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BOUTIQUE HOTEL MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA


BOUTIQUE HOTEL MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA

INTERIOR DESIGN THESIS 2019 CARA VENTURA


2


INTRO

Table of contents 4

STATEMENTS

5

GOALS & OBJECTIVES

6

CONSULTANTS & CLIENTS

7

SITE ANALYSIS

11

BUILDING ANALYSIS

13

ADJACENCY MATRIX

14

PLAN PROTOTYPES

16

CASE STUDIES

24

THESIS FOCUS & RESEARCH

37

CODES & ACCESSIBILITY

3


INTRO

Problem Statement The Boutique Hotel is a roughly 20,968 square feet U.S. company based building in Melbourne, Australia. Melbourne is the second largest city in Australia with a population of 5,000,000 people. It is a diverse city with over 57.7 million visitors per year. In 2006, 33.2% of its residents were born outside of Australia and the city continues to attract masses of immigrants over the years. Melbourne’s population consists of mainly British and Irish ancestry at 43.3% with 28.2% reported to have Australian ancestry. The city has a growing population of 18.2% of Asian descent including 6.5% reported to be Chinese. It is important for hotel design to consider all cultures and varying socio-demographics of people in order to acheive a space that will improve quality of life for all.

Thesis Statement Well-being is the state of alignment with the mind, body and spirit. In hospitality design it can be implemented by following the Well Building Standard. WELL has been proved to improve nutrition, health, fitness, sleep and overall mood of users influenced by its principles. It is a performance-based system that tracks features of the built environment that directly impact human health and well-being. When designing a space using the Well Building Standard it must address physical, psychological, social, and ecological dimensions to have the most positive affect on individuals.

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INTRO

GOAL # 1 Create and environment that supports user health, happiness, and comfort. OBJECTIVE -Minimize disruption to the body’s circadian rhythm by controlling light levels. -Promote integration of physical activity with spa and fitness spaces. GOAL # 2 Implement aspects of the Well Building Standard in all areas. OBJECTIVE -Reference the Well Building Standard requirements throughout design process. GOAL # 3 Promote sustainability by using eco-friendly or locally based materials. OBJECTIVE -Specify materials that meet Indoor Advantage Gold Standards. -Use materials that are Greenguard and Gold Certified. -Provide Renewable and Bio-based materials throughout the space. -Utilize Zero Waste furnishings. GOAL # 4 Operate using energy efficient products and methods. OBJECTIVE -Provide lighting such that fixtures (except decorative) are programmed to automatically dim to 20% or less when the zone is unoccupied. -Utilize LED and florescent lighting fixtures. GOAL # 5 Make the hotel a unique experience that is also open to the community. OBJECTIVE -Incorporate programming like a bar, restaurant, cafe, and rooftop access. -Create a luxurious experience for guests with various amenities and services. 5


INTRO

CONSULTANTS SIERRA COLLEY Sierra is current student at Virginia Tech, graduating in 2019 with a degree in Graphic Design. During her time at Virginia Tech she has held various design positions like personal relations chair for her sorority Gamma Phi Beta. She recently finished an internship this summer with Amazon in San Jose for graphic design and will return at a full time position. Sierra will be used as a resource for graphics, way-finding, and branding of the Boutique Hotel.

KYLIE OTT Kylie is a Virginia Tech student graduating in 2019 with a degree in Hospitality and Tourism Management. After graduation she has accepted a position to work for Marriott’s Hospitality Program in Washington, D.C. She will be consulted throughout the project for help with programming and advice from a business perspective.

CLIENT There are multiple clients like tourists, tenants, and the hotel owner that all have a variety of needs for the Boutique Hotel. Tourists and tenants both need amenities for them to live and enjoy their time at the hotel that also promotes a better quality of life. Specifically, tenants need a connection to the community through program spaces like the restaurant and rooftop bar that make the hotel seem more like a home. The hotel owner is looking for a space that invites guests to return and provides a luxurious experience unlike an other in Melbourne. A lot of this can be achieved through branding and programming to distinguish the hotel. 6


ANALYSIS

SITE & Building Melbourne, the capital of Australia, is the most populous city in Victoria and is the second most populated city of the country. DEMOGRAPHICS Population: 5 million people Male: 15,780 Female: 15,098 Median age: 36 37% of the population 25-49 years

Ancestry: British/Irish: 43.3% Australian: 28.2% Asian: 18.2% Chinese: 6.5%

Melbourne’s population is made up of many groups of people of all ages and from many different cultures. The official language of Australia is English, but more than 100 languages are spoken by the city’s residents. Melbourne is one of the safest, healthiest and cleanest cities in the world with over 57.7 million visitors per year. It is a prominent center for arts & culture, education, dining, and shopping.

Site - 495 Collins St. Nearby Attractions: Aquarium Yarra River Immigration Museum Enterprize & Batman Park Hammer Hall Chinatown

State: Victoria 7


ANALYSIS

WEATHER Hottest month: January (70 °F) Coldest month: July (50 °F) Wettest month: May (66mm of rain) Melbourne enjoys a temperate climate with warm to hot summers, mild and sometimes balmy springs and autumns, and cool winters. Snow is extremely rare; however, the Victorian High Country receives good snowfall throughout winter. The best month to swim is in February when the average sea temperature is 64 °F. 8


ANALYSIS

ECONOMIC CONDITIONS

TRANSPORTATION

Victoria, Australia is a mid-sized economy which is larger than Singapore, New Zealand and most of South East Asia increasing by an average of 2.4 per cent annually. Around 3.2 million people are employed in Victoria. The economy transitioned from being heavily reliant on a declining manufacturing sector to a diversified economy with significant growth in professional and financial & insurance services.

Melbourne’s public transportation is the easiest and best way to get around the city. It includes the world’s largest tram network, a privatized public transport system comprising trains, trams, and buses. Trains are the main mode of transport throughout the greater Melbourne area. Throughout the central business district trams are the main form of transport and run up and down most main streets. Bike share, car share, and taxis are also forms of transportation in the city. 9


ANALYSIS

JOURNEY TO WORK MODE SHARE IN MELBOURNE

4%

2016

4% 2%

Private car trips 32% 5%

The share of public transport trips has increased while that of private cars has decreased

38%

2011 51%

Cycling trips Other trips Public transport trips Walking trips

56%

CURRENT AND FUTURE RAIL DEMAND & CAPACITY

2031

MMR1

100%

0%

2011 rail patronage

MMR2

200%

2011

2011

CBD rail patronage (VITM)

CBD rail capacity (MMR bus)

Melbourne Metro 2 is essential

2031 additional demand Metro 1 capacity increase Metro 2 capacity increase

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ANALYSIS

BUILDING ANALYSIS UP

Existing Bay Windows UP

UP

Vertical Circulation

Points of Entry

UP

UP

Geometry - Column Grid

Sunlight 11


ANALYSIS

SUN STUDIES

Summer Solstice

Winter Solstice

Morning Shadow

Evening Shadow 12


ANALYSIS

ADJACENCY MATRIX ACOUSTICS PLUMBING

DAYLIGHT

PUBLIC/PR.

SQ FT.

SPACES

YES

NO

YES

PUBLIC

150 SF

RECEPTION

YES

NO

YES

PUBLIC

400 SF

LOBBY

YES

NO

NO

PRIVATE

140 SF

ADMIN

YES

NO

YES

PUBLIC

120 SF

LOUNGE

YES

YES

YES

PRIVATE

430 SF

GUEST ROOMS

YES

NO

YES

PUBLIC

1300 SF

RESTAURANT

YES

NO

NO

PUBLIC

1000 SF

DINING ROOM

YES

NO

YES

PUBLIC

650 SF

CAFE

YES

YES

NO

PRIVATE

800 SF

KITCHEN

YES

YES

YES

PUBLIC

700 SF

BAR

YES

YES

YES

PUBLIC

720 SF

FITNESS

YES

YES

NO

BOTH

180 SF

SPA

NO

NO

YES

PUBLIC

ROOF

ROOFTOP

YES

NO

NO

PUBLIC

10 SF

COFFEE BAR

NO

YES

NO

PRIVATE

486 SF

LAUNDRY

Secondary Adjacency

NO

YES

NO

PRIVATE

80 SF

STORAGE

Tertiary Adjacency

13

Primary Adjacency


ANALYSIS

plan prototypes - 0"- 0" 12'12' - 0" 12'

10' - 0" 10' - 0" 10' - 0"

- 0"- 0" 15'15' - 0" 15'

12' - 0" 12' - 0" 12' - 0"

12' - 0" 12' - 0" 12' - 0"

- 0"- 0" 12'12' - 0" 12'

Office 1/8”=1’-0”

3' -3'0"-3'0"- 0"

Lounge 1/8”=1’-0”

3' -3'0"-3'0"- 0"

Spa 1/8”=1’-0” 30' - 0"

- 0"- 0" 27'27' - 0" 27'

- 0"- 0" 31'31' - 0" 31'

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3' - 0" 3' - 0" 3' - 0"

8' - 0" 8' - 0" 8' - 0"

6' - 2"

3' - 0"

18' - 0" 18' - 0" 18' - 0"

Fitness Room 1/8”=1’-0”

16' - 2" 16' - 2" 16' - 2"

8

10' - 0" 10' - 0" 10' - 0"

24' - 0"

- 10" 10'10' - 10" 10' - 10"


10' - 0"

12' - 0"

12' - 0"

3' - 0"

30' - 0"

12' - 0" 31' - 0"

27' - 0"

King Room 1/8”=1’-0” 27' - 0"

6' - 2"

Double Room 1/8”=1’-0”

3' - 0"

10' - 0"

8' - 0"

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16' - 2"

3' - 0"

3' - 0"

8' - 0"

18' - 0"

24' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 0"

10' - 10"

16' - 2"

0"

ANALYSIS 3' - 0"


PRECEDENT

Case Studies

HYATT ANDRARES

L’HOTEL

MIST

It is important to use precedent studies when conducting research as it aids the design process from concept all the way to the final design. Precedents are used as an inspiration for design. These 3 case studies give an idea or guide to understanding the needs of the Boutique Hotel and some of its goals. They will help solve problems throughout the design process, serve as a vision for the space, provide potential insights into programming, materiality, concept, site, architectural elements and the direction of the project moving forward.

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PRECEDENT

Case study #1 HYATT REGENCY ANDRARES LOCATION: Jalisco, Mexico DESIGNER: Sordo Madaleno Architects YEAR: 2017 AREA: 57,210 sq ft. This building is a part of a visionary urban complex that has positioned the Puerta de Hierro zone as a new center for the city of Zapopan. The hotel acts as a visual and spatial backdrop to the interior street of Paseo Andares, complementing the urban layout of the city. The building rises to 41 stories above street level while the ground floor is part of a public plaza that connects to the interior street and functions as the lobby of the hotel.

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PRECEDENT

In terms of the program, it is similar to the Boutique Hotel. The hotel is larger using the lowest 12 floors and leaving the top 28 floors for residential apartments. Floor 13 is allocated to the transfer of services and installations used by both program types. The hotel experience begins from the ground floor motor lobby, which includes several retail spaces, together with meeting rooms and a mini ballroom in response to the commercial requirements of the area. On the following levels, the hotel amenities such as the lobby lounge, bar, restaurant and the main ballroom are on the first floor, while the pool, gym, and an exclusive members club are located on the next floor up. The pool provides the central element of the residential amenities, occupying a doubleheight floor with an open, south-facing terrace, while a multipurpose room is located on the east side of the building close to the elevators.

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PRECEDENT

The ground floor comprises the lobby which welcomes people to the residences. The 257 luxury hotel rooms occupy floors 2 to 12. Starting on floor 14, the residences occupy 1,080 sqm per level, with a total of 105 apartments that range from 125 sqm to 250 sqm, giving space for two penthouses on the tower’s top floors. To complement each interior and provide warmth, an artistic collaboration was made with César López- Negrete.

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PRECEDENT

Case study #2 L’HOTEL LOCATION: Paris, France DESIGNER: Jacques Garcia YEAR: 2000 refit L’Hotel was the world’s first boutique hotel. The Hôtel d’Alsace, it’s original name, became notorious at the end of the 19th century when the celebrated Irish thinker and writer Oscar Wilde moved in and ultimately died here. Numerous artists, philosophers and musicians from around the world used this hotel as a meeting place. The building underwent a refit in 2000 influenced by the ornate style of Napoleon III referred to as Second Empire.

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PRECEDENT

The interior layout, cellars and marble ground floor is consistent with the original Hôtel d’Alsace. The dining room and decoration in the rooms changed with the remodel. Each room is unique with its own atmosphere and originality. This hotel is a great representation of a luxurious and unique environment that is memorable. The level of detail, materiality, and colors makes the space feel mysterious. The L’Hotel tells a story of the history of the building, staying true to architectural features while putting an updated spin on the interior. Alone, the hotel stands to represent the creative and social culture that allured so many people in the 1960s. It reflects a past time in history giving people an experience unlike any other.

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PRECEDENT

Case study #3 MIST HOT SPRING HOTEL LOCATION: Henan, China DESIGNER: Department of Architecture YEAR: 2018 AREA: 400,000 sq ft. The location of the Mist Hot Spring Hotel has been considered the nation’s most famous hot spring destination spot. The best natural attribute of the site its geothermal underground water. As the heated water is brought up, it gives off mist that floats above the water surface. The project attempts to heighten the experience of the user through blurring the landscape. The building masses, passageways and water-scape are integrated with natural steam from hot-spring pools and some additional mechanized fog that surrounds the overall atmosphere, creating a unique experience.

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PRECEDENT

Some of the hues are first seen on the hotel facades where clear tempered glazing alternates with blue or magenta translucent vinyl panels. Natural light casts the colors throughout the interior, including in each of the 51 guest rooms. The inspiration comes from the colorized black and white films in the early 1900s when an artist would handpaint transparent layers of colors onto black and white films. Inspiration for the interior comes from the beauty of the hot spring steam itself. Architecturally-scaled, site-specific installations, exploring natural phenomenon, and relating to mist and water are designed and installed throughout the hotel as the main elements that tie the entire experience together. Public spaces are unified by a series of glass installations suggesting light and water. In the cocktail lounge, thousands of crystal beads hang from the ceiling like a suspended rain shower. In the ballroom, a matrix of acrylic rings lit by color-changing LEDs hover above a wool-nylon carpet in a complementary pattern like being surrounded by clouds.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

Thesis Focus The WELL Building Standard combines the best practices in design and construction with in depth evidence-based medial and scientific research. It is the world’s first building standard focused solely on human health and wellness. WELL harnesses the built environment as a vehicle to support individual well-being. Throughout our lives we spend more than 90 percent of our time in buildings. WELL uses their medical research to explore the connection between buildings and health and wellness impacts on people. There are 7 main concepts—air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mind—that WELL sets as performance requirements in order to become certified. They are all relative to the built environment and occupant health. WELL is used to create spaces in the built environment that improve nutrition, fitness, mood, sleep patterns, and performance of users. The built environment has direct and indirect effects on mental health. As our society continues to change, more people have started to address mental health as a growing concern on the world. An example of a mental disorder seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that occurs in relation to the amount of exposure to daylight. Individuals chronically exposed to shorter hours of daylight suffer more sadness, fatigue, and, clinical depression. Designers may use the physical environment to influence mental health and combat these issues by altering psychosocial processes. Personal control, socially supportive relationships, and restoration from stress and fatigue are all affected by properties of the built environment. Views of nature, fireplaces, fountains, aquariums, and animals as well as paintings of landscapes and other tranquil scenes use restoration to improve human quality of life. Spaces where people can briefly get away and be alone are used to create environments to re-energize and de-stress. Design elements other than nature have the potential to enhance restorative processes within settings. Architectural features that support fascination, curiosity, or involuntary attention enhance recovery from mental fatigue. With this information on the built environment and mental health, the most pressing need is better understanding of the psychosocial and biological processes linking the two together. This type of understanding would enable consideration of the built environment along with contextual factors to be incorporated into more ecologically valid models that will lead to advancements on human health and wellness. 24


EXTENDED RESEARCH

THE WELL BUILDING STANDARD +AIR promotes clean air through reducing or minimizing the sources of indoor air pollution, requiring optimal indoor air quality to support the health and well-being of building occupants. +WATER promotes safe and clean water through the implementation of proper filtration techniques and regular testing in order for occupants to receive optimal quality of water for various uses. +NOURISHMENT requires the availability of fresh, wholesome foods, limits unhealthy ingredients, and encourages better eating habits and food culture. +LIGHT provides illumination guidelines that aim to minimize disruption to the body’s circadian system, enhance productivity, occupant experience, and promote sleep. +FITNESS promotes the integration of physical activity into everyday life by providing the opportunities and support for an active lifestyle and discouraging sedentary behaviors. +COMFORT establishes requirements designed to create distraction-free, productive and comfortable indoor environments. +MIND requires design, technology and treatment strategies designed to provide a physical environment that optimizes cognitive and emotional health.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

Thermal

Buildings can achieve a better balance between occupant comfort and energy efficiency by separating temperature controls and fresh air supply systems. All lobbies and other common spaces must meet the requirements set forth in ASHRAE Standard 552013 for thermal comfort through hydronic heating and/or cooling systems or electric radiant floorings. Personal thermal controls may also be implemented in order to satisfy all occupants at the same time. Individual performance can be affected by the temperature of a space with 4% reduction at warmer temperatures and a 6 % reduction at cooler temperatures.

When exposed to distracting noise individual performance drops to around 66%. Some acoustic concerns for a space are sound pressure level, reverberation time, and mechanical equipment sound levels. Designers can reduce these issues by using sound masking, sound reducing surfaces, and sound barriers to mitigate uncomfortable acoustic disruptions.

Acoustic

Air Quality

The main sources of indoor air quality concern are inadequate ventilation, contamination from inside building, contamination from outside building, microbial contamination, and contamination from building fabric. Concentration of some pollutants can be 2 to 5 times higher indoors compared to outdoors. As a result of better air quality, productivity has been shown to increase at 8-11% of improvement. Air quality can be improved through VOC reduction, increased ventilation, humidity control, operable windows, and antimicrobial surfaces.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

Observational research For my partner research project with Bridget Mclean we visited the Inn at Virginia Tech 5 separate times at different times of the day. Each day we collected observations on how people moved and interacted in the space. We took photos, notes, sketched behavioral maps, and made traffic, hot spot, and activity maps. Through our observations we focused on spaces to use in our program such as the bar, kitchen, restaurant, conference, seating, and community space, noting their adjacency to each other to help inform our program placement for the Boutique Hotel. We recorded the most popular, loudest, and most welcoming time of day. Each space was highly active at different times of the day.

TRAFFIC MAP

HOT SPOT

ACTIVITY MAP

Most Popular Area Per Time of Day

Seating Enclosed Seating Restaurant Bar/seating area

8am 11/2

10am 10/28

12pm 10/31

2pm 10/26 27

5pm 11/2

Conference


EXTENDED RESEARCH

Attention Restoration Theory The Attention Restoration Theory by Rachel and Stephen Kaplan suggests that exposure to nature can help to renew our attention capacity. It helps explain human responses to sensory information, particularly in the environment and addresses the problem of directed attention fatigue.

The attention restoration theory builds on the notion that humans often seek out nature when stressed. Example: Taking a walk in a park, or targeting a tropical destination for a vacation, provide outlets for physical activity, relaxation, and rest.

WHY IS THIS IMPORTANT TO INTERIOR DESIGN? Both interior and exterior environments contain a number of stimuli which are senses can react too. Understanding how environmental influences affect human functions and wellbeing is essential to good design. 2 types of attention integral to human cognitive functioning ART is based on: Involuntary attention or effortless attention: -When attention is drawn towards something we experience as interesting -When something exciting or interesting happens and we focus upon it without effort -Restoration of mental energy

The attention restoration theory is an example of a stimulation theory. Stimulation Theories: Stimuli- sight, sound, touch, taste, smell

Periodic, effortless exposure to nature can have a significant impact on lowering levels of stress in a setting that allows directed attention to rejuvenate. The benefits of exposure to nature through the use of photos, artistic depictions, colors and sounds also can be realized in the designed environment.

Examples:

sight of a puppy

sound of ambulance

Voluntary or directed attention: -Focusing on something that does not draw our attention by itself Examples:

driving in a snowstorm

last minute assignment

Direct attention can fail (ex. overworked muscles) Attentional deficit: inability to concentrate

Each of our 5 senses can be over or under stimulated Threshold: the point at which too much or too little stimulation is available.

Restorative Experiences: occur in settings where we can function primarily in involuntary mode

One end is the absolute minimum intensity of stimuli we can perceive.

Key Components in Restorative Environments:

The other is the maximum amount of stimuli we can cope with effectively.

-fascination: achieved through a part of or a whole setting that easily engages attention thereby allowing fatigued attention to rest

Weber Fechner Law: states that as we get “used to” a level of stimuli we need a greater intensity of stimulus in order for us to notice a change . Arousal perspective: the environment itself causes an automatic physiological response such as increased heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, adrenaline, secretion, and neural activity within the brain

Sleep is one remedy for restoring voluntary attention, but clearly not always the most convenient.

-extent: provided by a setting that is complex enough to engage the mind and promote exploration (experience of totality and meaning) -compatibility: matching the characteristics of the environment and the needs and behaviors of the individual

Example: Needing more time and energy to learn and retain information People often required to complete tasks that would be considered uninteresting, needing to closely focus one’s attention. Situations requiring mental focus eventually create fatigue and reduce cognitive functioning.

-being away: provided by a setting that is either physically or conceptually different from an individual’s typical setting

Negative Consequences of Mental Fatigue: - Aggressiveness - Less tolerance - Reduced sensitivity to social signals - Less helpfulness - Reduced self-control - “Chronic Fatigue Syndrome”

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The attention restoration theory provides a valuable framework to demonstrate how nature can play a role in creating a workspace that supports physical and psychological wellbeing Encourages the restoration of the directed attention needed for daily human functioning.


EXTENDED RESEARCH

A.R.T. The Attention Restoration Theory by Rachel and Stephen Kaplan suggests that exposure to nature can help renew our attention capacity. It helps explain human responses to sensory information, particularly in the environment and addresses the problem of directed attention fatigue. Both interior and exterior environments contain a number of stimuli which are senses can react too. Understanding how environmental influences affect human functions and wellbeing is essential to good design. There are two types of attention integral to human cognitive functioning. Attention restoration is built on: involuntary and voluntary attention. Involuntary attention is when something exciting or interesting happens—when we focus upon it without effort (ex: the sight of a puppy or ambulance). Voluntary attention is focusing on something that does not draw our attention by itself (ex: driving in a snowstorm). The Attention Restoration Theory builds on the notion that humans often seek out nature when they become stressed. Taking a walk in a park or targeting a tropical destination for a vacation provides outlets for physical activity, relaxation, and rest. Focusing on providing restorative environments in the Boutique Hotel will serve to improve the quality of life of tourists and tenants that use the space. This can be done by creating a setting that easily engages people, providing by a setting that is either physically or conceptually different from an individual’s typical setting and matching the characteristics of the environment to the needs and behaviors of the individual.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

COLOR RESEARCH + COURAGE, STIMULATION

+ ENTHUSIASM, ATTENTION

+ PURITY, SIMPLICITY

+ CONFIDENCE, OPTIMISM

+ NEUTRALITY, HIBERNATION

+ BALANCE, RESTORATION

+ SOPHISTICATION, SECURITY

+ CALMNESS, TRUST

+ EARTHLINESS, SUPPORT

+ SPIRITUALITY, LUXURY

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

COLOR RESEARCH HOSPITALITY DESIGN While certain colors generally invoke the same reactions in most people, it’s still important to note that shade and saturation can drastically change their character. Light colors are generally perceived as airy and make rooms feel brighter and more spacious. Dark colors, however, suggest sophistication and intimacy. Blues are some of the most universally liked colors: They are generally associated with calmness and serenity, and are therefore some of the best choices for bedrooms and bathrooms. Associated with wealth—opulence and fantasy—purple has become the favored color among designers in the hospitality industry. Blending the confidence of red with the calming nature of blue also adds a sophisticated feel to the space. Color has physiological effects in design and will be used to advance way-finding, navigation techniques, and branding in the Boutique Hotel. AUSTRALIA Green and gold are Australia’s national colors. Gold is symbolic of Australia’s beaches, mineral wealth, grain harvests and the fleece of Australian wool. Green evokes the forests, eucalyptus trees and pastures of the Australian landscape. PRIMARY colors are red, yellow and blue. SECONDARY colors are created by mixing two primary colors. TERTIARY colors are created by mixing primary and secondary colors.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

MATERIALS RESEARCH COMMON NFPA STANDARDS FOR FINISHES & FURNITURE NFPA 253

Standard Methods of Test for Critical Radiant Flux or Floor Covering Systems Using Radiant Heat Source

NFPA 260

Standard Methods of Tests and Classification Systems for Cigarette Ignition Resistance of Components of Upholstered Furniture

NFPA 261

Standard Method of Test for Determining Resistance of Mock-Up Upholstered

NFPA 269

Standard Method for Developing Toxic Potency Data for Use in Fire Hazard Modeling

NFPA 270

Standard Test Method for Measurement of Smoke Obscuration Using a Conical Radiant Source in a Single Closed Chamber

NFPA 286

Standard Methods of Fire Tests for Evaluating Contribution of Wall and Ceiling Interior Finish Room Fire Growth

NFPA 701

Standard Methods or Fire Tests for Flame Propagation of Textile and Films

NFPA 703

Standard for Fire-Retardant-Treated Wood and Fire-Retardant Coatings for Building Materials

Materials for hospitality design should be durable, long-lasting, and address sustainability. Using organic materials is a continuing trend for the industry. Certain tests should also be done for materials like the steiner tunnel test, pill test, vertical flame test, room corner test, smolder resistance test, toxicity test, upholstered seating test, and mattress test.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

MATERIALS RESEARCH LOCALLY SOURCED Geologically, Australia is an ancient continent with an abundant supply of minerals. Western Australia and Queensland are the most resource rich states. Of Australia’s roughly three hundred and forty operating mines, almost half are in WA. Australia is the world’s leading producer of bauxite, alumina, rutile, and tantalum; It is the second largest producer of lead, ilmenite, zircon and lithium; the third largest producer of iron ore, uranium and zinc; the fourth largest producer of black coal, gold, manganese and nickel; and the fifth largest producer of aluminum, brown coal, diamonds, silver and copper. Additionally, Australia is the world’s largest exporter of black coal, iron ore, and lead. In Australia, the mining of natural stone is regulated, and cannot be undertaken outside the strict guidelines imposed on the industry. Local stone travels shorter distances to its destination which means significantly lower carbon emissions.

CONSTRUCTION METHODS Mainly solid brick, clad frame, brick veneer, and post and beam construction. Flooring methods are usually either concrete slab or stumps. Roof framing is done by either a truss or a pitched system.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

SOCIO-ECONOMIC RESEARCH When it comes to the inner city there is a sea of wealthy blue suburbs, particularly in the inner east. There are pockets of red disadvantaged areas on Melbourne’s fringe, in suburbs such as Dandenong and Broadmeadows. Zoomed into the city there are some purple areas such as Clayton, Whittlesea and Bayswater, which fall somewhere in the middle of the income scale. These could be considered “low middle income.” The areas of Melbourne that are further from the central business district increase relative levels of disadvantage moving out of the city.

The map shows the most disadvantaged areas of in red and the most advantaged areas in blue.

More than a third of Chinese-born residents in Victoria live in areas that are ranked in the top 20 per cent of suburbs when it comes to advantage. Those born in China tend to flock to wealthier areas of Melbourne’s such as Glen Waverley and Box Hill, which often have good schools. Toorak has been known as Melbourne’s wealthiest suburb; however, has lost to East Melbourne due to the large proportion of retiring community members. More than a third of Victorians born in Vietnam live in the most disadvantaged 10 per cent of suburbs. Overall, among people born in Australia there is a relatively even distribution between people living in disadvantaged or more well-off areas.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE +PLACE articulates where it is acceptable to build, how to protect, and how to restore a place once it has been developed. +WATER realigns how people use water and redefine “waste� in the built environment. +ENERGY requires all buildings to rely solely on renewable forms of energy and operate year round in a pollution-free manner. +HEALTH creates robust, healthy spaces and encourage a highly productive indoor environment. +MATERIALS strives to have a successful materials economy that is non-toxic, transparent and socially equitable. +EQUITY focuses on creating communities with equitable access to all people regardless of physical abilities, age or socioeconomic status. +BEAUTY designs buildings that elevate our spirits.

The IWBI welcomes projects to pursue both LEED and the Living Building Challenge alongside WELL in order to promote both environmental sustainability and human health. As designers, we have a responsibility to the environment to protect energy and resources by choosing renewable materials and energy efficient options.

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EXTENDED RESEARCH

leed In the U.S. buildings account for:

38%

13.6%

73%

of all CO2 emissions

of all potable water

of U.S. electricity

LEED projects are responsible for diverting over 80 million tons of waste from landfills. Compared to the average commercial building, LEED Gold buildings consume a quarter less energy and generate 34% lower greenhouse gas emissions. LEED projects earn points across nine basic areas that address key aspects of green buildings. LEED works for all buildings at all phases of development, from new construction to existing buildings, as well as all building sectors, from homes to hospitals to corporate headquarters.

9 basic areas 1. Integrative Process 2. Location & Transportation 3. Sustainable Sites 4. Water Efficiency 5. Energy & Atmosphere 6. Materials & Resources 7. Indoor Environmental Quality 8. Innovation 9. Regional Priority

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REGULATIONS

CODES USE GROUPS

OCCUPANCY FACTORS

Reception: A Office: B Lounge: A Laundry: B Guest Rooms: R-1 Restaurant: A-2 Kitchen: A-2 Cafe: A-2 Bar: A-2 Rooftop: A-2 Fitness: A-3 Spa: B Storage: S

Reception: 7 net Office: 100 gross Lounge: 7 net Laundry: 100 gross Guest Rooms: 200 gross Restaurant: 15 net Kitchen: 200 gross Cafe: 15 net Bar: 15 net Rooftop: 15 net Fitness: 50 gross Spa: 100 gross Storage: 300 gross

DOOR

SPRINKLERED? Yes

Width: 32”

EGRESS

Height: 48 “

44” minimum corridor width 20’ maximum corridor length

Push side: 12” Pull side: 18”

2 exits minimum per story with an occupancy load less than 500

37


s through ept where erved are p H occus travel to

prohibited spaces in joining or or a lesser

hat can be

ping areas let rooms

MEANS OF EGRESS

SECTION 1017 EXIT ACCESS TRAVEL DISTANCE 1017.1 General. Travel distance within the exit access portion of the means of egress system shall be in accordance with this section. 1017.2 Limitations. Exit access travel distance shall not exceed the values given in Table 1017.2. 1017.2.1 Exterior egress balcony increase. Exit access travel distances specified in Table 1017.2 shall be increased up to an additional 100 feet (30 480 mm) provided that the last portion of the exit access leading to the exit occurs on an exterior egress balcony constructed in accordance with Section 1021. The length of such balcony shall be not less than the amount of the increase taken.

REGULATIONS

MEANS OF EGRESS

TABLE 1017.2 1004.4 EXIT ACCESS TRAVEL DISTANCEa

TABLE 1004.5 Multiple occupancies. Where a building contains MAXIMUM FLOOR AREA ALLOWANCES PER OCCUPANT two or more occupancies, the means of egress requirements WITHOUT SPRINKLER WITH SPRINKLER FUNCTION OF SPACE OCCUPANT LOAD FACTORa OCCUPANCY to(feet) each portion of the building based on the occuSYSTEM (feet) shall apply SYSTEM Accessory storage areas, mechanical pancy of thatb space. Where two or more occupancies utilize 300 gross A, E, F-1, M, R, S-1 200e 250 equipment room portions of the same means of egress system, those egress b Agricultural building 300 gross I-1 Not Permitted components 250shall meet the more stringent requirements of all through a c Aircraft hangars 500 gross ms constioccupancies are served. B 200 300that or sleepAirport terminal 1004.5 Areas F-2, S-2, U 300 400c without fixed seating. The number of occuMEANS OFclaim EGRESS Baggage 20 gross d computed at the rate of one occupant per unit of pants shall be H-1 Not Permitted 75 Baggage handling 300 gross d through area as prescribed in Table 1004.5. For areas without fixed Concourse 100 gross H-2 Not Permitted 100d where all seating, the occupant load shall be not less than that number Waiting areas 15 gross d H-3 Not Permitted 150 determined area under by exit or access to a single 5. Exit access stairways and ramps betweenbythedividing bal- the floor 1006.3.3 Singleconsideration exits. A single Assembly d thethe occupant load factor assigned to thebefunction of the space or press box and main assembly exit shall permitted from any story or occupied roof H-4cony, gallery Not Permitted 175 e hazard Gaming floors (keno, slots, etc.) 11 gross set forth in Where anofintended function is c Table such asas theaters, places of 1004.5.where one the following conditions exists: the main H-5floor in occupancies Not Permitted 200 Exhibit gallery and museum 30 net not and listedsports in Table 1004.5, the building official shall establish religious worship, auditoriums facilic 1. The occupant load, number of dwelling unitswith andfixed com-seats I-2, I-3 Not Permitted a function200 Assembly See Section 1004.6 based on a listed function that most nearly resemties. mon path of egress travel distance do not exceed the f the exit Assembly without fixed seats I-4 150 200c bles intended function. 1006.3.2 Egress based on occupant load.the Each story and values in Table 1006.3.3(1) or 1006.3.3(2). om. Concentrated 7 net For occupied SI: 1 foot = roof 304.8shall mm. have the minimum number Exception: Where approved2.byRooms, the building the complying of separate (chairs areas official, and spaces withonly—not Section fixed) ubject to a. See followingexits, sections modifications exitspecified access travel actual number of occupants for whom each occupied andthedistinct or for access to exits,to as indistance Table 5 net Standing space 1006.2.1 with exits that discharge directly to the requirements: space,exit floor or be building is designed, although lessofthan 1006.3.2. A single exit or access to a single shall Unconcentrated (tables and chairs) 15 net exterior at the level exit discharge, are permitted Section 402.8: For the distance limitation in malls. mum 44determined to beto a single permitted in accordance with Sectionthose 1006.3.3. The by calculation, Bowling to shall have be onepermitted exit or access exit.centers, allow 5 persons for Section 404.9: For the distance limitation through an atrium space. efined by used of the design occupant load. required number ofdistance exits, or exit access stairways or determination ramps each lane including 15 feet of runway, 7 net Section 407.4: For the limitation in Group I-2. in the 3. Parking garages where vehicles are mechanically walls or providing access exits,For from any story or occupied roof and for additional areas Sections 408.6.1 and to 408.8.1: the distance limitations in Group I-3. 1004.5.1 Increased occupant parked load. The occupant loadto have shall be permitted one exit or access maintain shall maintained untillimitation arrival at the exit discharge or abuilding, or portion thereof, is permitted Sectionbe 411.3: For the distance in special amusement buildings. 150 gross permitted in any Business areas to a single exit. d directly public Section way. 412.6: For the distance limitations in aircraft manufacturing Concentrated business use areas See Section 1004.8 to be increased from that number established for the occuit without 4. Group R-4 occupancies shall be permitted facilities. pancies in Table 1004.5, provided thatR-3 all and other requireTABLE 1006.3.2 Courtrooms—other than fixed Section 1006.2.2.2: ForNUMBER the distance limitation in refrigeration 40 net toonhave one exit or number access to a single exit. MINIMUM OF EXITS OR seating areas ments of the code are met based such modified machinery rooms. ACCESS TO EXITS PER STORY ne tenant 5. Individual single-story or multistory dwelling units and the occupant load does not exceed one occupant per 7 Day care 35 net Section 1006.2.2.3: For the distance limitation in refrigerated rooms and ure, each OCCUPANT LOAD MINIMUM NUMBER OF EXITS OR shall befloor permitted have a single exit or access to a square feet (0.65 m2) of occupiable space.toWhere spaces. Dormitories 50 gross PER STORY ACCESS TO EXITS FROM STORY ll be prosingle exit fromaisle, the dwelling provided that both Section 1006.3.3: For buildings with one exit. required by the building official, an approved seat- unitEducational 1-500 t passing of the following criteriaany are met: Section 1017.2.2: For increased distance limitation 2ing in Groups and S-1. or F-1 fixed equipment diagram substantiating 20 net Classroom area nd sleepSection 1029.7: For increased limitation in assembly seating. in occupant load shall 5.1. 501-1,000 3increase be The submitted. Where dwelling unit complies with Shops and Section other vocational room 50 net Section 3103.4: For temporary structures. diagram as shall be a space with areas one means of More than 1,000 4required by the building official, such1006.2.1 Section 3104.9: For pedestrian walkways. ler tenant posted. egress. Exercise rooms 50 gross b. Buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in hrough a 1004.6 Fixed seating. accordance with Section 903.3.1.1 or 903.3.1.2. See Section 903 for For areas having fixed seats and aisles, Group H-5 fabrication and rooms or 200 gross occupancies where automatic sprinkler systems are permitted in the occupant load shall be determined by the number of fixed manufacturing areas 10 percent accordance with Section 903.3.1.2. seats installed therein. The occupant load for areas in which Industrial areas 100 gross c. Buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system gh which 1006.3.3(1) fixed seating isTABLE not ininstalled, such as waiting spaces, shall be accordance with Section 903.3.1.1. Institutional areas STORIES WITH ONE EXIT OR ACCESS TO ONE EXIT FOR R-2 OCCUPANCIES group; a determined in accordance with Section 1004.5 and added to OF EGRESS d. Group H occupancies equipped throughout withMEANS an automatic sprinkler InpatientPATH treatment 240 gross MAXIMUM NUMBER OF MAXIMUM COMMON OF areas provided; OCCUPANCY seats. system in accordance withSTORY Section 903.2.5.1. the number of fixed DWELLING UNITS EGRESS TRAVEL DISTANCE Outpatient areas 100 gross ace is not e. Group R-3 and R-4 buildings equipped throughout with an automatic a, bof wheelchair spaces and the associThe occupant load Sleeping areas 120 gross Basement, first, second or third story above grade plane R-2 4 dwelling units 125 feet required sprinkler system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.3. See Section 903.2.8 ated companion seatNPshall be based on oneNA occupant for each Kitchens, 200 gross pace shall for occupancies sprinkler Fourth story abovewhere gradeautomatic plane and1020.1 higher systems are permitted in NA commercial TABLE ium comspace and one occupant for the associated comaccordance with Section 903.3.1.3. paces. CORRIDOR FIRE-RESISTANCEwheelchair RATING Library For SI: 1 foot = 3048 mm. panion seat provided in accordance with Section 1108.2.3. REQUIRED FIRE-RESISTANCE Reading rooms 50 net NP = Not Permitted. RATING (hours) n parking For areas having OCCUPANT Stack area 100 gross NA = Not Applicable. 285 fixed seating without dividing arms, the OCCUPANCY LOAD SERVED occupant shall besprinkler not lesssystem than the number with of seats based Without RESERVED. Accessed bya.Lisa Tucker on Nov 7, 2017 9:44:03 AM pursuant License Agreement with ICC.with Noload further reproduction or Buildings classified asBY Group R-2 toequipped throughout anWith automatic in accordance Section 903.3.1.1 or 903.3.1.2 and provided Locker rooms 50 gross CORRIDOR sprinkler sprinkler THORIZED REPRODUCTION OR emergency DISTRIBUTIONescape IS A VIOLATION OF THE FEDERAL AND THE with and rescue openings inCOPYRIGHT accordance with Section 1030.18 inches (457 mm) of seating length. on one ACT person forLICENSE each See Section 402.8.2 Mall buildings—covered and open system systemc moke-proIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES THEREUNDER. b. This table is used for R-2 occupancies consisting of dwelling units. For R-2 occupancies consisting of sleeping units, use Table 1006.3.3(2). The occupant load of seating booths shall be based on one g with the Mercantile 60 gross H-1, H-2, H-3 All Not Permitted 1 person for each 24 inches (610 mm) of booth seat length meaf Section Storage, stock, shipping areas 300 gross H-4, H-5 Greater than 30 Not Permitted 1 sured at the backrest of the seating booth. Parking garages 200 gross 1006.3.3(2) A, B, E, F, M, S, U Greater than 30 1 0TABLE 1004.7 Outdoor areas. Yards, patios, occupied roofs, courts Residential 200 gross balcony, STORIES WITH ONE EXIT OR ACCESS TO ONE EXIT FOR OTHER OCCUPANCIES c d and similar 0.5 outdoor areas accessible to and usable by the /1 R Greater than 10 Not Permitted rinks, swimming pools y floor in MAXIMUM OCCUPANT MAXIMUMSkating COMMON PATH OF STORY OCCUPANCYshall be provided with means of egress as building occupants LOAD PER STORY EGRESS TRAVEL DISTANCE Rink and pool(feet) 50 gross ious worI-2a All Not Permitted 0 chapter. The occupant required byb this load of such outdoor Decks 15 gross 49 75 A, B , E Fb b, M, U I-1, I-3 All Not Permitted areas shall be 1assigned by the building official in accordance Stages and platforms 15 net H-2, H-3 3 25 with the anticipated use. Where outdoor areas are to be used -2 and I-3 I-4 story above or below grade All plane 1 0 First Warehouses 500 gross a, c by persons inI,addition ining exit 10the building, and 75 H-4, H-5, R-1, R-2 to the occupants of For SI: 1 foot = 304.8 mm, 1 square foot = 0.0929 m2. a. For requirements for occupancies in Group I-2, Sections theseepath of 407.2 egress b, d and travel from the outdoor areas passes ed with a S 29 75 area in square feet per occupant. a. Floor 407.3. through the building, means of egress requirements for the ion 713. d

ge rooms,

ess stairection 408

Second story above grade plane M, SI-3, 29 75 b. For a reduction in the fire-resistance rating for occupanciesB, in F, Group see Section 408.8.grade plane and higher 259 2018 INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE® 38 Third story above NP NA NA Copyright © 2017 ICC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Accessed by Lisa Tucker on Nov 7, 2017 9:44:03 AM pursuant to License Agreement with ICC. No further reproduction or c. Buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in Foraccordance SI: 1 foot =with 304.8 mm. 903.3.1.1 or 903.3.1.2 where allowed. distribution authorized. ANY UNAUTHORIZED REPRODUCTION OR DISTRIBUTION IS A VIOLATION OF THE FEDERAL COPYRIGHT ACT AND THE LICENSE Section AGREEMENT, AND SUBJECT TO CIVIL AND CRIMINAL PENALTIES THEREUNDER. NP = Not Permitted. d. Group R-3 and R-4 buildings equipped throughout with an automatic NAsprinkler = Not Applicable. system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.3. See Section a. Buildings as Group equipped throughout withare an permitted automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1 or 903.3.1.2 and provided 903.2.8 forclassified occupancies whereR-2 automatic sprinkler systems


enclosures required by Section 1019 shall be permitted to terminate at a top enclosure complying with Section 713.12. 707.5.1 Supporting construction. The supporting construction for a fire barrier shall be protected to afford the required fire-resistance rating of the fire barrier supported. Hollow vertical spaces within a fire barrier shall be fireblocked in accordance with Section 718.2 at every floor level. Exceptions: 1. The maximum required fire-resistance rating for assemblies supporting fire barriers separating for in Section 415.9.1.2 R E G U tank L Astorage T I OasNprovided S shall be 2 hours, but not less than required by Table 601 for the building construction type. 2. Supporting construction for 1-hour fire barriers required by Table 509 in buildings of Types IIB, IIIB and VB construction is not required to be fire-resistance rated unless required by other sections of this code. 707.6 Openings. Openings in a fire barrier shall be protected in accordance with Section 716. Openings shall be limited to a maximum aggregate width of 25 percent of the length of the wall, and the maximum area of any single opening shall not exceed 156 square feet (15 m2). Openings in enclosures for exit access stairways and ramps, interior exit stairways and ramps and exit passageways shall also comply with Sections 1019, 1023.4 and 1024.5, respectively. Exceptions: 1. Openings shall not be limited to 156 square feet (15 m2) where adjoining floor areas are equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1. 2. Openings shall not be limited to 156 square feet (15 2 mGENERAL ) or an aggregate width ofAND 25 percent BUILDING HEIGHTS AREAS of the length of the wall where the opening protective is a fire door serving enclosures for exit access stairways and ramps, and interior exit stairways and ramps.

404.6. 707.3.7 Incidental uses. The fire barrier separating incidental uses from other spaces in the building shall have a fire-resistance rating of not less than that indicated in Table 509. 707.3.8 Control areas. Fire barriers separating control areas shall have a fire-resistance rating of not less than that required in Section 414.2.4. 707.3.9 Separated occupancies. Where the provisions of Section 508.4 are applicable, the fire barrier separating mixed occupancies shall have a fire-resistance rating of not less than that indicated in Table 508.4 based on the occupancies being separated. 707.3.10 Fire areas. The fire barriers, fire walls or horizontal assemblies, or combination thereof, separating a single occupancy into different fire areas shall have a fireresistance rating of not less than that indicated in Table 707.3.10. The fire barriers, fire walls or horizontal assemblies, or combination thereof, separating fire areas of mixed occupancies shall have a fire-resistance rating of not less than the highest value indicated in Table 707.3.10 for the occupancies under consideration. TABLE 707.3.10 FIRE-RESISTANCE RATING REQUIREMENTS FOR FIRE BARRIERS, FIRE WALLS OR HORIZONTAL ASSEMBLIES BETWEEN FIRE AREAS FIRE-RESISTANCE RATING (hours)

OCCUPANCY GROUP

H-1, H-2

4

F-1, H-3, S-1

3

A, B, E, F-2, H-4, H-5, I, M, R, S-2

2

U

1

707.4 Exterior walls. Where exterior walls serve as a part of a required fire-resistance-rated shaft or stairway or ramp enclosure, or separation, such walls shall comply with the requirements of Section 705 for exterior walls andTABLE the fire508.4

REQUIRED SEPARATION OF OCCUPANCIES (HOURS)f

® 2018 INTERNATIONALA,BUILDING CODE I-4 E I-1a, I-3,

OCCUPANCY

S

NS

Ra

I-2

F-2, S-2b, U

Be, F-1, M,

H-1

H-2

H-3, H-4

H-5

A, E

N

N

I-1a, I-3, I-4

N

N

2

NP

1

NP

1

2

1

2

NP

NP

3

NP

2

NP

2

NP

I-2

N

N

2

NP

2

NP

2

NP

NP

NP

3

NP

2

NP

2

NP

Ra

N

N

1c

2c

1

2

NP

NP

3

NP

2

NP

2

NP

F-2, S-2b, U

N

N

1

2

NP

NP

3

4

2

3

2

NP NP

Be, F-1, M, S-1

N

N

NP

NP

2

3

1

2

1

H-1

N

NP

NP

NP

NP

NP

NP

NP

H-2

N

NP

1

NP

1

NP

H-3, H-4

1d

NP

1

NP

H-5

N

NP

S = Buildings equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1. NS = Buildings not equipped throughout with an automatic sprinkler system installed in accordance with Section 903.3.1.1. N = No separation requirement. NP = Not Permitted. INTERIOR FINISHES a. See Section 420. b. The required separation from areas used only for private or pleasure vehicles shall be reduced by 1 hour but not to less than 1 hour. c. See Section 406.3.2. d. Separation is not required between occupancies of the same classification. TABLE 803.13 WALL AND CEILING FINISH REQUIREMENTS BY OCCUPANCYk e. See Section 422.2 for ambulatory INTERIOR care facilities. l f. Occupancy separations that serve to define SPRINKLERED fire area limits established in Chapter 9 for requiring fire protection systems shall also comply with Section NONSPRINKLERED 707.3.10 and Table 707.3.10 in accordance with Section 901.7. GROUP

Corridors and Interior exit stairways enclosure for exit and ramps and exit access stairways a, b passageways SECTION 509 and ramps

Corridors and Interior exit stairways and Rooms and enclosure for exit ramps and exit enclosed access stairways c a, b passageways spaces not required to be fire-resistanceandrated unless ramps

INCIDENTAL USES A-1 & A-2 B B 509.1 General Incidental uses located within single occuf A-3 , A-4, A-5 B pancy or mixed occupancyB buildings shall comply with the m provisions ancillary funcB, E, M, R-1of this section. BIncidental uses are C tions pose a R-4 associated with a given B occupancy that generally C greater level of risk to that occupancy and are limited to those F listed in Table 509. C C uses H Exception: Incidental uses B within and serving B a dwelling with this section. I-1 unit are not required to comply B C

C C C C C Cg C

509.2 Incidental uses I-2 Occupancy classification. B B shall not be Bh, i individually classified in Aaccordance with Section 302.1. C I-3 Aj Incidental uses shall be included in the building occupancies h, i I-4 B B B within which they are located. R-2 Area limitations. C C not occupy C 509.3 Incidental uses shall more the building area ofC the story in C R-3 than 10 percent of C which they are located. S

C

133

Copyright © 2017 ICC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Accessed by LisaS-1 Tucker on Nov 7, 2017 9:44:03 AM pursuant to License Agreement with ICC. No further reproduction or Sdistribution NS authorized. S NS S NS S REPRODUCTION NS S OR NS S NSIS A VIOLATION S NS OFSTHE FEDERAL NS SCOPYRIGHT NS ANY UNAUTHORIZED DISTRIBUTION ACT AND THE LICENSE 1AGREEMENT, 2 2AND SUBJECT NP 1TO CIVIL 2 ANDNCRIMINAL 1 PENALTIES 1 2 THEREUNDER. NP NP 3 4 2 3 2 NP

C

C

other sections of this code.

Rooms and enclosed

c spacesby required

A

Ad

Be

B

B

C

509.4.2 Protection. Where Table 509 permits an autoAd barrier, the incidenC matic sprinklerA system without a fire C the tal uses shallAbe separated from Bthe remainder of building by construction capable ofBresisting the passage A B of smoke. The walls shall extend from the top of the founC the dation or floorB assembly below toCthe underside of ceiling that is A a component of a fire-resistance-rated A Bfloor assembly or roof A assembly above orBto the underside of B the floor or roof sheathing, deck or slab above. Doors shall be A A B in self- or automatic-closing upon detection of smoke accordance with A Section 716.2.6.6.ADoors shall notBhave air transfer openings and shall not be undercut in excess of A A B the clearance permitted in accordance with NFPA 80. B B shall not have C air Walls surrounding the incidental use transfer openings C unless provided with C smoke dampers C in accordance with Section 710.8.

509.4.2.1 Protection limitation. Where an automatic 509.4 Separation and protection. The incidental uses listed U No restrictions No restrictions sprinkler system is provided in accordance with Table in Table 509 shall be separated from the remainder of the 2 For SI: 1 inch 25.4 mm, 1with square = 0.0929 msprinkler . 509, only the space occupied by the incidental use need building or =equipped anfoot automatic system, or a. Class interior finishwith materials shall be permitted for table. wainscotting or paneling of notbe more than 1,000 square feeta of applied surface area in the grade lobby equipped with such system. both, inCaccordance the provisions of that where applied directly to a noncombustible base or over furring strips applied to a noncombustible base and fireblocked as required by Section 803.15.1. 509.4.1 Separation. Where Table 509less specifies fire- above grade plane, Class B interior finish for nonsprinklered buildings and Class C b. In other than Group I-3 occupancies in buildings than threeastories resistance-rated separation, theshall incidental uses shall exit be stairways and ramps. interior finish for sprinklered buildings be permitted in interior SECTION 510 c. Requirements for rooms and enclosedof spaces shall be based spaces enclosed by partitions. Where a fire-resistance rating is required for structural elements, separated from the remainder the building by aonfire barSPECIAL the enclosing partitions shall extend from the floor to the ceiling. Partitions that do not comply with this shall bePROVISIONS considered to be enclosing spaces and the rier constructed in accordance with Section 707 or a horirooms or spaces on both sides shall be considered to be one room or space. In510.1 determining the applicable requirementsinforSections rooms and510.2 enclosedthrough spaces, the General. The provisions zontal assembly constructed in accordance with Section specific occupancy thereof shall be the governing factor regardless of the group classification of the building or structure. 510.9 shall permit the use of special conditions that are 711, or both. Construction supporting 1-hour fire barriers d. Lobby areas in Group A-1, A-2 and A-3 occupancies shall be not less than Class B materials.

39

or horizontal assemblies used for incidental use separa-

exempt from, or modify, the specific requirements of this


REGULATIONS

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REGULATIONS

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REGULATIONS

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REGULATIONS

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REGULATIONS

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REGULATIONS

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WORKS CITED

Sources ARCHITECTURE FOR WELL-BEING AND HEALTH. (2015, July 23). Retrieved from http://thedaylightsite. com/architecture-for-well-being-and-health/ AusDesign Australia Pty Ltd. The Australian Dream Series. Retrieved from http://www.ausdesign.com.au/ articles/article16.html Bailey, C. T. (2016, January 14). Heimtextil 2016: Key wellbeing trends are influencing design. Retrieved from https://www.wgsn.com/blogs/heimtextil-2016-how-key-wellbeing-trends-are-influencing-design/ Butt, C. (2018, March 31). Melbourne’s richest and poorest suburbs: How does your area compare? Retrieved from https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/melbourne-s-richest-and-poorest-suburbs-how-does-yourarea-compare-20180327-p4z6hi.html Cohen, E. (2018, May 23). Department of Architecture Draws Geothermal Inspiration for China’s Mist Hot Spring Hotel. Retrieved from https://www.interiordesign.net/projects/14943-department-of-architecture-drawsgeothermal-inspiration-for-china-s-mist-hot-spring-hotel/ Color Psychology and Mood for Hospitality Interiors. (2015, April 06). Retrieved from https://gpidesign. com/2012/07/color-psychology-and-mood-for-hospitality-interiors/ Commonwealth Parliament, & Parliament House. (2013, February 19). The Australian Resources Sector its contribution to the nation, and a brief review of issues and impacts. Retrieved from https://www.aph.gov.au/ About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/BN/1011/AustResources Constitution of WHO: Principles. (2016, September 01). Retrieved from https://www.who.int/about/mission/en/ Designing for Workplace Wellbeing. Center for Active Design. Retrieved from https://centerforactivedesign.org/ designingforworkplacewellbeing Hotel Hyatt Regency Andares / Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos. (2018, June 20). Retrieved from https://www. archdaily.com/896714/hotel-hyatt-regency-andares-sordo-madaleno-arquitectos ICC. 2018 International Building Code. Retrieved from https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IBC2018?site_ type=public Invest Victoria. (2018, May 22). Strong economy. Retrieved from http://www.invest.vic.gov.au/why-melbourne/ strong-economy Invest Victoria. (2018, May 30). Economic indicators. Retrieved from http://www.invest.vic.gov.au/resources/ statistics/economic-indicators

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Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design. Retrieved from http://leed.usgbc.org/leed.html L’Hotel Gallery | L’Hotel Paris. Retrieved from https://www.l-hotel.com/gallery/ L’Hotel – Paris. Retrieved from http://intohistory.com/paris-lhotel/ Living Building Challenge. (2018, June 05). Retrieved from https://living-future.org/lbc/ Melbourne facts and figures. Retrieved from https://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/about-melbourne/melbourneprofile/Pages/facts-about-melbourne.aspx Melbourne Population 2018. Retrieved from http://www.population.net.au/melbourne-population/ Mist Hot-spring Hotel / Department of Architecture. (2018, October 15). Retrieved from https://www.archdaily. com/903696/mist-hot-spring-h Online, M. Public Transport In Melbourne. Retrieved from http://www.melbourne.com.au/pt.htm Public Transport Network :: Transport Strategy refresh. Retrieved from https://participate.melbourne.vic.gov.au/ transportstrategy/public-transport-network Public transport. Retrieved from https://www.melbourne.vic.gov.au/parking-and-transport/public-transport/ Pages/public-transport.aspx Team, H. (2018, January 16). Understanding the Living Building Challenge and Its “Petals”. Retrieved from https://www.hourigan.group/blog/understanding-living-building-challenge-petals/ Tech Trends of 2016: Designing the Workplace of Tomorrow - Workplace Strategy and Design - architecture and design. Retrieved from http://www.gensleron.com/work/2016/7/22/tech-trends-of-2016-designing-theworkplace-of-tomorrow.html The built environment and mental health. J Urban Health. 2003;80(4):536-55. Velasquez, I. (2017, December 18). Hotel Interior Design, Part 1: The Psychology of Color and 2018 Trends. Retrieved from https://www.fohlio.com/blog/hotel-interior-design-part-1-color-psychology-2018-trends/ WELL Building Standard. International WELL Building Institute. Retrieved from https://standard.wellcertified. com/well WELL Building Standard. Retrieved from https://delos.com/services/well-building-standard Working and Living in Melbourne: American Expat in Australia. (2018, August 26). Retrieved from https://www. whereintheworldisnina.com/working-and-living-in-melbourne-american-expat-in-australia/

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Thank you

INTERIOR DESIGN THESIS 2019 CARA VENTURA


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Profile for Cara Ventura

Boutique Hotel Thesis Research 2019  

Boutique Hotel Thesis Research 2019  

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