuals self-supplying water is a reality in the country. Understanding its complexity and proposing improvements in water quality is the purpose of participatory research on My Solar Water in a jungle rural community.

Promoting entrepreneurship opportunities related to the recovery and safe reuse of waste water, plant waste from markets, and used edible oils, is the innovative bet for Lima.

© CARE

in 2016 we worked in 17 regions. (Lima, Amazonas, Ancash, Apurímac, Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huancavelica, Huánuco, La Libertad, Lambayeque, Madre de Dios, Piura, Puno, San Martín, Tumbes y Ucayali)

TESTIMONY Despite the difficulties we have in this territory, we're always aware that solidarity is very important to contribute to development. And here we are. That's why I'm grateful that these organizations continue to contribute with so many people that really need this type of support. Yolmer Gutiérrez - Nueva Cucungará community, Catacaos district, Piura

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© Jana Koerner / CARE


EDUCATION

More than 45% of women adolescents in rural areas do not complete secondary education, according to the Ministry of Education. We seek that children and adolescents in poverty exercise their right to a quality education with equality and that they develop their potential in an environment without violence and without gender, social or ethnic-linguistic discrimination.


The empowerment of girls and their completion of secondary education are key to breaking the circle of poverty. Girls with opportunities

© Willie Cervan / CARE

114 student leaders of the School Municipalities in 19 secondary schools conducted awareness actions to fight violence against women, prevention of school dropout, and teenage pregnancy addressed at 8,543 students; more than 5,500 students participated in learning sessions on social skills and entrepreneurship development. 375 girls and adolescents were given socioemotional support to avoid the risk of school dropout due to adolescent pregnancy, bullying and violence. 14 business plans were formulated with groups of entrepreneurs in 9th grade in high school.

providing PAOs with educational material.

13 student groups of 10th and 11th grade in high school have business enterprises underway.

The electric company San Gabán S.A. implemented 23 PAOs in four districts of the Carabaya province: Macusani, Ollachea, San Gabán and Corani.

26 groups of student entrepreneurs strengthened their digital marketing skills.

176 teachers now manage the methodology of curricular programming within the framework of Intercultural and Bilingual Education and improved their teaching-learning strategies for reading comprehension, text production and mathematical problem solving .

More than 200 teachers and tutors trained in the strengthening of socio-emotional skills, entrepreneurial skills and entrepreneurship development. Girl leaders in school municipalities participated in the ‘Youth and Gender Violence’ forum, which was organized with the Women’s Emergency Center, National Police and Health Centers in Chincha, for the Day of Nonviolence against women.

The following was achieved among 2,843 students from 1st to 6th grade of primary school: • 70.8% show satisfactory results in reading comprehension. • 60.5% write and produce texts, such as letters, riddles and stories. • 61.6% developed mathematical skills.

At the Public Hearing for the International Day of the Girl Child (October 11), two leaders from Huancavelica and Puno presented to the Parliamentary Education Commission in Congress the difficulties faced by girls in completing high school in peri-urban and rural areas.

Creating capacities for financial inclusion

Quality and equity in intercultural education in Puno, KAWSAY Phase II

27 Educational Institutions in Piura, Chincha and Huancavelica participated in incorporating the entrepreneurial , financial and social education strategy approach.

When the Opportune Learning Program (PAO) was adopted as an educational policy in Puno, 657 PAOs were incorporated into 12 Local Educational Management Units, which involved 3,115 girls and boys aged 0-3 in the rural area.

CONTACT:

SEGUNDO DÁVILA Program Manager

117 non-standard Pre-school Education Programs (PRONOEI) for children between 3 and 5 years of age and 117 PAOs for children from 0 to 3 years-old, were implemented and in operation, with 979 children under 5 years-old.

SDAVILA@CARE.ORG.PE

SILVIA NOLE

Education Program Manager

Agreements were signed with 11 provincial and district municipalities, and the public budget was approved for

SNOLE@CARE.ORG.PE 22


8,543 children and adolescents from five Educational Institutions (IIEE) of Huaytará-Huancavelica and 14 IIEEs from Chincha initiated the Girls with Opportunities project, which seeks to have school-aged girls complete their secondary educationat a suitable age with better gender equity and educational quality.

75% of girls and boys aged 0 to 3 years in the rural area of the Timely Learning Program (PAO) in Puno, improved their sociocommunicative skills and 65% did so in logical-mathematical aspects.

Girls and boys in elementary school and in bilingual intercultural education institutions in rural Puno improved their reading comprehension in Spanish, from 8% to 70.8%, and in mathematics from 3.2% to 61.6%.

In 2016 we worked in seven regions. (Arequipa, Huancavelica, Ica, Junín, La Libertad, Lambayeque and Puno)

TESTIMONY

401 teachers and 6282 students trained in business plans, financial education, entrepreneurship and social security.

I think it's important that appropriate stimulation be given to children under 3 years of age, as there is research that states that infants and toddlers develop 80% of the brain's abilities before that age, so that they can later solve their problems, be responsible, and be good people in the future.

10 Educational Institutions in Junín, La Libertad, Lambayeque and Arequipa initiated curricular programs in entrepreneurial, financial and social education. Women and girls in front 1,746 students participated in learning sessions on sexual and reproductive health, and on the importance of education and social skills.

With the Kawsay Project from CARE Peru, I participated in trainings and meetings where I learned how to teach children under the age of three that we have enrolled in the PRONOEI-PAO. I have also transmitted those teachings to parents, and I have received materials from both the project and the Paucarcolla municipality.

52 students, municipal school leaders and school prefects strengthened leadership skills by conducting three awareness campaigns in their Educational Institutions on the prevention of dropout, alcohol consumption and addiction to computer games.

Mothers are contented and happy because we now teach children under three years of age. Children feel happy and safe. They are more active, and play more. I see them smiling and that's a great change for me. Mery Pérez Condori - Promotora educativa PRONOEI – PAO de la Comunidad de Anexo Corte Estación, distrito de Paucarcolla, Puno

80 representatives from 33 School Municipalities gathered in an event, in partnership with the San Román Local Educational Management Unit, to address the importance of education, prevention of adolescent pregnancy and development of life projects.

Project: Quality and Equity in Intercultural Education in Puno - Kawsay II

568 parents participated in 16 workshops that dealt with topics such as communication, family life project, importance of education for their daughters and sons, and prevention of adolescent pregnancy and violence. Five radio programs broadcasted by students of the Musoq Kallapa School Journalism Network addressed the prevention of adolescent pregnancy, life project, self-esteem, alcoholism, addiction to computer games and bullying. © Jana Koerner / CARE

Advocacy was conducted in nine high schools so that they implement the plan of Educational Tutoring and Guidance. 723 educational actors, including teachers, students and parents participated in it.

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© CARE


HEALTH, FOOD

SECURITY AND NUTRITION

Chronic malnutrition affects more than 370,000 children under the age of five and almost one million have anemia. (ENDES 2016). We implement strategies to ensure the participation of women and social organizations in the fight against chronic child malnutrition and anemia in children. We advocate with the government for implementation of public policies on nutrition and food security, as well as in mental health.


We support the fight against chronic child malnutrition and anemia in favor of Peru's children. We also support women and adolescents with mental health problems -including addictions- so they can access health services. Advocating for child nutrition project

emphasis on women and children.

CARE Perú, coordinator of the Initiative Against Child Malnutrition (IDI), made an effort to ensure that the eight candidates for the Presidency and several candidates for Congress during the 2016 elections sign a commitment to reduce chronic child malnutrition (DCI) to less than 10%, anemia to less than 20%, and increase the public budget for these goals.

Three governance proposals for food security and nutrition were validated, disseminated and assumed by subnational governments and social organizations. Project on developing innovations for food and nutritional security in Peru-Bolivia border integration areas As part of the Regional Council for Food and Nutrition Security (CORESAN), we advocated for the approval of the 2016-2021 Regional Strategy and Plan for Food and Nutrition Security of Puno, which was approved by Regional Executive Resolution. The Strategy seeks to enable the population to meet their nutritional requirements with Andean products to improve their quality of life. The Platform of the Food Security Observatory was also presented.

The IDI digital campaign “President, I also sign for child nutrition” was launched to raise public awareness and engage the government. The current government committed to reducing chronic child malnutrition to 6.4% and anemia to 19% by 2021. The report “Recommendations to the new government for the reduction of chronic malnutrition and childhood anemia” was made to join efforts to improve child nutrition.

The Regional Strategy and Plan for Food and Nutrition Security in Puno was published. CORESAN disseminates it to local authorities, social organizations and the population.

The NGO Nutriedúcate Peru joined the IDI for the mobilization of young people in favor of child nutrition.

A meeting was organized between the ROM Mission (Results Oriented Monitoring) and the CORESAN of Puno. We participated in the organization of the event for World Food Day, whose motto was “The climate is changing - Food and agriculture too”, in order to promote work among institutions linked to food security in Puno; and report on the actions of the Agriculture and Health ministries to promote healthy eating.

An alliance with the Andean Regional Community was set up to develop inter-institutional work in five regions (Apurímac, Ayacucho, Huancavelica, Ica and Junín) for the fight against chronic child malnutrition and anemia. Project on strengthening Andean organizations for public political advocacy of food security in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru

Ten communities are prioritized for awareness and training activities in potato, quinoa and food security. It coordinates with the Regional Agrarian Bureau and INIA to promote

45 social organizations in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru implemented actions that improve food security with an emphasis on children.

CONTACT:

60 communities in the three countries incorporated the associated rights (access to water, land and agrobiodiversity) to food security and nutrition in their Statutes and Regulations.

WALTER VILCHEZ

Manager of the Health, Food Security and Nutrition Program WVILCHEZ@CARE.ORG.PE

1,000 women leaders participated informally in decisionmaking processes in food security and nutrition at the subnational level.

ELENA ESQUICHE

Health Project Head

Network of social organizations promoted a food security and nutrition agenda at national and regional levels, with an

EESQUICHE@CARE.ORG.PE

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We conducted advocacy with the eight presidential candidates to sign the commitment to reduce chronic malnutrition to less than 10%, and anemia to less than 20%.

The National Government has undertaken to reduce chronic child malnutrition to 6.4% and anemia to 19% to 2021.

Six regions committed to implementation of the program for the recovery of women that abuse substances.

In 2016 we worked in nine regions. (Lima, Arequipa, Ayacucho, Callao, Huánuco, La Libertad, Lambayeque, Moquegua and Puno) 510 professionals from health centers in Lima and Callao are sensitized and trained to provide primary care to patients with substance abuse and domestic violence problems, with a gender focus, and refer them through the public health network. Support was provided for the validation of the manual “Registration and Coding of Care in the Outpatient Service HIS Information System” of Mental Health - HIS 2016, which allows the standardization of the mental health information system.

© CARE

Six regions committed to the implementation of the genderbased program to guide the recovery of women who abuse substances (Arequipa, Ayacucho, Huánuco, La Libertad, Lambayeque and Moquegua).

TESTIMONY

actions that strengthen the native potato chain and improve the marketing of tunta (a type of bitter potato) in Ilave, Puno.

"Mr. President, I also sign for child nutrition" is a call that we make so that the authorities are aware that all Peruvians will be very attentive to the engagement you have assumed. It is not acceptable that a child of ours starve to death. Policy decisions have to be made. We cannot turn our backs and ignore our children who are suffering from rape, mistreatment, abuse, and also malnutrition. The numbers are alarming and we're not going to let this keep going unnoticed. Let's fly the flag and make commitments come true.

In MISTURA 2016 (the most important food fair in Peru), tunta producers who participate in the project presented the biodiversity of native potatoes and how they generate income in Puno communities. Educational material aimed at improving child nutrition and reducing anemia in Puno was produced. Demonstration sessions were implemented at 48 health centers of the El Collao Health Network, which will facilitate the development of the educational component aimed at families in the area.

The authorities have signed it, we are attentive, not as an inspector, but in loving awareness, seeking to get the country to look after its children and not let them down or to die of hunger.

Project on Guiding the Recovery of Women (GROW)

Lupe Maestre - Psychologist and Radio Conductor at Radio Programas del Perú

42 health professionals completed the GROW course and are certified as national facilitators by the Ministry of Health, the Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia and the Colombo Plan - USA.

Campaign on “Mr. President, I also sign for child nutrition Advocacy Project on child nutrition

The facilitators conducted 83 supervision and technical assistance visits to participating health facilities. 468 professionals from 130 health facilities in the country completed the replication program.

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© CARE


CLIMATE CHANGE

Peru is one of the ten countries most vulnerable to climate change. Forty percent of coverage in the Peruvian Andes glaciers has already melted in the last 10 years. (Minam, 2014) We improve the adaptive capacities of families and vulnerable communities to the effects of climate change.


We work with a climate change adaptation approach, which combines the local knowledge of families and communities with scientific information, to enhance the intervention strategies. of Racracalla, with technical advice for its operation and maintenance, in order to irrigate 10 hectares to have better quality natural pastures and to take advantage of the fountains generated with the fencing and maintenance of bogs.

© Miguel Moran / CARE

Two public investment projects were formulated: 1. “Improvement of the integrated water resource management service in the micro-watersheds of the Comas, Quilcas and Pariahuanca districts, Huancayo province and Concepción province, Junin region”, in order to improve the publicprivate technical and operational capacities of each district to develop and update the process of territorial organization, with a S /. 3,169,510.13 budget. 2. “Improvement of the territorial planning service in the districts of Comas, Quilcas and Pariahuanca, provinces of Huancayo and Concepción, Junín region”, in order to manage water resources in these microbasins in an efficient, integrated and sustainable way, with a budget of S /. 5,577,297.37.

Strengthening of indigenous capacity in conflict resolution and sustainable resource management in the Block 76 hydrocarbon concession and the Amarakaeri Communal Reserve (RCA) in the department of Madre de Dios The capacity building plan for indigenous people and officials within the project scope was developed. It was validated with both groups and had four topical areas:

Risk management and productive use of water from glaciers Phase II (Glaciers +)

1. Indigenous self-determination, prior consultation and citizen participation 2. Conflict analysis, transformative dialogue and transformative leadership 3. Amarakaeri Communal Reserve Management. 4. Extractive, productive and / or traditional economic activities in the RCA buffer zone and in native communities

The formation and operation of working groups, Emergency Operation Committees and Civil Defense Platform were achieved, with approved resolutions and internal rules of operation. Trainings in Disaster Risk Management (DRM), Adaptation to Climate Change (ACC) and Integrated Water Resource Management (IWRM) were conducted for community leaders and regional and local government authorities in the project intervention areas.

The action plan for the implementation of the People-to-People (P2P) approach was developed, involving leaders and staff of indigenous organizations (FENAMAD, COHARYIMA and ECA-RCA) and SERNANP (Lima and Puerto Maldonado). It was approved and submitted in May 2016 to ECA-RCA.

A hazard map of the Quilcay - Huaraz sub - basin was developed, validated and socialized with residents and authorities. Public investment projects promoted in areas of prevention and protection against glacier-caused alluviums in Huaraz were developed.

Creation of two dialogue forums linked to mining in the Camanti sector and the construction of roads (Salvation, Manu).

Coordination spaces between public and private institutions were created for the identification and promotion of investment projects in ACC, DRG and IWRM.

Strengthening of environmental and territorial management capacities of communities in the Huaytapallana Regional Conservation Area (ACR) influence zone as part of the participatory construction of the ecosystem services retribution mechanism (MRSE).

Technical design and promotion of multipurpose projects were carried out in alliance with the Ministry of Economy, MINAGRI,

Producers from the communities received certification from the Participative Guarantee System for organic production subsequent to capacity strengthening and productive improvements among small farmers.

CONTACT:

KAREN PRICE Project Head

KPRICE@CARE.ORG.PE

A technical irrigation system was installed in the community 30


In 2016 we worked in fiveregions. (Ancash, Cusco, Junin, Madre de Dios and Ucayali)

A virtual platform for scientific exchange is created.

ANA, regional and local governments, technical institutions, energy companies and communal settlers.

The Mechanism of Remuneration for Water Ecosystem Services was implemented in the Shullcas Basin, Junín

the local communities for the conservation of water sources that supply the city of Huancayo and the farmers (human and agricultural consumption.)

Management tools were developed: plans for concerted development, municipal strategic institutional plan and plan for the prevention and reduction of disaster risks.

Technical advice was started and provided for the establishment, management and production of Andean crops with lesser water requirement and high commercial value (quinoa, native potatos, mashua.)

The Teacher Manual on “Adapting to Climate Change and Disaster Risk Management in Andean Educational Institutions” - MINEDU and training of teachers in Ancash and Cusco was formalized.

A technical irrigation system was installed in the community of Cullpa and technical advice was given for its operation and maintenance, in order to irrigate 42 hectares, to have two agricultural campaigns per year, as well as more efficient use of water.

The integrated pest management manual was drafted for replication measures from the rural-peasant-to-farmer schools in Santa Teresa, Cusco. The tenders of the Sanitation Services Management Boards (JASS) were replicated. Articulation between ACC and Water & Sanitation in Pitumarca and Salcca.

The “Mechanism of Remuneration for Water Ecosystem Services” was implemented in the Shullcas basin, a tool that facilitates the generation, transfer or investment of economic resources through an agreement between contributors (suppliers) and rewarders (consumers) oriented towards conservation, recovery and sustainable use of ecosystem service sources.

The training module on Glaciers in the Master’s Degree on Climate Change and Sustainable Development of the National University of San Antonio Abad of Cusco was taught. The winter school “Multi-use of water resources in high mountains” and the International Social Science Forum were organized.

TESTIMONY

Teaching of short courses, workshops and conferences:

Thanks to CARE Peru we have learned the importance of pasture management for our animals and our water sources. With your support we have fenced in natural pastures in order to implement a rotary management program with the project (3 hectares) and also with our own community resources (7 hectares).

• “Measurement and analysis of glacier mass balance”, in La Paz, Bolivia • “Principles of Academic Work and the Writing of Scientific Articles” • “High Mountain and CC: Knowledge Management and Research Approach”

It has not been a long time, but you can notice the difference with the pastures that are enclosed by the fences. Now we see animals in these areas, especially birds. that were not there before.

Scientific studies carried out: • Hydrological modeling of the Cañete basin. • The future of glaciers. • Future gaps. • Guidance document on the project “Multipurpose Highland Water Resources”.

Years ago the little toads had disappeared ... but now they have returned. I ask myself, where did they come from? Nicéforo Espinoza Portalanza Racracalla Community, Junín

The platform of scientific exchange was created: http://investigacioninter.wixsite.com/investigacionandespe

Project: Strengthening environmental and territorial management of communities in the Huaytapallana ACR as part of the participatory construction of the mechanism of remuneration in exchange for ecosystem services.

Sustainable water management and new farming methods to adapt to the impacts of climate change in the Shullcas valley, Junín: In the Regional Conservation Area (ACR), five management pasture plans and five bog recovery plans were updated with 31


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© Willie Cerdan / CARE


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

There are 6.5 million Peruvians living in poverty. Half of the poor and extreme poor are concentrated in the rural area. (INEI 2016) We seek to ensure greater equity in commercial and financial inclusion of small producers and families who are traditionally excluded from the formal economy. To this end, we develop skills to improve productivity among young people and women. We promote entrepreneurship education.


We reduce economic poverty gaps by generating competitiveness in excluded sectors through the generation of of knowledge and advocacy of better public strategies. We build capacities for the economic and social inclusion of families living in poverty in the Huancavelica, Ica and Piura regions

Entrepreneurship and economic empowerment of women in rural communities along the coast and the Andean region of Peru

A 33% increase in economic income was achieved.

The number of women engaged in productive activity with economic compensation increased from 59.1% to 100%.

26.3% of families increased their access to formal credit in Ica and Huancavelica.

An average increase of 87% in the economic income of women entrepreneurs’ homes was achieved.

A 7.3% increase in access to formal credit was obtained in Piura.

100% of the women were trained in business management and leadership, of which 76% apply good commercial and business management practices. Development of competitiveness in the beef value chain in the provinces of Huancané, Moho and Putina in the Puno region The economic income of 2,680 producers increased by 27%. 70 caregivers were trained.

© Miguel Moran / CARE

13,244 heads of cattle were marketed. 407 new jobs were generated. An increase of 1.0 to 1.2 kg per day per head of cattle was achieved.

© Willie Cerdan / CARE

Chronic malnutrition was reduced by 3.36% in children under three years of age. 8,282 students participated in entrepreneurial educational sessions. 185 teachers were trained in financial and social entrepreneurship education. 27 schools participated in the process of incorporating the strategy of entrepreneurial, financial and social education approach, of which ten have developed contextualized curricular programs for entrepreneurship education.

CONTACT:

SEGUNDO DÁVILA

Education for development and financial inclusion in the departments of Arequipa, Lambayeque, La Libertad and Junín

Program Manager

Training was initiated to improve production, social skills, business management, financial education and marketing.

BIBIANO HUAMANCAYO

SDAVILA@CARE.ORG.PE

Project Head

BHUAMANCAYO@CARE.ORG.PE 34


More than 3,000 women in situations of vulnerability strengthened their productive capacities techniques and connection to market through replication, inspired by success stories of women facing similar social and economic barriers.

More than 3,600 women strengthened their leadership and management skills and 36 groups of women benefited from seed capital that served to boost their business.

There was an increase of 66% in family monthly economic income of almost 6,000 women and men household heads. More than half are empowered women.

Increased access to formal credit for more than 2,300 women and men household heads.

Š Miguel Moran / CARE

In 2016 we worked in nineregions. (Arequipa, Cusco, Huancavelica, Ica, Junin, La Libertad, Lambayeque, Piura and Puno)

TESTIMONY Five years have passed. The process was long and exhausting, but today I feel happy: together with my sister and brother-in-law, we can be proud to say that we are already a company dedicated to pastry, which has become consolidated in our village and other surrounding villages. I feel that my life has changed. I no longer lack econimcally and my children already have everything they need. All this is thanks to CARE Peru. We have succeeded and now we are going for more. Our company is called "Jesus Sacred Heart of Campo Alegre Association - D'Sabores." We are already registered in the Public Registry and we have our collective brand in Indecopi, so that we are able to sell our products, and so that our customers recognize us. What I want for my future, is for my children to become professionals. I want to see them with opportunities that I did not have. I want my business to continue growing, because only then can I achieve what I wish. I know it will not be easy, I have to keep training. Reyna Lidia GĂłmez Pomasoncco Campo Alegre village, Chincha Baja district, Ica Project: Creating capacities for the economic and social inclusion of families living in poverty in the regions of Huancavelica, Ica and Piura

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© Willie Cerdan / CARE


EMERGENCIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT

In 2016, there were 4,530 emergencies, leaving 74,516 victims, 2'171,099 affected and 110 deaths. (INDECI 2016) We seek to reduce the effects of disasters in the country by involving vulnerable and affected communities, local governments and regional governments, as well as the central government, scientific and technical bodies and the academia. We develop and strengthen capacities and systems to prevent or mitigate risks in natural events.


We must always be prepared and willing to respond to emergencies, respecting the humanitarian principles and the dignity of people. Binational Project “Together against Zika,” which began at the end of 2016 and will achieve the following results by 2019:

Ten sensitized rural communities are aware of and apply disaster prevention and mitigation actions. Alliance with the Universidad Nacional del Altiplano - UNA (Puno).

1. Good practices in community participation for Zika prevention have been identified 2. Good practices and lessons learned found in qualitative / quantitative studies disseminated and replicated 3. Local governments in the intervention areas apply userfriendly information systems for community surveillance and vector control 4. Communicational strategy for behavior change established and implemented 5. Scaling up the strategy and protocols developed by the project to other areas of the country and the region

Strengthening existing links between hazard identification, monitoring of indicators, early warning systems and timely actions to reduce and / or mitigate risks. Alliances and joint programming were encouraged. Alliances with the Regional Government of Puno, local governments, the National Meteorology and Hydrology Service (SENAMHI), the National Civil Defense Institute (INDECI), Universidad Nacional del Altiplano (UNA) were consolidated, which will generate synergies and a better coordination with the National Disaster Risk Management System (SINAGERD), including the Ministry of Economy and Finance (MEF).

Reinforcing innovation with participatory mechanisms to increase development and resilience capacities in Rimac Awareness of civil society organizations and local authorities about the vulnerabilities and resources of the Rimac district was strengthened.

Three conferences were held at the National University of Puno to sensitize the academic community in disaster risk management for sustainable development, with more than 500 participants, which led to the completion of a Diploma in Disaster Risk Management aimed at public managers.

Disaster risk management was strengthened through cooperation between civil society organizations and local authorities.

There were 52 graduates (22 municipalities, 13 sectors and 17 technical scientific bodies) in the diploma on Disaster Risk Management offered by the National University of Puno.

A database was installed with a mapping viewer for territory management, including the present risks.

GRD Synergy

Existing risks were mitigated with the improvement of physical infrastructure and social capacities, promoting a combined effort of local authorities, civil society organizations and local enterprises.

A virtual classroom for risk management training was installed in CENEPRED with four general use and free-of-charge online courses.

Kamaricuy Chaakimanta (Preparing ourselves for droughts and frost)

Together with Universidad ESAN, the training of trainers in disaster risk management was completed, with the “Advanced program of high specialization in disaster risk management”, training teachers from public and private universities in the Andean Regional Commonwealth (Apurímac, Ayacucho, Huancavelica, Ica and Junín). These teachers replicated the diploma in local universities of their respective regions, which led to graduating

20 rural Aymara and Quechua communities are better organized and coordinated with sub-national RRD institutions. More than 40 hydro-meteorological risk mitigation interventions (drought or extreme cold) were implemented to reduce the vulnerability of the population and their livelihoods. The National Plan against Droughts has been approved and the Puno plan is in the process of being built.

CONTACT:

Resilient Ramis

LUCY HARMAN

Manager of the Emergency and Risk Management Program

Capacities, empowerment and appropriation of innovative measures to cope with the hydro-meteorological hazards in Puno (bio digesters and mini stables) were developed.

LHARMAN@CARE.ORG.PE

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We installed a virtual classroom in CENEPRED because there is a very significant need for training in risk management and face-to-face training is not enough, so you have to use the tools of modern times.

We led a consortium with eight NGOs to get ready for El Niño.

We made strategic alliances with institutional actors from different levels of national government, and also scientific and technical actors, as well as those at the subnational level with regional and local governments.

In 2016, we worked in 13 regions. (Lima, Ancash, Apurímac, Ayacucho, Cusco, Huancavelica, Ica, Junin, La Libertad, Lambayeque, Piura, Puno and Tumbes).

TESTIMONY In the past, INDECI always invited us but the people did not go. Receiving a group-by-group training has been very useful and people have been happy with their brochures and materials. Brigader from Trujillo

© Willie Cerdan / CARE

Through the fairs, the people have become aware and have remembered the damage caused by the rains ... Ideally the project should continue in other sectors of the district. There are areas at risk. Arturo Huanca Bejarano, Manager of the Leonardo Ortiz Municipality, Chiclayo It was fun, there were a puppet show and music, the Ministry of Health and the firemen explained to us issues such as preparedness, hygiene practices and sanitation, adequate disposal of waste, prevention against dengue, vector control, etc. The municipality was also present. Focus Group in Chiclayo

200 local public managers. Community awareness-raising events for risk management Project on strengthening readiness in view of El Niño.

The Disaster Risk Management plan of the Andean Regional Commonwealth was formulated with the watershed approach. Strengthening preparation for El Niño A consortium made up by eight NGOs seek to create consensus and synergies that contribute to better preparation and information management to deal with the effects of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the most exposed and vulnerable communities in the regions of La Libertad, Lambayeque, Piura and Tumbes, especially in terms of roof, water, sanitation and hygiene, and protection. Community brigades were trained, sensitizing them in readiness in view of ENSO. © Willie Cerdan / CARE

Demonstration prevention works were developed in view of ENSO. Community risk-awareness-raising fairs were held in Tumbes, Piura and Lambayeque, reaching more than 17,230 participants.

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ONE YEAR IN CARE PERU’S LIFE THE

INITIATIVE against Child Malnutrition (IDI) campaign was launched with the motto “Mr. / Madam President, I also sign for child nutrition”, to influence the next President of the Republic, through citizen participation, demanding compliance with the political commitment regarding concrete actions, such as mentioning their plan to reduce chronic malnutrition and childhood anemia in their presidential speech on July 28.

FEBRUARY 2016 OF EXPERTS. Technical meeting of public sector, international cooperation and NGO specialists, for the simplification of management models in water and sanitation in scattered rural areas.

© CARE

CIRCLE

© CARE

“COMMUNITY

APRIL 2016 CLOSING GROW Project Training Program

- Phase I: “Developing Capabilities to Offer Treatment Sensitive to Gender for Substance Abuse,” implemented from February 2015 to February 2016 in 12 hospitals in Lima and Callao. The project was done thanks to the coordination of the Mental Health Directorate in the Ministry of Health, the National Commission for Development and Life without Drugs (DEVIDA), the United States Embassy in Peru, and CARE Peru as executing institution. During the ceremony, the health authorities showed the results of the 2015 intervention and announced the expansion of the project to six regions. In addition, equipment was donated with project funds to six Mental Health Community Centers of Lima.

awareness-raising fairs for risk management” were started. The fairs develop awareness-raising actions for the management of disaster risk for the general population, in a clearl way, with a space for children. These fairs were held until August in Tumbes, Piura and Lambayeque.

JUNE 2016 THE 2016-2021

Regional Strategy for Food and Nutrition Security of the Puno region (approved by Regional Executive Resolution) was presented, with the attendance of representatives of the Regional Government of Puno, Huancané Provincial Municipality, Huatasani District Municipality, Regional Agrarian Directorate, CONVEAGRO, FEMUCARINAP, Agrarian League, Producers Organization, National Institute of Agricultural Research, National University of the High-Plateau, Peruvian Center of Social Studies, Puno civil society of and community representatives. This strategy seeks to make sure that the Puno population can meet their nutritional requirements with Andean products to improve their quality of life.

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AUGUST 2016 CLOSURE

of the High Specialization Program (PAE) in Disaster Risk Management (DRG) at ESAN University, with the participation of national and regional authorities and officials, as well as the International Humanitarian Network.

2016

INTERNATIONAL Forum on Glaciers, organized by the Institute for Research on Glaciers and Mountain Ecosystems (INAIGEM) in Huaraz. CARE Peru organized three side events for the forum. The first was an exhibition by Dr. Francisco Cereceda on Paleoclimatology, who worked on ice and snow cores, and


© Miguel Moran / CARE

the effects of anthropogenic activity; the second, a working breakfast on Multipurpose Projects; and the third, a methodological workshop for mapping high mountain hazards.

Social Inclusion, Health, Education, Agriculture and Irrigation, Housing, Construction and Sanitation; representatives of the Poverty Reduction Roundtable, representatives of the Initiative Against Child Malnutrition (IDI), authorities and officials of the Regional Governments of Apurimac, Ayacucho, Huancavelica, Ica and Junín.

SEPTEMBER 2016

The Committee will have coordination functions to combat chronic malnutrition and childhood anemia and will draw up an Intervention Plan based on the guidelines set out in the Act of Commitment signed by the Regional Commonwealth Governors.

IN ICA, a working meeting was held to

© Miguel Moran / CARE

set up the Inter-institutional and Interagency Committee for the Fight against Chronic Malnutrition and Child Anemia of the Andean Regional Commonwealth, with the assistance of representatives of the Ministries of Development and

CLOSURE

of the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) consortium project “Getting ready for ENSO”. Regional and national authorities and the International Humanitarian Network were invited to report on advances, discuss progress in getting ready for ENSO and take stock.

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OCTOBER 2016 THE SECOND

regional contest for communicators in Puno. The best journalistic work on risk management was awarded in the following categories: print media, radio and TV. The event was covered by the Puno media, with presence of regional authorities and SENAMHI at the national level.

THE 2016

School Literature Contest “Writing from our Cultural Diversity” allowed for the participation of specialists, directors of Educational Institutions, teachers, parents and mothers of the Local Educational Management Units (UGEL) of Puno, San Román and Azángaro. This was done following training and coaching for teachers in the classroom (2015 and 2016). The event was developed in two stages; first, at the level of each educational institution with the participation of the total number of students; and second, at the level of each UGEL. The subjects for the third cycle (1st and 2nd grade) was for riddles and narratives; and for the fourth and fifth cycles (3rd, 4th, 5th and 6th) was of narrations: stories, descriptions, testimonies and poetic texts, in mother tongue and second language, in Quechua or in Spanish.


The first and second place winners in the mother tongue and second language, and the teachers who participated in the second stage, have been incentivized due to their efforts to translate their knowledge to produce texts from our culture.

AT THE PUBLIC

Hearing for the International Day of the Girl Child, on October 11, in the Congress of the Republic, two leaders from Huancavelica and Puno presented on the difficulties faced by girls in peri-urban and rural areas to complete high school before the Parliamentary Education Commission.

Approved action lines were: a) governance and political leadership, b) territorial management as a mechanism for articulation, c) integrality and sustainability, d) food and nutritional security, e) safe water consumption, f) communicational-educational strategy for social mobilization, g) information, monitoring and evaluation system, h) financing management and incentive policies, and i) co-responsibility, citizen oversight and social control.

CLOSING of the Training Program in the

LAUNCHING of the Project Safe Recovery

GROW Project - Phase II at the MINSA headquarters. The Minister of Health, Dr. Patricia García was accompanied by the DEVIDA’s executive president, Carmen Masías; CARE Peru ‘s Board of Directors Chairperson, Inés Temple; and the United States ambassador, Brian A. Nichols.

VOLUNTEERING

The minister reported on the advances of health services in addiction care that will be provided to vulnerable people who abuse substances, with emphasis on women and adolescents, within the framework of the Mental Health Reform implementation.

NOVEMBER 2016 and Reuse of Resources. Formal launching event with the participation of SDC, MVCS, MINAM, SEDAPAL, members of the RRR Consortium and potential entrepreneurs. of Pepsico workers in New Cucungará, Catacaos, Piura. Manual work to dismantle bathrooms, clean school, make adobes in this rural community.

DECEMBER 2016 IN AYACUCHO,

the Inter-institutional and Inter-agency Working Meeting for Fighting Chronic Malnutrition and Infant Anemia of the Andean Regional Commonwealth was held, with the attendance of regional governors and officials from Apurímac, Ayacucho, Huancavelica, Ica and Junín, representatives of the Ministries of Development and Social Inclusion, Health, Education, Agriculture and Irrigation, Housing, Construction and Sanitation; representatives of the Poverty Reduction Roundtable, representatives of the Initiative Against Child Malnutrition (IDI); to approve the strategic action guidelines of the Andean Regional Commonwealth for fulfilling the goals of child nutrition.

National facilitators were certified by the Ministry of Health, the Psychology School of the Peruvian University Cayetano Heredia and the Plan Colombo - USA - CICAD / OAS.

LAUNCHING

of the virtual classroom program for the National Center for Estimating, Preventing and Reducing Disaster Risk (CENEPRED). The public was made up by 300 national and regional authorities.

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© Willie Cervan / CARE


2016-2017 BOARD OF DIRECTORS

INÉS TEMPLE ARCINIEGA CHAIRPERSON

CARLOS HEEREN RAMOS 1ST VICE-PRESIDENT

ÓSCAR CAIPO RICCI 2ND VICE-PRESIDENT

JORGE LUIS ARCHIMBAUD (International Banking Expert)

(General Manger at the National Industry Society)

CARIDAD DE LA PUENTE WIESE

(Managing Director at LHHDBM Peru and Chile)

(UTEC / TECSUP Executive Director)

(Chairman and Senior Partner at KPMG - Peru)

ELENA CONTERNO MARTINELLI

MARTÍN BEAUMONT FRAÑOWSKY

LUIS BUSTAMANTE BELAUNDE

(PUCP Management School Dean)

ZELMA ACOSTA-RUBIO

(Legal Manager at Interbank)

SUSANA DE LA PUENTE WIESE

OSCAR ESPINOSA BEDOYA

MARÍA DEL CARMEN FEDALTO BERNAL

MARÍA ELENA FORT MEYER

PAUL NEIRA DEL BEN

MARIANO PAZ SOLDÁN FRANCO

EDUARDO WICHTEL

LIENEKE SCHOL CALLE

(Chairperson of the Board of Directors at the National Fisheries Society)

(Director at the Wiese Group)

(CEO, founder of The Learning Factor and National Education Counselor)

(Managing Director at FERREYCORP)

(Independent Consultant – Business Expert)

(Managing Director for Peru and Bolivia at G4S)

(Chairman of the Garwich Group in Peru)

(Managing Director in Peru of the Association for Management Progress - APD)

(Regional Director for LAC at CARE USA)

(Commercial Director at Microsoft Peru)

ROSA ASCA CORDANO

(Chairperson of the Board at SURA)

DAVID SAETTONE WATMOUGH

(Managing Director at Andean Crown S.A.)

MILO STANOJEVICH DESTEFANO

(National Director at CARE Perú)

Members since 2017 Más información en: www.care.org.pe/consejo-directivo PATRICIA TEULLET PIPOLI

(Corporate Affairs Director at Newlink)

JOSÉ ALLEMANT SAYÁN

(Public Affairs and Sustainable Development Manager)

FERNANDO VILLARÁN

(Chairman at SASE Consultores S.A.C.)

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2016 MANAGEMENT TEAM Our organization is made up by a multidisciplinary team of managers with extensive experience in their respective fields of work. This allows us to implement innovative programs and projects in social and developmental areas that seek to raise the quality of life of the most vulnerable populations. Our managers have graduate studies in first class universities and international awards that guarantee their impeccable background.

MILO STANOJEVICH NATIONAL DIRECTOR

SEGUNDO DÁVILA PROGRAM MANAGER

NELSON GAVIRIA FINANCE, ADMINISTRATION & IT MANAGER

JESSICA MORALES MARKETING AND RESOURCE GENERATION MANAGER

LUCY HARMAN EMERGENCIES AND RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAM MANAGER

SANDRA ÍSOLA CLIMATE CHANGE PROGRAM MANAGER

LOURDES MINDREAU WATER AND SANITATION PROGRAM MANAGER

SILVIA NOLE EDUCATION PROGRAM MANAGER

WALTER VÍLCHEZ HEALTH, NUTRITION AND FOOD SECURITY PROGRAM MANAGER

More information at: www.care.org.pe/equipo-care

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OUR HUMAN RESOURCES

75 + 62 = 137 WOMEN

MEN

COLLEAGUES IN 2016

Our true motivation is linked to the spirit of solidarity and success that characterizes us. That is why our day-to-day collaborators perform their activities with great dedication and commitment, as they seek to have their work reflected in a better quality of life for the most vulnerable people. Thank you to all the collaborators for being part of CARE Peru's great family. It is a real pride to acknowledge that, due to all your effort and dedication, we have managed to overcome great challenges and that today we provide well-being and more opportunities to thousands of girls, boys, women and men from the most excluded communities in Peru.

CARE PERU PERSONNEL AT NATIONAL LEVEL PER POSITION CATEGORY

Management

5 women 4 men

Heads

10 women 5 men

Supervisors, Coordinators

17 women 23 men

Specialists, Analysts, Senior Administrative Assistants

26 women 11 men

Assistants

14 women 9 men

Clerks

0 women 7 men

Interns

3 women 0 men

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CARE PERU PERSONNEL AT NATIONAL LEVEL 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46.

Acero Arocutipa Edith Veronica Aguilar Cosquillo Rosa Candy Alcos Pacheco Roxana Marta Alvarado Chavez Julio Jaime Alvarez Chavez Consuelo Andrea Anguis Fuster Roberto Carlos Arenas Zea Monica Stenka Aste Cannock Natalia Baffigo Torre De Pinillos Virginia Barbis Quiñones Marcia Elena Barriga Espiritu Lizeth Mayra Benites Campos Georgina Soledad Bernales Chavez Carmen Elizabeth Blas Ramos Bryan Junior Bolaños Arias Elio Ademir Cabrera Huaman Walter Eduardo Caceres Padilla Juan Carlos Calderon Neyra Hilda Mar Calderon Pauta Carmen Esther Evelia Calle Palacios Carlos Rodolfo Camino Quispe Gladis Canales Sierra Liw Capristan Carhuapoma Rosa Elena Cardenas Cueva Susy Janet Castillo Paredes Elena Angela Chacaltana Mateo Jackelin Rossy Chang Prado Luis Alberto Martin Chang Sanchez Alfredo Chavez Rea Patricia Maria Chichizola Ramirez Andrea Alejandra Choquecahuana Pocco Dino Adolfo Choquevilca Lira Walter Florencio Chulla Villa Elizabeth Coanqui Yana David Cruz Ramirez Willy Cuzco Ruiz Carlos Alberto Davila Herrera Brenda Davila Muñoz Segundo Eliades De La Vega Bezada Milagros Maricielo Diaz Fernandez Jose Ney Elguera Ysnaga Roberto Elias Escobar Vera Lippmamm Escudero Banda Lucia Elida Espejo Pacheco Rocio Espinoza Aguila Sindy Esmeralda Espinoza Montenegro Maria Antonieta

47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92.

Esquiche Leon Blanca Elena Fernandez Cantorin Abel Antonio Fernandez Cantorin Mario Jhonatan Figueroa Diaz Marina Brigida Flores Fernandez Karen Marines Galvan Huaman Rosa Angelica Garay Nima Juan Carlos Garcia Kanashiro Luis Guillermo Andres Garcia Leon Lia Gaviria Perez Nelson Omar Giraldo Cuellar Karol Juan Pablo Gonzales Alfaro Cesar Alfredo Gregorio Valerio Elvert Guerra Meza Fredy Harman Guerra Lucy Anne Mary Hidalgo Huanca Joaquin Hifume Montes Carmen Romelia Huaman Guillen Zosimo Alfredo Huaman Huaman Luz Huamancayo Quiquin Panfilo Bibiano Huamani Medina Maria Lourdes Huayhua Quispe Roxana Isola Elias Sandra Pilar Juarez Jorge Isabel Tika Sulla Lara Quezada Diana Beatriz Laura Flores Yosselyn Leon Farias Ediltrudis Vicenta Leon Gallardo Lumper Luis Doro Loaiza Huairocaya Michael Loayza Alfaro Jorge Madera Mayz Nilton Magallanes De La Cruz Daniela Malaga Carrasco De Maravi Nancy Mamani Chujtaya María Luisa Marocho Ore Elsa Mestanza Huaccha Jorge Luis Minaya Nuñez Dalia Lizeth Mindreau Zegarra Lourdes Elena Miñan Bartra Fiorella Maria Miranda Carrillo Pedro Alejandro Montero Pulache Jose Monzon Urbina Melissa Vanessa Morales Martinez Jessica Veronica Moran Moran Miguel Jose Moreno Chavez Miguel Angel Nole Delgado Silvia Gabriela

47

93. Nunura Rodriguez Maria Teresa 94. Nuñez Untiveros Socorro Silvana 95. Nuñez Villena Betzabeth Margot 96. Ocaña Rios Christel 97. Odar De Mujica Delia Cecilia 98. Ojeda Parra Teresa Esther 99. Olivares Tarrillo Maclovio 100. Olvea Toque Edelisa 101. Ortiz Cahuas Laura Rosario 102. Pacheco De La Jara Herberth Ernesto 103. Parra Pacheco Tania Melisa 104. Pons Herrero Gema 105. Price Rios Karen Melissa 106. Prudencio Blas Americo Nilo 107. Pulache Jimenez Angela Olibia 108. Quinto Soto Clara Luz 109. Ramos Ticlavilca Guillermo Antonio 110. Reyna Camogliano Hipolito Andres 111. Rivera Cadillo Alex Isaac 112. Rubiños Gacliardi Diana 113. Salazar Sanchez Juan Jesus 114. Saldaña Rabanal Mildred De Jesús 115. Saldarriga Rivas Augusto Cesar 116. Seclen Contreras Luis Eduardo 117. Sosa Vargas Renzo Gustavo 118. Soto Cabrera Katherine Heidy 119. Stanojevich Destefano Milovan 120. Suarez Alvarado Percy 121. Surco Huayllapuma Freddy 122. Taboada Cabrejos Victor Agustin 123. Tapia Tapia Valerio 124. Timana Lafranco Liliam 125. Tiquilloca Maraza Orlando 126. Toche Avilez Diana Decire 127. Torres Vega Veronica Roxana 128. Toscano Rodriguez Fredy Roland 129. Urquiaga Iparraguirre Luis Antonio 130. Valenzuela Sumarriva Fernando 131. Vasquez Atoche Maria Luisa 132. Vasquez Rojas Juan Jose 133. Velasquez Ortega Guadalupe Imelda 134. Vilchez Davila Walter 135. Ynoñan Garcia Patricia Vicenta 136. Zelarayan Muñoz Odon Juan 137. Zuñiga Jara Miryam


ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY Accountability for CARE Peru is a process that ensures direct and sustained participation as well as mutual feedback with the population with whom we work, by promoting more equitable power relations and strengthening of organizational management. Therefore, we emphasize:

INFORMATION AND TRANSPARENCY:

PARTICIPATION

We provide information to our beneficiaries and counterparts about our intervention. This allows us to create relationships of respect, trust and transparency.

CARE has a strategy to involve intervention beneficiaries. To do so, it seeks to involve them in the decision-making process by defining mutual responsibilities from beginning to end.

We have considered accessibility as a decisive factor when providing information in order to reach accountability. The work focuses on making information accessible to groups that are more vulnerable due to their remoteness, to speaking a different language, etc. To do so, we have been working to build channels and tools to provide important information to these groups.

This process allows key actors to play an active role in the decision-making processes that affect them. The mechanisms used to guarantee that all are represented are: Project Management Committees, Meetings and Communal Assemblies, Participatory Meetings, Inquiries, etc.

Some tools we use are written, oral, or audio documents, information meetings, assemblies, etc. These are the means used by the organization for beneficiaries, providing them with information they need to know.

100%

Likewise, our institution has mechanisms and open channels for the management of complaints, claims and suggestions. This allows us to understand and verify if we are achieving the necessary changes in our interventions and our actions. These can be positive or negative, allowing us to know if something is going wrong and taking the necessary actions.

in 2016, of participatory messages have been answered and resolved.

We have a telephone line, email, complaint logs, which allow us to gather the voice of the beneficiaries and counterparts. CARE is also working to develop more accessible mechanisms for more vulnerable groups due to their remoteness and lack of access to the media.

* The main means of communication with CARE is emails

FEEDBACK MECHANISMS

OUR SEAL ENABLES US TO DISSEMINATE OUR MECHANISMS:

Accountability and transparency is a right of the people and a duty for CARE Peru. If you have some opinion, complaint or suggestion use toll-free number 0800 – 14417 to call or write to: opinion@care.org.pe

48


51%

© Willie Cervan / CARE

OF ADOLESCENT WOMEN IN THE RURAL AREA OF PERU DO NOT FINISH HIGH SCHOOL.


2016 FINANCIAL REPORT CARE Peru makes sure that received donations are used for the benefit of the people and communities with whom we work and support through the following programs: Water and Sanitation; Education; Health, Food Safety and Nutrition; Climate Change, Economic Development and Emergencies and Risk Management. The following is detailed information on CARE Peru’s Revenues and Expenses in 2016, as well as an extract from the Audited Financial Statements.

REVENUES

AMOUNT IN MM S/

%

Institutional Donors

17,724

59%

Funds Received from CARE CI

9,443

32%

Private Donors

2,271

8%

Other Revenues

496

2%

29,935

100%

Total General

REVENUES

AMOUNT IN MM S/

%

Direct Program Expenditures

25,477

83%

Administrative Expenditures

3,774

12%

Donation Raising

1,010

3%

Depreciation

384

1%

Total General

30,644

100%

32%

8% 59%

2%

3% 1%

12%

83%

16% REVENUES Water and Sanitation

AMOUNT IN MM S/

%

6,460

25%

Climate Change

4,123

16%

Economic Development and Governance

4,962

19%

Education and Gender

2,119

8%

Emergencies and Risk Management

6,867

27%

946

4%

25,477

100%

Health and Nutrition Total General

50

19% 25% 8% 4% 27%


OPINION BY THE INDEPENDENT AUDITORS

Opinion In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the net assets of Asociación CARE Perú as of December 31, 2016 and 2015, and its financial performance and cash flows for the years ended those dates, in accordance with the accounting principles described in note 3 to the financial statements. Lima, Perú, May 31 2017

Endorsed by:

Daniel Carpio C.P.C.C. Registration number 24098

51


STATEMENT OF ASSETS AND LIABILITIES AS OF DECEMBER 31 2016 AND 2015 2016 S/(000)

2015 S/(000)

9,463

10,459

-

109

1,339

943

204

170

11,006

11,681

205

208

Investment property, net

4,524

4,593

Real estate, furniture and equipment, net

6,932

7,154

211

-

22,878

23,636

Accounts payable to suppliers

78

88

Accounts payable to related entities

55

1

Donations received to be applied

3,014

3,109

Taxes and remuneration payable

1,145

1,008

Other accounts payable

1,012

1,146

5,304

5,352

20

7

5,304

5,352

12,125

12,138

5,429

6,139

17,554

18,277

ASSET Current assets Available Funds Accounts receivable from related entities Other accounts receivable Prepaid expenses

Non-current assets Accounts receivable from related entities

Intangible, net TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES Current liabilities

Non-current liabilities Other accounts payable TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS Net Assets by Donation of Fixed Assets Accumulated net assets arising from operations TOTAL NET ASSETS

The financial statements include the corresponding notes which are essential to understand the information. The entire report is available at www care.org.pe

52


STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS FOR THE YEARS ENDED AS OF DECEMBER 31 2016 AND 2015 2016 S/(000)

2015 S/(000)

25,462

21,032

4,091

5,238

-

932

346

231

Sale of donated fixed assets

-

2

Partner Fees

2

2

Financial Services

10

4

Other revenues

23

52

REVENUES Application of Restricted Donations Unrestricted gifts received Donations of services received Provision of services and rentals

Exchange difference

-

726

29,934

28,219

30,426

25,282

45

57

173

-

30,644

25,339

(710)

2,880

Initial balance in net assets

6,139

3,259

Opening balance on net assets

(710)

2,880

SURPLUS FROM OPERATIONS

5,429

6,139

EXPENSES General and administrative expenses Financial Services Exchange difference

(DEFICIT) SURPLUS FROM OPERATIONS CHANGES IN NET ASSETS

The financial statements include the corresponding notes which are essential to understand the information. The entire report is available at www care.org.pe

53


STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE YEARS ENDED AS OF DECEMBER 31 2016 AND 2015 2016 S/(000)

2015 S/(000)

(710)

2,880

383

338

112

4,830

(396)

87

Prepaid expenses

(34)

246

Accounts payable to suppliers

(10)

(293)

Taxes and remuneration payable

137

(1,421)

(121)

40

54

(54)

(585)

6,653

25,300

21,124

(25,395)

(20,800)

(95)

324

Acquisition of real estate, furniture and equipment

(140)

(21)

Acquisition of intangibles

(211)

-

35

2

(316)

(19)

(996)

6,958

Cash at the beginning of the year

10,459

3,501

Cash at the end of the year

9,463

10,459

(13)

321 -

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATIONS (Deficit) surplus from operations MORE (LESS) ITEMS NOT REPRESENTING CASH MOVEMENT: Depreciation and amortization NET CHANGES IN OPERATIONAL ASSETS AND LIABILITIES Accounts receivable from related entities Other accounts receivable

Other accounts payable Accounts payable to related entities Net cash (used in) coming from operations CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING OPERATIONS Restricted donations received Execution of Restricted Donations Net cash (used in) coming from financing operations CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTMENT ACTIVITIES

Sale of real estate, furniture and equipment Net cash used in investing operations (Net decrease) net increase of cash

TRANSACTIONS NOT REPRESENTING CASH FLOW Real estate, furniture and equipment received in donation Others The financial statements include the corresponding notes which are essential to understand the information. The entire report is available at www care.org.pe

54


© José Orihuela / CARE


OUR 2016 DONORS Contributions for development: We have the economic support of recognized companies and institutions that support the programs and projects we undertake. We thank all our donors for their trust in the various activities we carry out.

Recreate PMS

COMISIร“N EUROPEA

Ayuda Humanitaria y Protecciรณn Civil

56


CORPORATE ALLIANCE CORPORATE SPONSORS: We thank the following companies for contributing to help more girls in poverty remove the barriers that prevent them from finishing high school and obtain greater development opportunities in the future.

MARKETING PARTNERS: We have the important support of various communication agencies, committed and working hand in hand with us to ensure that all of Peru contributes to greater opportunities for girls and women in poverty.

XI Feria Internacional de Proveedores para la Industria Textil y Confecciones

57


MARKETING AND RESOURCE GENERATION Help. Donate. Finance. Cooperate. The private sector has many ways to approach CARE and join our cause. It collaborates with us and changes the living conditions of thousands of Peruvian women and men in poverty.

Finance a project

We work in 22 regions of the country, with regular projects and interventions in water and sanitation, education, health, food security, nutrition, climate change, economic development, emergencies and risk management, targeting the most vulnerable populations. As a company you can finance a specific project that goes with your philosophy. Choose the project that motivates you and prompts you to act.

Marketing with a Cause

It consists of allocating a percentage of a product or service sale to CARE programs for a limited time. The alliance can be communicated on product packaging or other promotional materials. Throughout these years we have designed several successful actions of this type both nationally and internationally. Your consumers will be helping to change many families’ lives in a sustainable way.

Involve your people and join the CARE Peru Friends Network

It is important for us to reach the maximum number of people with our message. Your company can collaborate with us by involving employees, suppliers, customers, shareholders and multiply the impact of the collaboration through monthly donations, through payroll contributions to our organization, holding awareness events for employees, participating in corporate volunteering and solidarity initiatives to raise funds for our organization.

Strategic Partner in Emergencies

CARE’s heart is the humanitarian response. Your company can be a strategic partner in Emergencies. A vital ally. It is a solid commitment, because your donation helps us to respond in 72 hours at the latest with all the logistics, mobilization of materials and people neededto save lives.

Donates goods and services

At CARE we accept goods and services we need, to invest the money we saved in the development of our programs and in providing humanitarian response.

I want to join!

write to info@care.org.pe pe or call (511) 417 1155. you can also leave your contact information and we will contact you. find us at: www.care.org.pe/empresas 58


© Jana Koerner / CARE

OTHER WAYS TO HELP

Making a donation through the following channels:

Being a volunteer in any of the following ways:

• Calling 1836 from Movistar landlines to automatically donate S / 5 (five soles). The charge is made on the landline telephone bill. • Becoming a monthly donor through a credit or debit card VISA ® or MASTERCARD ®. Write an email to: amigos@care.org.pe or on-line at www.care.org.pe/dona

• Professional Volunteer: You can contribute with your professional knowledge and experience in any of our support areas and / or projects. • More information at: www.care.org.pe/ voluntariado-profesional

59


MAIN OFFICE

DEPARTMENTAL OFFICES

CARE Perú Av. General Santa Cruz 659 Jesús María, Lima - Perú Phone +511 417 1100 info@care.org.pe

Áncash Jr. 28 de Julio 467 Barrio de Huarupampa, Huaraz Phone +51 043 422854

Junín Cl. San José 595 San Carlos, Huancayo Phone +51 064 223960

Ica Cl. Los Angeles 159 Chincha Alta, Chincha Phone +51 056 280568

Cajamarca Cl. Baños del Inca 290 Urb. Ramón Castilla Phone +51 076 363284

Madre de Dios Jr. San Martín N° 1230 Tambopata, Tambopata

Chiclayo DRVCS LAMBAYEQUE - Calle los Laureles 171 Urb. Libertadores - Chiclayo

Cusco Cl. Los Cactus Lote C-18 Urb. La Florida, Wanchaq Phone +51 084 253527

Piura Cl. San Ignacio de Loyola 300 Urb. Miraflores, Castilla Phone +51 073 520956

Trujillo Calle Gound 1178 – 1182 Departamento 101 Urbanización Mochica.

If you are a company, go to www.care.org.pe/empresas, or call 417 1126. For questions, complaints or suggestions: 0800 14417 opinion@care.org.pe Find us as CAREenPeru in:

Tumbes Urb. Andrés Araujo Moran MZ.4, Lote16 Av. Mafalta Lama

www.care.org.pe

Photos: Cover: Jana Koerner. Inside: Jana Koerner, Willie Cerdán, Miguel Morán, Archivo CARE. Editing Committee Tania Parra, Gustavo Vera. Supervision Milo Stanojevich, Jessica Morales. Drafting: Verónica Valcárcel. Design Gustavo Vera Montalvo. | August 2017 | Legal Deposit at the National Library of Peru Number 2017-13245. Edited by: CARE Perú, RUC: 20525163238, Av. General Santa Cruz 659, Jesús María, Lima - Perú. Printed by: BIO PARTNERS S.A.C. / RUC: 20524448379 / Lima - Perú.

CARE Peru Anual report 2016  
CARE Peru Anual report 2016  

CARE Peru

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