__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

CARALL COMMUNICATIONS A Publication of the Caribbean Association of Law Libraries (CARALL) Issue 2014/2015


2

Dedication

This issue is dedicated to the memory of

Ms. Claudette Valentine (1953-2015), longstanding member and former Editor.

2


3

Communications and Editorial Committee 2014/2015

Erica Beache (Editor)

Librarian, Environmental Commission of Trinidad and Tobago Janice Jhinkoo (Design & Layout) Librarian, Industrial Court of Trinidad and Tobago

Genevieve Jones-Edman Coordinator, Research and Information Department, National Library of Jamaica Sandra Lakhram

Librarian, Parliament of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago Jolie Rajah (Chair) Law Librarian, Alma Jordan Library, The University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus, Trinidad and Tobago Terri Saint-Amour Librarian, Foreign, Comparative and International Law Harvard Law Library, Harvard University United States of America

3


4

EDITORIAL A warm welcome to all of our readers. Inside this issue, you will find five papers based on the 2014 conference which was themed ‘The Heart of Caribbean Law Libraries: A People-Centred Approach’. Within these pages, June Renie advises us on how we can attain stature at work and also provide the space for others to achieve the same. Jolie Rajah reminds us that communication is key to building successful work place teams and Terri Saint-Amour guides us on how to stay healthy at work. Proficiency in using social media is become an important competence for librarians and Errol Adam has attempted to shed some light on the challenges that Caribbean law librarians are facing in using social media tools to reach their users. We all have the opportunity to lead not only in our work places but in other aspects of our lives, therefore, learning how to lead should be important to all of us. Dwaymain Brissette’s piece looks at leadership development and challenges us, as Caribbean legal information professionals, to create a framework for growing leaders that is relevant to our own needs. Additionally in this issue, we have brought together the first president of CARALL, Mrs. June Renie and the current president Ms. Lynette Isaac. Read their opinions on how law librarianship has changed, future trends and note the advice they have for new professionals and paraprofessionals entering the field of law librarianship. Immerse yourself in the delightful contributions from two first time attendees. Genevieve Jones-Edman, describes the conference as a treasure to behold and Catherine Deane shares some suggestions, on growing the conference, in her open letter to CARALL members. Furthermore, 2015 is the 30th Anniversary of this organisation and we invite you to revisit conferences, colleagues and yourselves in our collection of photographs from conferences over the years. Dear reader, we hope that you enjoy this issue and we look forward to your feedback. In conclusion, we want to say thanks to all of the contributors, because without them this publication would not have been possible. Erica Beache

Editor

4


5

Contents Tribute to a Dear Friend and Colleague: Claudette Marcia Valentine - 05.11.53 – 03.06.15 Diane Clarke-Ottey

6

Feature Articles Ten (10) Questions with Ms. Lynette Isaac, President (CARALL)

9

Ten (10) Questions with Mrs. June Renie, First Past President (CARALL)

12

30th Anniversary Special: CARALL Through the Years in Photographs

15

CARALL Trivia

25

Conference Focus: CARALL XXIX (2014) - From Presentation to Paper Welcome Address: Mr. Thomas Borkowski, President (CARALL), 2012-2014

28

The Law Library Staff: Men and Women of Stature June Renie Survey Results: Technology (Social Media) and Our Users: An Evolving Relationship

Errol A. Adams Building Teams: Communicate! Communicate! Communicate! Jolie Rajah Work Health Hazards: How to Stay Healthy in a Challenging Environment Terri Saint-Amour

Leadership Development: Thought and Taught Dwaymian Brissette

30 33 35 37 40

Conference Reports LexisNexis Raynold Cartwright ‘First-Timer’ Grant (2014): Treasures in the Small Networks

43

Genevieve Jones-Edman Thomson Reuters Leonie M. M. 'Bundie' Asgarali Memorial Grant (2014) Adrian Duncan

Open Letter to CARALL Members Catherine Deane

5

45 47


6

Tribute to a Dear Friend and Colleague:

Claudette Marcia Valentine - May 11, 1953 –March 6, 2015 My association with Claudette started when she joined the Myers, Fletcher & Gordon (MF&G) family on September 1, 1994 in the capacity of the Records Manager. Over time the management of the library was added to her portfolio and she became the manager of the Information Management Department. She worked with the firm for 7 years. During her tenure she ensured the smooth and efficient operation of the IM Department. She also encouraged and developed her team members in knowing and valuing the efficiency of teamwork, the importance of using one’s initiative and the wisdom of flexibility.

Claudette was always a hands on person who led by example both in her personal and professional life. She was a sociable and compassionate person and just about anyone could go to her for advice and guidance. Claudette was known to be fair and just, she would tell it like it is but in a loving and caring way and her Christian principles would govern her actions. She had ears of gold and her advice was always honest and therapeutic. Honesty was her defining characteristic and as such, at no point during her life she would encourage or tolerated any form of mediocrity. She was indeed a special gem whose existence impacted so many. She lived a remarkable life, one that inspired me and her colleagues greatly. Her calm and happy demeanor made her a wonderful person to know and be around. She was very optimistic about life and was always seeing the glass as half full as opposed to half empty.

Claudette’s generosity knew no bounds. She had a heart of pure gold; she would give unconditionally of herself and time, and this was not limited to her friends and love-ones. She had a way of seeing people’s need without persons even expressing it to her. She was always very willing to help even to her own detriment. We are just travelers in this, the journey of life but for a brief moment, make it worthwhile, meaningful and maintain good relationships… life is too short to do otherwise. On March 6, 2015, Claudette went to sleep; her sojourn on earth ended. But, Revelation 14:13 tells us “Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord; they will rest from their labour, for their deeds will follow them”. It is hard to say goodbye but I have this blessed assurance that one day Claudette along with the righteous dead will live again in the earth made new. Until then, I will remember how she positively touched my life and the lives of so many others. She has left an amazing legacy behind. I have lost a great friend, but the inspiration of her faith, optimism, and perseverance will live on in my heart forever. Claudette-a caring and beloved family woman, a cherished colleague, a scholar and friend--will be missed by many, but never will she be forgotten by those who were fortunate enough to have known her!

Claudette, we loved you but Jesus loves you best…sleep on and take your rest, until we meet again, may God hold you in the palm of his hands. Continue to rest in perfect peace my friend!! Diane Clarke-Ottey Information Management Supervisor, Myers Fletcher & Gordon 6


7

CARALL Conference & Annual General Meeting XXX (2015)

29th June – 2nd July, 2015 Accra Beach Hotel & Spa Rockley, Christ Church Barbados, W.I.

7


8

FEATURE ARTICLES

8


9

Ten (10) Questions with Ms. Lynette Isaac, President (CARALL) 1. How long have you been a member of CARALL? I first attended CARALL in 2009 in Barbados so it’s just about 7 years. 2. Do you recall your first CARALL Meeting / Conference / Annual General Meeting? If so, can you please share a few recollections? CARALL in Barbados was an interesting and informative experience. It was 12 years that I had been in the law library profession then and meeting and interacting with professionals in the field enabled within me a sense of kinship and camaraderie that I have never experienced before in my profession. The presentations that year, especially the indexing and headnotes session, brought the realization that there was so much more to learn and I was quite excited to be on this journey and be a part of it all. 3. What do you think has been your greatest achievement during your tenure as President of CARALL? I was elected President of CARALL only last year (2014) so there is not much I can say about my “greatest achievement”, however, I have always been committed to excellence. Through this commitment I am striving to complete the outstanding issues that have been on the drawing board for the last few years and with the assistance of the membership and the Executive I hope that this will come to fruition.

9

4. How has your involvement in CARALL throughout the years helped you professionally? CARALL has given me a deeper appreciation of the magnitude that is Law Librarianship and this has fostered a greater commitment to my duties and the organisation and clientele that I serve. I have been fortunate to expand my knowledge base in legal resources, research strategies and administrative functions among others. Moreover, the contacts and networking within the Association have assisted me immensely in the performance of my duties and have allowed me to reap the rewards of appreciation and respect from my clientele over the years. 5. What advice would you offer to a new member of CARALL? CARALL is a valuable resource for the profession within the Caribbean region and a new member should attempt to immerse himself/herself within the Association. Someone new can learn from those with vast experience, those who have been mentors to many of us. The knowledge imparted at each conference is invaluable and should serve to propel the new member in a positive direction and make an impact upon the organisation he/she serves. A new member signals the future of CARALL and should become involved in serving on committees to enable change and bring new and innovative ideas to the table. Each person is equipped with talents and abilities that could only redound to the benefit of the Association.


10

6. What would you like to see for CARALL in the future? I would like to see CARALL become an Association that would be respected worldwide as an Association; that our Librarians can be recognised for the huge contribution to the profession in our tiny corner of the world. This has already begun as we have seen Dwaymian Brissette and Jeanne Slowe, to name a few, become great ambassadors of CARALL! I would also like to see a greater commitment by members to serve the Association and complete the goals that we have outlined year after year. 7. How long have you been a law librarian and how do you think that law librarianship has changed since you first joined the profession? While I have been in the library profession for 23 years and 17 years in the law library field, I became professionally qualified in 2007. Law Librarianship has moved from the traditional cataloguing, classification, textual legal research, collection development and selection of materials towards a dynamic and revolutionary technological change that has been introduced to adapt to the changing needs of the Organisation. We have now focused upon areas that were not traditionally explored or were not as explored as they should have been– marketing and public relations, information literacy, training and development, a variety of subscription databases, leadership and management to name a few. Technology has afforded us the opportunities to enhance our abilities and deepen our knowledge base. This was exemplified at the last conference when we had

10

two Skype presentations for the first time. I would like to add though that while we have the technology to work for us we should not lose focus on the traditional aspects of the profession but we should try to marry both. The past should positively inform the future. 8. What do you see as future trends in the profession? With financial upheavals and economic challenges in the world today, law librarians would need to justify their existence and work even harder to ensure that our importance is recognised. We have to plan for the future and this involves a unique balance of budgeting and maintenance of essential services. We need to be skilled in the organisation and management of our resources to meet our client’s needs, research and instruction and marketing of resources among others. We need to become a face within the organisation, one that is synonymous with dependability, trust and confidentiality.

9. What advice would you offer to a new law librarian / law library paraprofessional? He/she should strive to be an active member of the team and to seize opportunities for training and development within the Organisation not only as they relate to Law Librarianship but general training that can only be beneficial to the Organisation. Professional development within the field is also important for growth and learning as attendance at CARALL and other


11

Library conferences allows persons to become more proficient in their career path. About the Contributor

10. What would you like to see for Lynette Isaac is cu r rently the Libr ar y M anager - Access Services at the Court Library Services Commonwealth Caribbean law libraries Department, Judiciary of the Republic of Trinidad in the future? and Tobago I would hope that Libraries will maintain a high standard of service to users that they can withstand economic challenges and be respected as a very important facet of the Organisation that they serve.

Ranganathan's Five Laws: Books are for use. Books are for all; or Every reader his book. Every book its reader. Save the time of the reader. A library is a growing organism. — Shiyali Ramamrita Ranganathan (1892-1972)

11


12

Ten (10) Questions with Mrs. June Renie, First President (CARALL) 1. How long have you been a member of CARALL? Since its inception. 2. Do you recall your first CARALL Meeting / Conference / Annual General Meeting? If so, can you please share a few recollections? The Inaugural Meeting and Conference was held in 1984 at the Hugh Wooding Law School, Trinidad. It was held the week prior to ACURIL that was held in Trinidad that year. CARALL was so arranged to facilitate members attendance at both CARALL and ACURIL. There was no theme for that meeting but the conference focussed on getting the Association started, the Constitution approved and the election of officers, setting up of accounts and determining fees. Approximately 22 persons attended that meeting. At that time our acronym was CALL for Caribbean Association of Law Libraries.

3. What do you think has been your greatest achievement during your tenure as President of CARALL? In retrospect, one of the greatest achievements in the early days was putting CARALL on the professional map and making the Association known. As president I sent letters to International Publishers and Associations inter alia AALL; CALL; IALL; ACURIL introducing our Association. It was when the Canadian

12

Association (CALL) responded congratulating us and mentioned that we shared the same acronym that we decided, in deference to the original CALL, to allow them the undisturbed use of the acronym CALL and so we changed to CARALL. Other associations responded with congratulations and invitations to cooperate in their programmes and I recall a special congratulation from US Hein with a cheque for US $300.00 to assist with initial expenses. 4. How has your involvement in CARALL throughout the years helped you professionally? My involvement with CARALL has given me both a regional and international perspective of law Librarianship as it is practised in both arenas. I have always felt that there was much to learn from the international practise of Law Librarianship that could be used to guide our regional perspective. As a CARALL representative at International Associations I have received much respect when discussing our region’s needs, practice and perspectives on the international forum. 5. What advice would you offer to a new member of CARALL? Make full use of the professional connections to be made with other members of the association through attendance and participation at


13

CARALL’s events. Learn to think regionally not just locally and to cooperate in the region wide collection and dissemination of legal information. Offer whatever assistance you are comfortable with giving to CARALL, learn and enhance your potential for growth opportunities and regional sharing of information. 6. What would you like to see for CARALL in the future? A strengthening of our position as the leader in legal information provision in the region. To achieve this CARALL must have a voice and visibility that is respected and sought within the regional Legal Administration of Justice. 7. How long have you been a law librarian and how do you think that law librarianship has changed since you first joined the profession? I have been a Law Librarian for 37 years (1975 2012). There have been many significant changes/ improvements in the practise of Law Librarianship during my tenure as a Law Librarian with introduction of the Internet and the facility of online, real time, global, legal information access. The availability of Online legal databases both for subscription and free access have changed the way legal research is conducted and also access to information has progressed our acquisition policies from acquiring information to be housed in the library as a self- sufficient place of information to an information space where information is accessed in whatever format it exists in real time, online access, thereby making our libraries borderless.

13

8. What do you see as future trends in the profession? There can only be more improved presentation and access to information; more collaboration in information acquisition and distribution and a greater reliance on online information access and delivery. In our region we ought to be more collaborative in ensuring that our region’s primary legal information is made accessible in online, real time format and that the cost for same is not prohibited. 9. What advice would you offer to a new law librarian / law library paraprofessional? Join CARALL. It is your starting place for receiving support, encouragement and collaboration with your peers within the region. Learn as much as you need to and then some more. Strive to be cutting edge in the practice of your profession. Never say to a user that you do not have whatever he/she asks for. Get it from wherever it resides even if it takes a day. Legal information is critical to the practice of law. Take one day at a time; no two days are similar in a Law Library. 10. What would you like to see for Commonwealth Caribbean law libraries in the future? It would be nice to see every law library in the Commonwealth Caribbean under the direction of a fully qualified and competent Law Librarian. This will ensure a continuous strengthening of the practise of regional law librarianship and as


14

well, an increase in CARALL’s membership and regional presence. It would be nice to see more Law Librarians making an effort to acquire subject specialisation in law. It would be nice to see CARALL’s views being sought by the region’s Administration of Justice in the delivery of its services to the people of the Commonwealth Caribbean.

About the Contributor

Mrs. June Renie is a R etired Law Libr ar ian from Trinidad and Tobago

New Laws of Librarianship: Libraries serve humanity. Respect all forms by which knowledge is communicated. Use technology intelligently to enhance service.

Protect free access to knowledge. Honor the past & create the future. — Michael GORMAN (American Libraries 9/95)

14


15

30th Anniversary Special: CARALL Through the Years in Photographs CARALL XXIX (2014)

15


16

16


17

New Laws of Librarianship: Libraries serve humanity. Respect all forms by which knowledge is communicated. Use technology intelligently to enhance service. Protect free access to knowledge. Honor the past & create the future. — Michael GORMAN (American Libraries 9/95)

17


18

18


19

19


20

20


21

21


22

22


23

23


24

24


25

CARALL Trivia

Across

Down

4. Years no meetings were held

1. Place of inaugural meeting

8. Membership categories

2. Country responsible for changing first acronym

12. Joint conference partner

3. Designer of Association's logo

13. Wrote book on law libraries in Trinidad and Tobago

5. Publisher Library student internship programme was named after

14. CARALL Talk

6. Leonie-------Asgarali

16. Responsible for organisation's public relations

7. 30th Anniversary location 9. Renamed after librarian 10. The number of countries represented at launch

11. First president (See Answer Key on page 49)

25

15. Sponsor of New Librarian Award


26

CONFERENCE FOCUS: CARALL XXIX (2014) [From Presentation to Paper]

26


27

27


28

Welcome Address Mr. Thomas Borkowski, President (CARALL), 2012-2014 The Opening Ceremony was held on Monday 7th July, 2014, at St Lucian by Rex Resorts, Saint Lucia. The Theme for this year was The Heart of Caribbean Law Libraries: A PeopleCentred Approach

G

ood morning and welcome. Distinguished guests, delegates, members of the press, fellow librarians, welcome to the 29th annual conference of the Caribbean Association of Law Libraries. As President of the Association I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Honourable Attorney General Kim St. Rose, for taking the time to attend and address this opening ceremony. We are delighted to be hosting this year’s conference in St Lucia. This is the third time we as an Association have visited this beautiful island, and hopefully not the last. On a personal note St Lucia will always hold very happy memories for me, it was the location of my first CARALL conference seven years ago where I made new friends, many of whom are in this room, it was also the place where I saw England beat the Canadian cricket team at the World Cup, and then lose to New Zealand.

I say this every year but it is fantastic to see so many information professionals gathered in one place. Many have travelled long distances to be here. It should serve to remind us all the commitment we have to the profession and to those we help be they judges, attorneys general, lawyers or students.

28

The Association is committed to promoting law libraries throughout the Caribbean, to enhancing the professionalism and status of the profession and uniting the interests and opinions of the librarians in the region. The conference gives us an opportunity to achieve this; it gives us time to be together, to share our experiences and we should take full advantage of that opportunity. “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” I’d like to speak very briefly about the broader theme of the conference. The Heart of the Caribbean Law Libraries: a People-Centred Approach. I will keep this brief as some of my colleagues have told me that in the past I’ve spoken for too long and it’s not all about me, I agree with the former statement but not necessarily the latter. In the fourteen years that I have been a librarian there have been phenomenal changes, the way we access information, the way it’s stored, catalogued and shared. People say that libraries are facing an identity crisis, as the internet has become the primary way that people gather information, the building filled with books isn’t relevant to people. I’d disagree with this simplified explanation but to ignore it completely would be ignorant of the way things are changing, and how those changes have a very real impact on our lives. I think a building filled with books is always going to be irrelevant to people, for that is what a library without a librarian is – just a roomful of books. Librarians are vital to link


29

resources to users, to guide them and teach them. We need to start concentrating on the human side of the profession, not just of our users but of ourselves - to start reconnecting with our users. We may use computers every day but that doesn’t mean that we as librarians have to act as computers every day. Prepare to be challenged and prepare to be inspired over the next few days. Before I hand over to the Honourable Attorney General I would like to thank everyone who has helped put this conference together. It is a tremendous amount of work, and it wouldn’t be possible without your help. A special mention to Claudette Valentine here in St Lucia whose tireless work was instrumental. To all of you, thank you for being here, welcome and enjoy the conference.

Information is the

currency of democracy — Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826)

About the Contributor Thomas Borkowski Immediate Past President (CARALL) Librarian, Harney Westwood & Riegels, Attorneys at Law, Craigmuir Chambers, Tortola, British Virgin Islands

29


30

The Law Library Staff: Men and Women of Stature June Renie

A

ll Libraries are populated with staff who are deemed to be or who are aspiring to become “men and women of Stature.” Law Librarians work in Organisations where the core competence is not Librarianship. Our position is to support and enhance the Organisation’s core competence, that of the practice of Law within the administration of justice. As Law Librarians we possess the information skills and competences necessary to support the efficient and competent practice of law, yet we are often relegated to back bench positions of sub-professionals within the Organisation. Happily this is changing because our predecessors have established themselves as competent professionals in their own right and their professional achievements have endorsed them in the eyes of their Organisation as men and women of stature. Recognition of stature as a professional is an achieved position and the potential for creating such professionals must be reflected in the recruitment and selection processes that are designed to attract persons who demonstrate a potential for excellence.

and skills required for the position and a particular temperament may be critical to the position. Recruitment strategies must therefore identify and address such requirements:  the qualities of successful leaders

 the development of successful leaders  the

interrelationship between effective leadership and organisational success

 the identification of individuals who are likely

to become successful leaders Details to be considered as a guide to the effective selection:  job title  position within the organisation  duties and responsibilities of the position  required education and training

 preferred education and training  required competencies, experience, and skills  preferred competencies, experience, and skills  salary and other benefits

Recruitment and Selection Often this is not within the sole remit of the Law Librarian. Where it is, the Law Librarian must manage the recruitment process to select the person who best fits the position being filled. There must be a clear understanding as to the vision for the future of the position within the law library and the organisation, the qualifications

30

There are other considerations for the selection process:  professional image and presentation of the

applicant  future

goals and plans for professional advancement

 demonstrated willingness to take initiatives


31

that advance the organisation  previous professional experience comparable

to the position

The interview is critical to make contact with the applicant, to assess the person on appearance and face value and to be satisfied as to the truth about the person, their character and style. Because of the shortage of information professionals in our region it is too often the case that we accept whoever applies for the position as it is not uncommon to advertise a post and receive a single application. This is not always the best case scenario and in this situation my advice is to re-advertise, even regionally. The goal is to select the person with the correct attitude towards the clientele and the right attitude regarding work. Opportunities and Challenges for Advancement and the Attainment of Stature within the Library and the Organisation

 encouragement to access scholarships and

pursue further training with compensatory time off or leave to pursue same  encouragement

conferences internationally

and assistance to attend at local, regional and

 opportunities that enhance and ensure job

satisfaction, recognition of performance and personal and professional advancement  team

exercises and group projects to encourage bonding and good work relationships that are conducive to productivity and job satisfaction

 satisfactory compensation that is comparable

and equitable To be successful at creating professional stature the library must maintain a strong presence within its organisation; provide efficient, reliable and competent service and opportunities for staff development and professional advancement.

Organisational responsibility requires commitment to staff development; provision of resources to get the job done and ensuring a work environment that encourages productivity. Opportunities for successful staff integration and productivity are identified as:  successful strategies for integration into the

work environment  continuous training on the job and continuous

review of work and related processes  availability

of mentorship programs to provide opportunities for professional excellence and advancement

31

BIBLIOGRAPHY Redrup-May, Margaret. "Growing a Young Adult Librarian: Recruitment, Selection and Retention of an Important Asset for Your Community." APLIS June 23.2 (2010).

Schreiber, Becky, and John Shannon. "Developing Library Leaders for the 21st Century." Journal of Library Administration 32.3/4 (2011): 35-57.


32

Winston, Mark D. "Recruitment Theory: Identification of Those Who Are Likely to Be Successful as Leaders." Journal of Library Administration 32.3/4 (2001).

About the Contributor June Renie First Past President (CARALL) Retired Law Librarian, Trinidad and Tobago

Libraries are not made; they grow. — "Book Buying". Obiter Dicta. Augustine Birrell (1850-1933)

32


33

Survey Results: Technology (Social Media) and Our Users: An Evolving Relationship Errol A. Adams

T

his article focuses on the results of a specific survey question conducted for the presentation which tied into the 2014 CARALL’s conference theme “The Heart of Caribbean Law Libraries: A People Centred Approach”. Technology is at the heart of any library but humanizing the relationship with our users is integral. According to a survey I conducted on June 16, 2014 using Survey Monkey, I discovered the following results as pertains to question six: What are some of the major challenges you have had as relates to the use of technology in the library? How did you handle any social media challenges or what were your recommendations?  “Reference and research for primary clientele is confidential and as such cannot be facilitated via social media. Channels for communication are clearly defined: Intranet for distribution of current awareness publications etc. for Members of Parliament & staff; Phone and Email for reference and research services.  Financial resources/adequate staffing to be in place to improve server capacity and creation of a website etc.  More sharing and consolidation of resources.  Need a change in government policy – not sure?  More staff or the use of summer interns to assist with routing activities.  Consider purchasing cloud based library system.

33

 The library is part of a larger academic

  

  

institution that has a strict social media usage policy. Officially using the institution's name, image, logo as part of any social media initiative (individual unit department) requires prior approval which is an extremely bureaucratic, time-consuming process. As such, the Library itself does not have any social media accounts, rather any advisories/ announcements /notices/promotions from us is filtered to the Marketing & Communication Unit of the larger academic institution. That Unit will share those announcements etc. with the campus community using the institution's official social media accounts (Facebook, Twitter etc.). Incorporation of social media is ongoing. Recommended training and adequate funding. Unfortunately, we don't control our server space, and even our website format is determined by the law school's communications department. We did a tiny bit of customization to have a blue "announcements" box where we can highlight news, and sometimes blog posts. We do have one person whose main job is the marketing, etc. for the library, (a librarian) so she gets training in different technologies, but the rest of us don't do nearly as much for lack of time. Training and increase in budgetary allocation. Information from friends via e-mails faxes. The challenges that were faced included having to be always reminding them of the


34

internet and server urgency to make our work flow better.  Getting Wi-Fi and faster internet has been a main recommendation.  Seeking funding to purchase equipment, and/ or requesting a donation of equipment.  Continued sensitization of the need for the technology.” My Recommendations A.

A. Social Media Usage at The College of The Bahamas’s Law Collection.

Upon joining The College of the Bahamas Harry C. Moore Library and Information Centre as the law librarian in January 2013, a social media presence was established inclusive of a Facebook, a Twitter and a blog page. Although it has been challenging to keep posting relevant material, the Facebook page now has a total of 200 likes and the Twitter page has over 300 followers. I usually include social media usage statistics in my monthly library report inclusive of likes and so on, which shows evidence of marketing the library. I post legal related and other relevant materials to the social media pages such as pictures of new acquisitions and any innovative library projects. For example, at the end of a semester when I knew an independent research paper was due I wrote a blog article on citation style and posted same simultaneously on Facebook. It was liked by many and students approached me indicating that said post was very helpful. B.

Social Media Usage at Other Libraries

In my prior positions in a government and a law firm libraries in the United States, the experiences with social media varied, as privacy

34

issues are of concern in both arenas, hence I would caution that you subscribe to your respective organisational policies and be that change if it would not affect privacy issues of clients. Conclusion This presentation revealed that as relates to technology and our users, the relationship will remain forever evolving. But as information professionals we must be flexible within our respective libraries to maintain the connectedness with our users and stave off any disconnectedness by adding new technology, whilst simultaneously considering the relevant policy implications.

About the Contributor Errol A. Adams Law Librarian (Librarian II) The College of The Bahamas Nassau, The Bahamas


35

Building Teams: Communicate! Communicate! Communicate! Jolie Rajah

defining team success. To perform effectively, a team requires the right types of people, a task that is suitable for teamwork, good internal group processes, and a supportive organizational context. Group members need both an appropriate set of task skills and the interpersonal skills to work as a team.

W

hether you work in an academic, government, judicial or firm library and are a professional or para-professional, at some point, you would have been or will be expected to work in groups of two or more persons (teams), to achieve some common work-place goal(s) or task(s). Depending on your level of expertise, you may be called upon to work with diverse persons, internal or external to your library or organisation, on goals or tasks that may or may not be primarily related to law libraries. How can you as a team leader or member best contribute to the development, facilitation and maintenance of an effective and successful team? Communication is the key. On p. 18 of Group Dynamics for Teams (2002), author Daniel Levi states:

A successful team completes its task, maintains good social relations, and promotes its members’ personal and professional development. All three of these factors are important for

35

As Levi has identified, relevant communication skills, specifically interpersonal skills (i.e. the communication between persons) are core. Yet what is communication? There are many definitions of human communication in the scholarly and professional literature but basically it is the process of exchanging messages, verbal or non-verbal, in a particular context. Our backgrounds, culture, education, experiences, knowledge etc. all bring something to bear on the communication process, i.e. the construction, transmission and interpretation of messages. As such, in order for our messages to be most effective, we must consider our audience, the intended recipients of our messages, in the crafting of those messages. In the context of teams, our immediate audience is our fellow team members.

On pp. 201-202 of Communicating Professionally: A How-To-Do-It Manual for Librarians (2013), authors Ca therine Sheldrick Ross and Kirsti Nilsen stress the communication behaviour that they consider to be indicative of good group dynamics (constructive). In terms of facilitating facilitating tasks, the authors underscore: initiating, asking for information, giving information, asking for clarification,


36

clarifying, seeking consensus, asking for opinions, giving opinions, linking, summarizing, testing, expediting and recording. Additionally, in terms of maintaining teams, the authors emphasize: supporting, harmonizing, gatekeeping, reflecting group feelings, and relieving tension. Do you engage in these examples of constructive communication behaviour and if not, are you capable of doing so? On pp. 232-233 of their text, Sheldrick Ross and Nilsen also highlight the communication behaviour that they consider to be self-oriented (destructive) to group dynamics. They are: blocking, attacking, attention-seeking, withdrawing, monopolizing and horsing around. Do you already engage in these examples of destructive communication behaviour and if that is the case, are you capable of refraining from doing so?

can certainly increase your work-place competitiveness. Remember when building teams, communicate, communicate, communicate!

Take some time to reflect on your own communication behaviour. Consider that your success in the work-place may well rest on your ability to communicate effectively and to work in teams. Indeed, professional library associations have increasingly recognised the importance of communication skills and/or team work. Refer to the American Library Association’s (ALA) Core Competences of Librarianship (2009), the American Association of Law Libraries’ (AALL) Competencies of Librarianship (2010) a nd the Special Libraries Association’s (SLA) Competencies for Information Professionals of the 21st Century (2003 ). Furthermore, job descriptions and outlines are with growing frequency, including references to the same. As such, it would be to your benefit to enroll and participate in any communication skills or teamwork training and certification programmes that are offered by academic or professional organisations (library-related or otherwise), or even by your own institution. In that way, you

About the Contributor

36

REFERENCES

Levi, Daniel. 2011. Groups Dynamics for Teams. 3rd ed. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE. Sheldrick Ross, Catherine and Kirsti Nilsen. 2013. Communicating Professionally: A How-to-do-it Manual for Librarians. 3rd ed. Chicago, IL: Neal-Schuman.

Jolie Rajah Law Librarian (Librarian II) Alma Jordan Library The University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus Trinidad and Tobago


37

Work Health Hazards: How to Stay Healthy in a Challenging Environment Terri Saint-Armour

L

ast year, I was lucky enough to be able to make a return presentation at the 29th annual CARALL conference, held in St. Lucia. The theme of last year’s conference was The Heart of Caribbean Law Libraries: A People-Centred Approach. At the time, I was certified as a personal trainer and physical and mental fitness was (and remains) quite important to me. So as soon as the list of possible presentation topics was sent out, I jumped at the chance to present on the topic of how to stay healthy in a workplace environment. Sunset in St. Lucia Credit: Terri Saint-Amour

I wanted to make people laugh so I started off the presentation with a video clip from The Onion. If you haven’t heard of The Onion before, you will want to check it out for some great humor. The video discussed a new “trend” in office furniture: the Fetal Position Desks. You can check it out at this link, which I highly suggest doing at https://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=NYSxkqL9l_8. (We’ll wait until you get back from watching it.) Ok, now that you’re back… A lot of people think that librarians have easy jobs. No stress and all we do, all day is read books, right ? I included a quote in my presentation from Kay G. Johnson, Column Editor of the Serials Review, which said:

Taking Flight in St. Lucia Credit: Terri Sain t-Amour

37

[t]he British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) aired a program a couple of years ago on job stress, and surprisingly, library workers were more stressed than firefighters, police


38

officers, train operators and teachers. [T]hose of us in libraries also encounter more stress than the general public realizes. In addition to the mental stress that our jobs cause, having a job that has become increasingly sedentary (as we have begun to rely on computers more and more) has had negative effects on our physical health as well. Many librarians and office workers suffer from something called upper-crossed syndrome, where certain muscles are tight (pectorals and upper trapezius and levator scapula) and other muscles are inhibited such as your neck flexors and rhomboids and serratus anterior. What this means in layman terms is that, from looking at a computer for hours every day, our necks lean forward. We suffer from carpal tunnel and many other hazards from keyboard use such as: rounded shoulders, eye strain, and dry eyes, just to name a few. Many of us suffer from lower back pain (I’m one of those people.) Another concern that appears to be widely experienced (whether in the Caribbean or the United States) is the lack of climate control in our workplace situations. Many of us drive to work in air conditioned cars, and then step out into a world of heat and high humidity. Then, we enter our workplace, most likely so air conditioned that your glasses fog up from the sudden change in temperature. After discussing all the aforementioned depressing topics, I thought it might be best to discuss some solutions for our occupationally induced ailments. When looking at possible solutions, I tried to stay with physical items that could be shipped to the Caribbean Islands. Where I live in the USA, some people have taken

38

to sitting on stability balls or specially made chairs which cradle a stability ball as your seat cushion. Desk treadmills are increasingly becoming popular so that employees can get physical exercise while engaging in intellectual work. For those who feel intimidated by the thought of walking and typing at the same time, there are also stand-up desks. And finally, to address climate control concerns, there is always the concept of adding layers of clothes, or, in the case of some of my colleagues, buying an electric blanket to wrap around oneself. In addition to items you can buy to help alleviate pain caused by your library job, my presentation discussed several stretches that can be done to lengthen tight muscles and strengthen inhibited (or shortened) muscles. And this is where the fun really began! I loved seeing everyone stand up from their desks and performing peroneal (calf) stretches! Everyone learned how to do a soleus stretch by placing both hands against the wall, and bending both legs at the knee. You lean forward into the wall until you feel a stretch in the leg which is placed furthest from the wall. I also asked some of our colleagues to demonstrate how to do some stretches from the group. Current CARALL President, Lynette Isaac, as well as CARALL member Adrian Duncan took part in these demonstrations, with Adrian really feeling the stretch in his erector spinae when I got him to sit down on the floor, put one leg straight out in front of him, and cross his other leg over the straightened leg. I then had him turn his body in a direction opposite of his crossed leg. Anyone who knows Adrian knows how animated his face can be and the look on his face was priceless!


39

Finally, being such a good sport, Adrian allowed me to demonstrate to the group a calming breathing technique which can be used to calm oneself down after a stressful situation. With the lights turned down low in the room, and his eyes closed, Adrian was instructed to listen to my voice which acted as a metronome of sorts, and to take deep breaths and hold for four counts both on the inhale and exhale. While our exercise was quite abbreviated, I have found from personal experience that performing this breathing technique for a few short minutes can be very beneficial. At the very end of my presentation, I discussed ways that each of us can work on improving our mental health when away from the office. Taking a walk in nature, or a walk with your (or a friend’s) dog, writing in a journal, or taking up a hobby – all are great ways to take your mind off of workplace stress and focus on something positive. Also, none of them cost any money. (I’ve provided some photos which I was able to take of the beauty of St. Lucia to prove my point about observing the natural world around us as a means of stress relief.) If you would like to see the PowerPoint with its images and sources consulted, please feel free to send me an email at tsaintamour@law.harvard.edu, and I will be glad to share it with you. I would like to thank everyone who attended last year’s conference for making it such an enjoyable experience, and one which I will not forget!

39

About the Contributor Terri Saint-Amour Librarian for Foreign, Comparative and International Law Harvard Law Library Harvard University United States of America

A good library is a place, a palace where the lofty spirits of all nations and generations meet. — Samuel Niger (1883-1956)


40

Leadership Development: Thought and Taught Dwaymian Brissette

M

cCauley et al., (1998) defines leadership development as expanding the collective capacity of organisational members to engage effectively in leadership roles and processes. Ardichvili and Manderscheid (2008) believe that leadership development involves building the capacity for groups of people to learn their way out of problems that could not have been predicted. Interestingly, Northouse (2007) argues that it seems there are almost as many definitions of leadership development as there are persons writing about it. Therefore, Sashkin and Sashkin (2003) definition of leadership development as an intentional effort to provide leaders with opportunities to learn grow and change appears to be as appropriate a definition as any. For the purpose of this paper, I will focus more on leadership development as a ‘taught’ rather than a mere ‘thought’. Taught is the past tense of teach and according to Dictionary.com “is to impart knowledge or skill; give instruction”. While a thought according to Dictionary.com is a “single act or product of thinking; idea or notion”. Considerations of the above definitions together with my own understanding of leadership development, have led me to the conclusion that leadership development emphasizes the concerted, formalized efforts of individuals and organizations towards leader improvement. From my observations and involvement in leadership, I believe that leadership is action

40

oriented either innately so or formally and informally learned and practiced. Literature on leadership also cements my view that leadership and leadership development are ‘taught’ and are not just a result of mere ‘thought’. According to Avolio (2005), “leadership is action oriented” and as such, for us to develop trendsetting and transformational leaders in the Caribbean we have to develop our thoughts on leadership. For many persons, development can only happen if leadership is taught through experience and practice. While theory does not replace practice or supersede it in validity, theory does complement practice. The challenge for leadership development provision is to move the relationships of thought and taught between the lenses to ensure that the heart of leadership development is having a vision beyond what you actually see in front of you when you look at someone, to believe in someone else even more than they believe in themselves. As an illustration, Riggio and Conger (2007) note, in their edited collection of writing and research on different elements of leadership practice, that leading effectively is essentially complicated because of the frequent caveat ‘it depends’. Good leadership involves doing the right thing in particular circumstances, accounting for the task, followers, situation, timing and process. Thomas (2004) states that existing organisational leaders have an obligation not just to continually develop themselves, but also to enable and support the development of emerging leaders via training,


41

reading, analyzing and following the example of ‘good’ leaders and by assessing, monitoring and improving their own performance. Many executives and organisations now seem to readily accept the positive impact of developing people and leaders on the business and have stopped attempting to measure ‘return on investment’ (ROI) on management or leadership development in isolation. In a recent quarterly staff meeting at the law firm to which I am currently employed, a discussion of the foregoing was referred to as a “no-brainer” by the Managing Partner when responding to the issue of leadership training and succession planning. Learning leadership therefore requires the freedom to practice leadership and to critically reflect on our own representations of leadership and its emotional and cognitive complexity (Antonacopoulou and Bento, 2003). It is this notion of reflection on practice that must now inform Caribbean legal information professionals who are leaders in our own right as we move forward in developing our own theoretical frameworks of leadership that can build on the generic developments outlined above. However, it is very important to note that it is critical for programme providers to understand that simply identifying and placing individuals in leadership development programmes does not ensure they will become effective leaders once the training is complete. It is a notion that I am sure most individuals in the Caribbean will be most familiar with especially in our respective countries. In closing, I can safely state that leadership development requires more than a “thought” but must be taught as that will help to develop the

41

leaders around us. The Caribbean Association of Law Libraries leadership must therefore develop a strategy to create future leaders within the organisation. These strategies I hope will consist of just-in-time and highly-tailored action learning techniques, reflective and dialogue practices including peer feedback, coaching and interventions which support the development and deployment of the Association’s vision and mission. It is important to understand that committing to a leadership development initiative does not mean that the workload eases – in many cases it could drastically increase. However, the long term benefit of growing leaders is worth the effort and investment.

REFERENCES Antonacopoulou, E.P. and Bento, R.F. (2003). “Methods of Learning Leadership: Taught and Experiential”, in Current Issues in Leadership and Management Development, J. Storey, ed., Oxford: Blackwell Publishers, p. 81-102. Ardichvili, A., & Manderscheid, S. V. (2008). Emerging practices in leadership development: An introduction. Advances in Developing Human Resources, 10(5), 619-631.

Avolio, B. J. (2005). Leadership development in balance: Made/born. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Dictionary.com

www.dictionary.reference.com


42

accessed June 4, 2015 Northouse, P.G. (2007). Leadership: Theory and Practice. 4th ed. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications McCauley, C. D., Moxley, R. S., & Van Velsor, E. (1998). The Handbook for Leadership Development. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Riggio, R.E. and Conger, J.A. (2007). “Getting it Right: The Practice of Leadership,” in The Practice of Leadership: Developing the next generation of leaders, J.A. Conger and R.E. Riggio, eds., San Francisco: JosseyBass.

Sashkin, M., & Sashkin, M. G. (2003). Leadership that matters. San Francisco, CA: BerrettKoehler. Thomas, N. (Ed.) (2004). The John Adair Handbook of Management and Leadership. London: Thorogood. About the Contributor Dwaymian Brissette Law Librarian / Information Management Manager Myers, Fletcher & Gordon Jamaica

42

A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent. —Douglas MacArthur


43

[Conference Report] : LexisNexis Raynold Cartwright ‘First-Timer’ Grant (2014):

Treasures in the Small Networks Genevieve Jones-Edman

T

he heart of librarianship, cooperation and collaboration, can be no more deeply felt than in attending a conference of small library networks. I was pleased to have been awarded The LexisNexis Raynold Cartwright ‘First-Timer’ Grant to attend the 29th annual CARALL conference and general meeting from July 6 -9, 2014 in St. Lucia. With the kind support of the management of the National Library of Jamaica (NLJ) additional funding was secured to make the trip possible. I am glad that I was able to experience this and happy to say that the National Library’s network was further strengthened through participation. In a very specific way I became a personal member in CARALL. I was also added to the CARALL listserv (CARALL-Talk) where the National Library’s research services can be further extended. For example, a request was sent out for a law in the 1940s, I was very pleased to see that this was something we could assist with; a fellow librarian beat me to the punch though.

I was privileged to have met a number of new faces in librarianship. I met librarians from UWI, Cave Hill and St. Augustine; Trinidad and Tobago’s House of Parliament and AttorneyGeneral’s Office; Montserrat, Harvard, Antigua, and the British Virgin Islands. It was heartwarming to witness the close knit relationship of CARALL members and the obvious commitment to law librarianship and the development of librarianship overall. The progamme of the CARALL conference

43

was dedicated to the individual and I benefitted greatly from this. The session that had the greatest impact on me was “The Law Library Staff: Men and Women of Stature” presented by Ms. June Renie. She explored the issue of developing library staff and key in her presentation, which struck a chord with me, was the issue of mentorship. As a supervisor/ manager this led me to deeper consideration on staff motivation and got me thinking of developing a more formal/structured mentorship system in my own department. Overall the conference reinforced and challenged me to think about the principles and practices that make an individual successful. On a lighter note, fitness trainer and librarian, Teresa Saint-Amour gave a practical session on staying healthy at work. This was very useful and each time I sit at my computer, a voice in my head says “no slumping.” Though I was not able to participate in the country tour, the long ride to and from the Hewanorra International Airport was very beautiful and the landscape reminded me of Jamaica. I would have liked to experience more of St. Lucia’s culture but that urge was somewhat satisfied when I read about its French/English history and saw this reflected in the place names.

I made myself available to Communication and Editorial Committee look forward to working with CARALL attending many more conferences. I know

the and and that


44

attending this conference has strengthened my personal and the National Library of Jamaica’s network which will only serve to further the mission of libraries locally and regionally.

Special thanks to the librarians at the House of Parliament (Trinidad and Tobago) whose gifts/souvenir I am grateful for and was happy to give as a token to a member of my department who consistently performs well.

About the Contributor Genevieve Jones-Edman Coordinator, Research & Information National Library of Jamaica

44


45

[Conference Report] Thomson Reuters Leonie M. M. 'Bundie' Asgarali Memorial Grant (2014) Adrian Duncan

P

rofessional conferences are ideal platforms to get trained, interact with people, and learn about developmental happenings and the introduction of cutting edge technologies that are designed to make information access, storage and retrieval much easier and more efficient and effective. I benefited greatly by attending the recently concluded Caribbean Association of Law Libraries (CARALL) conference, held in St. Lucia from the 6th - 9th of July 2014. The conference provided training and resources that focused on issues faced by librarians in the legal and judicial realms. It was another superbly planned and carefully executed conference that awarded me another opportunity to interact with other professionals across the region in physicality, as this is one of the main advantages of attending conferences. It is the best way to meet new and catch up with other library professionals as well as another opportunity to solidify networks and bonds created with colleagues and vendors alike. Being a part of the conference enabled me to integrate with other professionals from within and outside of our region. Although one cannot exactly quantify the networking value of a conference, it remains an essential aspect of such a gathering. We were able to take the pulse of what is happening as it relates to law libraries, to hear ideas and get exposed to new software and tools that are available and slated to be available for our profession. This conference helped to reinforce team building and communication skills and provided

45

a forum for members to discuss tools, technologies, and processes and how we can apply them in our companies to improve our information products, workflow, and processes. Additionally, emphasis was placed on health and safety practices in the workplace, these included demonstrations on proper posture for sitting and tips for reducing eye strain when using the computer. Furthermore, the presenter suggested taking 5 minute breaks which aid in refreshing the mind, and rejuvenating and energising your spirit for work, thereby fostering heightened efficiency and effectiveness. However, not understating the need for proper resources that fosters productivity and ease of use which results in more work being done in shorter periods of time.

Overall, the presentations were very informative as well as interesting. I was especially fascinated by the following presentations: Ms Myrna Douglas - “The law librarian- she of many hats”, the title was a little sexist but the presentation was excellent. Ms. Terri Saint- Amour “Health best practices within the work place”, Mr. Dwaymian Brissette - “Leadership development: thought and taught”, Ms. Jolie Rajah “Building teams: communicate! communicate! communicate!” and Mr. Errol Adams “Technology and our users: an evolving relationship”. These presentations were particularly important and relevant to me and the furtherance of my work within my company. The demonstration by the Lexum representative on their new information storage and dissemination platform, “Oyez Oyez”, sparked my interest as our firm is


46

looking into getting a platform similar to this for internal document sharing, storage and retrieval. Oyez Oyez is an online tool for governing bodies wishing to provide easy and professional access to their legislative and regulatory material from their own website, intranet and extranet. Oyez Oyez allows firms and companies to create tags that can be assigned to documents making search and retrieval easier. These tags can be efficiently used in search result filtering and drilling down. Additionally, related documents can be conveniently cross linked across all spaces and collections for quicker access. The presenter outlined that Oyez Oyez makes it possible to create, name and organise your document databases; customising it as your need presents itself. One is also able to create collections to host subsets of documents of similar nature. Furthermore, these collections can be grouped in spaces to facilitate access and searching. Moreover, creating collections and spaces is easy through the user-friendly administration interface. In addition to regulatory information, Oyez Oyez also hosts other types of documents that organisations work with on a daily basis. Such information includes meeting agendas, minutes and other meeting documents, notices, bulletins, policies and guides. It can also be used to store PDF of precedents, cases and acts that can be shared within or outside of the company.

46

About the Contributor Adrian Duncan Law Librarian DunnCox Attorneys-at-Law Jamaica


47

[Conference Report]: Open Letter to CARALL Members Catherine Deane

professional law librarians. This is not the highest paid field in any country, but the work that we do in providing access to legal information and supporting government processes is very important indeed.

Rodney Bay, St Lucia. Credit: Alex@far aw ay.co m Available at https://www.flickr.com/photos/faraway/ Creative Commons License Attribution-NonCommercial -ShareAlike 2.0

I

t is with great fondness that I recall the 2014 CARALL conference in St. Lucia. As a Trinidadian-born librarian who came of age in the United States, this was my first opportunity to rub elbows with my professional peers from the Caribbean. The presentations were informative, and the speakers pertinent and knowledgeable. However, I relished most the insight I gained from hearing about what is done at your various libraries. I think that law librarians worldwide could benefit from your local knowledge, ideas that are so much a part of your professional landscape that you take them for granted. The main lesson that I took away from this interaction is that cultural differences aside, we share a deep respect for the work and for the efforts that we have all made to become

47

I would like to encourage more global collaboration among law librarians. One way to begin would be to attend the annual meeting of the American Association of Law Libraries (AALL). If external funding is needed, consider applying for the Schaffer Grant for Foreign Law Librarians that is awarded by the Foreign, Comparative & International Law Special Interest Section (FCIL-SIS). “The purpose of [this grant] is to provide financial assistance to ensure the presence and participation of a foreign librarian at the AALL Annual Meeting.” This grant recognizes the value that your experiences bring to U.S. law librarians. Past winners of this award have maintained ongoing working relationships with the FCIL-SIS. Conversely, I would love to see future CARALL conferences draw more law librarians from the U.S. and beyond because I believe that this leads to mutually beneficial collaborative endeavours. The long range impact of networking at AALL, IALL & CARALL conferences should not be underestimated. One unexpected outcome of attending the CARALL conference was the chance to meet and collaborate with Librarian Kamau Osborne. FCIL Librarian, Vince Moyer and I very much appreciate Mr. Osborne’s substantial contribution to the forthcoming 2015 update to Trinidad and Tobago Law and Legal Research on


48

Globalex. I recognize that the CARALL conference is for Caribbean law librarians and I am not suggesting that it should be modified to the exclusion of Caribbean law librarian interests, but perhaps there could be some simultaneous sessions. This would accommodate a range of interests and give more Caribbean law librarians a chance to participate as workshop facilitators for a global audience. It is a rare and expensive occasion when Caribbean law librarians gather and perhaps the value would be enhanced by talking face-to-face in small groups rather than listening to one person. In this time of YouTube and smart phones with video cameras, we can record and view lectures when we are apart leaving us more time for in person interaction. Not that I think we should do away with all speakers, it is important to have a local keynote speaker, (who could be live streamed to those unable to attend in person) but I think it’s useful to then discuss the ideas brought up by the speaker in smaller groups.

Interactive workshops and shorter sessions are essential components of modern library conferences. Below are some ideas that I think might attract a global audience of law librarians who care for Caribbean materials.  Caribbean legal research– Using a simulation

setting, Caribbean law librarians could demonstrate how to approach a typical research question. Then a research situation could be provided and the participants could use the demonstrated process to find relevant materials. (I could see this as a 4 hour preconference workshop aimed at nonCaribbean area based law librarians for which an additional fee could be charged.)

48

 Selecting and finding materials to support a

Caribbean law curriculum.  Innovative

techniques in teaching legal research – a series of 6 minute Pecha Kucha style talks where law librarians can share their techniques for teaching legal research.

 Blogging workshop during which participants

write 500 words on a law librarian topic. They learn how to write for the web & how to market their blog.  Practical

leadership and management training tailored for Caribbean law librarians.

 Virtual

teams: developing long distance relationships – workshop to support committee members.

 Increasing efficiency & productivity while

decreasing meeting management coach.

time

led

by

a

Thank you for asking for my opinion on the conference. I hope to be back again someday soon.

About the Contributor Catherine Deane Foreign & International Law Librarian/ Lecturer in Law Vanderbilt Law School United States of America


49

TRIVIA ANSWER KEY

49


50

The Caribbean Association of Law Libraries (CARALL), wishes to thank our members, participants, presenters, sponsors and all other organizations and/or persons who have contributed to the success of this Conference. A Special Thank you to our Sponsors: :

Wildys and Sons Ltd. , LexisNexis, Thomson Reuters

carallonline.org

CaribbeanAssociationLL@gmail.com

Caribbean Association of Law Libraries

50


51

51


52

52


53

Š 2014 Caribbean Association of Law Libraries (CARALL) 53

Profile for Caribbean Association of Law Librarians

CARALL communications 2014 2015  

CARALL communications 2014 2015  

Profile for carall
Advertisement