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2012-2013 YEARBOOK


CONTENTS Cardus 185 Young Street Hamilton, ON L8P 1V9 McKenzie Towne RPO 70 High Street Box 89008 Calgary, AB T2Z 3W3 411-642 de Courcelle Montreal, QC H4C 3C5 13023 Raintree Place Chino, CA 91710 905.528.8866 info@cardus.ca www.cardus.ca

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Thank you to our donors Message from the President RESEARCH Education Social Cities Work & Economics

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PUBLICATIONS Comment Magazine 16 Convivium 18 Cardus Daily Blog 20 Media 21 NETWORKING Events 24 The Hill Family Lecture Series 28 ORGANIZATION Income & Expenses Audited Financial Statements The Team Senior Fellows

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Cardus seeks the renewal of North American social architecture, drawing on the wisdom and resources of 2,000 years of Christian social thought. We attend to the systems and practices and institutions that shape our culture, with a conviction that good architecture leads to flourishing.

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THANK YOU TO OUR DONORS Cardus is indebted to the individuals, companies, foundations, and subscribers across Canada and the U.S. who have demonstrated their belief in our work through financial support. For more than 13 years Cardus has been able to translate and activate ideas that ensure what we believe touches what we do. We believe that accountability is an appropriate response to this generosity and hope that the enclosed record of our work and independently audited financial statements honour the trust you’ve placed in us. As always, we welcome your calls to discuss, encourage, clarify, and otherwise engage. On behalf of each reader of a Cardus publication, each event attendee, each public hearing guest, each school board using a Cardus report, and of course, each member of the Cardus team: thank you!

Brian Harskamp Senior Director, Philanthropy & Finance

Cardus Senior Fellows’ Retreat in Montreal, QC, September 2013.

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FROM THE PRESIDENT I have observed that when I am painting the grand vision of Cardus—renewing our social architecture—the question that will invariably come next is, “What does that mean in the real world?” or, “Can you give me a practical example?” I love these kinds of questions, especially because at Cardus we take a good crack at answering them. On the other hand, when I find myself deep in the weeds of a policy issue or cultural analysis, the questions come—“Can you give me the big picture so I know where to place this?”or “What are you really trying to accomplish?” Cardus needs to have a deep knowledge of the puzzle pieces, their complex designs and how they fit and relate to each other. More, we seek the imagination for what the picture looks like—how it all coheres together to show what is true and beautiful and good. The troubled picture is often easier to see: governments less able to accomplish their responsibilities, and yet eager to occupy spaces better open for others; an economic market struggling to right itself, and yet unable to observe its moral foundations; civil society and social service organizations turning to the state for help, rather than natural communities to assist their missions. Cardus argues that the great tradition of 2,000 years of Christian thought can make contributions to what today’s social architecture might look. Great truths all play into our thinking: • • • •

being image bearers of God work is good and work is social the abiding principle to animate the market is service not profit to be human is to be religious

Finally, Cardus is committed to the counter–cultural idea that a flourishing society is one with healthy institutions that balance their place in our social architecture and are committed to their own renewal. These institutions do not have to be nameless systems; they can be by way of people, ideas, lessons of history, order and respect, and hotbeds of creativity. Yes, this report you have in your hand is more focused on seeing the puzzle pieces and seeks to illustrate how we steward the resources for which you give us responsibility. However, there is no doubt that the whole team at Cardus, our board and our staff, are committed to the grand task and the beautiful picture of loving God and our neighbour.

Michael Van Pelt, President

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Alternative policy measures, especially the opening up of existing unions to more competition, may not produce immediate results, but they contain the seeds that will produce deep-rooted improvements to Canadian labour relations and parallel political reward. —Brian Dijkema, Cardus Policy in Public, June 2012

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RESEARCH Cardus’s mandate is not just to study and learn, but to go somewhere with the best available research. Research programs are tightly focused areas of interest with deliverables that contribute to and enhance external recognition of the Cardus school of thought. The subjects for these programs will change over time but will be guided by:

• a recognized social problem • the identification of a unique contribution or perspective that Cardus could provide on an issue of public importance

• the ability to resource credible expertise in this area to sustain an ongoing program of research and engagement

• support for this program that makes it financially sustainable. Presently our research programs are focused on Social Cities, Education, and Work and Economics, with Law as a fourth area under active consideration.

Ray Pennings, Executive Vice President, talks about faith communities and municipalities in a Manning Meets video in April 2013.

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EDUCATION

THE CARDUS EDUCATION SURVEY If Christian education is worth doing, it’s also worth measuring. It’s worth holding up a steady hand with a large mirror, and taking a few minutes to look at what we’re seeing. The Cardus Education Survey was launched believing that once we’ve measured the results of Christian education, we’ll be able to both improve it for those who come down this road after us, and we’ll be able to defend it to a general public that may become less convinced of the worth of what we’re doing. CONTINUING THE CONVERSATION Since the release of the Phase I report in 2011 and the Phase II report in 2012, and through conference keynotes, newsletter updates, continued downloads on the website, and round table discussions, the conversation is growing and the data are taking on a life of their own. The importance of this study becomes more clear as schools continue to get on board and administrators champion the information in their own context.

www.carduseducationsurvey.com

“The

first

comprehensive

Canadian

survey to measure outcomes of adults who didn’t go to public school has found these graduates to be very active and engaged citizens—more likely to volunteer and donate to charity than their governmenteducated counterparts.” PHASE II: A RISING TIDE LIFTS ALL BOATS

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How do Canadians students rate their education? How do they fare—years later, decades later—in their cultural and civic lives? The Cardus Education Survey 2012 report examines graduate outcomes of both government (public) and non-government schools, comparing them to each other and to the stated aims of every provincial education ministry.

—Sarah Boesveld, The National Post September 2012


CONFERENCES The Cardus Education Survey is the premier resource available for measuring Christian education outcomes. Cardus has been invited to speak to every major Christian school association on the continent since its release. Conference locations can be seen on the map. MEDIA The Cardus Education Survey has been reported on in nearly 50 media outlets, including Christianity Today, The National Post, ACSI Christian School Education Magazine, and the B.C. Catholic. View the full list at www.carduseducationsurvey.com.

The vision of the Cardus-University of Notre Dame research initiative is to be the most sophisticated tool for advancing religious education across Canada and the USA. The Initiative launched in July 2013, located at the University of Notre Dame. Through its ongoing research, consolidation of religious school research data, development of practical tools for individual schools, and its focus on making sound, research-driven policy arguments, Cardus will build on the success of the Cardus Education Survey with this innovative continuing project. The CRSI advisory committee includes: Mark Berends (University of Notre Dame), Derek Keenan (Association of Christian Schools International), Ray Pennings (Cardus), David Sikkink (University of Notre Dame), Christian Smith (University of Notre Dame), and Michael Van Pelt (Cardus).

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SOCIAL CITIES Program Director: Milton Friesen

Thriving cities require that all of the resources within and around them interact as effectively as possible. Our Social Cities program explores the dynamics of how the social and institutional resources in cities contributes to that thriving. WHAT MAKES A GREAT CITY AND HOW DO WE GET THERE? Our Social Cities program explores these questions through integrating work on a variety of social infrastructure project areas.

REGIONAL City Soul (Calgary)

City Soul (Potentials)

LOCAL

City Soul (Edmonton)

Social Capital

Charity

Subsidiarity

NATIONAL Thriving cities require that all of the resources within and around them interact as effectively as possible, including social and institutional resources. Each of our four key project areas in the Social Cities program represents a different balance of research, policy, and application activity.

For more about Social Cities publications and events, visit:

cardus.ca/research/socialcities

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SOCIAL CITIES PROGRAM FOCUS: Reseach: Reports, Studies, Data Policy: Legislation, Decision Making Application: Events, Publications, Organizing

CITY SOUL (NORTH AMERICA)

How can urban planners and faith-based organizations cooperate more effectively in building good cities? The City Soul projects explore how faith-based organizations can contribute more effectively to long-term, strategic urban planning processes and how municipalities can better engage faithbased organizations. Cardus has organized public roundtable meetings in Calgary, conducted nearly 60 meetings with Edmonton institutional leaders, and written articles outlining the policy positions that can support long-term growth. SOCIAL CAPITAL (GLOBAL)

How do social connections impact quality of life in cities? Social capital explores the social, economic, and other benefits that people receive as a result of being part of a network of connected individuals and organizations. Cardus has been researching new methods for measuring social capital, reviewing current applications of social capital measurement, and networking with other organizations who are interested in social change phenomena.

SUBSIDIARITY (CANADA)

Are there ways of pursuing the common good that go beyond right, centre, left, or other political labels? Cardus is interested in exploring how subsidiarity could rejuvenate and bring cohesion to public and private thought and practice including both civil service and political processes and engagement. Through research and collaboration events with key leaders and thinkers, we have strengthened the discussion and practice of subsidiarity in Canada.

CHARITABLE SECTOR (CANADA)

How are charitable activities and organizations in Canada changing? We are currently exploring how and when Canadians donate, particularly the planned aspects of giving across the country. This will help us form a more complete picture of the donation dynamics in the Canadian charitable sector. The changing institutional landscape of charities in Canada—how many are being added or removed, what role they play in particular cities, and what charity in Canada means­—are also being actively pursued. 11


WORK & ECONOMICS Program Director: Brian Dijkema

What we believe and how we work are more connected than we often think, and at Cardus we think we’re onto something: a way of connecting belief and behaviour in work and economics that can contribute to the common good. Here you will find out more about three key happenings on this project from the past year.

PAPER: CARDUS CONSTRUCTION COMPETITIVENESS MONITOR Each year, over a quarter of Ontario’s population is forced to pay up to 40% more for public construction projects in their cities. A loophole in Ontario’s labour law has forced some of Ontario’s largest cities into a labour monopoly, whereby only a select few companies can bid on projects like water treatment plants, bus stations, hockey rinks, and public schools. But thanks to Cardus’s research, there is movement to change this. A wide swath of Ontario associations and an increasing number of politicians have taken Cardus’s research which describes the scope and cost of these labour monopolies and have started to advocate for change. Research provided by our “Construction Competitiveness Monitor” has been used by the Association of Municipalities of Ontario, the Region of Waterloo, the Progressive Contractors Association and other construction associations, to make the case for introducing open and competitive bidding for public procurement projects in Ontario. Our work is regularly cited by authorities and media and has been the catalyst for a private members’ bill at Queen’s Park which will allow for a diversity of companies, unions and labour organizations to work on publicly funded projects. It’s yet another example of how sound research helps shape public discussion and leads to sound public policy.

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POLICY: HEWERS OF WOOD OR DRAWERS OF WATER Natural resources and economic activity spurred by their extraction can be found in all corners of our country. In short, rather than being lopsided, Canada is a country rich in a variety of resources from sea to sea. Eliminating legislative barriers which prevent qualified parties from bidding on public construction work is one of the most effective ways of achieving savings, and ensuring that construction’s central role in our economy benefits all Canadians, not just a few. The specific nature of construction’s role in our economy raises important questions about the effects it will have on our social fabric. As noted above, much of the construction related to our resources takes place in remote parts of Canada, sometimes far removed from the tight social fabrics of our cities and towns. This prompts us to ask: How will the influx and retreat of large numbers of workers in small towns affect workers’ health, crime rates, family cohesion, employment insurance programs, and other factors? Cardus’s research has started this discussion, and is providing Canadians with sound data on the proper use of our natural resource wealth.

EVENT: TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE HEARING A key pillar of Cardus’s work is to show that economic matters are not neutral, but spring from our deepest commitments and are embedded in strong institutional frameworks. Every so often, this becomes clear to policy makers and members of civil society. In our recent testimony to the Federal Transport Committee on the question of open-tendering, it came up in an unexpected way: discussing federal infrastructure. Here’s what London West MP, Ed Holder, had to say to his colleagues on this issue after hearing of our work: “Do you not believe that there’s a moral obligation...to give every worker the right to work in Canada, regardless of their union or non-union status, as long as they’re qualified?” We do, and it’s nice to see our government’s leadership agree!

JAN U

ARY

2014

Cardus is pleased to host a conference exploring the implications of the rise of construction on Canada’s national economy. The conference will:

• Situate construction related to resource extraction, transportation, and marketing as pan-Canadian opportunities; • Assemble a unique network of three competitive labour pools, the legal community, construction companies and purchasers, and key government leaders

• Allow unique collabortation to address policies including labour supply, productivity, and lobour mobility

go.cardus.ca/CNIR

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“...Cultural change happens, but it happens slowly and unpredictably. I guess the first thing to be said is that it is what drives history.” —David Brooks, New York Times Columnist, in Comment Magazine

“A country’s foreign policy is but an extension of its domestic policies. It allows us to project our values abroad.” —Anne Leahy, former Ambassador to the Holy See, in Convivium

“Calvin’s image is creation as the theatre of God’s glory. Maybe we need to think of the Spirit as the stage manager.” —Richard Mouw, President Emeritus of Fuller Theological Seminary, in Comment Magazine

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PUBLICATIONS In an individualistic world of echo chambers and self-affirmation, Cardus still believes the printed word can unify where talking heads splinter. Our publications harbour our hope, expressing across time and place how old ideas can help us live better together now.

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PUBLIC THEOLOGY for the COMMON GOOD

“We’re not here just to celebrate and affirm that it’s good for Christians to engage culture. We want to now ask the hard questions—to resource those who are on board with the project and are now looking for wisdom about how to actually do this. Yes, Christians should be engaged in cultural creation and stewardship; yes, God values and affirms our cultural labours; now what does that look like? And what does it look like to do that Christianly? “We’re all for common grace affirmations; but we’re equally concerned about what Abraham Kuyper called “the antithesis.” Think of Comment as the magazine where we not only encourage you to see your work as pursuing God’s shalom; we also dig deep to consider just what shalom looks like in economics and education, for cities and civil society.” —From the Comment Manifesto, 2013 Read the manifesto online at go.cardus.ca/2013Manifesto

MEET COMMENT’S NEW EDITOR Comment welcomed new Editor, Dr. James K.A. Smith. Jamie is a Senior Fellow with Cardus and teaches philosophy at Calvin College in Grand Rapids, MI. He also currently holds the Gary & Henrietta Byker Chair in Applied Reformed Theology and Worldview. Jamie is an award-winning author and has written for a number of journals. He brings to Comment a unique perspective at the intersection of philosophy, theology, and cultural criticism.

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COMMENT ONLINE STATISTICS

52

ARTICLES PUBLISHED ANNUALLY

185,000 PAGEVIEWS THIS YEAR

4,500

WEEKLY EMAIL SUBSCRIBERS


FALL 2013: WE BELIEVE IN INSTITUTIONS “If you’re really passionate about fostering the common good, then you should resist anti-institutionalism. Because institutions are ways to love our neighbours.” With articles from Chris Ganski, Emily Rose Gum, Jeff Haanen, Davey Henreckson, and Gideon Strauss, and an interview with James Davison Hunter.

SPRING 2013: PERSUASION “We believe in persuasion as a mode of convicted charity—willing to meet one’s interlocutors where they are, while unapologetically hoping to change their mind.” With articles from Anne Snyder, Marilyn McEntyre, Calvin Seerveld, Jordan Ballor, and Aaron Belz, and an interview with Nicholas Wolterstorff.

FALL 2012: WORD OF GOD AND CITY OF MAN “...People moulded by the Word of God not only bring that Word to the city of man. In union with the eternal Word, they are the Word of God in the city of man.” Guest edited by Peter Leithart and with articles from Al Wolters, Richard Mouw, Esther Meek, and Makoto Fujimura.

COMMENT PRINT STATISTICS

4

ISSUES PER YEAR

1,400

TOTAL PRINT SUBSCRIBERS

35 PERCENTAGE INCREASE IN PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS THIS YEAR

Comment Digital Editions

Download yours 17


CONVIVIUM SOCIETY: MUCH MORE THAN A MAGAZINE Edited by Fr. Raymond J. de Souza and published by Peter Stockland, Convivium seeks to create and engage a community of Canadians who see the value of religious faith in Canadian society. In addition to six issues of the magazine each year, Convivium also hosts lectures and events for members through out the year.

CONVIVIUM CONNECTIONS For those who wish to go a little deeper, Convivium Connections are member-run reading groups across the country where members meet to discuss the articles, share stories, and generate ideas about faith in our common life. Here is what Kemptville Convivium Connections group leader Harmen Boersma has to say: The Kemptville group meets downtown. Discussion topics include what is written about in Convivium magazine as well as relevant topics in our own lives and communities. We always wonder how faith (Christian or other) shapes our action and community institutions. We gather to informally share stories and ideas. Find out more about Convivium and Convivium Connections discussion groups at:

www.cardus.ca/convivium

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF: Fr. Raymond de Souza PUBLISHER: Peter Stockland COMMUNITY & PARTNERSHIP COORDINATOR: Julia Nethersole CIRCULATION: 1,400

CONVIVIUM

VOLUME 2 NO. 8 JUNE / JULY 2013

FAITH

& FINANCE

LOVE & SCANDAL Alisha Ruiss

p.27

GOD & AMBIGUITY Diane Bederman

p.37

VISIT US ONLINE w w w. c a rd u s . c a /c o nv i v i u m

Barbara Kay on cultural memory Licia Corbella: converting Ralph Klein John Robson: Chesterson’s woeful economics

CONVIVIUM OCT0BER / NOVEMBER 2013

CONVIVIUM JUNE / JULY 2013

p.17

p.14

James K.A. Smith, John Zucchi, Christine Jones

Mark Carney, Roger Martin & Fr. Raymond J. de Souza

BUDDHISTS & BASEBALL Barbara Clayton

FAITH IN OUR COMMON LIFE

Reflecting the Light of Faith

p.8

Plus:

CONVIVIUM

VOLUME 2 NO. 10 OCTOBER / NOVEMBER 2013

Volume 2, No. 10

Volume 2, No. 8

FAITH IN OUR COMMON LIFE

MARTIN LUTHER KING:

American Prophet Father Raymond J. de Souza

p.42

Christian Lions & ISLAMIC JIHAD Barbara Kay

p.38

WEDDING BELLS,

Whatever Sells Kurt Armstrong

p.24

Dr. Nicholas Newman: Free Willy Nilly Anne Leahy: The Conversation Diane Bederman: Memories of a Lost Boy Heidi MacDonald: Habits of Community

PUBLISHED THIS YEAR: Cardinal Thomas Collins Paul Allen Diane Weber Bederman Douglas Farrow Lorna Dueck Father Tom Rosica Ian Hunter Anne Leahy Travis Smith John von Heyking Richelle Wiseman Kevin Newman Michelle Rebidoux Jason Zuidema Barbra Clayton John Zucchi Lars Troide Father Julián Carrón Ian Boyd Don Hutchinson Albertos Polizogopoulos Alisha Ruiss Richard Bastien Randy Boyagoda Ryan Topping Licia Corbella John Robson Heidi MacDonald Reginald Bibby Gina Rubinsky

Convivium Audio Extras feature informal dialogue between Fr. Raymond de Souza and Peter Stockland on a variety of topics written about in the current issue. Convivium donors of over $200 receive access to Convivium Audio Extras.

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AY P E N N I N G S P E T E R S T O C K L A N D B R I A N D I J K E M A D O U G S I K K E M A D E R E K M I E D E M A N E T E P P B U C K I N G H A M S T E V E N G A R B E R PA U L R O W E F R . R AY M O N D J . D E S O U Z O H N S E E L R AY S AW AT S K Y J U L I A N E T H E R S O L E R E G I N A L D B I B B Y R O B E R T J O U S T R A N D R É S C H U T T E N D A N I S H AW S TA N L E Y C A R L S O N - T H I E S J A M E S K . A . S M I T H K AT H R Y E R U I J T E R M I LT O N F R I E S E N A N D Y B A Y E R E M I LY S C R I V E N S D A V I D G R E U S E L L B E R T O S P O L I Z O G O P O U LO S D E A N I VA N P E LT A N D R E A M R O Z E K J O N AT H A N W E L L U

CARDUS DAILY BLOG Managing Editor: Dan Postma

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The Cardus Blog features Cardus staff and regular contributors responding to current events, big ideas, and whatever else they’re thinking about. Popular posts this year: NOT IDEOLOGY BUT CHARACTER: LONG LIVE MAGGIE THATCHER Peter Stockland, April 9, 2013 BUYING GROCERIES IN EGYPT Janet Epp Buckingham, August 19, 2013 KNITTING WHILE DETROIT BURNS James K.A. Smith, August 21, 2013 WHEN “OFFENSIVE” BECOMES “DISCRIMINATORY” Albertos Polizogopoulos, July 27, 2013 PERSECUTION AND THE STORIES WE TELL Doug Sikkema, September 27 2013

250

72,000

25

POSTS PUBLISHED EACH YEAR

VISITS TO THE CARDUS BLOG IN THE PAST YEAR

PERCENTAGE OF VISITORS THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA


IN THE MEDIA Senior Director of Publications and Media: Peter Stockland

Cardus is committed to broadening and deepening the conversation about renewal of social architecture in North America. Our commitment is met through our own research reports as well as our outstanding magazines, Comment and Convivium. It is also lived through the appearance of Cardus team members in outside publications ranging from the Globe and Mail and National Post to the Ottawa Citizen, Calgary Herald, Edmonton Journal, New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal. In the electronic domain, our staff appear regularly on national programming such as Cross Country Checkup with Rex Murphy and numerous Sun Media interview shows as well as on global specialty channels such as EWTN, where Father Raymond de Souza, a Cardus Senior Fellow and editor-in-chief of Convivium magazine, was part of the team in Rome covering the retirement of Pope Benedict XVI and his replacement by Pope Francis. We have no intention, however, of sitting on our successes and letting past appearances in mainstream media outlets count as our future. In early 2013, we undertook a full audit of our own web and social media presence, engaging Graeme Menzies, director of social media for the Vancouver 2010 Olympics, to study our processes and recommend things we could be doing better. A major outcome of Mr. Menzies’ report was the addition to our team of Naomi Biesheuvel as our communications coordinator. A veteran of the social media world, Naomi has been tasked with making our presence on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and other media sites much more robust. Broadening the conversation about social architecture does not mean abandoning mainstream media forms in a rush to embrace social media, nor does it mean spreading ourselves so thinly across all platforms that we comes across as having little more than Twitter chatter to contribute. Rather, it means bringing the dialogue to our existing audience in a way that is timely and accessible and that matches their needs and their lives. It also means cultivating new audiences who may not even yet know they are waiting for what we have to say. The most important step in any strategy is committing to it. At Cardus, our communications strategy begins with a commitment to the conversation we know North America needs to deepen.


The real economy relies on the financial system. And the financial system depends on trust. Indeed, trust is embedded in the language of finance. -Mark Carney, former Governor of the Bank of Canada, Hill Lecture 2013

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NETWORKING Cardus events bring credible people into the same room who otherwise would be unlikely to meet each other. Our networks consist not only of those who are gatekeepers or influencers but also include the next generation of cultural leaders. Providing tomorrow’s leaders with a language and framework for doing their cultural work is one way influence spreads as those leaders pursue their vocations and a new generation is faithfully present in the full range of social institutions.

Banking, Trust, and the Culture of Capitalism: 2013 Hill Lecture with Mark Carney, Roger Martin, and Fr. Raymond de Souza.

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EVENTS

“CHARITY HAS A POLITICAL PROBLEM” Michael Van Pelt, Public Lecture September 19, 2012 | Lethbridge, AB CARDUS EDUCATION SURVEY LAUNCH September 20, 2012 | Langley, BC CARDUS EDUCATION SURVEY LAUNCH September 26, 2012 | Hamilton, ON THE CARDUS/PAIDEIA FORUM September 26, 2012 | Toronto, ON HILL FAMILY LECTURE SERIES: BARBARA KAY October 15, 2012 | Ottawa, ON CARDUS EDUCATION SURVEY LAUNCH October 16, 2012 | Ottawa, ON CARDUS SENIOR FELLOWS RETREAT October 17-18, 2012 | Hamilton, ON SUBSIDIARITY ROUNDTABLE Alessandro Colombo October 21, 2012 | Hamilton, ON CARDUS POLICY FORUM WITH TIM HUDAK November 29, 2012 | Hamilton, ON CALGARY CITY SOUL EXPLORATORY DINNER December 5, 2012 | Calgary, AB CONVIVIUM LAUNCH December 5, 2012 | Montreal, QC CONVIVIUM WELCOMES CARDINAL ZEN February 7, 2013 | Toronto, ON

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CARDUS EXECUTIVE PROGRAM @ The Manning Networking Conference March 7-9, 2013 | Ottawa, ON HILL FAMILY LECTURE SERIES: MARK CARNEY May 3, 2013 | Toronto, ON HILL FAMILY LECTURE SERIES: CONRAD BLACK May 9, 2013 | Calgary, AB BRIDGING THE SECULAR DIVIDE Event Sponsor May 27-28, 2013 | Montreal, QC VITAL SIGNS PUBLIC ROUNDTABLE June 18, 2013 | Calgary, AB VITAL SIGNS PUBLIC ROUNDTABLE #2 September 10, 2013 | Calgary, AB CHRISTIAN FAITH AND THE UNIVERSITY Event Sponsor September 26-28, 2013 | Montreal, QC CARDUS SENIOR FELLOWS RETREAT September 26-27, 2013 | Montreal, QC THE PAPACY IN THE 21ST CENTURY Fr. Raymond de Souza & Dr. Robert Ventresca September 27, 2013 | London, ON RENEWING CANADIAN PUBLIC POLICY: CAN SUBSIDIARITY GO THE DISTANCE? September 30, 2013 | Hamilton, ON VITAL SIGNS PUBLIC ROUNDTABLE #3 October 1, 2013 | Calgary, AB

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The Convivium Society presents:

PUBLIC SAFETY, PUBLIC COMFORT, PUBLIC RECIPROCITY Barbara Kay October 15, 2012 | Ottawa, ON Barbara Kay, a columnist with the National Post and author of Unworthy Creature: A Punjabi Daughter’s Memoir of Honour, Shame and Love was the Hill Family Lecturer to more than 100 guests at the Rideau Club in Ottawa. Her talk, “Public Safety, Public Comfort, Public Reciprocity” delved into discussion of religious freedom, community, and our shared obligation for the common good. BANKING, TRUST, AND THE CULTURE OF CAPITALISM Mark Carney, Roger Martin, and Fr. Raymond de Souza May 3, 2013 | Toronto, ON In one of his very last public events as the governor of the Bank of Canada, Mark Carney spoke to a sell-out crowd of nearly 300. Responses were given by Fr. Raymond de Souza and Dr. Roger Martin from the Rotman School of Business. LESSONS LEARNED AND ARGUMENTS ADVANCED Lord Conrad Black in conversation with Fr. Raymond de Souza May 9, 2013 | Calgary, AB For this Hill Lecture, 175 people joined noted author, historian, columnist, and former newspaper publisher Lord Conrad Black for an evening of “Lessons Learned and Arguments Advanced.” At this Convivium Society event, Lord Black was interviewed by Convivium Editor-in-Chief Fr. Raymond de Souza.

ABOUT THE HILL FAMILY LECTURE SERIES Canada’s biggest improvements are often achieved on account of its quietest and most diligent servants. The Hill Family have been leaders in Canadian business and public life for more than a century. The Hill Companies have been led by three generations of successful businessmen and philanthropists—a constant legacy of integrity in cultural engagement starting with Walter H.A. Hill in 1903, followed by Frederick W. Hill (O.C.) in 1953, and capped from 1976 to present day by grandson Paul J. Hill. 2013 HILL LECTURE SPONSORS:

John & Rebecca Horwood

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I want to commend you for the important work you do. In a secular world, the voice of faith is very important. S.S., Brampton, ON

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ORGANIZATION Cardus comes from the root word cardo. The cardo was a north-south oriented street in Roman cities that was considered to be an integral element of city planning and city life (both publicly and economically).

© 2012 Kara Johnson, project manager for Cardus. Oil on canvas, 18” x 8”.

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2012 FINANCES

24%: Research & Consulting

69%: Donations

INCOME

7%: Other Income

Cardus gains income from three distinct streams. First, as a charity, we rely on the GIFTS of private donors, foundations, and other charities to fund the majority of our work. In 2012, you’ll note that 69% of all income was given in support of our work. Second, RESEARCH AND CONSULTING FEES provide further evidence that Cardus knows how to work. We’ve cultivated expertise and people are willing to pay for it. Cardus staff take a single salary, and the revenue from these contracts goes to fund our research projects, infrastructure, and to offset fundraising costs. By bringing in earned revenue, we’re able to spend a much larger portion of donor dollars on the programs they care about most. We’re also proud to own our own building, a leased portion of which generates rental income. We report this in “OTHER INCOME”, along with revenue from subscriptions, ticket sales, and products bought through cardus.ca.

Cardus is a Canadian charity registered under Work Research Foundation (no. 11892 9207 RR 0001), operating as CARDUS. In the United States, the Work Research Foundation is a designated Exempt organization under section 501(c)(3), classified as a Public Charity (ID no. 20-2324150) in the State of California.

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33%: Projects & Events 56%: Talent

EXPENSES

4%: Building & Utilities 7%: Overhead & Admin

As a research organization, program costs are most visible under our TALENT spending. Teams of researchers, often under contract for the period of any particular project, work alongside Cardus operations staff to conceptualize, structure, and deliver. PROJECT & EVENT costs cover a wide range of non-staffing costs related to the business of

think tanking. It’s payment for surveys, it’s hosting public lectures and launch events. It’s printing, distributing, and promoting multiple publications across Canada and the US. And every year, we’re getting better at it.

BUILDING & UTILITIES reflects the investment in our head office, a historic stone building in central Hamilton. Each year we continue to make improvements for energy use, staff productivity, and security. OVERHEAD & ADMINISTRATION is the dark horse of charitable budgets. Overhead’s not sexy. Donors seldom single it out for their designated support. But, especially for a think tank that believes in the long-term value of institutions, we pay attention to this sort of thing and seek to balance wise investment with efficient use of scarce resources.

For full audited statements, visit GO.CARDUS.CA/DONORINFO

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AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS THE CARDUS INSTITUTE>

consolidated statement of financial position >DECEMBER 31, 2012

January 1, 2012

2011

2011

assets current Cash

$

485,951

$

151,541 $

337,316

Accounts receivable

39,739

56,294

42,328

Government remittances recoverable

14,035

10,636

7,651

3,567

3,567

8,501

543,292

222,038

435,796

593,348

581,836

596,738

-

69,067

-

Prepaid expenses

capital assets due from related party

$ 1,136,640

$

$

$

872,941 $ 1,032,534

liabilities current Accounts payable and accrued liabilities Deferred contributions

35,911

46,223 $

83,373

-

22,374

122,336

Deferred revenue

330,000

11,454

40,000

Current portion of long term debt

309,000

309,000

309,000

674,911

389,051

554,709

-

275,000

275,000

-

664,051

829,709

Invested in capital assets

284,348

-

12,739

Unrestricted net assets

177,381

208,890

190,086

461,729

208,890

202,825

long term debt

commitments

net assets

$ 1,136,640

34

$

872,941 $ 1,032,534


THE CARDUS INSTITUTE>

consolidated statement of operations >YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2012

2012

2011

revenue Donations

$ 1,756,592 $ 1,294,410

Activity income

514,032

340,032

Reimbursements

26,204

18,688

Rental income

57,412

55,203

72

917

2,354,312

1,709,250

Amortization

15,868

15,197

Bank charges and interest

19,440

5,843

Event Expenses

73,653

43,255

1,431,936

1,247,767

Interest on long term debt

24,705

27,992

Marketing and promotion

152,989

87,918

Meals and entertainment

19,993

16,183

Foreign Exchange gain (loss)

expenses

Human resources

Meeting expenses

2,969

3,992

110,308

58,352

Professional fees

20,394

16,544

Rent and utilities

53,169

51,777

Telecommunications

16,356

19,326

159,693

109,039

2,101,473

1,703,185

252,839

6,065

Office expenses and miscellaneous

Travel

excess of revenue over expenses for year

$

$

35


TEAM

PRESIDENT

SENIOR DIRECTOR, PHILANTHROPY & FINANCE

PROGRAM DIRECTOR, WORK & ECONOMICS

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, CONVIVIUM

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT

SENIOR DIRECTOR, PUBLICATIONS & MEDIA

PROGRAM DIRECTOR, SOCIAL CITIES

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF, COMMENT

OPERATIONS MANAGER

READ FULL BIOS ONLINE: CARDUS.CA/ORGANIZATION/TEAM 36

CONTROLLER


PROJECT COORDINATOR

PROJECT COORDINATOR

COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

INTERN INTERN

“The nature of our work requires an investment in our people. Whether through staff, authors, partnerships, senior fellows, or other as-yet unimagined relationship structures, the day-to-day work Cardus is engaged in requires creative insight, asking big questions, and a desire to listen and learn. Cardus invests in individuals but also in a team. Our tone is winsome and respectful, even as we are forthright and robust in our disagreements. We need a diversity of gifts and perspectives to complement each other in service of a common mission. We aspire for excellence and diligence in all that we do, recognizing that the cause we serve deserves no less.” —Michael Van Pelt, Cardus 2020 37


SENIOR FELLOWS

PAUL WILLIAMS GLOBAL MARKETS PETER MENZIES MEDIA & ARTS

Vancouver, BC

Calgary, AB RAY PENNINGS THEOLOGY & INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS Calgary, AB

GIDEON STRAUSS CULTURE Pasadena, CA

JONATHAN CHAPLIN POLITICAL THEORY Cambridgeshire, UK

38


RAYMOND DE SOUZA THEOLOGY & ECONOMICS Kingston, ON

JANET EPP BUCKINGHAM LAW Ottawa, ON

JONATHAN WELLUM CAPITAL MARKETS PETER STOCKLAND MEDIA

Burlington, ON

Lachine, QC DEANI VAN PELT EDUCATION Ancaster, ON

MILTON FRIESEN SOCIAL INNOVATION Hamilton, ON

JAMES K.A. SMITH PHILOSOPHY Grand Rapids, MI

ELEANOR CLITHEROE FAMILIES, JUSTICE

STANLEY CARLSON-THIES PUBLIC POLICY

JOHN SEEL EDUCATION

St. Catharines, ON

Annapolis, MD

Cohasset, MA

The Cardus Senior Fellows are a network of recognized experts in a wide range of disciplines. Our Senior Fellows are part of our advance scouting team, pioneers and leaders in their fields. They bring specialized expertise and capacity to our research projects, networks and events.

Read full bios online at www.cardus.ca/fellows

39


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2012 2013 Cardus Yearbook