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Cara Indiano


EDUCATION

TECHNICAL SKILLS

University of Cincinnati: College of Design Architecture Art and Planning Master of Design Class of 2019

Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Adobe Lightroom Wordpress Microsoft Office

University of Cincinnati: College of Design Architecture Art and Planning B.S. in Fashion Design Class of 2014

EXPERIENCE SOCIAL INNOVATION LAB 2017-2018

Design Research Graduate Assistant - The Social Innovation Lab is a collaborative, transdisciplinary think tank that utilizes a human-centered and systems-thinking research approach to deepen understanding of and generate transformative solutions to the social and cultural challenges of our time. This year’s focus is on the issues Transgender Students face when it comes to their Healthcare.

THE INDIE FILM INDUSTRY 2015-2017 Costume Design - Managed the entire costume department including budget and production time tables. Communicated and collaborated with Director and cast. Drew up a costume plot. Identified when a character may need a quick costume change during successive scenes. Researched and designed the clothing styles worn in the appropriate eras. Acquired costumes based on budget and schedule. Fitted all performers on each single item and worked on patterns and cuttings. THE STORYTELLER: Feature Film - Director Joe Crump BOULEVARD: Short Film - Director Jeff Holiday DORIS: Short Film - Director Oscar Rodriguez Gorriz

MOTIONWEAR 2011-2018

Communications Design Freelancer- Contributing to the overall production of the Graphics Team, main responsibility is photo-editing for the nine catalogs produced every year. Fashion Design Intern- Second internship. Main job was to help the transition from design to the manufacturing stage. This included fabric testing, sending supplies to contractors, fabric and trim sourcing, organizing photo shoots, and engineering new and improved style worksheets that focus on modular sewing efficiency for a multilingual manufacturing workforce. Communications Design Intern- My first internship for them. Contributed to the overall production of the Graphics Design Team, often photo editing 25 pictures a day and received an Award of Awesomeness.

COMPETENCIES leadership skills project management skills (budgets, timelines, scope and communications) organizational skills willingness to learn hard working creating efficiencies self sufficient self motivated

AWARDS University of Cincinnati: Graduate Scholar Award

HOBBIES Reading Writing Sewing, Knitting, Quilting

CONTACT Email: indiance@mail.uc.edu Phone: 317-557-4581 Referrals Upon Request


THESIS RESEARCH

Currently researching homelessness for my thesis and designing new research tools based off of Vijay Kumar’s 101 Design Methods: A Structured Approach for Driving Innovation in Your Organization. After mind mapping (Image to your right) homelessness to identify opportunities for research, I settled on current solutions to homelessness. I then went through Kumar’s book and picked 2 research methods that I could alter to suit my research needs. SWOT became Multi-SWOT as a way to compare and contrast the various current solutions to homelessness. And Picture Interview became Multi-Sided Picture Interview as a ground up approach to how the various stakeholders throughout the solutions in the system see and deal with homelessness. On the next page you will see the break down on Multi-SWOT and Multi-Sided Picture Interview styled in Kumar’s 101 Design Methods’ layout.


Evaluate and compare various current solutions’ strengths, weaknesses, oppurtunities, and threats.

BENEFITS

Creates Overview Compares Various Methods Identifies Challenges Reveals Oppurtunities

INPUT

Formal statement of the project objective and unterstanding of the various contexts

OUTPUT

Diagram showing the competitions strengths, weaknesses, where your oppurtunities are, and threats.

WHEN TO USE

EXAMPLE PROJECT: Homeless Solutions

WHAT IT DOES

current environment that will be barriers?

To better understand where all of the current sollutions for people living with homelessness overlap and diverge in the four quadrants of strengths, weaknesses, orppurtunities and threats, an ambitious, nameless grad student, wrote them down on SWOT card magnets and put them up on a dry erase board. This allowed her to easily compare and contrast large swaths of information to get a better grasp about who is being served, how, what threats to those who serve the homeless face, and many more things.

The Multi-SWOT Analysis is used to evaluate multiple pre-existing solutions strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. The analysis begins with studying the various solutions and seeks to understand how the solution performs in relation to other soultions in the market. A high-level assessment is made of the strengths and weaknesses of the various solutions, the opportunities available as well as economic, social or governmental threats. It looks at factors inside and outside the solutions to determine where the oppurtunities are within the already existing solutions, and whether the solutions are in some ways contributing to the problem.

STEP 3: Organize findings into a 3.5” × 3.5” SWOT Magnets.

Stock Photo

HOW IT WORKS STEP 1: Describe the initial innovation intent. Define the basic goal that you are considering for analyzing the various solutions. Are you creating a product, a system, a form of communication? STEP 2: Assess the organization’s strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. Strengths: What about these pre-existing solutions is working, why is it working? What might you not consider a strength but it is something a solution does well. Weaknesses: What about these pre-existing solutions isn’t working, why isn’t it working? What might you not consider a weakness but it is something a solution doesn’t do well. Opportunities: Where are the gaps in offerings that you can fill? Are there other solutions you are not aware of that fill that gap? Why aren’t they currently being met? Figure caption

Threats: What are the external threats that these solutions face? What elements exist in the

Summarize findings into brief statements that can be listed in each of the four magnet quadrants, no more than seven or eight statements per quadrant. STEP 4: Compare and contrast the various solutions SWOTS to get a better understanding of the whole picture, and see where needs are not being met. Put the magnets up on a white board and involve key team members to discuss the findings. Move the various pieces around, compare and contrast weaknesses, figure out where the oppurtunities are over all. Write all over the board. What does the unified presentation of thedifferent elements suggest about the opportunity space? How many threats are there over all? Periodically take photos of what you’ve analysed before you move the items around again. Discuss these questions and summarize them for sharing. Involve key decision makers to determine the directions to pursue for the project.

4.6 YMulti-SWOT Analysis

4.6 Multi-SWOT Analysis

METHODS | 3


Having conversations with various stakeholders about the photographs they have taken of thier activities.

BENEFITS

Builds Empathy Captures a larger part of the story. Grounds conversation with artifacts. Promotes learning in context.

INPUT

Project Topic List of Activities and Interactions relevant to your study, especially the ones that are spontaneous and difficult to observe

EXAMPLE PROJECT: Homelessness Solutions

WHAT IT DOES

An ambitious, nameless grad student gave multiple people living with homelessness disposable cameras, and asked them to photograph their experiences. They then had various social workers, shelter volunteers, police, and soup kitchen staff, do the same at the same time. This gave the grad student a much broader understanding about how the various sides see their lives and their work. How they interact with each other and try and see where both sides are in agreement, where they aren’t,

All Sides Picture Interview is a method that combines aspects of Photo Ethnography and Ethnographic Interview. The interview follows a period in which subjects from all ends of the spectrum have been asked to use photography to document their engagement in specific activities or experiences. An interview is scheduled and a researcher sits down with the participant to review the photographs. The method gathers information, through open-ended questions, about participants by getting them to talk in detail about the photographs they have taken. The narratives emerging from the interviews are sources of rich information and potential insights about the user ’s experiences and possible unmet needs.

Stock Photo

OUTPUT

Photos and observations of situations that are important to the various stakeholders

WHEN TO USE

disposable cameras, if using them; provide the diary templates. STEP 4: Give mid-course feedback. Ideally, have a quick check-in with participants after they have shared an initial set of photos. Use this opportunity to give them feedback, correct any misunderstandings, answer their questions, debug technical difficulties, and possibly ask them to refocus on new or different things.

HOW IT WORKS

STEP 5: Interview participants. I deally in the same location the photos were taken, have participants walk the team through the diary. Ask questions, get clarification, take additional notes, and don’t forget to capture everything about the interview.

STEP 1: Plan research protocol.

STEP 6: Debrief.

Decide who will be asked to take photos (make sure to get a range of people who would or could theoretically interact with each other) where and when, roughly how many photos are desired, and choose any frameworks, that they should use to guide them.

Immediately after the interview, debrief the team about what was learned, and if necessary plan to follow up with participants for additional clarification. Synthesise information gathered.

STEP 2: Assemble resources. Create diary templates (print or electronic) and instruction sheets; procure disposable cameras, if using them, or set up digital photo-sharing services. STEP 3: Brief participants. Explain how to take photos—quickly,liberally, don’t worry about artistic quality; what to take photos of (for example, POEMS, any and all people, objects, environments, messages, and services related to an activity); how many days the study will continue; and logistical details (where to send back disposable cameras or where to upload digital photos); provide

3.13 Multi-Sided Picture Interview

4.6 Multi-Sided Picture Interview

METHODS | 5


IMPACT REGISTRY

Improving Pediatric and Adult Congenital Treatments Registry (IMPACT) is a national hospital registry that collects the data of heart disease patients from pediatric 110 hospitals throughout the United States, and aims at ensuring evidence-based cardiovascular care, improving patient outcomes, and lowering health care costs. However Cincinnati Children’s hospital, having implemented IMPACT into their system, ran across inefficient work-flow complications. We were charged with finding ways to increase data interchange between different systems and to reduce manual operation, error, and cost of data entry. Through use of design research and interviews with the various stakeholders we were able to access the situation and offer solutions to their team. TEAM: Cara Indiano Zhenhao Tian Zhaoran Liu Cai Xinyi Woojae Kim


Collegiate Physical Activity App After a study by the Mannheim Institute of Public Health, Social and Preventive Medicine found that college students tend to be less physically active when starting at a university, I designed an app that would allow the student to try new social exercise activities across the UC campus. Basing the app off of the popular Augmented Reality app PokÊmon GO I chose to create an app specifically for UC students, but could be adapted to other campuses, that would allow them to: - Find various activities through school, student organizations or fellow classmates, sponsors or app generated random activities that would award them point. - Track their points, set goals, and their points would contribute to their program and college’s point systems. - Find fellow classmates interested in an informal game or type of exercise.


My Goals

My Events

Challenges

Rankings

Student Activities

Log In

School Activities

Sponsored Activities

Main Page BEARCAT Games

Preferences Settings

BEARCAT Randomly Selected Option CHALLENGE

My Rewards

SYSTEM MAP


SET YOUR PREFERENCES

Log In Page

Activities Page

Goals Page

Notification Page

Location Access Page


COLLECT POINTS AND CHALLENGE YOURSELF Activity Post

Main Page

BEARCAT CHALLENGE

My Rewards


FIND YOUR ACTIVITIES Sponsored Activities

School Activities

Student Activities

BEARCAT Games


TRACK YOURSELF AND YOUR TEAM

My Goals

My Events

Challenges

Rankings


THE STORYTELLER On the run from her mysterious past and guided by a fairy that no one else can see, Abby sparks a daisy chain of compassion, bringing joy and music back into the family.

As the Costume Designer I managed the entire costume department including budget and production time tables. Communicated and collaborated with Director and cast. Researched and designed the clothing styles worn by each character and how the character’s identity and therefor costume changed throughout the film. Drew up a costume plot. Acquired costumes based on budget and schedule. Fitted all performers on each single item and worked on patterns and cuttings. Was in charge of all costumes throughout the shoot

STARRING: Brooklyn Rae Silzer Samantha Colburn Cassidy Mack, Constance Towers James Snyder Eden Espinosa Kristina Wagner

DIRECTED BY: Joe Crump WRITTEN BY: Joe Crump, Rachel Noll PRODUCED BY: Rachel Noll


Homeless Urchin

Adorable Urchin

A B B Y


M A G G I E

Need for Control

Letting It Go


Surly Teenager

Softer Sarcastic Teenager

J E N


J O H N

Scruffy Bachelor

He’s a Keeper


Nursing Homes Blues

I’m Home

R O S E M A R Y


BOOK COVER

A five look Capstone Collection, with each look being based off of a chosen heroine from some of my favorite book series. Each look was thoroughly researched, designed, prototyped, patterned and crafted, and is comprised of one coat in patchwork leather and wool to represent the cover of the book; one jewel toned dress to represent the story within; and one tooled leather mask for dramatic flare. As they say “Don’t judge a book by its cover.” COATS, DRESSES, AND MASKS DESIGNED AND MADE BY: Cara Indiano INSPIRATION PHOTOS : Individually Marked

MODELS: Catie Albright Karah Jones Marrisa Graham Elizabeth Hamann Alexa Hodge Jang

PHOTOGRAPHY: Cara Indiano Alexandra Nalepka HAIR AND MAKEUP: Catie Albright


Autumn Leaves, Japan Photograph by Michael Yamashita

The Slexyz Bookstore in Maastricht

The Livraria Lello in Porto, Portugal

Leonid Afremov Painting

That Same Other World by Lars van de Goor


A N N A B E T H C H A S E


E V E L Y N F L Y N N


M A E R A D of P E L L I N O R


K A R I G A N G’ L A D H E O N


D E N N A


ILLUSTRATION


THA N K YO U

Email: indiance@mail.uc.edu Phone: 317-557-4581

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