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2018 Graduate Portfolio

CA RA


Cara Helen McCusker Graduate Portfolio 2018 Masters of Architecture Graduate at the University of Adelaide Ph: 0410 741 042 @: cara.mccusker@icloud.com Issuu e-portfolio: https://issuu.com/caramccusker


The following selected projects have been chosen to show the range of studies, ideas and conceptual explorations achieved during the completion of my Masters of Architecture with the University of Adelaide. Projects have been collated in chronological order. All works have been completed by myself unless otherwise accredited.


C o n t e n t s

Resume Bio

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History

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Referees


Masters of Architecture 2017

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Bachelor of Architecture 2015

Final Studio 2017

3rd Year Studio

“Arch-applique”

“Open Atmosphere”

2017

18

2015

5th Year Studio

3rd Year Studio

“The Gateway Hotel”

“Epiphenomena”

2016

26

2014

4th Year Studio

Offshore Studio - Japan

“Australian Embassy”

“The Australia House”

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40

46


CARA M CC U S K E R

https://issuu.com/caramccusker Cara has always known that her future was destined to be part of the design industry due to her affinity for art, design and architecture. After exploring studies in art and language in her first degree with Flinders University, she developed a love for Japanese culture and styles, particularly the works of Tadao Ando, which was the catalyst for Cara to redirect her interest to Architectural Design. Cara began her Bachelor of Architecture in 2010 and completed this in 2014 before taking a year away from university to focus on her work with Detmold Group LaunchPAD. In 2016 she returned to her studies and achieved her Masters of Architecture at the end of 2017. Cara has proven herself to be driven and dedicated throughout her various employments, and has developed a multitude of skills. She has also proven herself to have leadership qualities as she was the President of the Architectural Design Students Association during the final year of her Bachelor of Architecture, which required her to take initiative and liaise with university staff and professional associations. Cara’s philosophy for her architectural designs sits somewhere in-between an appreciation for simple and sustainable solutions, to highly unique architectural expressionism. She also has a love for heritage preservation with a desire to reinvigorate forgotten and historical places.


Work Experience Detmold LaunchPAD (2015 - current) /Visual Designer & Sample Maker Graphic design responsibilities and hand-making new samples for international and local consumer businesses. Flightpath (2016) /Internship Documentation, Analysis of conditions, Design iteration development for external features, Initial design concepts for clients on small-scale projects. La Buvette Drinkery (2015 -2016) /Bar staff Drink and food service. Office for Design + Architecture, SA. (2015) /Work Experience Office assistance, poster design, event photography. Assaggio Ristorante (2012 - 2014) /Casual Waitress Table waiting, food service, drink service Office for Design + Architecture, SA. (2013) /Internship Document proof-reading, InDesign document designing, exhibit hostess, competition jury assistant, exhibit set-up. Woodstock Winery Coterie (2011 - 2012) /Casual Waitress Table waiting, food service, drink service, event preparation, wine merchandiser. Lake Wanaka Language Centre (NZ) (2011) /ESL English Teacher Teaching English, activity creating, course coordination, tutoring, and substitution.

Hand Drawing Photoshop InDesign Illustrator AutoCAD Rhino Maxwell for Rhino Revit ArchiCAD SketchUp MS Office

Qualifications Masters of Architecture /University of Adelaide. Bachelor of Architectural Design /University of Adelaide TESOL (Certificate IV) /University of Adelaide Bachelor of Arts /Flinders University - Major in Japanese - Minor in Philosophy High School SACE stage 1 & 2 /Loreto College, Marryatville.

Achievements 2017 - Graduated from Masters of Architecture 2017 - Exhibited in the PRAXIS Student Exhibition 2014 - Graduated from Bachelor of Architecture 2014 - ADSA President for the University of Adelaide 2014 - SABE ALL-IN Exhibition curator 2013 - Royal Adelaide Hospital Open Ideas Exhibition Hostess

Hobbies Drawing Cooking Yoga Horse Riding Snow Boarding


A r c h - A p p l i q u é

The ‘Arch-Appliqué’ design proposal for the Austral Stores Building aims to incorporate and re-envision what ornamentation could become for the future of architecture through structural elements rather than mass-produces ornate elements, as prescribed by Antoni Gaudi when envisioning the future of ornamentation in architecture over a century ago. Inspired by Coco-Chanel’s infamous quote “Dress Shabbily and you’ll notice the dress; Dress impeccably and you’ll notice the woman” this Masters-final project aimed to explore the possibility of the influences and expressive nature of fashion & fabric, and how new structural forms could create a visually dramatic impact for old architecture, highlighting its facade once again. The form is ‘tailored’ around the existing structure, flowing out in an intricately curved shell, which moves throughout the spaces; turning from roof-structure to wall, creating a unique and visual experience for not only those within, but also those observing the structure from the street. In keeping with the proposal of a coat, the structure was designed through a process of observing the overall flow and movement of a garment, as well as observing the intricate structure on a micro scale, observing the ‘Warp & Warf’ weaving of each thread. The resulting form creates interweaving and open spaces, fitting for the purpose of an artists atelier, where artists can reside and work in an unlimited environment while giving them a space for public and private display of their work. The street-level floors allow for a more public and explorative experience as observers and artists can see the array of works within the studios, while the upper floors allow for more interactive workshop spaces. The underground extension also allows opportunity for more private and intimate exhibitions and a theatre space for more expressive forms of art to be performed. RHINO 3d MAXWELL AUTODESK AUOCAD ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR ADOBE PHOTOSHOP


FORM: THE INNER LACE

FORM: THE OUTER LAYER

DIGITAL REBUILDING

STANDARD WEAVING

CONSTANT RULE

cut

DIGITAL REBUILDING

DIGITAL READING OF FORM

DIGITAL PIECING

FORM: THE INNER LACE

FORM: THE OUTER LAYER

CREATIVE WEAVING

REPROCESSING OF WARP & WARF LINES TO FORM

STANDARD WEAVING

CONSTANT RULE

CREATIVE WEAVING

CONNECTION EXPLORATION [PHYSICAL MODEL]

DIGITAL REFINEMENT

cut

DIGITAL READING OF FORM

DIGITAL READING OF REFINEMENT

REPROCESSING OF WARP & WARF LINES TO FORM Straight ‘lace’

Condensed ‘lace’

DIGITAL PIECING

DIGITAL TAILORING

CONNECTION EXPLORATION [PHYSICAL MODEL]

DIGITAL REFINEMENT

DIGITAL READING OF REFINEMENT Straight ‘lace’

Condensed ‘lace’

Open ‘lace’

DIGITAL STRUCTURAL MAPPING

DIGITAL TAILORING

Initial explorations for the Arch-Appliqué explored the form and flow of fabric, and how an interaction with a solid form could be interpreted at a 1:1 scale. Initial processes began with a Macro study, in looking at the natural movement of fabric through a series of sketches and digital interpretation of those forms.

DIGITAL STRUCTURAL MAPPING

The second stage for the fabric’s form required a breakapart of the curves in order to determine its structural integrity. This resulted in a closer Micro study into the structure of fabrics. In observing the process of fabric production and weaving process, the ‘warp & warf’ structural elements of fabrics were reinterpreted to create a new large scale architectural structure. With the two objects then overlaid with each other, a lace effect began to emerge, and the complex skin formed.

Open ‘lace’


Layered effect of the skin and the resulting dappling of light within the exposed rooms & galleries

Initial construction developments.


The ‘diagrid’ steel frame became the main and overwhelming component of the re-development, where the skin structure enveloped over the existing buildings and weaved its way through the spaces, in horizontal and vertical movements. The upper levels (Entrances, upper galleries and workshop areas) became immediately affected by the twisting forms, allowing for a unique and unpredictable spacial experience

for the viewer, as well as allowing for natural light to achieve an ornamental effect within the spaces. The overall form became a very organically placed process as the fabric in its initial design development stages was encouraged to form it’s own placement around the solid objects, as a jacket or coat would around the human figure.


Long Section Showing the entrance from Victoria Street descending into lower gallery areas and the basement theatre


View from within the lower gallery space


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Hindley Street

Ground Plan (Entrance) Ground floor of the Austral Stores with open public gallery space, and view of the staircase (via Victoria Street) descending to the private gallery and theatre spaces below. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Main entrance from Hindley Street Private artist studios Courtyard Secondary entrance/exit to the lower private exhibition spaces Public gallery Cafe area Fire escape for lower floors Entrance to lower private exhibition spaces Artist workshop and open studio Hub/meeting areas for artists and public use.

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Theatre/Basement B2 Theatre and events bar, accessible via lift services from the Private basement gallery (B1) 1. Lobby/Entrance into theatre spaces 2. Theatre entrance 3. Performers area 4. Stage 5. Bar 6. Waiting area 7. Fire escape for lower floors

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Descending the stairs to the lower galleries, via Victoria Street entrance.


The Gateway Hotel

The historical and cultural intensity of Rundle Street, Adelaide, has long been an exciting scene for both locals and tourists. It is the base point for several major annual events including the Fringe Festival parade, The Garden of Unearthly Delights and the Adelaide 500 to name a few, and consequently attracts an array of high end fashion stores and restaurants. The Gateway Hotel proposal will sit on the fringe of the city, as an adjoining feature to the heritage protected Stag Hotel (1848). It aims to incorporate features of the current space, as well as enabling it to increase in attraction by multiplying the area’s use, into a bar, restaurant, small bars, cafe, fashion store and boutique hotel. The boutique hotel, standing just short of 50 meters tall, will include a series of boutique apartment suites, all of which have sweeping views over either the parklands or the city, with double heighten ceilings and full-sized apartments on the upper levels which can be kept as penthouse rooms or sold on as private housing. The internal spaces are centred around having full access to natural light and views of the Adelaide Eastern Parklands and suburbs, while being shaded by the ‘graphicesque’ skin design all-year round. This skin also allows for climate control, which is completely determinable by the hotel clientèle, as the automated blinds can open and close at the will of the user. This also adds to a unique and constantly changing skin-form for the building, fitting with the uniqueness of the surrounding east-end culture. ARCHICAD IESVE AUTODESK AUOCAD ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR ADOBE PHOTOSHOP


RATIONALISING FORM

Orientation: OnceLOOK the paramaers of the sites FIRST AT ORIENTATION footprints have been determined, Wtih the rationalisation of the on the of siteboth werethe rotated and keyblocks elements theme twisted

Feel Inside The Space: By WITHIN keeping THE the SPACE interior spaces FEEL and open, of the hoIn large keeping with the thefeel ÒBoutiqueÓ tel develops a ‘Boutique’ air. How Theme and the idea of how the the body is orientated and moves througout the spaces extrudes scales and directions of the some o the block edged space, the form extrudes in

to determine the parameters of the space begin to twist to ÒorientateÓthe spaces

External Movement: The sites exposure to intense and INCLUSIVE MOVEMENT uninterpted melts its away the The site sunlight imputs own form from one side, parameters, due and to the thewind sun direction errodes and pushes from movement, intense heat spots the other. (through simple sun-study determination). The sun pulls, the wind pushes.

areas of particular orientations

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Figure 3.3 Summer effect: By offsetting the sun-shading by 800mm from the windows edge, the West-facing full-length windows are successfully shaded in summer.

Figure 3.4 Winter effect: The shading device still allows for the winter sun to reach into the rooms of the hotel.

Summer effect: By offsetting the windows by 800mm from the buildings edge, the west-facing facade of the building is almost completely shaded by from the summer sun.

Winter effect: During winder, the large windows allow for the winter sun to completely reach into the hotel room.

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1. Main Living Suite 2. Bedroom 3. En-suite/walk-in 4. Kitchenette (premium suites only) 5. Second bedroom (premium suites only)

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1. Lift Shafts (Core) 2. Ground Floor Services access 3. Plant Room 4. Cooling Tower location 5. Rain water collection area Figure 2.7 Cut section through the building showing the core detail, lift shaft and the plant room, with further access rooms on the ground floor.

RATIONALISING FORM

FIRST LOOK AT ORIENTATION Wtih the rationalisation of the key elements of both the theme

FEEL WITHIN THE SPACE In keeping with the ÒBoutiqueÓ Theme and the idea of how the

to determine the parameters of the space begin to twist to ÒorientateÓthe spaces

scales and directions of the space, the form extrudes in areas of particular orientations

INCLUSIVE MOVEMENT The site imputs its own parameters, due to the sun movement, intense heat spots (through simple sun-study determination). The sun pulls, the wind pushes.


D01 14

D03 14

Typical floor layout (lvl 5)

Ground Floor plan with extensions to existing buildings on ground floor - Nola Bar & The Stag Hotel.


FIXED CLADDING ONLY (ID CODE SPECIALS)

ACLD 04

ACLD 01

3600X2090

3600X2090

ACLD 03 3600X2090

ACLD 04 3600X2090

CURVED CURTIAN WINDOW WITH ALUMINIUM FRAMING (WHITE POWDERCOAT TO MATCH CLADDING) ACLD 02

ACLD 01

3600X2090

3600X2090

ACLD 01 3600X2090

ACLD 03 3600X2090

SLAB OFFSET (SUNSHADE) WITH MAINTEANCE TRACK ACLD 04

ACLD 01

3600X2090

3600X2090

ACLD 03 3600X2090

ACLD 02 3600X2090

ACLD 04 3600X2090

ACLD 01 3600X2090

ACLD 04 3600X2090

ACLD 01

ACLD 03

3600X2090

3600X2090

FIXED CLADDING ONLY (ID CODE SPECIALS) PLANT ROOM LEVEL

ACLD 01 3600X2090

ACLD 04 3600X2090

ACLD 02 3600X2090

ACLD 03 3600X2090

ACLD 03

ACLD 02

3600X2090

3600X2090

ACLD 04 3600X2090

ACLD 01 3600X2090

LVL 4 ACCESS TO STAG ROOFTOP ACLD 02

ACLD 04

ACLD 01

ACLD 03

3600X2090

3600X2090

3600X2090

3600X2090

ACLD 01

ACLD 02

ACLD 03

ACLD 04

3600X2090

3600X2090

3600X2090

3600X2090

FIXED CLADDING ONLY (ID CODE SPECIALS) HOTEL ENTRANCE

TENANCY ENTRANCE

STAG AS IS


SD05

15

PLANT ROOM LEVEL

SD04

15

LVL 4 ACCESS TO STAG ROOFTOP

STAG AS IS


Lobby and check-in desk area


Full height windows within each suite


Australian Embassy

The aim for Studio VII was to develop a concept for a new Embassy of Australia within the capital of India, New Delhi. The project was to span across a large lot of land, while adhering to the contemporary, stringent regulations regarding safety barriers, distances from public zones and access routes for anti-terrorism precautionary measures, but without making the space becoming completely disconnected to public interaction or interest. The proposed response to the brief was focused on the historical connection between land and water; a precious resource to both Australian Aboriginal cultures as well as to the Cultures of India. For well over a thousand years water has been harvested and reserved within Hindu cultures through the use of ‘step-wells’ - large and deep structures which catch water during the rainy-seasons with minimal to no technology required in order to give the people a constant access of water to all the people all year round. These huge structures would be comprised of a series of levels which allow for access regardless of the water level, and in the waters recline could reveal new features and access. The buildings within the site have been positioned to reflect the nature of the natural Australian rivers - in particular the formation of the Murray River as it crosses state divides. In the centre, billabong-esque step-well reserves water for the coming dry-seasons, and then flood around the buildings at its peak fill, eventually entering into the building itself, inviting all members to have a connection to the water. RHINO 3d AUTODESK AUOCAD ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR ADOBE PHOTOSHOP


Re-use of soil into the site as part of the “rock”structure

ROCK Natural Traditional

GLASS CUBE Contemporary Transparent

Development of stepwells and depth of rivers

Water Areas

Creates a physical barrier arounf the embassy, and stops the sun, but will have thermal mass properties.

Creates large openings for main axis through building, natural ventilation and allows full sunlight.

Determining site boundaries Controlling the heat of the sun, and allowing light to access through the rock

Determining areas of density and depth of water

The Murray, rivers and billabongs Determining the cliff edges and water flow.

Murray River at the state boarder, between SA, Vic & NSW

By taking inspiration from the natural curves of the Murray River, the site develops its own natural safety barriers from the site edge, surrounding not only the entirety of the main embassy hub, but also gives some protection to the political and staff housing on the southern side of the site. In keeping with the aesthetics of the traditional step-wells

language, the levels of the ‘Murray River’ overlaid over the site was pixelated in order to find the appropriate step levels, resulting in a structured landscaping and site planning. In effort to reuse as much of the soil which would be require to be excavated for the development of the step-well form, the ground areas in observations of the Murray which remained


Ground Floor Entrance showing the main lobby space, cafÊ’s, lecture/theatre space, library entrance, fire stairs, public bathrooms and gallery walk-through.

16300

13900

8600 7100

4300 2800

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- 4800

Short Section z the full heigh of the lobby glass-arched-walls and water envelopment surrounding the building.

dry and arid were filled with the left over ground, and raised again to impose the natural barrier around the site. As the water fills the ground and floods, some areas will spill out from their structured edges to create more organic edges to the site. and allow for a more natural flow of water around the site as well.

The lobby area allows for full connection and transparency of the people visiting the embassy. The lobby allows for full natural ventilation and cooling effect from the internal water pools which flood into the space at peak seasons.


Roof Detail 1. 150mm In-situ cast concrete roof with Black oxidising aggregate mix 2. BONDEK Frame for cast concrete (590mm width per sheet) 3. PFC230 at edging of concrete 4. Flashing 5. 12mm Glazed Panel 6. 2 prong Spider Fixing welded to RHS 7. Insulation (BATT) 80mm 8. 28K10 Open Web Truss System 9. Suspension rod with 247 (RONDO) fixing clip into BONDEK 10. Stud frame (35mm x 76mm) 11. Steel Bracket Frame 12. Universal Beam 410 13. Welding plate from RHS to UB 14. RHS

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Spider Fixing Detail in Plan 1. Glazed Window (12mm) 2. Clamping Disk (rubber) 3. SS200 Spider Fixing (4 prong) welded with plate to RHS 4. RHS Cold Press (50mmx100mm) (DuraGal, OneSteel)

Glass Curtain Wall

Floor Detail with water overflow catchment 1. Glazed Window (12mm) with Spider Bracing (2 prong) welded to RHS support 2. RHS Welding plate into in-situ ground slab (with rust protective coating) 3. UB410 (with column plaster and render treated) with welding plate into in-situ concrete ground slab 4. In-Situ concrete slab (raised 900 from ground) 5. Perforated drain edge 6. Over-flow cistern with drainage to piping (to go to storm-water system) 7. Tiling 600x600 (R10 slip resistance) 8. Tanking membrane (Sikalastic 480 sheet membrane) 9. Mortar 10. 50mm Ridged Edge extruded polystyrene (2400x600)

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Curtain Wall and Screen Detail (at bulkhead) 1. 150mm Concrete Slab 2. 450-500 Aluminium Mullion 3. fixing bracket into slab 4. 12mm Aluminium laser cut perforated screen 5. 12mm Glazed Panel (Dark Grey) 6. Insulation BATT (80mm) 7. Wall Stud (35mm x 76mm) with steel track bracing 8. Suspension rod with 247 (RONDO) fixing clip into BONDEK 9. Cross Rail 10. Furring Channel 11. P51 (RONDO) Shadow-line 12. 13mm ceiling plasterboard

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“Open Web� Truss steel systems @7000 and @12000 (28K10)

Fall

Roof Height 16100

Suspended ceiling with 13mm ceiling plasterboard

Cast box gutter

Top Slab Level 12800

3600

Ceiling Level 11650

3800

Government Office

Glazed wall with spider fitting supports

Floor Level 8550

150mm Slabs

Ceiling Level 7400

Visa Office

Column UB410

Lift Shaft (2500x2800)

Floor Level 4300

Glass Balustrade (1600 high)

TGSI

Foyer

(View to North East and Main Entrance) Step-well access from foyer Ground Level 00

150 rise

In-ground LED lights Stainless Steel Point Domus 361

In-situ concrete slab on grade soil with waterproof membrane

Ground Level -4800

Aluminium screens (with laser cut details) (3800x1600 panels)


Within the Lobby Space


Open Atmosphere

The current Kilkenny station off from Port Road currently stands as a concrete raised platform with little shelter, light or ease of access. It has become an uninviting space filled with graffiti and litter from the neighbouring factory sites. In-between the station and the neighbouring (but nonaccessable) McInerney Reserve, stands an unused Bianco warehouse and an abandoned brick station warehouse. The site presents a unique opportunity due to its openness of space as well as its immediate connection to the Kilkenny station and the surrounding residential areas. The brief for this site was aimed to revitalise the site and re-plan the train-line through the site without overdeveloping the area. Simply by opening up the site, we immediately allow a new movement to the station, both from the park, Kilkenny Road and the Northern residential areas, and can give new life to the buildings which currently exist at the site. In particularly to conserve and renew the old station warehouse which possibly has some heritage significance to the area. RHINO 3d AUTODESK AUOCAD ADOBE PHOTOSHOP


Trees/Shrubs

Current Green Landscapes

Train Stations

Contour line

Concrete Roads (Un permeable)

STRENGTHS

Residential

Commercial Buildings

Heritage Listed Sites

Main Transport Thoroughfares:

WEAKNESSES

Port Adelaide to CBD

OPEN ATMOSPHERE

NEW KILKENNY STATION

Semi-permeable Surfaces

Electric Station

THREATS OPPORTUNITIES

DEVELOPING THE SITE

Polluted areas from industry

Structures that could be altered or recycled

Possibility of re-suing area

Semi-permeable areas

Access Barriers

Strength of Visibility

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SWOT analysis of greater site

McInerney Reserve is an established parkland with native wild-life, markets and play areas for the public to enjoy. Harnessing on this community energy, the site should encourage a continuation of this throughout the new site, by bringing is the same species and landscape into the west of the site

The site will need to remove some areas - the current train station platform to that the site sits flat and in line with the new tram line. Many parts of the abandoned factories are severely damaged and will be removed to open up the rest of the site, and finally the extension of the park-lands west will be removed to allow for a new road to the site.

The Northern side of the Bianco warehouse is surrounded by other industrial factories which are still in full use and require the space for their business. Therefore the northern side must remain as a barrier, but can be incorporated with native climber species around the walls, which can also help with filtering air pollution from the surrounding areas.

The current train system can be replaced by a more effective and space-friendly light train/tram system. The tracks are now level with walking pathways. The tram consequently will have a very low speed through the site for safety. The tram line will also be a green space along the line, increasing permeability areas along the site.

The North-East of the site will become the main entry point for residential walking access. This area already has an abundance of naturally occurring green spaces due to years of abandonment. Rather than destroying this organic green space, we can carve it into areas, allowing safe path v round the lawn areas and encouraging the spaces to grow

Next is to determine all likely entry points to the site - particularly the connection from Zone 2 - The Culture Park. These entry points determine the most effective pathways which will then dictate where landscaping can occur around the site and where pathways need to be laid.

To create a barrier a distinction of space between the Hub and the McInerney Reserve, the western edge of the park will be ‘cut out’ to create interesting low lines of view. The dug out land will be recycled onto the western side to create mounds and raise the eye level.

The new green spaces (filled with up to 40% of recycled material from the site) will respect the new points of access and help direct users to appropriate areas. Trees will also be planted in allignment with the paved pathways for shade and direction

Cara McCusker | a1150199 | Design Studio VI | Studio 04 Area D

The site was analysed for its accessibility, pros and cons, which were then documented and determined which areas should be removed and which areas should stay in order to achieve the best accessibility for users. A ‘cut and full’ approach was used for the overall landscaping, aiming to re-use 35% -50% of any matter dug up on site and allowing for areas to have lowered

garden beds while others become raised, creating a more interesting visual feature to the ground, and reducing the ground heat from full sun exposure. The landscape features have been determined by the predicted flow of movement around the site and allow for a variety of access points, including bike-service features for those using the train for their daily travels.


Site master plan

Train Platforms

Reserve Access

Slow moving, electrified trains move through the site at pedestrian level much like city trams. The area becomes a shared traffic space and allows for easy access for boarding, regardless of pedestrian route.

Opening up routes directly into the McInerney Reserve creates a more inviting atmosphere which is desperately missing in the current site. This also allows for an integrated landscape from the current parkland into the station site.


Short section A: Landscape section & warehouse elevation

Long section: Landscape section & warehouse elevation


Short section B: Warehouse section


E p i p h e n o m e n a

As an introduction to commercial architectural design, this project aimed to explore methods of creating unusual and unpredictable formations for large scale buildings. The brief required a large student accommodation on campus which could house over 200 students while accommodating university facilities and lecture rooms simultaneously, and any other facilities deemed appropriate for the maximum capabilities of the site footprint to be achieved. The form of the building was developed through an aggregative philosophy by taking a logically arranged and simple form representing a single unit of space, and cloning & deforming the object into a new arrangement. The arrangement of the aggregation was based on the principles and discoveries observed through bird flock behaviours, both on a social and visible level in order to create an organised chaos. The repetitive ‘breathing’ of a flocks movements within the air reflects the repetition of social iterations between people. The rhythm can become predictable but will have instances of erratic behaviours which break away from the flow of the greater group. The overall aim in observing this nature was to develop a design which reflected the identity of each while forcing them into a programmatic unity. AUTODESK REVIT RHINO 3d AUTODESK AUOCAD ADOBE PHOTOSHOP


Observing flock massing and splitting the flock movement to determine spacial distribution within the form

Initial form concept sketches: Single form, split and divided then rearranged into a full form.

Initial developments for the project began with observing and arranging blocks within the site limits. This organisational pattern was redistributed through studying bird-flight flock behavioural patterns and aiming to mimic their ‘organised chaos’ shifts in forms. Unified flocking within large groups of birds does not originate with a large scale, or group decision but rather with the changing whim of a single individual bird which others aimlessly follow, thus creating the unpredictable movement of the clouds of birds, with the fluid-like forms merging and separating continually. The building form itself was derived through the aggregation of cut and split singular forms before - much like the site organisational pattern - was re-arranged to replicate the movement and

organisation within the new building form. The singularity of the form was determined by visualising the movement of the individual. (MICRO) The individual wakes, wonders, eats, cleans and leaves. The process is personal, repetitive and can cause both a negative and or positive outcome for the day. (MESO) The individual s combined with other individuals the process becomes complex with one figures movements deflecting the others, while still interacting with them. Division is both present as is a unified flow. (MACRO) The group acts as a society on a whole, requiring the others in order for appropriate functioning of the internal system. In this zoomed-out perception, personal lines begin to blur.


Restaurant

Salon

Cafe

Mini pop-up book store

Street Market on New Kintore Avenue

Gym

Johnstrons Chemistry Labs

Sushi Bar Room

Fire stairs

Study Rooms

Janitors closet

Directors Office

(for ground floor)

Lobby

Security/Cleaning Staff offices

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5m

10m

20m

50m

Ground Floor Plan and extension into the surrounding landscape and market areas on Kintore Ave/

Range of typical room arrangements and details for students, as well as common rooms, study areas and multi-student suites.


Lvl 16 Lvl 15 Lvl 14 Lvl 13 Lvl 12 Lvl 11 Lvl 10 Lvl 9 Lvl 8 Lvl 7 Lvl 6 Lvl 5 Lvl 4 Lvl 3 Lvl 2 - Beginning of housing lvl Dinning Lvl and main study hall (Lvl 1) Ground Lvl (Commercial Lvl) with cafe, study rooms, market areas, security, etc

Basement Lvl - security and emergency vehicle access and parking, road access from Victoria Drive


The Australia House

The Australia House concept was in response to a 2012 design competition brief for a new Australian Artist Accommodation as part of the Triennale Art Field Exhibition held in Echigo-Tsumari in Niigata prefecture, Japan. The project required a response to the question of ‘What makes a house Australian?’ The design required a reflection of the Australian way of life and an exploration into the design qualities of typical Australian housing meanwhile respecting the qualities of the existing Japanese landscape and environment. The location for the Australia House is in a fairly secluded area of Japan which is surrounded by Rice-fields, farm land and natural forests surrounding. In winter, snow covers the area up to 4 meters in depth in some seasons, requiring extra accessibility around the site in order to stop any occupants from being trapped within the house. The proposed design aimed to create a completely openable form which could respond to the requirements of the external environment all year round. The idea was developed from the quintessential Australian Farm Shed form. The walls allow for a constant flow of sunlight into the form while shielding and insulating it from the elements. As the hot and humid Japanese summers arrive, the East and West facing points of entry become completely open-able allowing natural cooling within, aided by the full heighten spaces on the outer rooms of the house The overall design was aimed to reflect the nature of Australian environmental influences in design - To work with nature and not against it. RHINO 3d

AUTODESK AUOCAD ADOBE PHOTOSHOP


Site Plan with ground floor

Section through house

The residence is designed to occupy up to three artists at any one time while still allowing each artists their own space in order for them to explore their respective artworks. Removable walls allowed for a connection to nature within the house, blurring the lines between inside and outside living.

The kitchen space is centred into the heart of the building surrounded by sliding Japanese walls, allowing for a complete 360 accessibility with the sleeping and bathroom arrangements kept together in a more solid compartment within the house.


Shell

Services wall Interior space

Ground space

Exploded isometric view of the spaces within

North

East

West

South

Elevations


“I am Australia... Australia is Me.” [Maris H. Dreamtime Poetry]

View of the House from rear of the house


For any extra details about my work, other projects, qualification and published works, please contact me via my contact details.

çľ‚ Thank you.

Portfolio 2018  

Graduate Architect Portfolio for Cara McCusker (Australia) If you would like to contact me further, please email me via cara.mccusker@icloud...

Portfolio 2018  

Graduate Architect Portfolio for Cara McCusker (Australia) If you would like to contact me further, please email me via cara.mccusker@icloud...

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