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No.13 $14.95*incl GST

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ISSUE NUMBER THIRTEEN

ISSN 2205-9024

13

$15.95 NZ

double: sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more buoyant, safer, faster and has more capacity

bruce almighty

bruce almighty! almighty! shark special!

WWW.THECAPTAIN.TV MOBY DICK CONTENT

A tribute to Bruce Harris & his Shark Cats plus: legends of lure-making, diving with sharks, sub science, haggerstone is. + more

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OB_AU_Outdoor_DPS OB_AU_Outdoor_DPS The The Captain Captain Print Print Ad_460x297_OP.pdf Ad_460x297_OP.pdf 1 1 18/10/2018 18/10/2018 3:12 3:12 PMPM

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CAPTAIN’S CONTENTS

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Features

STORY 24 COVER BRUCE ALMIGHTY

Bruce Harris and the story of Australia’s most legendary cat

ISLAND HOME 48 MY Alli Ficarra hauls in massive mackerel at Haggerstone Island

STABIS OF AMERICA 60 UNITED The Captain tackles the Pacific Northwest in a trio of Stabicrafts

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STREET 78 STRUGGLE Joshua Hutchins toils for a tuskie in the Whitsundays

HEAT 90 DEEP Discover all there is to know about the sneaky world of submarines

CHARIOT 100 SCOTTY’S Scott Gray’s new Seacruiser Safari SC6000 is a barra and bluefin buster

OF THE LURE 106 LEGENDS The Captain interrogates some legendary lure makers

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014 Columns

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08 THE CAPTAIN’S LOG Welcome to issue 13

16 SPEAR SCIENCE

Luke Potts goes spearing with sharks

20 CAST AWAY

Justin Duggan’s Top 10 old-school lures

22 BRRRRR!!

Captain Blackbeard’s life as a custom rod builder

128 RUM AND RATIONS

Miguel Maestre’s flake and chips

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tain’s Crew Cap EDITOR The Captain captain@thecaptain.tv CONTENT CREATORS Jack Murphy Travis Godfredson Alli Ficarra Paul Robinson Captain Blackbeard Scott Gray Luke Potts Nick Wood Justin Duggan Joshua Hutchins Miguel Maestre Scott Gray

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SUB EDITOR Paul Robinson ART DIRECTOR Brendon Wise The Captain — Legends of the Sea is published by Moby Dick Content Pty Ltd. ABN 89 604 591 077. All material is protected by the Commonwealth Copyright Act, 1968. No part of The Captain may be reproduced, replicated or adapted in whole or in part without written permission from Moby Dick Content Pty Ltd. Distributed by Gordon & Gotch. Printed by Blue Star Group. ISSN 2205-9024 www.mobydickcontent.com

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THE CAPTAIN’S LOG

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CRAFT LESSONS

here are some crafty characters in this issue of The Captain. Bruce Harris shares the tale of his revolutionary Shark Cat while Roy and Anna Turner whisk us away to a remote island resort they built themselves. More than 20 pages are dedicated to the lure craftsmen of Australia. They all share a dream — to fool a 1000lb pointy marine beast with nothing more than a cup of carefully crafted polymer and a hook. It got The Captain thinking. What makes a great craftsman? We delved into their resumés and probed their responses to find the answer. Want to be a clever captain of industry? Here are a few pointers from those who have done it:

1

Work with the best. You’ll never be the best lure maker in the world until the best game fishermen in the world drag your skirts. Likewise, you probably won’t be an immortal glass boat builder until the abalone pluckers have brutalised your boat and come back for more. The hotter the kitchen, the better the breakfast.

2

They don’t do it for money. No lure maker ever said, “I want to get rich crafting lures”. Nope, they did it for thrill of the hunt and art of the craft, often selling off family assets to buy better materials.

3

They don’t rest on their laurels. It seems a true craftsman is never satisfied. The reward isn’t in the finished product, but in the process of finding a better one — a softer-riding, faster boat, or a better-swimming lure.

4

Perseverance. A true craftsman never gives up and certainly doesn’t work a 38-hour week. They test their concepts then test some more. They keenly observe the finer details, and adapt quickly. In The Captain’s experience, nothing good was ever done easily. In fact, a bloke I knew had a note scribbled above his tool bench that read: “Go the extra mile. There’s nobody else there”. We’ll be seeing you there.

www.thecaptain.com.au www.thecaptain.tv

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ALL-NEWrds outboa

CAPTAIN’S NEWS

BIG COX ENTERS AUSTRALIA

But will they justify the $70K price tag? Let’s hear the pitch.

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fter 10 years in development, Cox diesel outboards are finally in Australian and New Zealand ports, with Power Equipment the exclusive distributor. The Captain gets the good oil on this new diesel demon from Cox Powertrain global sales director Joel Reid. 1. So, er, tell us all about your Cox. Cox is built by Cox Powertrain — a British engineering company founded in 2007. Our mission is to fulfil the demand for diesel outboards. Over the past 10 years, Cox has been developing the world’s highest-powered diesel outboard — the 300HP CXO300. 2. What was your inspiration? David Cox, the founder of Cox Powertrain, was a Formula 1 engineer keen to put his vast knowledge into something new. The company developed a high-powered diesel outboard to satisfy the NATO single-fuel policy. Originally, the engine concept was developed for government use, but it soon became apparent there was significant demand from recreational and commercial users. 3. Why has it taken so long for diesel tech to find its way into outboards? Essentially, the investment in time and money that goes into developing a diesel outboard. Cox has built the CXO300 from a blank piece of paper for marine use. It’s taken us 10 years up to launching in November 2018. 4. You say a Cox diesel outboard lasts three times longer than traditional petrol outboards. How did you prove that? In order to meet EPA commercial requirements, the engine must last at least three times longer than for petrol recreational use. It’s not that current makers can’t extend the life of their outboards, they simply don’t have to in order to comply with legal or customer requirements. We don’t

have an option. 5. Got it. What is the fuel economy compared to an equivalent petrol engine? Publicly, we say the CXO300 is 20 per cent more fuel efficient than an equivalent petrol engine — it’s more like 30 per cent. We like to undersell and over-deliver. 6. There’s a perception that diesels are slow, spewing out black smoke on take-off — at least if The Captain’s Toyota LandCruiser is any example. How does the Cox compare? Engine speed is defined by propeller speed and torque. Our propeller speed is around 3400RPM, similar to that of a Yamaha, yet with a much higher crank torque, so there’s no reason to believe the boat will be any slower. If anything, it’ll speed up quicker due www.thecaptain.tv

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to the higher torque. As for the smoke, we have an incredibly clean combustion, very close to meeting IMO III (International Maritime Organisation) emission requirements. The best way to prove it is by showing you a video of an engine running — you won’t be able to tell the difference between the Cox and a petrol outboard. 7. Are you suggesting we remove the “Soot gets the moot” sticker from The Captain’s ride? Not likely. Why else should Aussies consider a Cox outboard? We don’t like to try and sell the CXO300 to people who don’t want a diesel outboard. We normally find people either want a diesel outboard or they don’t. If they do, we have the performance, durability and service to meet their demand. We’re confident Power Equipment will do a great job taking care of our Aussie customers. 8. What models are coming to Australia? At the moment, we’re only launching a 300HP diesel outboard, but we’re working towards bringing higher horsepower diesel outboards to the market — up to 500HP. 9. Yikes! When will they be available? The CXO300 will be available to order from November 1, for delivery in the second quarter of 2019. 10. OK, hit us with the price. The CXO300 starting point will be US$50,000 ($70,600), excluding local tax and duties. The warranty is 1500 hours/18 months for commercial users and 1500 hours/five years for recreational users. No worries, get us aboard one of these oilers. COX CXO300 Propeller shaft power 224kW (300HP) Crankshaft power 252kW (338HP) Peak torque 650Nm Displacement 4.4L Number of cylinders 8 Configuration 60-degree V8 Fuel system High-pressure common rail fuel injection Weight 375KG Aspiration Twin-turbo Shaft Length 25”/30”/35” Transmission Standard and counter rotating capability Service Interval 1200 hours/1 year FURTHER INFORMATION www.coxmarine.com/en AVAILABLE THROUGH POWER EQUIPMENT AUSTRALIA 10-12 Commercial Drive, Lynbrook, Victoria. (03) 9709 8500. info@powerequipment.com.au www.powerequipment.com.au POWER EQUIPMENT NEW ZEALAND 156 Beaumont Street, Westhaven, Auckland. +64 9 358 7478 sales@powerequipment.co.nz www.powerequipment.co.nz www.thecaptain.com.au www.thecaptain.tv

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NEW TINNIE TIME!

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CAPTAIN’S NEWS

BOAT OF PREY

120 years of evolution has gone into Savage’s new v-nose punt, the fearsome Raptor Extreme.

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o, it can’t fly, but Savage’s new Raptor Extreme punt can do just about anything else when it comes to getting you where the fish are biting. Messing around with dinghies for more than 120 years, the blokes at Savage know a fair bit about what rocks your boat. So when they call their latest offering their “most adventurous dinghy yet”, you know they aren’t just blowing smoke up your exhaust. And when they call that offering the Raptor Extreme, you know this is serious predator business. Launched at the Melbourne International Boat Show at the end of June, this v-nose punt is suited to river, creek and estuary fishing — and fishos of all ages. You can strap it to a trailer, chuck it on the roof or slot it in the back of the ute, because this baby ain’t afraid to go off-road so you can explore those more remote fishing spots — from deep in the rainforests of Northern Queensland to messing around among the mangroves in the tidal estuaries of the Top End.

This newest addition to the Raptor flock of dinghies — joining the Savage Raptor and Raptor Pro — is available in two models, 355 (15HP rating) and 375 (20HP). The Raptor Extreme has large front and rear bench seats, plenty of room in the centre for fishing and crabbing, and increased internal freeboard courtesy of its higher sides and greater beam. Grab rails for loading, anchor storage and a deep floor for that extra comfort on the water come as standard. The Raptor Extreme could be just what you need for your next expedition to the forgotten wilds of Jurassic National Park in search of the legendary barra-saurus. Find a dealer and check out the specs on the Raptor Extreme and the entire Savage range at www.savageboats.com.au

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THE CAPTAIN’S TREASURE

'X’ MARKS THE SPOT

BOOTY FOR YOUR TREASURE CHEST OTTERBOX DRYBOX 3250 SERIES

LOWRANCE ELITE TI2 SERIES

Only little guys, but pretty damn clever these otters. They’ve just brought The Captain’s attention to the new 3250 Series Drybox. OtterBox has been in the business of keeping things safe and dry for a while, but the new 3250 Series is even more durable and streamlined — its polycarbonate construction and easy-to-open stainless steel hinge and latch pins make it almost indestructible. With 55 cubic inches of foam-lined space, your wallet, keys, phone and, er, fishing licence have never been safer. The Drybox is guaranteed waterproof to 90 feet (27m) for 30 minutes. It’s tough, secure and stackable, comes in four colour options and will probably last longer than your boat. What are you waiting for?

Working on the “you can run, but you can’t hide” theory for fishy targets for more than 60 years, there’s not a lot Lowrance doesn’t know about what goes on beneath the surface. They’ve just released the next-gen version of their potent Elite Ti series fishfinder/chartplotter unit. The Elite Ti2 features enhanced high-resolution Active Imaging sonar functionality, which combines CHIRP sonar with DownScan Imaging, making it easier to search fish structure, delivering higher clarity and target separation. Wireless networking means you can share sonar and charting, and sync waypoint data, without all the cable clutter. And a Bluetooth call/text message display means your phone can have a lie-down somewhere safe and dry while still receiving calls and texts. With so much smart stuff in one standalone package, the Lowrance Elite Ti2 comes in 7-, 9-, and 12-inch display sizes, plus various charting and transducer bundles.

$59.99

www.otterbox.com.au

FROM $1299 TO $3599 www.lowrance.com

MINOX NAUTIC BINOCULARS

Making faraway things come a bloody sight closer for 80 years, Minox marine binoculars are now distributed in Australia by MarinePlus. Minox made its bones inventing the subminiature spy camera, manufactured from 1936 and a must-have piece of gear for espionage agencies during WWII — so they have a handle on miniaturisation and cutting-edge tech. Precisionengineered in Germany, Nautic marine binoculars are designed — in part by the Volkswagen design crew — to handle extreme marine conditions. Tough rubber armour gives a good grip in the wet and the binoculars are filled with nitrogen to ensure no fogging and 100 per cent waterproofing (down to 3m). Robust and compact, Nautic binoculars deliver clarity, resolution and reliability in the shittiest weather. Minox reckons they’re “designed for the severe requirements of water sports enthusiasts and maritime navigation”. The Captain reckons it may have gained something slightly unintentional in the translation. Every captain needs a telescope — and binoculars are just like Siamese twin telescopes. Check out the range and price details at Marine Plus. www.marineplus.com.au www.thecaptain.tv

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NAVICO INFORMATION DISPLAY (ID)

If you’re ready to get rid of messy, mixed-brand dashes with varying user interfaces and take your integrated onboard electronics to the next level, Navico has good news. Their snazzy new Information Display (ID) is a configurable interface that makes monitoring and control of onboard systems a breeze. The software features pre-defined modes displaying all the relevant info for your situation, including system checks, cruising, anchoring and water sports. The ID also has custom modes that can be easily configured to builder specs to get the most out of your boat, whether you’re using it for cruising, offshore game fishing, day sailing, tournament fishing or just beverage testing. The centralised hub uses ethernet, wifi and Bluetooth along with Sonar, USB, CAN and NMEA 2000 ports to connect to all onboard systems, and IDs will be available with a choice of Lowrance, Simrad or B&G electronics. www.navico.com

ACADEMY BRAND STRIPED SWIM SHORTS

Boardies. You know you’re going to need more than a few pairs because you’re gonna live in ’em all summer long. OK, all year round. They’re going to get ripped. They’re going to get fish guts, grease and tomato sauce smeared all over them. The clever tailors at Academy have knocked up basic horizontally striped beauties resplendent in pastel colours. They’ve got an elastic waistband plus a drawcord for added trouser security, twin side pockets and a Velcro-secured back pocket to stash your cash. They reckon these boardies will look even better as they fade and if you want to go for the sophisticated look, team them up with Academy’s Stanford linen shirt.

$69.95

www.academybrand.com

HANGING HABITATS TREEPOD CABANA

SHIMANO XL HARDTOP TACKLE BAG

You see “XL” on something and you know you’re heading into fat bastard country. You want room to move, you choose XL. Same goes with tackle bags. For the average fisho, there’s no end of gear that “might come in handy at some point”. Think of Shimano’s new ruggedly durable XL Hardtop Tackle Bag as your own personal mobile shed — except it’s also water-resistant. The XL Hardtop has a reinforced bottom and moulded top, which means it keeps its shit together whatever hell experiences you put it through, and an elastic tie-down point helps it stay with you whatever the conditions, on the boat or in the ute. Three large pockets make for plenty of extra safe storage options. And it looks so good, you can maximise your tackle in style.

$149.95

Hanging Habitats have come up with a hybrid chair/hammock/tent that literally “hangs out”. Run the boat up onto the beach, find a convenient tree and in a lazy few minutes you can assemble the perfect chill-out or snoozing space. The TreePod Cabana is way comfortable and high enough off the ground that any little critters are going to have a hard time joining you for a nap or stealing your snacks. Silver mesh sides mean you get the breeze, you get the view — and if you get a big enough TreePod, you may even get some company. You also get to feel good about giving something back to the planet because Hanging Habitats has hooked up with Trees For the Future and pledged to plant a tree for every TreePod they sell. Real easy to store and equally at home in your backyard, TreePods are available in a variety of sizes and colours.

$369.95

www.shimanofish.com.au

mytreepod.com

www.thecaptain.tv

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SPEAR SCIENCE WITH LUKE POTTS

SPEARING WITH SHARKS

If you want to stay calm and confident spearfishing around sharks then here are a few pointers from that gun spearo, cool hand Luke Potts from Aquatic Rehab Spearfishing.

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umans are hard-wired to be scared of big toothy critters that can chomp us in half. But with the right mindset, we can actually learn from them and better understand what’s happening in the water around us.

SHARKS ARE OUR FRIENDS

Sharks are a good sign when it comes to fish habitat. Sharks hang around fish because, like us, they like eating fish. Fish are also attracted to sharks. Some feed off their scraps and some even hitch a free ride. Consider the remora fish. It attaches itself to the host with a suction cup on its head. We don’t imagine you’ll be hosting a dinner party with a few remoras on the barbie any time soon. More than likely, it’ll be a snapper or kingfish. And guess what? They’re often found around sharks, so let’s get used to them. Chances are you won’t get to choose when you have your first encounter with a shark. The outcome depends on how you act. At first sight, your adrenaline will start pumping hard. When that happens, three things are important: • Stay calm • Maintain vision • Create a barrier

STAYING CALM

Staying calm begins with understanding the shark —

learning how to see the world through its eyes. In my experience, this is best done first-hand rather than via textbooks or videos. Sure, it’s easy to say that in the pages of The Captain, but trust me, remove the mystery and you’ll become fascinated with these magnificent creatures. Like cats, sharks’ eyes are extremely sensitive to light —10 times more sensitive than human eyes. And those nostrils aren’t for breathing, but for sniffing out prey. Good news is, the research boffins reckon sharks don’t interpret human blood as a potential food source. It does make sense that a 400-million-year-old predator hasn’t adapted to hunt something outside its environment. Put simply, for the majority of sharks, humans are too different from their normal diet to be considered a food source. See, you’re feeling calmer already. Another neat shark feature is its lateral line. Understand this and you’ll add a real edge to your spearfishing, especially with kingfish and schooling species. The lateral line is a series of sensory organs running down the length of the shark. They allow it to feel pressure changes in the water and aid schooling behaviour; helping the shark orientate itself and hone in on its prey. Sharks can hear low frequencies and this works in conjunction with the lateral line to track prey at distance. Another piece of shark trickery is electroreception, a biological ability to sense natural electrical stimuli. It’s particulalry useful in poor visibility, when the water is filthy or low light conditions. It’s believed to help them with long-distance travel, too.

www.thecaptain.tv

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“Chances are you won’t get to choose when you have your first encounter with a shark.” More good news is that your average human is much larger than a typical shark meal. For example, a bronze whaler’s biggest feed would probably be a large kingfish. Need more proof? I actually have trouble photographing sharks because 99 per cent of them are scared of me. Hopefully, you are now feeling super-chilled about close encounters of the shark kind.

MAINTAINING VISION

Sharks have good eyesight and they’re looking for cues that say, “prey!” Fortunately, humans don’t display such cues. If you’re watching the shark, it means you’re not behaving like food. That’s a good thing. Even if you can’t see it, but you know a toothy is around, pretend you can.

CREATING A BARRIER

An approaching shark can be an intimidating — OK, occasionally terrifying — experience. A spear prod to the nose will send it packing. The best way to defend is to hold the speargun by your side, halfway up the handle. This will give you more control if you feel the need to poke. If the shark happens to come close, or if you have a fish on your line that’s being eyeballed by Noah, then in my book it’s fine to jab the animal. I spear in areas where bronze whalers are prevalent and they can be bloody pests until you give them a hard jab. They soon get the message.

THE TAX MAN

We all know a fish struggling on the end of a spear is a shark attractant. It resembles all the cues sharks are looking for: blood, oil and vibrations in the water. Having fish taxed from your float line is something you’ll experience if you tow fish around for any length of time. It’s damn annoying, but they can also damage your float line or pull the gun out of your hands. It can be avoided if you use a float boat or plate to store your fish. Or minimise your time with fish on your float line. Another option is to run a steel fish thread off the back of your float, so any shark that wants to take fish will not damage your float line. If I see that a shark wants to take fish, I’ll posture toward the shark and try to jab it with my speartip. Often, though, they’ll hang around and look for another sneaky opportunity. If this is the case, you’ll need to swim the fish to the boat or tow a float boat.

SHARK SPORT

Sharks can be competitive, becoming aggressive with each other even over a small fish. My first bad experience involved a speared kingfish and two bronzies mauling the fish. One shark abandoned the kingfish and sped straight up to my dive buddy. It started ramming him and he fought it off with his unloaded gun, but then the other shark joined in, sending the first shark packing. After a short while, the second assailant turned tail. From this, I concluded sharks hype each other up and will act territorial around prey.

www.thecaptain.tv

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SPEAR SCIENCE

PRESSURE POINT: Should a shark close in on you, posture towards it, prepare to defend yourself and then get out of the water if it’s getting too hot in the kitchen. Unless you’re 100 per cent confident, avoid dirty water and low light — or perhaps use a float boat rather than a float line.

THE FIN FILES: 4 SHARK PROFILES

1

GREAT WHITES: THE AMBUSH PREDATOR

The great white has adapted to hunt mammals, so it’s best that humans avoid them. Their special skill is ambushing, spying prey from below, smelling and feeling the vibrations and bioelectrical disturbance with its lateral line sensors. These inputs fuel the sharks’ predatory instincts. This is why surfers very occasionally get attacked by whites — because they’re paddling in the whites’ hunting zone. I’ve seen footage from downward-facing cameras set up on fake seals towed behind boats off Gansbaai, in South Africa. The whites turned away from a breach attack at the very last second, the logical explanation being that some of the sharks realised the fake seal was not a food source – the fake seal wasn’t ticking enough of the boxes. It’s worth noting that great white attacks, though infrequent, are usually made by juvenile sharks with less experience.

2

BULL SHARKS: THE NASTY RAMMER

Bull sharks do have a nasty streak. Some people reckon they have more testosterone per kilogram than any other animal. Most bull shark fatalities and injuries have occurred in poor visibility — but in clear water, bull sharks still show aggressive and territorial behaviour toward spearos. The most common behaviour is charging or ramming, particularly when struggling fish are involved. Generally speaking, attacks are far less likely. Compared to a swimmer or surfer, a spearfisherman is submerged. We can use that to our advantage, identifying threats, posturing towards them and avoiding prey behaviour. Sharks may see us as just another competitor on the reef, as opposed to a prey animal, and this may be an explanation for why we can be on the receiving end of seemingly territorial behaviour, especially from bull sharks.

www.thecaptain.tv

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3

TIGER SHARK: THE GARBAGE COLLECTOR

The tiger shark is a large predator, willing to eat a large variety of food — crustaceans, fish, seals, birds, squid, turtles, sea snakes, rays, dolphins, sick and dead whales, and even smaller species of shark. They also have a reputation as a garbage collector, munching a variety of manmade objects. Tigers are second only to the great white in recorded attacks on people. Being such a large animal — with a reputation as an unfussy eater — is reason enough for a spearo to be diligent around tiger sharks, even though attacks and bites are rare. It is said tigers feed more actively at night and this is something to keep in mind if you’re diving at night or in fading light.

2

4

MAKOS: THE PROP MUNCHERS

Makos have a fierce reputation because they often bite outboard motors. This curious behaviour is often mistaken for aggression, but it’s apparently triggered by an ionic reaction between the shark’s electroreceptors and the metal on the motor. In my experience, this species is always very curious and I’ve never been on the end of any aggressive mako behaviour.

3

WHAT THE PROS DO

This is how an encounter between a pro spearo and shark will probably play out. The diver will descend and not be surprised to see a shark — no more so than a turtle or stingray. The spearo will remain calm, knowing negative encounters are few and far between. He’ll quickly identify the shark species, size and behaviour — all the time maintaining vision. If it’s a big, sluggish shark, they spearo will know it’s conserving energy. In most encounters, sharks will be calm and relaxed. Most divers report shark encounters as fascinating rather than fearful.

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cast away with justin duggan

TURN BACK TIME

Justin Duggan reminisces on his 10 favourite lures, as found in an oldschool tackle box. He reckons they’ll catch just as many fish now as they did back in the day.

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just found an old Plano tackle box in the garage. Cher is playing on the radio and I’m feeling rather nostalgic. As I untangle each rusty lure, the memories come flooding back. Each one has its own tale. McGrath Attack As a young sprog, I lived near a tackle store called Fishing Fanatic in the Sydney suburb of Ryde. Owner Dave Grieg gave me lots of advice, but one moment stands out. He pulled a lure off the shelf and asked, “Ever tried using one of these?” There, in a cardboard-backed, plastic zip bag was a pink and black McGrath Attack lure. “They’re easy to catch bream on, mate. Just go down to the river, throw it out and wind it back slowly,” he said, certainty in his voice. Taking his advice, I bolted down to the river and pegged that three-inch minnow into the murky Parramatta River. Instantly, I came up tight with a stud bream and was hooked. RMG Scorpion 35 Flathead couldn’t resist the RMG Scorpion 35. The key was a slow wind, keeping the bib bouncing on the sand. Arbogast Jitterbug The large Arbogast Jitterbug brings back memories of a steady retrieval, with a “plop, plop, plop” sound on the surface, followed by the “crash!” of a cod explosion. Paul Kneller Deception This model was a classic killer when fished around sunken timber. I often pulled it out on Glenbawn Dam or Lake St Clair in the Hunter Valley. Heddon Teeny Torpedo Speaking of bass, there were many great days stalking my local national parks with a twig-sized spin rod and a Heddon Teeny Torpedo. These fizzer-style top-water baits are as light as a feather, but tight-water creek bass would destroy them. The light spin stick required to throw these lures is no match for such snag-dwelling beasts — and the fizzing

“blurt” of the rear propeller is a sure-fire way to stir up and piss off an aggressive bass. Bibless Rattlesnake Digging further into the Plano I find the classic bibless, rattling, spot-style lure — I suspect it’s a copy of the original, made by Producer Lures. I caught a fingermark bream on one of these bad boys in the Kimberley. It still rivals the biggest I’ve seen. The internal rattle and vibration of these lures is as popular today as ever. A lift-and-fall retrieve will see the rod tip vibrate and any aggressive bottom dweller move in for the kill. At the bottom of the pile, I find a Rebel Crawfish. They were bream and bass classics. Then there’s a Tilsan Bass lure I used for fussier barra, and a LuhrJensen Hotlips, with its huge diving bib, which I trolled for jewfish with. And I can’t forget the old Mister Twister that’s since turned to jelly. It was one of my first soft plastics and accounted for many flathead. They still do. It begs the question. Should we revive some of these classics and give them another whirl? Hell, yes! The fish haven’t changed their tastes, only the anglers. The one thing that has improved is hook and split-ring technology, so take advantage of this and upgrade some of those older lures still sitting in the tackle box in the shed.

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JUSTIN’S TOP 10 OLD-SCHOOL LURES

1 Dan McGrath Attack 2 RMG Scorpion 35 3 Arbogast Jitterbug 4 Paul Kneller Deception 5 Heddon Teeny Torpedo 6 Producer bibless 7 Rebel Crawfish 8 Tilsan Bass 9 Luhr-Jensen Hotlips 10 Mister Twister

“It begs the question. Should we revive some of these classics and give them another whirl? Hell, yes!”

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Brrrrr!! with captain blackbeard

LIFE AS A CUSTOM ROD BUILDER

Captain Blackbeard shares his passion for building his custom CBB rods.

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y rod obsession began as a 14-year-old cabin boy working at Bohms Bait & Tackle shop in Narrabeen, NSW. As a grommet, I reckoned there’d be nothing better than building my own rod and catching a fish with it. I was right. CBB’s specialty is customising. Most of the requests I get are for custom snapper sticks, vertical jig sticks and popping sticks. In saying that, I’ve built rods to catch everything from bass to big game fish. One thing I pride myself on is that every rod is original. I personalise them with names, logos, colours and specific layouts of components and accessories. Hell, a customer even asked for some of my beard hair under the epoxy for good luck. I should’ve called that one the bearded clam! The build process starts with the rod blank and a list of components. Then I’ll do a static deflection test to determine the spine and bend in the rod. I start assembling at the butt, working my way forward to the reel seat and fore grip, followed by wrapping and epoxying the guides and tip. Then I crack a rum and wait for the epoxy to cure — it usually takes two or three rums. I love the art of it. It’s a totally therapeutic experience, watching the progression from start to finish. I’m always learning, too. Naturally, I fish with my own rods, constantly refining them on the biggest Seriola lalandi (yellowtail kingfish) I can find. Pound for pound, there’s no better bluewater brute.

@Captainblackbeard/CBB Instagram followers 43K @Captain Blackbeard Facebook followers 6K www.captainblackbeard.com.au

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“a customer even asked for some of my beard hair under the epoxy for good luck. I should’ve called that one the bearded clam!”

Mia, great meeting you last night. Want to join me for dinner on my boat? 12 sec ago

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ONCE YOU FEEL IT, YOU’LL NEVER BOAT WITHOUT IT. SCHEDULE A DEMO RIDE TODAY

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

Tribute

BRUCE

ALMIGHTY If John Haines Sr is the father of Australian monohulls then Bruce Harris surely owns the title for Australian cats

What’s more,

Bruce doesn’t owe anything to the Yank designers for his achievements — he did it all with good ol’ Aussie ingenuity, designing and building what would become Australia’s most legendary cat brand.

www.thecaptain.tv

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CA

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INâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PEO TA P P

WO R DS an d IM AGE S Th e C ap tai n , N i ck Wo o d , Gr an t S h o r l an d , B r u ce Har r i s

see the video at thecaptain.tv

www.thecaptain.tv

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

Tippy Willy: The Tippy Willy was Bruce’s first cat, built for his father in law. It proved highly capable as a shark netting boat, and so the legend was born.

TUNNEL OF LOVE: Bruce wasn’t the first to invent the cat, but probably the first to make it perform like it did thanks to the tunnel configuration and bottom modifications that came later.

FINE CHINE LINES: Bruce refined the concept with narrow bows to soften the ride and chines and strakes to create lift.

LIKE A CUT CAT: Jack Evans from Pet Porpoise Pool was one of the first to order a 17ft Shark Cat, used for collecting live samples.

www.thecaptain.tv

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I

n a sprawling, dusty yard in a Gold Coast suburb, the perfume of freshly cut hardwood, fibreglass and, er, honey wafts on the breeze. This is where The Captain finds Bruce Harris, father of the Shark Cat. He’s weaving his motorised scooter between beehives, past an old 18ft clinker hull and into a shed that’s home to a new 23ft prototype cat. It’s just had a spot of glass work finished and The Captain happily breathes in the familiar fragrance of Australian boat building. (Note: The Captain always inhales.) We manage to grab the handbrake on Bruce’s motorised scooter and put him into neutral just long enough to get him to tell his tale. His wife, Daphne, serves us hot tea, salad sandwiches cut neatly into triangles and a generous plate of Arnott’s Butternut Snaps — in between ferrying photo albums and filing cases. As Bruce slowly winds into the story, The Captain sensibly suggests, “We might need a few more cuppas to see us through.”

“I RECKONED I could build two hulls and put a plywood box on top. It turned out pretty good.” SHARKIE WATERS: Bruce earned the name “Sharkie” as a shark fisherman on the Gold Coast.

CAT OUT OF THE BAG — WHERE IT ALL BEGAN

In 1958, Sir Robert Menzies was prime minister and the FC Holden was Australia’s best-selling car. Bruce was a prawn fisherman in his early twenties, fishing out of Stockton Beach, just north of Newcastle on the New South Wales coast. One morning in May, he decided he’d had enough. It was snowing at Barrington Tops (100km away) and so cold he had to pluck his prawns underwater so his fingers wouldn’t freeze. So, at 4am the next day, his timber trawler loaded to the gunwales, he steamed out past Nobbys Head and headed north. Navigating old-school style, guided by paper charts and a compass, he didn’t stop until he got to Bundaberg in Queensland. Several days later, he was trawling for banana prawns. Fastforward a couple of years to 1962, and Bruce — with his dad, Ollie — scored the contract to shark net the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast, earning him the nickname “Sharkie”. One Xmas Bruce decided to build his father-in-law, Fred, a boat. How hard could it be? After all, he used to draw and build boats in the sand at the beach. Bruce picks up the story. “I used to watch the Quickcat sailing catamarans going in and out of the surf at Kirra, on the Gold Coast and reckoned I could build two hulls and put a plywood box on top. It turned out pretty good. Fred rejected it at first, but after he put his little 5HP Johnson outboard on it and went out in the water he came round. My daughter saw me building it under the house and said, ‘Dad, it looks like a tippy willy’. So we called it the Tippy Willy.”

www.thecaptain.tv

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“Everyone used to say, ‘Here comes Sharkie’s cat’, so I decided that’s what I’d call it.”

LOOK WHAT THE CAT DRAGGED IN — BRUCE PUTS TIPPY WILLY TO WORK

“One day my trawler broke down,” Bruce continues. “A mate said, ‘I’ve got a 20HP outboard here, how about we put it on the Tippy Willy?’ I wasn’t sure, as I’d never even been in a speedboat — and there was no breakwater back then just a sandbar. Anyway, we put it on and realised how much easier it was to pull the shark nets in. It used to take me two and a half hours to steam out at eight knots from Coolangatta to the Gold Coast, but I could do it in 40 minutes in the Tippy Willy.” Bruce saw the potential in the new tub and put some of his design instincts to work. “I realised how good it was, but it didn’t have a proper front on it. I also realised it wasn’t strong enough — it was only built out of quarter-inch marine ply — so I decided to build a glass boat.” There was one small problem — Bruce had never built a boat from glass before. That didn’t stop him. “I walked into a boat-building factory down the coast and had a look around. The owner wasn’t too happy, told me if I didn’t get out he was going to boot me out, but I found out how it was done. So then I made a mould out of Masonite under my house and built my first Shark Cat. Everyone used to say, ‘Here comes Sharkie’s cat’, so I decided that’s what I’d call it.” Bruce says it was pretty slow going at first on the boat-building front. “It wasn’t right, it was a bit wet. I finished up cutting the mould about six times to get the right shape before I built one I was happy with. I had no intention of going into it (production), but Queensland Department of Harbours and Marine wanted a boat for survey work in the surf. I told them I’d lend them the mould, but they wanted me to build it. So we got into it and it just took off.” And so the Shark Cat business was born. The boat attracted interest from the boating media after respected boat tester Peter Webster took a ride and gave it a glowing review. Then the business really took off. “Air Sea Rescue, Fisheries, Police and Coast Guard got interested — I was the first training leader for the Queensland Coast Guard. Then the abalone blokes and professional fisherman started using them — I think half the abalone boats are still in the industry.” At the peak of production, Bruce had 42 people working for him, building two boats a week, with a waiting time of nine months. He sold a few to Americans. “They were all grey,” Bruce recalls. “I was a bit suspicious — I think they were going into the drug trade.”

AT THE HELM: Bruce (left) skippering the shark trawler with deckie, Tom Crean.

www.thecaptain.tv

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WORKING CLASS CATS: Bruce built boats for Harbours & Marine, Water Police, Navy, Air Sea Rescue, Fisheries, drilling rigs, Coast Guard, TV networks, passenger transport, marine shows, commercial operators and the recreational ďŹ shing sector.

www.thecaptain.tv

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS 18-FOOTER: The 18ft model featured clinker sides for strength and to save weight.

23-FOOTER: A basic 23ft model would set you back $10,589 back in the day.

www.thecaptain.tv

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CAT AMONG THE PIGEONS — BRUCE DOES IT HIS WAY

“I wasn’t the first to invent the cat,” Bruce says. “But probably the first to make it perform like it did. Earlier catamarans never had enough clearance above the water and pounded badly.” The main deck on a Shark Cat sits about a foot above the waterline, trapping an eight-inch deep pocket in the tunnel. When the pocket is filled with air and water (vapour) it creates a cushioning effect. The boffins tell us air on its own can’t be compressed in this environment — and water on its own is too hard to compress, but mix the two and you’re floating like Bob Marley at the One Love Peace Concert. The hull lands on tapered sections nine inches wide, opening to 18 inches when fully submerged. The Shark Cat occupies about half the water surface area as a monohull. This displacement helps with the low planing speeds and efficiency cats are renowned for. Shark Cats proved a big hit with the professional fishing industry. They could travel at high speed in open seas, carrying 3000lb of payload and up to 1000L of fuel. They also offered twin motors for safety and selfdraining decks with huge scuppers should they cop a big green wave. Bruce credits his racing days for design refinements that included wider planks, extra chines and flared bows. Effectively, he was his own on-water R&D department. “The beauty about racing was I could work out how to make them go faster,” Bruce says, cracking a fat grin as he recalls his go-fast days. “The monohulls with planks were getting up and going very, very fast, so I put a big plank below my boat. It was a lot faster, but it was a lot harder running. I could get away with it with my 18ft boat, but on the 20ft it wasn’t real good. So I took the plank off and made it a round bottom shape, using a length of four-inch galvanised pipe. I put more little chines up the front, which made so much difference, and I flared the bow —for the simple reason that when I went into a wave the flare would throw the water clear and give a lot more lift. None of the cat builders today have got that flare in the front compared to what I had back then.” In the ’70s, Bruce knocked out three or four 18ft models for every big boat he built. Inspired by Cruise Craft, he put a clinker configuration into the sidewalls of the 18-footer, making the boats lighter and stronger. He also built a split mould for the 20/23-footer. This was designed to increase the waterline beam a couple of inches without blowing out the beam at the gunwales. The final hulls were joined and capped with rubber or aluminium. The 20-footers were pulled out of the same mould as the 23ft after they were blocked off.

“mix the two you’re floating like Bob Marley at the One Love Peace Concert. ”

LAYING THE DECK: Boxes are used to weight the floor down after affixing to the deck beams. www.thecaptain.tv

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

CAT ON A HOT, TIN ROOF — GETTING THE BEST OUT OF THE CAT

don’t know, hard turns aren’t a big cat’s strong point). Bruce draws a patient breath. “You’ve got to get used to turning with a cat. They lay out on turns whereas a normal (monohull) boat lays in. If you haven’t been in one when it starts to lay out, yaaaaaww!” Bruce is now leaning a fair way to the right in his chair, a wry smile on his face. “Once you’re used to it, no worries. The secret to driving a Shark Cat is the trim. Say the seas are coming on your port side — you have to trim the portside motor up and trim your starboard motor down. You’ve got to get used to the idea that if you lift your portside engine you’ll be lifting your starboard bow up — and vice versa. The best way to set up a Shark Cat is to have it heavier at the back than the front. They’re two narrow fronts and perform best by lifting out of the water and coming back into it slowly. The air under the hull helps this action.”

We’re onto our second plate of Butternut Snaps by now, and Bruce can practically smell the two-stroke, so we ask him to describe the ride in one of his boats. “To hop into a Shark Cat, particularly if you haven’t been in one before, it’s the most wonderful feeling, Bruce says. “To feel the response of the big motors on the back, you just give it to it and the boat gets straight up on the plane and you’re floating on top of the water. There’s no hitting hard — the air gets underneath, especially running into the wind. We’d get on top of the bar with the waves breaking under us, and just gun it off. She’d fly through the air — always stern-first — and then you’d be on top of the next wave that’d already cracked. I loved being in the boat.” “What about sharp turns around the buoys, Bruce?” The Captain asks with a smug grin (for those who

“We’d get on top of the bar with the waves breaking under us, and just gun it off.”

www.thecaptain.tv

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SLIPPERY SKIPPERS: Bruce won the Class 3 category at the 1978 Pacific 1000 Offshore Powerboat race from Cairns to Southport. He achieved the feat, despite being 30 minutes late to the start line in one leg, after blowing a motor.

www.thecaptain.tv

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

PETER NOONAN’S CAT (LEFT): The New Formula Shark Cat, built by Bruce and skippered by Peter Noonan could do 70mph (112km/h).

“I’m not a bloke who puts his trophies up, I just considered myself lucky to be racing.”

SHARKIE’S CAT: Bruce’s dedicated racing boat — the 28ft Sharkie’s Cat towed behind a motorhome that he built on a Leyland body.

CAT’S WHISKERS — BRUCE’S FAVOURITE

“What’s your favourite Shark Cat, Bruce?” queries The Captain — a question Bruce is often asked. “I always liked the 20-footer with the round bottom and double chine,” Bruce says. “I came first in the Sydney to Newcastle in ‘72, racing in the 200 cubic inch class against John Haines in his needlenose Haines Hunter Formula. We were up there on a couple of stools, laughing — averaging about 50mph with the twin 100HP Mercurys. It could do 62mph in calm water.” Bruce confesses to having had some nonregulation ballast on board. “I’d done the shark run from Burleigh Heads to Tweed before we left. When I got to Sydney there were still shark fins and part of a shark net on board. The scrutineer was horrified by the smell!” Only two boats beat him into Newcastle, both 36-footers. Bruce knew the area well from his prawning days, running close to the shore in the rough conditions with the strong sou’westerly blowing.

RACING DAYS: Bruce built a 32ft racing cat with Tony Low, featuring four 200HP outboards, winning the Pacific 1000.

CUT CAT — BRUCE TAKES THE WORLD TITLE

Bruce eventually built a dedicated racing boat — the 28ft Sharkie’s Cat. “It couldn’t be beaten,” he says. “I had four 175HP motors on it and we could do 85–90mph. I won the world title in 1980, just ran away with it. I really liked that boat. We built a 32ft cat with Tony Low. He put four 200HP motors on it and we won the Pacific race from Cairns to Southport.” Despite Bruce’s racing success, there’s no air of arrogance. In fact, there’s not a trophy in sight. They’d probably just take up space he needs for his homemade honey operation. Nevertheless, we put the question: “Where’s the trophy cabinet, Bruce?” “I’m not a bloke who puts his trophies up, I just considered myself lucky to be racing,” says the humble cat whisperer. “I won the world title and they gave me a goddess or something. I brought it home, unscrewed the head and threw it in the bin, just kept the wooden end. I’m a Christian and I wouldn’t have that goddess in my house.”

www.thecaptain.tv

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

www.thecaptain.tv

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COVER GIRL: Bruce bashfully shared this brochure from back in the day.

SCAREDY CATS — FLIPPING OUT

Cats do have their detractors, some of them ignorant moderators of monohull fan pages, wilfully blind to the legacy cats have earned in the Australian and world racing scenes — as well as in service with the emergency services and in commercial industries. Bruce acknowledges the stigma, noting some cats have perpetuated the myth. “The biggest mistake most people make is that they don’t make them (cats) full enough in the front, and they don’t make the chines come up,” says Bruce. “Going into a sea, you’ve got to have a boat that wants to lift, but if they’re too sharp, all they want to do is go into the wave. The Shark Cat has a ski in the front and two to three-inch chines either side, and as soon as it goes into the wave it wants to lift.” When pressed on models he thinks tarnish the cat name, Bruce sighs, but won’t dob in any brands. “A bloke in the Air Sea Rescue asked me if I would teach him how to drive another cat that was being built in NSW and I said I would. Anyway, in calm waters with a wave going past, I went to do a turn and it scared the heck out of me. The bow just went into the wave and kept going down. There was nothing to get it up, just a straight vee, no chines. I rang the bloke that built them and told him, ‘You’re going to give cats a bad name’. He went crook at me, said I didn’t know what I was talking about, but now he’s gone out of business. I’d say he didn’t go out in his own boat — just wanted them to look pretty.”

SPAT CAT: This racing cat called Cedar Lake flipped inside the surf zone on a Pacific 1000 race. According to Bruce he wasn’t paying attention. The skipper survived, but sadly, later died in a helicopter accident.

www.thecaptain.tv

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

RIGGED AND READY: This 30ft working cat was fitted with twin Volvo diesel stern drives and hired by the drilling rigs for X-raying underwater gas lines. Grant Shorland Sr was skipper.

DEAD CAT BOUNCE — BRUCE’S KEEPS BUILDING

In his heyday, Bruce would be up at 4am. “I’d change the baby’s nappy, give her to Daphne and wouldn’t see her until 7 o’clock that night. She thinks I’m a bit of a workaholic. That’s why I sold the Shark Cat business — I promised Daphne a trip to Europe.” Bruce never numbered his boats, but estimates there must be around 1000 cats with his fingerprints on them. That figure doesn’t include the Shark Catbranded cats that were built after Bruce sold — including some models branded Noosa Cat. We ask Bruce how he feels when he sees a Noosa Cat. “It makes me feel very good to see them. They’re a bit different to what I did. Some of the bottoms of the 18 are still the same, but the tops are much more refined and look very nice.” After the sale, Bruce started building a 9m roundbilged monohull called a Cuddles Cruiser. “That turned out to be a very good business. I sold a lot of them — mainly 30- and 35-footers. Then I sold up that business and thought I’d retire. But I was getting bored, so I built myself a marina at Coomera (later to become The Boat Works). Bruce also started a houseboat business, selling and hiring them out of his Coomera base. He fitted them with hydraulic Yamaha motors on the roof so they wouldn’t get wet. And Bruce kept on building boats, including a 60ft cat with a 26ft beam in which he took the family cruising around the Whitsundays for four months. One 30ft model, fitted with twin Volvo diesel stern-drives, was rented to a gas corporation that used it to survey underwater pipes. “It was skippered by Grant Shorland from Mallacoota (see issue #10 for Grant’s story),” Bruce says. “They must have paid him a lot because he was one of the top abalone divers in Australia.” Bruce admits that he finds it hard to stop building boats. “I’m only 80 years of age — all I know is boats. I haven’t had another job in my life. Even when I retired, I built boats, including party pontoons that are still operating in Lakes Entrance.” They feature a forward folding entry that Bruce designed for easy access. He still has the mould and has plans to sell it, lamenting that he can’t build it himself. Mobility is an issue for Bruce these days, after a car accident that partially crushed his legs. The love of boats has never left him. He still draws boats, mainly fishing boats and trawlers. “These old wooden boats, they talk to me.” Now beehives take up most of his time, producing Bruce’s delicious Harris Honey. “I make creamed honey and ginger creamed honey. People love it so much and it gives me something to do. I give a lot of it away.” Having persuaded Bruce to part with a couple of jars for testing purposes, The Captain can verify it’s a good brew, especially the creamed honey.

“I’m only 80 years of age, all I know is boats. I haven’t had another job in my life.”

www.thecaptain.tv

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GUN FOR HIRE: Bruce built, sold and hired houseboats from his Coomera base (seen on the right).

PARTY PONTOON (LEFT): The forward-opening party pontoons are still operating out of Lakes Entrance, Victoria. BELOW: This hull sat under a 60ft cat with a 28ft beam. Bruce sailed with his family to the Whitsunday Islands for four months. It was called Jilliandra after their kids, Jill, Ian and Sandra.

www.thecaptain.tv

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IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

ALL IN THE FAMILY: Bruce’s brother built this Shark Can inspired cat out of beer cans, winning the beer can regatta in Darwin.

NEW GENERATION SHARK CAT: This 23ft prototype is under development by Bruce’s son, Ian, in Bruce’s shed.

MORE THAN ONE WAY TO SKIN A CAT — THE HARRIS FAMILY LEGACY

Bruce’s son, Ian, designed his own cat, which now sits in Bruce’s shed. It features a stepped racing bottom and the top decks of an old Markham Whaler. “It’s called New Generation Shark Cat. “You might see them on the market one day”, Bruce says. Ian certainly has the genes — and the chops — to do it. He currently builds and repairs racing boats for Bill Barry Cotter at Maritimo. He’s not ready to throw in the towel just yet. Bruce’s brother also joined the boat-building scene for a while. His rig didn’t have quite the same prestige or seaworthiness as Bruce’s boats — being made out of beer cans — although the Shark Cat resemblance is uncanny. But he continued the Harris winning ways, taking out a beer can regatta in Darwin. Bruce Harris, The Captain salutes you. In fact, we just made you our inaugural Immortal Captain.

“It’s called New Generation Shark Cat. “You might see them on the market one day”. www.thecaptain.tv

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» 2 X GAFF / TAG POLE HOLDERS

» 25 YEAR DECAL

» 2 X TALON MOUNTS

» KNIFE BLOCK HOLDER ON CUTTING BOARD

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» EXTRA ROD HOLDERS ON CUTTING BOARD

» TOWEL HOOKS ON REAR BULKHEAD

» REEF PICK HOLDER ON BOW RAIL

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OVER TWENTY FIVE YEARS STRONG

27/11/18 3:27 pm


IMMORTAL CAPTAIN: BRUCE HARRIS

CAT’S TALE — A BRUCE HARRIS/ SHARK CAT TIMELINE

1937

Bruce Robert Harris born in Singelton, NSW to Ollie and Monica Harris. Bruce is the youngest of five kids, including two pairs of twins, all born within six years.

1958

Skippers a 38ft trawler, built in Norah Heads by Reg Massey, from Port Stephens to Bundaberg. Navigates with paper charts and a compass.

1969

Builds a shed on 1.2ha in Labrador, originally used to lay out his shark nets. Develops the 20ft model.

1962

Bruce and his dad, Ollie, score the joint contract to shark net the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast, earning him the nickname “Sharkie”. Bruce says, “Dad was the best mate I ever had.”

1972

Wins his first Sydney to Newcastle race in a 20-footer. When Bruce arrived in Sydney there were still shark fins and part of a shark net on board.

1964

Marries Daphne Stahmer at Southport Methodist Church, saying “She had no say in it — God gave her to me. We’ve been married 53 years and I’m a very, very lucky man.”

1975

Bruce figures the 16-footer is too narrow so builds an 18ft clinker-sided version. Build cost is the same, but they sell for much more. Also tests planked bottom.

1978

Sells the Shark Cat business for about $250,000 (worth about $1m in today’s terms) to Jim Anderson. It is acquired by NoosaCat in 1990.

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1965

As a gift for his father in law, Bruce builds the Tippy Willy. It’s 16ft long, built from 8ft x 4ft quarter-inch plywood sheets. The Tippy Willy is put to work when his trawler breaks down, proving a winner on the seas.

Mid-LATE ’70s

Develops the 23-footer. Bruce is now building two boats per week with more than 40 staff, running two 18ft moulds and one 23ft mould.

1967

Builds a 17ft mould (and boat) under his house at Biggera Waters. Uses it for shark netting off the Gold Coast. Gets first customers, including Harbours and Marine. Later builds a 16ft version.

BRUCE’S NOTABLE RACE WINS

1977

Won five class 3 Aus. titles Won two class 2 Aus. titles Won class 1 Aus. title Won class 2 world championship

Builds a split mould for the 20/23, increasing the waterline beam without blowing out the beam at the gunwales.

1981

Builds the first marina at Coomera, called Gold Coast Holidays Afloat. In 2000 it would become The Boat Works.

2012

Starts farming honey.

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Sticker

Out now !

‘em up! The Captain’s stickers are here. Not just cool, they’re practically a layer of carbon for your boat, car or family pet. Every sticker is designed by a dishonorably discharged naval architect while drinking gin on a pacific island, with a ukelele playing in the background. Oh, they’re also made from weather-proof vinyl.

GO TO: www.thecaptain.tv/shop CAP13p024_FEATURE_BRUCE ALMIGHTY.indd 44

27/11/18 3:27 pm


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SKIRT ALERT! SUBSCRIBE TODAY AND YOU’LL GET: - A 24-month subscription to The Captain (8 issues) - A Deadly Tide cut-face skirted lure - “The Captain” badge sticker

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ABOUT DEADLY TIDES LURES

Deadly Tide Lures was the brainchild of Clinton Bush, from Merimbula on the New South Wales south coast. He’s travelled from one side of Australia to the other in search of fish. As a teenager, he’d head out from Walkerville, in south-east Victoria, in a busted old Shark Cat — running a 90HP on the port side and 115HP on the starboard. Every year, he’d travel to Broome, buy a boat from the local yard and go looking for pelagics, selling the battle-weary boat at the end of the trip. Clinton eventually bought his own 5m Quinny, exploring the offshore reefs from South West Rocks to the Whitsundays. He upgraded to a 2200 Yalta Craft and now often fishes solo — and successfully — from his home port of Merimbula, up to Bermagui and down to Mallacoota. He rates former Merimbula skipper Bruce Libbis, who skippered Rathlin for more than 20 years, as his mentor. Clinton fishes more than 100 days a year and has put all his experience into practice developing his own Deadly Tide range of lures. After fishing his way around Australia he knew what he wanted in his lures. The Deadly Tide line-up includes 10 skirts, poppers and jigs. He also makes his own dredge teasers from scratch. Each model is rigorously tested before making its way into the range, often with several prototypes. The components are sourced from all around the world, including split rings from America and hooks from Hong Kong and Japan. Clinton personally rigs each skirted lure (if you ask him nicely) or popper, distributing to more than a dozen countries. The best result, that he knows of, was eight marlin on a single lure in a single day — as well as a billfish grand slam.

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES: HAGGERSTONE ISLAND

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Every sea captain dreams of their own remote tropical island — with accessories like a jungle cabin adorned with hunting spoils and a twin-rigged, high-powered vessel. Well, one couple is living the dream. In his infinite wisdom, The Captain reckoned no-one could tell the tale of this desert island idyll better than a beautiful, long-legged Californian with sun-kissed locks. Welcome aboard Alli Ficarra.

WO R D S A lli F ica r r a IM AG E S The Capt a in

see the video at thecaptain.tv

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES: HAGGERSTONE ISLAND

HIGHWAY TO HAGGERSTONE To get to Haggertsone Island, you have

H

aggerstone is the secret island we dream about on rainy days in the urban jungle. It sits far beyond the edge of the civilised world, 600km north of Cairns off the Cape York Peninsula. The crystal-clear water glistens in the sun as we pull into the blue lagoon. Jack Murphy from The Captain’s crew is by my side, his eyes hidden behind polarised Mako sunglasses, tracking coral fish as they dart among the reefs surrounding the lagoon. The twin 400HP diesel Cummins powering our immaculate ride idles back to a low thrum. We’re greeted by Roy and Anna Turner, who arrived on the island 30 years ago, hitting Haggerstone’s white sand beach in a 70-tonne barge loaded with timber, fruit trees, chickens and an old tractor. Roy is a former rock’n’roll muso and crocodile hunter. His salt levels are pretty high and I’m sure I spot a few barnacles hanging off his extremities. Anna is his graceful island goddess, exuding style. Together, they’ve created a tropical oasis. All the buildings are Roy’s work, resembling something out of The Swiss Family Robinson. Six handcrafted, freeform escapes are tastefully hidden away in the jungle, each with their own style and structure. Ours is the Kwilla Hut, set in the jungle fringing the beach. Its PNG-inspired style features open sides, wide verandahs and ocean views that could melt Instagram. But it’s the main building that really grabs my imagination — giant crocodile heads, croc skins, antiques, old books and pottery. Each piece tells a chapter of Roy and Anna’s life. There’s no itinerary on Haggerstone Island, you can do whatever you want. It’s a tropical wish list — from exploring shipwrecks, hiking to the top of the island or jet skiing in the blue lagoons, to snorkelling the Great Barrier Reef, beachcombing for WWII artefacts and, of course, fishing. Naturally, we’ll need a boat.

to pass through Cairns. It’s next to the Daintree, one of the oldest surviving tropical rainforests in the world. We hired a Toyota Prado with rooftop tent from Australian 4WD Hire, saw crocodiles in their natural habitat and spotted an endangered cassowary prancing around. Jack suggested I brush up on my casting technique and stick-bait twitching before entering the big leagues on Haggerstone. So we ventured to Hooka-Barra fishing farm, where the odds were well in our favour. They have more than 1500 barramundi stocked in a small pond. We spent the day hauling barra up the muddy banks and I finally appreciated the appeal of fishing, as my adrenaline pumped and blood lust boiled. Yep, I was hooked. From Cairns, we boarded a twin-prop, six-seat aircraft and cruised 600km north along the Cape York Peninsula. It’s largely uninhabited, but oh so striking, especially from the air. My fear of flying was definitely tested as we approached a dirt airstrip on neighbouring Hicks Island — which could’ve been mistaken for a neglected backyard garden. After wiping the sweat from our brows and patting the pilot on the back, we piled into an old red Suzuki Swift and headed for the water. Destination: Haggerstone, 6km away.

DYNAMIC DUO: Roy and Anna Turner arrived at Haggerstone 30 years ago and have been building their tropical oasis ever since.

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“ALL THE BUILDINGS ARE ROY’S WORK, RESEMBLING SOMETHING OUT OF THE SWISS FAMILY ROBINSON.”

CRIKEY, MATE: In earlier years, Roy hunted crocs in Papua New Guinea. Old habits still die hard.

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES: HAGGERSTONE ISLAND

CORAL COAST CRUISER

The boat porn on remote island getaways can often be a letdown. Wobbly banana boats with a couple of coconuts sloshing in the bilge are par for the course. Not on Haggerstone. Roy and Anna run a custom 40ft platey built by Rob Goode from Coral Coast Marine Construction. Perfectly suited to fishing the tropics, she maintains the high level of comfort expected by fussy customers. A large sunshade covers the handcrafted hardwood rigging bench and food-service area. The full walk-around configuration is perfect for casting big lures, while the luscious teak decking in the cabin and cockpit stops punters from falling arse over tit when slippery longtail tuna hit the decks — which happens frequently. It has oodles of refrigeration for stowing red emperor and a three-burner cooktop for fry-ups, but Roy’s favourite feature is the hydraulic windlass, inspired by a cray-lifting bucket he saw in Western Australia. Under the hood are twin 400HP diesel Cummins powering Hamilton Jets. Yep, this baby can turn on a dime. Having the jets is particularly handy when navigating tight

rivers in search of barra and jacks — as well as travelling in shallow water at high speed. Roy doesn’t flinch as he flies across the sand flats in 50cm of water at 20 knots. We flinch a lot. The jets are also handy for loading passengers off the beach, which happens daily on Haggerstone. Roy says the boat is an all-weather option, cruising comfortably at 18 knots even when there’s a 25-knot sou’easter on the nose. She burns 4.5L of diesel per nautical mile, the 1400L fuel tank delivering a whopping range for extended fishing missions.

ALLI’S ADVENTURES Don’t let the photos fool you. I’m

deathly afraid of flying, scared of sharks and the thought of seeing crocodiles in real life makes my skin crawl. This was the chance to overcome some of my worst fears at once — set against a backdrop of turquoise water, white sand and rustic jungle abodes. Check out Alli‘s adventures on: Instagram @allificarra

“ROY AND ANNA RUN A CUSTOM 40FT PLATEY BUILT BY ROB GOODE FROM CORAL COAST MARINE CONSTRUCTION.”

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(TOP) MACKEREL MAYHEM: Catching Spanish mackerel off Haggerstone is easier than popping to the shops for milk.

(BELOW LEFT) HORSES FOR COURSES: Twin 400HP diesel Cummins power Hamilton Jets, handy for navigating through shallow water.

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES: HAGGERSTONE ISLAND

“SEE ALL THOSE BIRDS? THAT’S WHERE THE LONGTAIL TUNA ARE FEEDING”, HE SAYS.

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THIS ONE’S A LONG TALE: All puns aside, the fishing is spectacular. All you need to bring is a funky pair of shorts and a smile from ear to ear.

TIME TO GO FISHING

I slip a strip of mackerel bait onto the 6/0 suicide hook and lower the 200lb handline into the water. I’m busy wondering where I’ll wipe my oily hands when the line strips through my fingers. I heave back with all my strength. With the fish in sight, I scream for someone to help me. One final haul and a sea monster flops onto the deck — possibly the biggest orange goldfish in the world. Jack identifies it as a large mouth nannygai, tipping the scales at 60lb. I’m in awe, dumbstruck by the size of it. Jack insists I slide my hands into its gills so he can take a trophy photo for The Captain. “Look natural”, he says, but I feel about as natural as a sea turtle on an ice-skating rink. After the photo op, we head to a nearby island to anchor and cook up lunch on the boat. Roy fries red emperor in his

homemade beer batter, pairing it with a locally sourced olive oil and fresh basil leaf dip. Our deckhand jumps off the boat to pluck some fresh oysters off nearby rocks. We soak the sweet and buttery treats, listening to Roy share stories of past encounters with the local crocodiles.

TUNA TORMENT

Jack points to the horizon. “See all those birds? That’s where the longtail tuna are feeding”, he says. Naturally, I’m excited. After all, I’d made Jack haul a slab of bluefin tuna for days on our last trip on the south-west coast of Victoria. My newfound mission: a longtail tuna. But the odds are stacked against me. Our fellow passengers are floppy-hatted holidaymakers, exhausted from a day of beachcombing. However, with some smooth sweet-talking, I manage to convince Roy to

VERSATILE VESSEL: Roy and Anna’s custom 40-footer carries up to 12 passengers and is just as capable up the creeks, as it is on the outer reef.

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES: HAGGERSTONE ISLAND

steer off course and track the birds. I grab my spin rod and cast a metal lure at the marauding school, retrieving at lightning speed across the surface. After several casts, I come up tight. My rod is bent and the battle is on. The power and speed surprise me — I have to use my entire body to keep the rod bent, jamming it into my thigh for leverage. Again, I yell to Jack for help, but he’s fighting a longtail on the other side of the boat. The deckie comes running, tightening the drag. Then, “snap!” Like a genie out of a bottle, my tuna wins its freedom. I rig up another metal slug and within minutes am bent up again. This time I’ll do it myself. Slowly and patiently I subdue the finny terrorist. A beautiful 25lb longtail tuna is next to the boat, silver sides and rich blue fins shimmering in the afternoon light. Then “bang!” The water turns blood-red as a huge whaler shark explodes from the depths, tearing my tuna to pieces with rows of razorsharp teeth. I let rip with a few profanities in my loud American accent, no doubt offending everyone on board. I hear Roy say, “If we don’t leave now the tide will be too low to get back on the island”. But it’s all just white noise. My blood lust is up and the tuna are still feeding on the surface. I tie on another metal lure and fire it past the floppy hats into the frothing water. I hook up, fight and finally land my first longtail tuna. Hours later, I’m gleefully dipping my freshly caught tuna into soy sauce and grated wasabi root. To our fellow passengers who trudged over the coral reef at low tide carrying lumps of fresh tuna: I’m sorry (not sorry) for the inconvenience.

(TOP) PAYING THE TAX MAN: A whaler shark chomped Paul’s trevally boat-side.

“I YELL TO JACK FOR HELP, BUT HE’S FIGHTING A LONGTAIL ON THE OTHER SIDE OF THE BOAT.”

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES: HAGGERSTONE ISLAND

VISIT HAGGERSTONE ISLAND (07) 4060 3399;

TINGLING TASTE BUDS

www.haggerstoneisland.com.au Email: info@haggerstoneisland.com.au

With sashimi cravings sated and taste buds tingling, I set my sights on new quarry. Over the next few days we chase toothy Spanish mackerel, mangrove jack, huge red emperor and more large mouth nannygai. Rumour has it that Haggerstone is also home to painted crayfish. The kitchen puts in a special request to bring some back for dinner. So Roy sails 10 nautical miles to a spot where, a few days earlier, he’d caught “so many crays they had to stop pulling them in”. I just have to overcome my shark phobia. Our deckhand is an attractive blonde, who’s getting uncomfortably close to Jack in the water, so I have to make a move. I slip into the blue, speargun by my side. We discover some crustaceans that are quickly dispatched for lunch. Although sweet and tasty they’re not a patch on my tuna.

GOLDFISH WRANGLING

The utter remoteness of Haggerstone makes this the quintessential desert island fantasy. It’s the perfect balance between living on the edge and living large — with unique accommodation, every meal beautifully cooked and prepared, and friendly staff. Not to mention world-class fishing. I’d say the trip was a big win for facing my fears, and although I don’t think I’m ready to wrestle crocodiles just yet, but I’ll take down a 60lb goldfish any day.

CANDICE GETS CRAYZEE: Candice the deckie snaffled this painted crayfish for lunch — de-lish!

KILLER CREW: Left to right: Jeremy, Michelle, Paul, Coral, George, Alli, Aaron, Jack and Georgie.

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AT F E A BO T RE

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INSANE INSTALLS: STABIS STORM THE STATES

WO R D S a nd IMAG ES by T he Capt a in

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The Captain’s crew is in Garibaldi, Oregon, on the US Pacific Northwest coast — on a trio of stabicrafts

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

Garibaldi, Oregon

“Er, g’day mate, this is The Captain from Australia. Can you take us fishing?” we mumble down the phone.”

v twww.thecaptain.tv . n i a t p a c e h t .w w w

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T

he Captain’s crew is in Garibaldi, Oregon, on the US Pacific Northwest coast. Huge mountain ranges covered in tall timber peer over the rugged coastline. Icy rivers meander out to bays where creaking timber trawlers and newer steel ones are docked side-by-side like old draught horses, taking respite before their next offshore stint hauling tuna and crab from the Pacific. The two major industries are timber milling and fishing, but tourists also come to Garibaldi in search of the legendary Big Foot, rumoured to live deep in the lush fir forests. However, it’s the fishing we’ve come to investigate. The salmon run is on and recreational fishermen are milling about the bay in open tinnies, many of them tiller-steer. They’re also pulling crab pots and nuzzling into the shores to collect clams. We reckon it’s the perfect habitat for wheelhouse game boats, suitable for bay fishing, but with the capability of mingling with the commercial fishing fleet hunting tuna and albacore. Kiwi boat builder Stabicraft thinks so, too. They’ve been making a huge dent in the Pacific Northwest boat market since launching here more than 20 years ago. We’d called our man at Stabicraft to see if he could organise us a local ride. He’d given us the numbers of three Stabicraft owners — John Files, Scott Sayer and David Larson. All we had to do was convince these guys it was a good idea to let some Australian blokes they’d never met jump aboard their boats and catch their fish. Oh, and we’d need some comfortable beds. It went a bit like this: “Er, g’day mate, this is The Captain from Australia. Can you

take us fishing?” we mumble down the phone. “Hello? No, I’m sorry, we’re not looking to change internet providers at the moment. Thanks for your call,” comes the response. Several confused phone calls and emails later, we finally persuade the three Americans to show us a slice of Oregon — and give us a ride aboard their Stabicrafts.

GOOD OL’ AMERICAN HOSPITALITY

It’s a long and sweaty slog across the Pacific before we touch down at Portland International at 10pm. The plan is to meet John Files’ wife, Julie, at a little farm they own near the airport. By the time we arrive, it’s well past midnight, but Julie opens the door with a welcoming smile. After making us tea, she ushers us to our rooms, saying, “You boys need anything, y’all don’t hesitate to ask, OK?” Now, we’ve stayed in some interesting places during our travels, but the jet lag mixed with shag pile carpet, embroidered pillows and crocheted doonas makes us wonder if we’ve travelled back in time. It doesn’t matter — we’re snoring in less than a minute. We’d planned a lay day to recover from the flight and check out some of the cool cafe culture Portland is famous for. The region is one of the most progressive in the US, with legalised same-sex marriage and pot smoking par for the course. But Julie isn’t having a bar of it. At 8am, she charges in to our room, “Wakey, wakey boys! Time to get moving.” Before we can prise the sleep from our eyes, she’s made breakfast and handed us printed instructions on how to get to the fishing shack. “Let’s get moving, got to beat the traffic!” The Captain’s breakfast reefer will have to wait.

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

THE FISHING SHACK

The fishing shack is a few hours from Portland in the coastal town of Rockaway Beach. It’s a hot spot for salmon and tuna, and John and Julie keep a Stabicraft 2750 Centrecab berthed at Garibaldi Marina. Julie proudly parades her adopted Aussies around the dock like a couple of celebrities. By the time we reach the shack, we’ve met the entire town — and are ready for another siesta. Just as we lie down on the quilt-covered beds, Julie hollers, “You boys can’t go to sleep, it’s happy hour and friends are coming over.” In the living room, we’re amazed to see more than a dozen faces glued to a TV screen watching The Captain videos. “Well, this is embarrassing,” we splutter. “The Aussies are awake everyone, come say hi!” Julie announces. The last reliable memory we have is of a guy called Danny, with a Glock pistol on his belt and a half-gallon bottle of rum in his hand, saying, “They say if I feed you guys Captain Morgan we’re going to have a mighty good time!”

DINNER SORTED

DAB FOR THE CRAB: Crabbing is a popular part of Garibalidi life, with Dungeness the main target species.

e Juli

Dann y

“Wakey, wakey boys!” It’s still dark outside and we’re not sure if it’s all been a dream. The seedy feeling in our stomachs and pounding headaches confirms it’s not. We’re hung-over and jet-lagged, but after a big pot of black coffee we level out and prepare for the day’s fishing. We’ll be chasing Pacific salmon — chinooks and cohos specifically. They’re a highly prized sport fish on every dietician’s wish list thanks to their high nutritional content. When it comes to salmon, the only way The Captain knows how to catch them is at his local cafe, served with avocado, a poached egg and hollandaise sauce. John and Julie look to have the fishing caper sorted, muttering in some strange language about flashers, hoochies, spinners and cut plug herring. It doesn’t matter, because after a few hours on the water, we’ve hooked a beautiful silverflanked coho salmon, destined for the smoker. Crabbing is a big part of Garibaldi life. It involves dropping a cage with fish bait, tied to a float, then picking it up hours or days later. Fortunately, John deployed some crab traps the previous day. He hauls up the pots and suddenly massive Dungeness crabs are crawling all over the Stabi cockpit. Skipper John might look like a mild-mannered accountant, but his Centrecab (appropriately named Happy-Ours) is set up for serious fish slaying. It’s fitted with 420HP of triple Yamaha power out back (OK, one is a trolling motor), a 500L fuel tank, downriggers, customised rod holders and a custom crab pot hauler with a winch. John says it was Julie who decided to buy the boat, “As soon as she heard about the positive buoyancy and the fact they’re virtually unsinkable, she was sold.” John is a bit of a tech geek, even selling his GPS dog collar patent to Garmin. He’s fitted out the boat with Simrad, running a bangin’ NSS12 Evo2 display with a 4G radar upstairs. Who thought you’d need so much tech to catch salmon? When we think about salmon fishing in the Northwest, we picture Brad Pitt in A River Runs Through It — quietly wading down a gentle stream, fly rod in hand. But John is far better looking than Brad Pitt.

“John is a bit of a tech geek, even selling his GPS dog collar patent to Garmin.” www.thecaptain.tv

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DEADLIEST CATCH: Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Yammie-powered 2750 Centrecab is equipped with a crab pot hauler.

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

“Chinooks can be caught with the coho techniques above, but you’ll usually find them in deeper water.”

SALMON STUD: Danny has mastered the art of catching coho salmon. Delta divers trolled at two to three miles per hour in the morning work best.

v twww.thecaptain.tv . n i a t p a c e h t .w w w

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Boat specs

STABICRAFT 2750 CENTRECAB Length: 8.4m Beam: 2.5m Deadrise: 21.5 degrees Seating capacity: 9 Dry hull weight (approx): 1990kg Fuel capacity: 500L Standard HP: 300HP Maximum HP: 500HP ELECTRONICS Simrad 4G Radar Simrad NSS12 Evo2 Simrad VHF radio ENGINE SPECS Model: 2 x Yamaha F200 Type: 16-valve, DOHC in-line 4 Displacement: 2.8L Weight: 222kg each PRICE Starting from: $206,000 AUD with an Easytow trailer

JOHN’S SALMON TIPS

John has a few pointers to get you started on salmon fishing. Techniques vary depending on species, location and conditions.

OCEAN COHO SALMON

Early in the morning is the time to chase ocean coho. Delta divers work well fishing under the surface, travelling at two to three miles per hour. When the fish hits, simply stop and fight it. Downriggers are also employed. Coho like bling, so 360 flashers with hoochies and/or spinners will work (bright colours on sunny days, dark colours on cloudy ones). Cut plug herring or whole anchovies bent to spin tightly work well, too. As the day progresses, the fish usually move from on top (6–15ft) to deeper (25ft). We run several depths and adjust the other rods when we find the best depth.

OCEAN CHINOOK SALMON

Chinooks can be caught with the coho techniques above, but you’ll usually find them in deeper water (towards the bottom). A sliding drop line about an arms length with a 16oz (0.5kg) weight allows you to drop down and present a spinning cut plug herring on a 6ft leader just off the bottom, trolled at a speed of about one mile per hour. As the salmon enter the bay and rivers, the bite becomes more tidal with the best times an hour before to an hour after tide change. I like the high tide change better than low tide, but both are good. I’ll put a six-bead chain swivel halfway down the 6ft leader so it won’t twist up if weeds get on it with the rotating herring. As you move up the bay, water temperatures rise and spinners seem to get the bite

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

(BELOW) FLUFFY FEATURES: Scott’s 2500 Ultracab XL comes complete with a full kitchen, fold-down table and a poodle that looks like it’s been on a 48-hour bender.

BLOOD BATH

The fishing is hot in the bay — and apparently even hotter out wide — so we get on the blower to beef farmer Scott Sayer, owner of a Stabicraft 2500 Ultracab XL. He doesn’t take much convincing and a few hours later, rolls down the ramp at Garibaldi Marina. “G’day mates!” Scott says in his best Aussie accent, shaking our hands. We’d expected a cap-wearing farmer in denim and cowboy boots, but Scott struts down the dock with a miniature poodle wedged under his arm wearing a pink sweater (the poodle, that is), its tongue hanging out like it had been on a 48-hour bender. Was this the Garibaldi way? Perhaps the pooch is bait, we muse, smiling and avoiding eye contact — with the poodle and Scott. Like his poodle, Scott’s Stabi is a one of a kind. He’s peeled the decals from the boat and engine cowlings so it doesn’t look like anyone else’s. “People ask if it’s a military prototype,” he says proudly. Today we’re heading 60 nautical miles offshore, in convoy with John Files’ Centrecab. We’ve packed 200kg of ice on board each boat, hoping for a large ice bath of tuna. The bag limit is 25 fish per person and we get the impression we’re not going home until the boat is “plugged” — it physically can’t hold any more fish. Nearing the GPS mark that signifies the hot bite, the crew

deploys the lures. It’s a glass-off and Scott runs a combination of two rods and two handlines. His favourite lure comes out — the cedar plug, which is basically a piece of untreated wood with a hook jammed up its butt. We pretend to be impressed, asking where the JB Lures are stashed, but Scott just gives us a quizzical stare. The twin Yamaha F150s are spooled up to seven knots and the trap is set. By 1pm that afternoon, our opinion of the cedar plug has changed. The kill tank and three additional coolers are packed to the brim with albacore tuna. “Hey Scott, where can we get one of those cedar plugs?” we ask casually. But he’s too busy bleeding and packing albacore on ice to hear us.

ULTRA AWESOME

Boat plugged, we head back to Garibaldi Marina to get some much-needed shut-eye. Scott has set up his 2500 Ultracab XL for overnighters. It’s got a full kitchen with a sink and cooktop, as well as a huge double berth in the bow. The handy dropdown dinette table can be folded away against the wall to create a second sleeping nook. Speaking of sleepovers, Scott has also equipped his 2500 with serious spotlight action: front and flank light bars. In the sounder department, a Simrad NSS12 Evo3 sits neatly in the dash while the 4G radar on the hardtop scouts for birds lurking above unsuspecting tuna schools. Get those cedar plugs ready.

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TUNA TAMERS: Scott and his old man Jack with one of many albacore tuna destined for the dinner table.

Jack

Sco tt

“He peeled the decals from the boat and engine cowlings so it doesn’t look like anyone else’s.”

Boat specs

STABICRAFT 2500 ULTRACAB XL Length: 7.62m Beam: 2.56m Deadrise: 19 degrees Seating capacity: 9 Dry hull weight (approx): 1630kg Fuel capacity: 378L Standard HP: 300HP Maximum HP: 400HP ELECTRONICS Simrad 4G Radar Simrad NSS12 Evo3 Simrad VHF radio ENGINE SPECS Model: 2 x Yamaha F150 Type: 16-valve, DOHC in-line 4 Displacement: 2.6L Weight: 228kg PRICE Starting from: $173,900 AUD with an Easytow trailer

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

Da vi d

CRUISIN’ DOWN THE 101: Highway 101 is Oregon’s version of The Great Ocean Road.

HIGHWAY 101

We give Julie a big bear hug and say our goodbyes to the cedar crew and Rockaway Beach. Next stop is Charleston, the biggest commercial fishing port in Oregon, four hours south on Highway 101. This famous stretch of road wraps itself along the west coast of the US, starting in Los Angeles, California and running all the way up to Seattle, Washington. In Charleston, we meet up with retiree David Larson. He describes the area as “a mini Alaska”. His ride is a brandspanking-new Stabicraft 2750 Ultra Centrecab XL, towed by a black Caterpillar-powered GMC, which makes a Dodge Ram look like a Suzuki Jimny. Prior to retiring, Dave ran Larson Industrial, which specialised in welding and machining — so he knows a thing or two about quality fabrication. The Ultra Centrecab XL features a big cabin with the pilot house-style windscreen, walk-around configuration, a massive 500L fuel tank and a nine-person payload. He can do 200 nautical miles at sea and still come home with 50 in reserve.

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“Next stop is Charleston, the biggest commercial fishing port in Oregon, four hours south on Highway 101.”

GHOST BUSTER: David’s 2750 Ultra Centrecab XL cuts through the early morning Charleston fog.

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

TOUGH TRUCK: Dave’s Caterpillar-powered GMC makes a Dodge Ram look like a Suzuki Jimny.

WEIRD AND WONDERFUL

Over an evening beer, we tell Dave about our salmon and tuna adventures. He’s impressed and eager to show us his backwaters, suggesting we go bottom bashing the next day. We happily agree, heading back to our motel room with dreams of hauling shimmering red snapper with iridescent blue fins over the gunwales the next day. A big fog rolls in overnight. We dodge the roadside deer and arrive at the Charleston boat ramp safe and sound. We’re glad Dave has Simrad 4G radar installed because we’re literally driving blind. After navigating the bar, we cruise five nautical miles down coast and pull up on a patch of reef that lights up with fish on the sounder. We thread soft plastics onto heavy jig heads and start twitching on the bottom. Before too long, we’re hauling in strange sea monsters one after the other — each one uglier than the last. Dave assures us they’re all delicious, but the camera lenses are working overtime to make them look even remotely edible. One particularly repugnant fish is the cabezon, poo-brown and covered in spiky fins. It makes a guttural grunting noise not too dissimilar to the koala (look it up on YouTube). Our dreams of soft, white snapper flesh evaporate. But nothing is thrown back and we fill the kill tank with black rockfish and copper rockfish before pulling the pin when a weather front rolls in. We know this because Dave has a Sirius Weather Module hooked up to the Simrad NSS12 Evo3. The crook weather won’t trouble the boat, but Dave’s worried about the Coast Guard — if they reckon the bar crossing is too dangerous,

Boat specs

STABICRAFT 2750 ULTRA CENTRECAB XL Length: 8.4m Beam: 2.49m Deadrise: 21.5 degrees Seating capacity: 9 Dry hull weight (approx): 1990kg Fuel capacity: 500L Standard HP: 300HP Maximum HP: 500HP ELECTRONICS Simrad 4G Radar Simrad NSS12 Evo3 Simrad VHF radio ENGINE SPECS Model: 2 x Yamaha F200 Type: 16-valve, DOHC in-line 4 Displacement: 2.8L Weight: 222kg each PRICE Starting from: $213,220 AUD with an Easytow trailer

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LEGENDARY RELIABILITY UNRIVALLED PERFORMANCE Whether your repowering or buying new, treat your pride and joy to the reliability and performance of a Yamaha Outboard.

Yamaha Outboards

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

(BELOW) BOTTOM DWELLER: If you think this cabezon looks ugly, you should hear the grunting noise it makes...

they’ll shut the entrance, making it a federal offence to come through. If that’s the case, we’re spending the night in a sloppy sea. It’s the first time we’ve seen the Weather Module in action and it’s damn impressive. With the water temperature overlay, we’re even able to look for temperature breaks within a 220 nautical mile radius — a seriously cool feature any top-water game fishermen can appreciate. Fortunately, the bar is still open, so we cruise back into the bay, checking on the crab pots we’d laid earlier. Before long, the Stabi is crawling with Dungeness and red rock crabs. We’re certainly getting used to tiptoeing around these clawed critters. We steam into Charleston Marina just as the Coast Guard decides to close the bar down. A close shave.

LEGENDARY LOCALS

The US might get a bad wrap from time to time, but our Northwest mission has been one of the most hospitable and productive trips The Captain’s crew has ever experienced. Reels screamed, but not as loud as Julie when the tuna hit the deck, and every crab pot yielded a healthy meal. And Mother Nature put on a fine show. The fall (autumn) clear skies and calm sea showcased the Pacific Northwest in all its rugged beauty — although no Canon lens could make those cabezons look good. The boats performed with typical Stabi efficiency. If there’s a more versatile boat — capable of hauling pots up the side one day, running along the rocky shore to collect clams and then heading offshore the next — we’d love to see it. The satisfied customers say it all. We made some life-long friends and look forward to returning the favour some time soon. Late nights, early starts and hearty feeds are guaranteed.

“Reels screamed, but not as loud as Julie when the tuna hit the deck, and every crab pot yielded a healthy meal.” www.thecaptain.tv

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STABIS STORM THE STATES

“The boats performed with typical Stabi efficiency. If there’s a more versatile boat we’d love to see it.”

Centrecab

STABI SUPER STYLING

Confused by all these Centrecab, Ultracab and Ultra Centrecab configurations on Stabicraft boats? So were we. But we came to appreciate the benefit of each on our trip. The Centrecab is all about fishing. The cabin is a little narrower due to the full walk-around, but there’s still a little berth and troop carrier-esque seating for four behind the captain and first mate. There’s stacks of room for casting off the bow — in fact, you can fish right up over the top of the anchor windlass. The Ultracab is a pilothouse configuration with a forward-raking windscreen. The Yanks reckon this comes into its own when fishing in cold conditions as it helps prevent fogging. There’s no walk-around on the Ultracab as you’ve got bulk cabin room. Appointments include multiple berths, foldout table and cooking facilities. It’s like a caravan that you can also happily take 60 nautical miles offshore. The Ultracab Centrecab features the pilothouse design, but with the full walk-around configuration. The fishy factor is also much higher on this baby than the standard Ultracab, with more of an emphasis on cabin space rather than creature comforts. What model would we pick for Australian east coast game fishing and bay hunting for snapper? We’d have the standard Centrecab fo’ sho’. Neat lines, lots of room for fishing — that’ll do us just fine. We wouldn’t say no to the Simrad NSS12 Evo3 with the Sirius Weather Module, either. Just got to keep the Ultracab brochure away from Mrs Captain, otherwise it might be a different story. Stabicraft — you know our delivery address.

Ultracab

Ultra Centrecab

MORE INFORMATION: STABICRAFT MARINE

345 Bluff Road, Invercargill, Southland, New Zealand. +64 (3) 211 1828. www.stabicraft.com

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CAPTAINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ADVENTURES WHITSUNDAYS

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STRUGGLE

STREET P

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FISHING TRIPS, LIKE NEW RELATIONSHIPS, ALWAYS START OFF WITH HIGH HOPES. YOU SCOPE THE LOCATION, PREPARE YOUR GEAR, TALK YOUR MATES’ EARS OFF AND DREAM OF THE PERFECT CATCH. BUT FISHING CAN HUMBLE THE BEST OF ’EM. HIGH HOPES DON’T ALWAYS TRANSLATE INTO GREAT TRIPS. SOMETIMES, THINGS DON’T WORK OUT THE WAY YOU PLANNED — EVEN IF YOU’RE JOSHUA HUTCHINS.

WORDS A ND I M AGE S by Jo s hua Hutc hins

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES WHITSUNDAYS

W

e arrive in Queensland’s beautiful Whitsundays, checking into the Discovery Holiday Park outside Airlie Beach. After careful negotiation, I abandon the wife and kids at a waterpark with a giant jumping pillow and go fishing. Genius move. Mathew Scholz and I had been talking for a while about catching up for a fly-fishing trip, and his recent move to Airlie was the perfect excuse to, er, hook up. “There are tons of tuskies (black spotted tusk fish) on the flats, and the odd nice GT. We should be up for a great week,” Mat promised during the many phone conversations we had while planning the trip. But now I’m here, to be honest, the forecast doesn’t inspire me with confidence: 20-plus knots of wind every day. No wonder the harbour is full of sailing boats. Undaunted we head into the first bay. The tide is low and we soon spot the first fish of the trip. I hook into a slatey bream and Mat snags a golden trevally. “What a great start to the week! Let’s hope that isn’t a curse,” I joke. I should’ve known better. Not long after, we run into busting schools of longtail tuna. The pods are moving fast and I immediately hook two, landing one. But then things take a turn for the worse, the wind kicking in and the bay turning milky. It’s impossible to continue sight fishing. www.thecaptain.tv

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FLATS : So many flats to explore.

“BUT NOW I’M HERE, TO BE HONEST, THE FORECAST DOESN’T INSPIRE ME WITH CONFIDENCE: 20PLUS KNOTS OF WIND EVERY DAY.”

FLY FLICKIN’: Mat’s Haines Signature 543SF is built for fly-fishing in shallow water. Note the extra elevation provided by the cooler.

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES WHITSUNDAYS

“SLATEYS ARE THE POOR COUSINS OF BLUE BASTARDS AND MAKE GREAT TARGETS FOR FLY FISHERMEN.” A CLEAR SLATE

The next few days continue in a similar vein. The flats, despite looking beautiful, seemed devoid of fish. By the time we manage to spot any tuskies they’re almost directly under the boat. The slateys stay on the bite, cruising in the shallows, muddying the bottom as they feed, giving away their location. Slateys are the poor cousins of blue bastards and make great targets for fly fishermen. Mat holds out for the tuskies, refusing the cast to the slateys — until his patience runs out. Fortunately, they keep our rods bent and minds sane.

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PAPARAZZI TIME: Josh had to photograph this poor tuskie from 14 different angles just to get enough images for this story...

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES WHITSUNDAYS

WHO CALLED THE FREIGHT TRAIN?

Mat wants to get out to the reef to chase GTs, but the wind rules that option out. To our surprise, we discover the flats also hold some very large geets and we regularly spot 15-30kg models. Large GTs — Mat couldn’t resist! We spy a huge bow wave coming from the shallows against the mangroves. I replace the 10-weight rod with a 12-weight, but as I rehearse the cast in my mind I realise the line has tangled in the boat’s deck hose and I can’t free it. As I fumble, a 45kg GT tank swims straight under the boat. Things continue not going to plan. The last day arrives and the weather is finally in our favour, 10-knot winds coinciding with low tide. We’ll be content with anything: GT, tuskie or even a toadie! We stick with the 10-weight, with the 12-weight in reserve for any GTs. Hopes are high as we stake out the flats. It isn’t long until we see a 20kg GT milling around. I make the cast and everything looks good. The fish lifts its attention to the fly and begins to chase. My retrieving pace increases and the fish goes into full-speed attack mode

MAT’S RIDE:

Haines Signature 543SF

Name a Toyota 4WD model and I can quote you the specs in full. But when it comes to boats, I’m no tech head. I usually only remember the colour and size of motor on the back and, of course, whether it was enjoyable to fish out of. But when Mat first arrived to pick me up for the day’s fishing, I couldn’t help but think, “That’s a sweet-looking boat”. The Haines features plenty of casting space up front and a surprisingly shallow draught for cruising the flats. The 150HP Suzuki had us hammering around from spot to spot. The deep gunwales are perfect for safe fishing in open water and Mat had his trusty cooler set up on front to give a bit of elevation when we needed to spot fish. For a region like the Whitsundays, offering a huge array of fishing scenarios, it certainly seemed like the perfect rig.

BITE ME: Tuskies have peg-like teeth, which are built for chewing on tasty crustaceans.

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Boat specs

HAINES SIGNATURE 543SF Length: 5.33m Beam: 2.13m Deadrise: 21–33 degrees Seating capacity: 7 Weight (approx): 880kg (dry hull only) Fuel capacity: 180L Hull warranty: 10+2 ENGINE SPECS Model: Suzuki DF150AP Type: DOHC 16-valve Displacement: 2.86L Weight: 241kg on 25” shaft MORE INFORMATION The Haines Group 140 Viking Drive, Wacol, Queensland. (07) 3271 4400. www.signatureboats.com

“THE LAST DAY ARRIVES AND THE WEATHER IS FINALLY IN OUR FAVOUR, 10-KNOT WINDS COINCIDING WITH LOW TIDE.”

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CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES WHITSUNDAYS

e DPS FINALCAP13p078_FEATURE_JOSHUA OUT.indd All Pages WHITSUNDAYS.indd 86

— mouth open and gills flared. I hold my breath for the connection. Then… nothing. For no apparent reason, the GT charges to within a centimetre of the fly then gets cold feet. I’m gutted. Mat suggests I change the fly to something more “in the fish’s face”, and out comes a big black brush fly. We continue tracking tuskies and it isn’t long until we see a huge shark heading our way, not far in front of it, a big GT. I make the cast and go into super-drive on the retrieval. The GT sees the offering and without hesitation, inhales it. “I’m on!” I yell. The fish tears off and I lock in the drag. I don’t need to go too hard as it is a long way to the drop-off, clear flats in every direction. Everything is going to plan. Until the line goes loose… “You’ve got to be kidding me!” I scream. “When can I get a #&%@*# break?” I bring in the line and see the end of the hook has broken clean off. A 6/0 doesn’t just break like that. How on Earth did I manage to pick the only faulty hook in my collection? I’m still hurting from that one. ON THE FLY: Josh uses a 10-weight fly rod for most of his flats fishing. The 12-weight is just in case the GTs show up...

FAULT LINE: A faulty 6/0 hook cost Josh a 20kg GT on the flats. Spewing.

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STA16

CAPTAIN’S ADVENTURES WHITSUNDAYS

TUSKIE TIME

Despite feeling crushed by unsuccessful GT encounters, our spirits lift a little when we spot a tuskie feeding in the small waves running off the end of the flat. Most of the tuskies we’ve seen have spooked, rejected the fly or eaten, but then not connected. This time, the fish comes straight over and inhales Mat’s fly. With tuskies, hooking is the easy part — landing them is the real test. These little nuggets of colour are fast and powerful. Mat fights the fish hard, and even after he wins it away from the rocks, it still manages to brick him. Gutted again. Amazingly, the fish is still connected and after a few minutes, Mat manages to free it from the rocks and finally land it. It’s no beast, but a gorgeous bundle of colour that makes these fish one of the prettiest flats’ targets in the world. The poor fish is photographed from 14 different angles before it’s returned to the water. I manage to hook another large tuskie on our return trip and have another follow all the way to the boat — but no love. It just hasn’t been my week. Despite the tough fishing, it’s been a great time with Mat. The Whitsundays offer plenty of potential and, with good weather, I will return.

Special thanks To Discovery Parks – Airlie Beach and Whitsundays Tourism for hosting us for the week.

“MAT FIGHTS THE FISH HARD, AND EVEN AFTER HE WINS IT AWAY FROM THE ROCKS, IT STILL MANAGES TO BRICK HIM. GUTTED AGAIN.”

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STA16126 Revo 499 TC_Layout 1 31/10/2018 11:12 PM Page 1

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P

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SUBMARINES

WORD S by Pau l R o b i n so n

The Captain dives below in a quest to discover all there is to know about the sneaky world of submarines

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A

submarine, aka “sub”, is any naval vessel that can propel itself above and below the water. They had their first serious outing in naval warfare during WWI, when the Germans used them to attack merchant ships with their main weapon, the torpedo. The same happened again in WWII. The 1919 Treaty of Versailles had limited the number of surface craft the Germans could build. So the sneaky Nazi navy poured big bucks into developing a fleet of Unterseeboots — U-boats. More than 1000 U-boats were built until 1945. Hunting singly and in “wolf packs” they monstered Allied merchant shipping convoys. One of the most successful, U-48, sank or crippled 54 ships. The Yanks also become pretty good at this underwater game, wreaking havoc on the Japanese navy in the Pacific. Despite comprising less than two per cent of the US fleet, subs sank more than 30 per cent of the Japanese navy, including eight aircraft carriers — for the loss of 52 subs. The 1960s saw the arrival of the nuclearpowered submarine, a game changer for naval warfare, as these monsters could stay underwater for months at a time and launch

long-range nuclear missiles without surfacing. All they really had to worry about were nuclear attack submarines. Of course, only major powers can afford nuke subs, so most navies have continued to buy/ build diesel-electric submarines that can trace their daddy DNA back to German U-boats. Subs still have snorkels, but much-improved radar. The big changes are in weapons and sensors. Deck guns are history, modern subs firing torpedoes capable of speeds in excess of 50 knots, either sonar- or wire-guided. Many subs also carry cruise or anti-ship missiles for spanking surface targets on land or sea. Submarine sonars have been improved out of sight, and on advanced subs the periscope has been replaced by “photonic mast” sensor systems that relay optical, infrared and radiowave information electronically. Maximum submerged speed hasn’t increased much on WWII — around 20 knots — but battery advances have increased endurance at low speed and modern subs can stay under as long as 10 days. The sub scientists have also developed “air-independent propulsion”, using fuel cells to store hydrogen and oxygen to generate electricity. Subs with this gear are able to operate at low speeds underwater as long as a month.

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SUBMARINES

UP PERISCOPE: The periscope lets the sub skipper have a sneak peak at what’s going on upstairs — without anyone knowing he’s there. Voyeurism made easy. LOCKED ON TARGET: Used in most modern subs, the spherical array sonar provides a larger image of the sub’s underwater quarry.

FLOAT

SINK Ballast tanks

Water

HOW SUBS WORK

With subs, it’s all about the buoyancy and ballast and trim tanks that can be filled with air or flooded with water. When the submarine is on the surface, the ballast tanks are filled with air (positive buoyancy). When it dives, the tanks are flooded with water, the air forced out and the sub sinks (negative buoyancy). The crew breathes courtesy of tanks of compressed air. Hydroplanes on the stern control the angle of the dive. Diesel subs usually have at least a couple of diesel engines, which drive propellers or run generators to recharge a big-arse battery bank. They have to

surface or cruise just below the surface using a snorkel to run the engines. Once the batteries are charged, the sub can dive and use its electric motors. Obviously how much battery grunt you have determines how long you can stay under. Which is why the sub scientists got so excited about nuclear power. A reactor produces heat to generate steam to drive a turbine, which directly drives the propellers, as well as electrical generators. Nuclear generators don’t need oxygen, and nuclear fuel lasts for years, so a scary nuke sub can stay underwater and/or out at sea for a bloody long time.

THIRSTY CREW?

Most submarines have a distillation kit that produces freshwater from seawater. The distillation plant heats the seawater to water vapour, which removes the salt, and then cools the vapour into a tank. Submarine distillation plants can produce anything up to 150,000 litres of freshwater a day. This is used for cooling electronics such as computers and navigation gear as well as the crew.

HOW DO YOU BREATHE?

Oxygen is stored in pressurised tanks. Some subs use an oxygen generator to cook up oxygen from electrolysis of water, or an oxygen canister that releases oxygen by a hot

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“Most submarines have a distillation kit that produces freshwater from seawater.”

TAMING OF THE SCREW: Increasing the number of propeller blades from five to seven meant less noise, which made stealth subs, er, stealthier.

chemical reaction — like on the mir space station. Oxygen is released continuously by a computerised system that senses the percentage of oxygen in the air, or puffed out in batches throughout the underwater day. CO2 is removed from the air chemically using soda lime (sodium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide). Because no-one likes a sweaty sub, moisture is removed by a dehumidifier, preventing it from condensing on walls and equipment. Burners remove other gases — like carbon monoxide or hydrogen generated by equipment. Cigarette smoke, too — if you were allowed to smoke on navy subs, which you’re not, except maybe for Russian ones. Filters

extract dirt and dust from the air.

HOW DO YOU SHIT?

A submarine head uses gravity to flush. Job done, open a water valve to fill the bowl to provide a head of water to push your business into the sanitary piping and into the sanitary holding tank. While leaving the water valve open, use the ball valve handle to open the valve at the bottom of the toilet bowl to flush. In general, most submarine heads are flushed using seawater. During WWII, Germany naval toilet techs invented a “deep-water, high-pressure toilet” that could be flushed while submerged. It was a bit complicated — sending Nazi

waste through a series of chambers to a pressurised airlock then blasting it into the sea with compressed air, like a turd torpedo. Each U-boat had a shit specialist trained in official toilet operating procedures. On April 14, 1945, U-1206 was on its first combat patrol, 200ft deep in the North Sea, when its captain decided to take a dump without the toilet tech on hand to operate the controls. Wrong valve turned, a tidal wave of seawater and sewage poured into the sub, all over the batteries. The subsequent chemical reaction produced poisonous chlorine gas and U-1206 had to surface, where it was spotted by Allied aircraft. Game over.

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SUBMARINES

HISTORY OF SUBS

Blokes had been working on plans for a craft that could sneak about underwater from the late 1500s, but none had got off the drawing board until 1620 when Cornelius Drebbel, a Dutch doctor living in England, concocted the kinky idea of a rowboat sheathed in greased leather. Very Mardi Gras. Go-forward was provided by 12 rowers pulling on oars poking out of flexible leather seals in the hull and snorkels were held on the surface by floats — admittedly a bit of a giveaway — allowing a submergence time of several hours. BTW — no-one’s actually sure how it submerged, the theories ranging from wooden ballast tanks to a bunch of bladders. Drebbel played around in the Thames at depths up to 15ft and at some stage King James I went for a dive to show how safe it was. Sadly, the Royal Navy wasn’t interested in the world’s first navigable submarine. The Yanks first had the idea of using a sub

in a naval operation. During the American Revolutionary War in 1776, David Bushnell built an egg-shaped barrel out of planks. A pedal-operated water tank allowed the oneman Turtle to submerge by pumping water into the hull and surface by pumping it out. Go-forward came courtesy of a pedal-operated propeller, while lead ballast stopped it from turning, er, turtle. It contained enough air for a 30-minute mission. The Americans figured with the simple addition of a keg of gunpowder they’d have a secret weapon to destroy Brit warships On the night of September 7, 1776, Sergeant Ezra Lee pedalled his Turtle to attack HMS Eagle in New York Harbour. The cunning plan was to attach the “torpedo” to the enemy hull and detonate it with a time fuse. Unfortunately, Ezra was forced to abort, then lost his “torpedo”, which blew up an hour later, giving the Brits a fright if nothing else.

CORNELIUS DREBBEL (ABOVE) DAVID BUSHNELL (BELOW)

“Cornelius Drebbel concocted the kinky idea of a rowboat sheathed in greased leather. Very Mardi Gras.” TOUGH MUDDER: On its only simulated attack mission, navigating blind, the Sea Devil got stuck in a mud bank and nearly sank.

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mission s Sub

1

AE2 1915

Australia’s second ever submarine was diesel-powered, carrying a crew of 35. During the Gallipoli campaign in April 1915, she snuck through the Dardanelles, navigating blind through minefields and past forts into the Sea of Marmara. Over the next few days, the AE2 attempted to sink shipping and avoid being sunk by the Turks. On the morning of April 30, after having difficulty submerging, it was shelled by a Turkish torpedo boat and sunk. All the crew were captured. Glorious fail.

2

Sydney Scare 1942

On the night of May 31, 1942, three Japanese midget submarines, each with a two-man crew, snuck into Sydney Harbour and launched an attack on Allied ships. A torpedo struck HMAS Kuttabul, a converted ferry, killing 21 Australian and British sailors and scaring the living bejesus out of Sydneysiders.

3

USS Tang 1944

Launched in 1943, USS Tang was a Balao-class sub that had a pretty good war record before shooting herself in the foot. Over the course of five wartime patrols, the Tang racked up quite a few kills, sinking 33 enemy ships totalling 116,454 tons. On station in the Formosa Strait in October 1944, she attacked a Japanese convoy, sinking several freighters before a malfunctioning torpedo circled back on itself, striking the sub amidships and sinking her in 55m of water. Only nine men, including the captain, survived.

4

USS Nautilus 1958 USS Nautilus was the world’s first

5

USS Triton 1960 In 1959, USS Triton, powered by two

nuclear-powered submarine. In 1958, it became the first vessel to reach the geographic North Pole and the first to voyage across the North Pole submerged, showing the Russians that the US was still the big dog in the Cold War fight.

nuclear reactors, was the largest, scariest, most expensive sub (US$100m) ever built. In February 1960, it began a submerged circumnavigation of the Earth, code-named Operation Sandblast, arriving back at her Connecticut port three months later. The mission was intended to impress the Russians, but because an American U-2 spy pilot had just been shot down by the Soviets, making a big noise about the 66,633km mission no longer seemed such a smart idea and there was little publicity for the Triton’s amazing feat.

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SUBMARINES

DEVIL’S IN THE DETAIL (ABOVE): Wilhelm Bauer’s Sea Devil could submerge OK but never managed much in the way of underwater go-forward.

“A hand-powered propeller moved the 21ft sub underwater and a collapsible mast and sail did the business on the surface.” SUCKER PUNCH: The first successful submarine combat mission in history would prove just as lethal for the Hunley as it did for the Union sloop it destroyed.

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movie s Sub Another American inventor, Robert Fulton — who would go on to coach the Manly Sea Eagles in another incarnation — was working for the French when he came up with the Nautilus, an-all metal, cigar-shaped unit with a copper conning tower. A hand-powered propeller moved the 21ft sub underwater and a collapsible mast and sail did the business on the surface. Diving planes were used to help in submerging, and compressed air in copper bottles provided oxygen for the crew. The Nautilus made several successful test dives in the early 19th century, but was sold for scrap after getting a fat thumbs-down from French and English navies. In 1855, Wilhelm Bauer built the Sea Devil for the Russian government. A 52ft sub capable of carrying a crew of 12, she featured multiple ballast tanks for added buoyancy, a DIY airlock and a propeller powered by an internal treadmill. Sea Devil made more than 130 successful dives before its last, unsuccessful, one. Its party piece during the

coronation of Tsar Alexander II involved submerging with a small brass band aboard. The Russian national anthem sounds best played underwater, apparently. During the American Civil War, inventor Horace Lawson Hunley, working for the Confederate side, converted a steam boiler into a submarine. The Hunley got along at four knots propelled by a hand-driven screw. It wasn’t a “lucky” ship. During trials, it sank twice for the loss of all aboard. In the second accident, Horace himself was among the fatalities. The sub was raised yet again and renamed, er, the Hunley. In 1864, armed with a 90lb powder charge attached to a long pole, the sub attacked — rammed, really — and sank the USS Housatonic, which was blockading Charleston Harbor. After the world’s first successful submarine attack, the Hunley of course promptly sank with the loss of all hands. This was the last time attaching the torpedo to the sub was deemed a good idea.

Das Boot 1981

For my doubloons, the best sub movie ever made, this film traces a single mission of U-96 as seen through the eyes of a war correspondent on board. The relentless boredom of daily life crammed inside a claustrophobic tin can is broken only by the intense battle scenes in a “journey to the edge of the mind”. Apocalypse Now under water.

The Hunt for Red October 1990

Based on the Tom Clancy novel, which was based on two actual Cold War incidents, this blockbuster Cold War thriller features the Red October, an experimental Soviet nuclear sub with a stealth-propulsion system that makes sonar detection impossible. Its captain — Sean Connery speaking Russian with a Scottish accent — decides to defect to the Americans.

Crimson Tide 1995

WATERY GRAVE: Now on display at Clemson University in South Carolina, the Hunley had already sunk twice before its final mission to take out the USS Housatonic in 1864.

During a period of political turmoil in the Russian Federation, bad guys threaten to shoot nuclear missiles at the US and Japan. The USS Alabama is directed to be ready to launch a pre-emptive strike on the Ruskis. Unfortunately, executive officer Denzel Washington doesn’t get on with commander Gene Hackman and the possibility of accidentally starting WWIII becomes very real.

Black Sea 2014

Sacked salvage sub captain Jude Law takes a dodgy job commanding a rusty wreck of a sub to search the depths of the Black Sea for another submarine allegedly stuffed with gold. Of course, his crew are all psychos, so the mission goes pearshaped pretty quickly.

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea 1954

In 1866, an expedition searches for a giant sea monster attacking ships in the Pacific. The monster turns out to be a submarine, the Nautilus, under the command of crazy Captain Nemo. The sub can travel at 50 knots and is driven by electricity, but finding this particular Nemo doesn’t end so well.    www.thecaptain.tv

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SUBMARINES

ICTINEO II

THE PLONGEUR

“In 1865, Spanish inventor Narcís Monturiol built Ictineo II, the world’s first engine-powered sub.” Meanwhile, back in France, naval officers Siméon Bourgeois and Charles Brun had designed the Plongeur (Diver). Launched in 1863, it was the first submarine with a motor — a piston engine powered by compressed air stored in tanks — which also provided oxygen for the crew and was used to empty the ballast tanks. Despite its innovations, the 140ft long and extremely unstable Plongeur was a beast, and was removed from active duty in 1872. In 1865, Spanish inventor Narcís Monturiol built Ictineo II, the world’s first enginepowered sub. Stability was good, courtesy of a system of weights and pump-operated ballast tanks inside its double hull. But the genius feature was an anaerobic steam engine that could create heat and oxygen. The sub made one successful dive in 1867, but funding dried up and it, too, was sold for scrap. By the late-19th century, while submarine tech had improved greatly, most undersea

boats could still only manage short runs underwater. Everything changed in 1897 when US engineer Simon Lake built the Argonaut, a 36ft sub with a 30hp petrol engine. It had a periscope, diving chamber and a floating hose to provide air for engine and crew. Weirdly, it also had a set of wheels so it could “drive” on the seafloor. Initially used to salvage sunken wrecks, in 1898 Argonaut sailed from Norfolk, Virginia to New Jersey — the first open sea voyage by submarine. In 1898, USS Holland was the first submarine commissioned for the US Navy. Built by Irish inventor John Philip Holland, the 54ft sub had a four-cylinder petrol engine for surface travel and a 160hp electric motor when submerged. Armed with a single torpedo tube and a pneumatic “dynamite gun”, the Holland never saw action, but was used to train submariners. By the time she was decommissioned in 1905, the US Navy had six more attack subs in the garage.

ARGONAUT

USS HOLLAND

DOWN UNDERWATER: The RAN’s locally built Collins Class dieselelectric subs entered service in 1996 and look like staying around well into the 2020s.

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SEACRUISER SAFARI SC6000

SCOTTY’S CHARIOT

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IN’S SH

I S

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TA

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New

mode

l

WORDS a nd IMAG ES Sco t t G r ay

Scott Gray’s new Seacruiser Safari SC6000 is designed to hunt down everything from barra to bluefin (AND KINGFISH)

Old model

T

he Safari concept was developed on a cold winter’s day on the Shipwreck Coast in southwest Victoria. I was hunkered down in the Tackle Shack with Ed Richardson, boss man at Richardson Marine in Warrnambool. We were depressed. The Bass Strait swell was crashing onto the rugged shoreline, rain was streaking down the windows and we hadn’t seen a fish or crustacean in weeks. But after drinking four cups of black coffee, an idea struck me. “Let’s build a bloody boat and go north!” I suggested to Ed. Once he’d cleaned up the coffee he’d spurted all over his shirt, he asked for more detail. Ed doesn’t take too kindly to rash decisions, but I was on a charge. The concept was to upgrade my 5600 Seacruiser console. The new chariot would have all the attributes of the old model (console configuration with casting deck) — but with the range and versatility to stalk remote rivers and runoffs for barramundi one day, then transport us to faraway desert islands to chase marlin and sailfish the next. There were a few things we needed to upgrade from the old rig. First, we’d need more capacity for camping gear and tackle. Then the fuel tank would need more cubes to improve the range — 240L should do it. Naturally, we’d need a few more horses from the Suzuki stalls, so the transom would be beefed up to bolt on a DF175APX four-stroke. Now we’d have a 40-knot vessel with a cruising range of more than 400km. Finally, the transom would need to be walk-through to allow for easy access on and off the water. It would also be the entranceway for pelagics and toothy critters.

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SEACRUISER SAFARI SC6000

XXXXXXXXXXXXXX: xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxxx xxxx

(ABOVE LEFT) Walk-through transom for easy access. (LEFT) Scotty with a top-water bluefin caught on a stick-bait. (ABOVE) The console is big enough to flush-mount a 12-inch screen. (RIGHT) Casting deck is wide enough for two casting side by side. Note the T-bar leaning post.

(ABOVE) Lockable rod storage for secure touring. (RIGHT) Richo stuffs another lobby in the bag.

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“Ed thinks SC stands for Seacruiser. Between you and me, it actually stands for “Scotty’s Chariot”.

TOP DECK

RICHO RATES IT

Ed was warming to the idea. It may have been the Bass Strait chill blowing under the door or just the thought of sipping cold XXXX in between hauling in the barra. After a little more encouragement — including the promise of mud crabs and black jews — Richo was finally sold. Plans were drawn up to turn the SC6000 into a reality. Ed thinks SC stands for Seacruiser. Between you and me, it actually stands for “Scotty’s Chariot”. The SC6000, or “Safari” as Ed also likes to call it, comes with plenty of other tricks. The console has enough room to flush-mount a 12-inch Garmin 7412xsv, Fusion stereo and gauges, with the Suzuki Precision Control fly-by-wire digital controls mounted neatly next to the wheel. The new console also has enough room to house a split-lid Evakool esky for cold drinks and fresh catches (that was one thing missing from the 5600, a slot for the esky), which also doubles as a comfortable seat for passengers. I was so impressed with the final console configuration, I convinced Ed to call it the “Elite”. Ed’s not usually swayed by fancy marketing jargon, but he liked the sound of that one. The side pockets were redesigned to create 2.5m lockable rod lockers capable of fitting several rods a side. Now I could leave all my gear locked inside the boat, ready to fish at the turn of a key.

The front casting deck on the old 5600 is one of my favourite fishing features. The elevated platform is the perfect spot to stalk schools of kingfish, rod and stick-bait in hand. The new deck on the chariot is just a bigger version, measuring 500mm high and 1800mm at its longest point. It can easily fit two anglers side by side, flicking gold bombers to barra in the mangroves. A monkey T-bar can be fitted in the spigot at the bow as an ideal leaning post for offshore conditions or comfortable sitting position for cruising. It improves safety, too, something I’m conscious of in an open boat. I haven’t lost anybody over the side yet, despite fishing in some big seas. If I do cop a green one over the top or get caught in a tropical downpour, the deck is sealed and the hull is foam-filled. Under the front deck is a large storage area 1200mm x 890mm. Access is by lifting the deck using gas struts. Underneath you’ll find all the safety gear, fishing tackle, kill bag and anchor floats as well as two large batteries for the electric motor. The storage area was built with a surrounding, self-draining gutter so water doesn’t penetrate the storage area. No more soggy sandwiches! To complete the Safari picture, two more drink holders were fitted either side of the deck — in case we get thirsty up north.

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CAPTAIN’S SHIPS: SEACRUISER SAFARI SC6000

HEAVIER HULL

Boat specs

The new hull does all the things we’ve come to expect from the old one — and more. Taking the south-easterly winds on the way home from Lady Julia Percy Island was a, er, breeze. The raised bow and drop sheer line helps push the wind and sea away from the cockpit. The extra weight of the fuel tank and heavier engine complement each other, adding stability and steerage through the sea. The 6000 is also fitted with VolvoPenta trim tabs, ideal for smoothing out the boat when loaded with people, camping gear and occasionally giant southern bluefin tuna. One of my favourite features is the electric motor — a 72-inch shaft 80lb 24V Minn Kota i-Pilot. It offers next-level versatility, manoeuvring around the snags or trolling at six knots if need be. Press a button on the remote spot lock and I’m locked over the honey hole. It’s great for deep-water fishing and reduces the need to anchor or drift, wasting bottom time or hoping the fallback on the anchor drop is on the spot. The Seacruiser Safari SC6000 is a tough, open, versatile boat suitable for bays, rivers or ocean. For our northern exposure, we’ll be rolling on an Easytow dualaxle trailer, custom-designed using CAD software to achieve the perfect fit. There are few moving parts and it’s super low-maintenance — Richo being aware of my fondness for such things. Now the SC6000 is finished and on the water, I guess I’d better invite Ed up north. Somebody needs to help me fill (and empty) all those cup holders. (TOP): The Minn Kota is ideal for holding over the gummy grounds. (ABOVE): The casting deck sits on gas struts above a watertight compartment. Note the smart seal and gutter configuration.

SEACRUISER Model SC6000CC Safari Length overall 6.05m Beam 2.3m Hull weight 900kg Tow weight 1850kg Rec min HP 140HP Rec max HP 175HP Fuel cap. 150LT Bottom sheet 6mm Side sheet 4mm Max persons 6 STANDARD FEATURES Foam-filled, sealed deck, rails, two deluxe seats and sockets, 135L fuel tank, plumbed bait tank, deck wash, boarding ladder SAFARI UPGRADE Lockable rod lockers, 240L fuel tank, Elite console with Evakool esky, four cup holders, electric motor mounts, Volvo QR trim tabs, T-bar, Boat-catch, vinyl wrap, Seadeck flooring, Minn Kota 80lb Terrova i-Pilot 72-inch with quick-release bracket and onboard battery charger, Fusion RA55 stereo with Garmin 7412 and TM265LH and GT51TM transducers, two Fullriver 12V 105Ah Deep Cycle batteries and two Optima Red Top start batteries, hydraulic steering, 175HP upgrade ENGINE SPECIFICATIONS Make Suzuki Model DF175APX Configuration In-line 4-cylinder Displacement 2.9L Weight 241kg PRICE Standard $74,000 As tested $95,000

“Now the SC6000 is finished and on the water, I guess I’d better invite Ed up north.”

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FUEL FIGURES L/KT

L/KM

1.36

1.5

1.12

30 1.0

0.81

0.76

20

0.62 0.49

0.45

0.5

10

3400

4000

LITRES

KNOTS

0.88

RPM

5000

W0T

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IN’S LEGE DS

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

*Remora 7” Goliath in blue

UV did the business

lure

legends OF THE

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PART The Auss1ie: s NEXT IS The InternaStiUE: onal

The Captain interrogates legendary lure makers from Australia, picking up some priceless game-fishing pointers along the way WORD S & I M AGE S by T he Captain, Australian lure makers

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

LURE HISTORY

In early times, fishing lures were made from bone or bronze. The Chinese and Egyptians used fishing rods, hooks and lines as early as 2000 B.C., though most of the first fishermen used handlines. The first hooks were made out of bronze, which was strong but still very thin and less visible to the fish.

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T

he next time you pluck a lure from the shelf, spare a thought for the craftsman who painstakingly sanded and rubbed the plug so it swam butterfly like Michael Phelps, poured and polished the head, skirted it, then boxed it up in the garage under a flickering fluoro before posting it to your local tackle store or mailbox. In The Captain’s lure survey, you’ll hear from some legendary lure makers. Their companies are named after themselves, their kids or their favourite motorcycle. Some are named after suckerfish that cling to the bellies of large predators while others are named after their local fishing grounds. There’s even some named after the mood swings of ex-girlfriends (hats off to you, Dramatic). We couldn’t fit them all in this issue, so we’ve split the Aussie manufacturers into this issue, and the international contingent in the next issue of The Captain. Not everyone wanted to be part of the survey. In fact, one lure craftsman suggested we were promoting thieves. He went in hard, barking into The Captain’s inbox that, “once upon a time, editors supported those who deserved it and shunned those who didn’t.” Ouch. However, The Captain has no knowledge of any such thieves — but if there is a skirt police hotline, we’ll be sure to dob in any we come across. But we digress. In The Captain’s lexicon of lure lore, you’ll read where the lure makers got their inspirations, crafting techniques and preferred rigging styles. You’ll read about the best days they’ve had on the water and their favourite battlewagons. If you haven’t hooked a game fish yet, pay attention to why the lure legends think anglers lose fish (note: The Captain’s crew wishes we’d found this out 20 years ago). And if you’ve never hooked a blue marlin, you will after reading this one. Danny Barrow from Catbo Lures says, “they’re powerful, acrobatic, beautiful and occasionally psychotic. If there’s a weakness in your tackle they will find it”. It seems the hole a blue marlin leaves in the ocean will never be forgotten. If the off-the-shelf skirted lures aren’t doing it for you, get inspired by the kings of custom-made — who have crafted lures out of diamonds, gold, coins, abalone shell, kids’ toys, human ashes, bones, bottle tops, marijuana leaves, rice (yes rice!) and even marriage proposals. To the legends of lure making: we salute you! To the thieves of lure larceny: please hand your lure licence back to The Captain.

t h e r e ar e l u r e s m ad e o u t o f d i am on d s , g ol d , c o i ns , ab al on e s hell, ki d s t o ys , h u m an as h e s , b o ne s , b o t tle t o p s , m ar i j u an a l e av e s , r i c e an d e v e n m ar r i ag e p r o p o s al s . . www.thecaptain.tv

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

Tornado Lures KEN FRITH

KEN named his lure range Tornado because he reckons they’re a force to be reckoned with. If the hook-up rates of game boat Mistress off the top end of Fraser Island this season is anything to go by, then the name is apt. Running exclusively Tornado lures, Mistress recorded epic numbers, including 23 blues in four days, one of them a triple-header. With 40 years of experience in lure manufacturing, Ken says all his babies are handcrafted and polished to the highest standards. Production happens under the one roof (other than the skirts), with sizes ranging from 4.5 to 16 inches. Ken reckons he’s fastidious with the weighting and that this is a factor in getting lures to track straight and swim properly. But Ken’s not just a bluewater bandit. He also loves walking crystal-clear streams tempting wild trout to take a fly.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

Ken, what’s the secret to rigging a Tornado lure? “I’m in regular contact with the best skippers around the globe, discussing what methods work. The verdict for larger lures (above eight inches) is a semi-stiff rig with a single hook, set with a hook lock on the back of the lure, the point of the hook facing down. On smaller lures, the single hook is not locked in and left to swim freely.” Goddit. Why do anglers lose fish? “Lack of knowledge about using the right hooks and not knowing how to sharpen each hook to suit the line class. Many people are willing to pay big dollars for a reputable lure then buy the cheapest hook.” Most unusual request for a custom lure? “I’ve made a few lately, with marriage proposals in them. They’ve all said yes, so that’s a plus. I recently made a black Cubin’ lure as a gift for Grant Shorland Jr.” Favourite game-fishing boat? “A Formula Thunderbird with twin 175HP Suzuki fourstrokes, owned by Daniel Sparks. We built it from the ground up to do exactly what we want.” Favourite lure (not yours)? “Koya. They’re made with the same passion as mine.”

INFO

Est. 1980 Location: Leopold, Victoria Website: tornadolures.com

www.thecaptain.tv

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Colorato Lures JASON SCERRI

JASON SCERRI attributes the name Colorato to his heritage (it means “colour” in Italian) as well as his penchant for colourful lures. His passion started in his teens when he read a magazine article about making lures using old film canisters. His original designs are now sold all over the world including the US, South Africa, Vanuatu, Canada, Italy and NZ. Each Colorato lure is hand-poured and polished in Australia, every step of the process conducted in-house. Before releasing to the market, each model is tested using various weights. The range includes five-inch options through to a 14-inch series, in both slant-head and cupfaced lures.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

Jason’s lure-crafting secret? “I use a unique process that keeps my pressures and temperatures consistent. It’s critical for high-quality heads. Regardless of the time of year, every lure comes out crystal-clear and super-strong. Size and weight is absolutely critical to lure performance. Some can be so temperamental that a lighter skirt fitted to a great lure can turn it into a dog.” Preferred rigging style? “Keep it simple. Use a single hook rig regardless of chasing tuna or big blue marlin.” Most unusual lure? “I stay away from gimmick lures, but know some anglers who throw a gold coin over the side to ask the fish gods for good luck. This led me to produce lures with coin inserts, called the “Mint”. I substitute the weight inserts with the coins so the balance is still right. The Mint has become a very popular lure for me.” That’s mint. Why do people lose fish? “Poorly rigged lures, poor hook selection and poor lure placement in the spread. Different sea conditions require different tactics. Your favourite spread may work beautifully on a calm day, but need a change-up on a rough one.” Good tip! Most memorable fish or fishing trip? “Definitely my first marlin. I was with my wife on a small trailer boat off South West Rocks, NSW. It wasn’t a huge fish at 60kg, but it was on 10kg. It was also a good day when Tasmanian charter boat captain Brett Sharp rang with the news he’d landed a 133kg southern bluefin tuna on a Colorato lure I’d sent him.” Favourite boat? “Ross Hunter’s boat, Broadbill.” Favourite lure (not yours)? Mold Craft lures. If I had to pick just the one, I’d take a Chugger, run in close to the transom.

INFO

Est. 2014 Location: Lake Macquarie, NSW Website: coloratolures.com.au

www.thecaptain.tv

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

REMORA LURES JASON OLIVEY

JASON OLIVEY is the man behind Remora Lures. The idea of crafting his own lures came about 25 years ago, while Jase was working hard in the Harbord Tackle store on Sydney’s Northern Beaches. He reckons remoras are pretty cool so the name, er, stuck. There are about 35 different lure shapes in five sizes. The process starts with a plug made from teak. To test them, Jase makes half a dozen different inserts and heads offshore with his posse. “It’s one of the highlights of being a lure builder — learning from the gurus on the water. I spend a lot of time getting the action and positions right before I sell any lures.” As to what makes Remora lures different, Jase says, “I do photos and kids’ toys in the heads, and trophy lures for tournaments. Hundreds of beer bottle tops have gone into my lure heads. They’re all handmade, one lure at a time. On his locally produced lure, he says, “Most lures made outside Australia have more angle on the face (called a Kona cut after a spot on Hawaii’s Big Island). They’re made for calm water areas, but run them in a bit of swell and they don’t do well.” A good lure maker, Jase reckons, has to be a perfectionist. “The finish has to be polished perfect and inserts need to align with the face. A bubble can be the end of a lure on the production line. I skirt my lures using waxed thread. You can replace the skirts in the future without ripping the heads apart (glued lure heads).” He has fond memories of his dad sharing knowledge of lure crafting — experience Jase is happy to pass on to game clubs and junior anglers. His other mentor was the late Jim Rizzuto from Hawaii, who got used to getting a lot of late-night phone calls when Jase was in his garage pouring heads.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

Preferred rigging style, Jase? “Single hook with mono twist when targeting marlin with nine-inch lures or larger. It’s safer, too. I use double-hook rigs for tuna. Generally speaking, I use thin gauge hooks with light line and small lures.” Best tip for staying connected? “Start with sharp hooks. Keep the boat moving after hooking up. Point the rod towards the fish. Guide the line on the reel (overhead) and move the boat into position to gain line or raise a diving fish, keeping tension on the line at all times. Communication among the crew is critical.” Hearin’ ya. Secret lure crafting tip? “Glue rubber plugs (hook locks) to the back of the heads and pull the crimp in to face the hook up if it’s calm, or face-down if the ocean’s rough.” Favourite game-boat? “Black Watch boats were made for game fishing. I also like walk-around configurations — they’re underrated.” Favourite fish? “Blue marlin. They leave a hole in the ocean where your lure was swimming only to pop up three seconds later off the side of the boat, laughing at you while they overtake the boat. There’s nothing better in lure making than seeing a crew hook and release a big blue on a Remora lure. In fact, a Remora lure won the Golden Lure comp in Port Macquarie last year for the biggest blue marlin.” Favourite lure (not yours)? “Lumo sprocket in the short rigger.”

INFO

Est. 2013 Location: Central Coast, NSW Contact: Facebook/Instagram

www.thecaptain.tv

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

Deadly Tide Lures CLINTON BUSH

CLINTON got the name Deadly Tide from a computer game he played on Windows 95 in the ’90s. It featured underwater aliens and was so large it came on four CDs. His first taste of resin came as a furniture maker and it got Clinton thinking he could make his own lures to support his fishing habit. He bought thousands of lures of his own, but wanted to supply a quality product to as many people as possible. To make it scalable, he worked with a small supplier who could make the lure heads to a consistently high quality. The Deadly Tide range is predominantly skirted lures and dredge teasers. Skirts are sized from eight up to 13-inch in a range of heads, including bullet, cut-face and pusher, with dozens of different colours. They’re sold all around the world, and Clinton is pleased with the growing demand from Florida. His most rewarding day was hearing of a billfish grand slam in one single day off Costa Rica.

KEY QUESTIONS

What’s special about your range, Clinton? “We spend hours and hours testing lures, getting them weighted well and swimming perfectly. It’s the less glamorous side of lure making, but we make 100 at a time so it’s critical to get right. Sometimes you get lucky and the lures swim great straight away. Other times, you cut your losses and move onto something else. I also hand-build dredges and they have been a big hit since launching them at the start of the year. They say in Florida that you can’t compete without a dredge. They’ll eventually be commonplace in the Australian market.” Preferred rigging style? “I don’t use any steel in my rigging and all my lures use rubber hook locks for easy hook positioning. On lures under 12-inches, I run the mono to the hook, spaced correctly with another crimp, then heat shrink the hook to stiff rig it. On bigger lures, I shackle rig and stiff rig the hooks using the heat shrink. I predominantly use Shogun Assassin hooks, which sadly they no longer make.” Why do people lose fish? “With trolling, we’re relying on the set drag on the reel and the boat speed. The best thing people can do is use medium to light gauge, super-sharp hooks and keep the hook facing up when its being trolled, to get the best chance of a hook up in the top of the jaw.” Best thing about the lure industry? “Helping keen fishos catch more fish. All my life I’ve wanted to make a living from fishing and now that I do, it’s amazing.” Best fishing trip? “A solo trip to Bermagui, NSW, earlier this year. I caught three marlin in one day on my own. That’s probably the day I’m most proud of.” Where was the invite? Favourite boat? My Yalta Craft 2200 — The Flying Hellfish. I’ve lost count of the number of people who’ve told me a 150HP wouldn’t be enough for that hull. Well it does almost 50mph, so I don’t know how much faster they want it to go. I love that boat!” Favourite game-fishing lure (not yours)? “Squidgy Blue Water Livies.”

www.thecaptain.tv

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INFO

Est. 2017 Location: South Coast, NSW Contact:. deadlytideluresaustralia.com

03 5248 5662

|

www.edencraft.com.au

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

www.thecaptain.tv

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Catbo Custom Lures DANNY BARROW

DANNY BARROW combined his love of fishing and lathing to create Catbo Custom Lures. The name is an abbreviation of the nicknames of his two kids, Caty and Ambo. His mission is to create special lures that repeatedly produce fish. Catbo has a regular showing at the multimillion-dollar Bisbee tournaments and 80 per cent of them are sold in Australia — NZ, Florida, Hawaii, Oman, Puerto Rico, Colombia, New Caledonia and Cape Verde buy up the rest. The Catbo range includes 17 different head shapes and lengths from four to 20 inches. The range includes some creative shapes that push the boundary of swimming actions. Heads come in soft, medium and hard resins.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

What’s special about your lures, Danny? “The holographic fleck. As kids, we would crush up shell and throw it in the water to attract and excite fish. I wanted to capture this effect with our lures and although the crushed shell didn’t quite work in the heads, the holographic fleck certainly does. Many customers comment on the look when the lure hits the water.” Cool. How do you make ’em? “The masters are created by hand on my old-school industrial wood lathe (no fancy machining). This allows us to test and make changes as required until we have exactly what we want. The master is then moulded so exact replicas can be reproduced and the preferred action doesn’t get lost. The second step is adding the right amount of additives, colours and holographic fleck to produce the desired effect.” Preferred rigging style? “When chasing small marlin, striped marlin, sailfish and tuna, I use a double-hook rig with Gamakatsu SE 4X ST hooks rigged opposite each other. When chasing big black and blue marlin, I use a single Mustad hook with the barb filed down a little finer.” Any unusual models made? “Er, probably shouldn’t say — there may be children reading this. Seriously, though, we made 15 (10-inch) lure heads out of rice for Skel Rice, which is a company in PNG. They Est. catch fish, too!” Best game-fish to chase? 2016 “Blue marlin. They’re powerful, Location: acrobatic, beautiful and occasionally Broome, WA psychotic. They put every part of your Contact: angling to the test. If there’s a weakness, Facebook/Instagram they will find it.” Most memorable fish or fishing trip? “My eight-year-old daughter hooked her first sailfish, but lost it when she stopped winding and let the pressure off to pick her nose. When I asked in shock, ‘what are you doing?’ she replied, ‘picking a booga’ and gave me a look like I was stupid. Ah, kids.” True dat. Favourite boat? “Stabicraft. They’re tough, stable, dry and ride so well for an alloy boat.” If you had to game-fish with one lure that wasn’t yours, which one would it be? “Super Plunger by Joe Yee. The man is an all-round legend.”

INFO

www.thecaptain.tv

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

JB Lures Australia DAVE VENN

JB LURES takes its name from Jervis Bay on the south coast of NSW. In its rough and windy waters, master craftsman Dave Venn refined his lures to track straight and true with an enticing wiggle. Dave reckons, “they’ll work anywhere and on any game fish.” The JB lure heads were designed 25–30 years ago. “We drew up our own shapes, not copying anyone, and used navy technology and materials at HMAS Fleet Air Arm base at Nowra, NSW, to translate the drawings into machined plugs to make the moulds,” says Dave. “Then we experimented with different ballast in the belly and face angles to make them perfect. I use polyester casting resin poured into silicone rubber moulds. When you pour each lure head, you also pour the insert for the next one (or 20). I leave them overnight, then pop them out in the morning.”

KEY QUESTIONS

Preferred rigging, Dave? “Single-hook, semi-stiff, either twisted wire or twisted mono placed with just the eye of the hook within the skirt — pegged in the up position with a toothpick. I have a disdain for rubber hook locks.” Who’s running JB Lures? “Peter Bristow (Katherine B, Madeira), Randy Hodgekiss (Dreamin’ On, Alabama), David Finkelstein (Miss Behavin’, Houston), Allan Legge (High Cotton, Galveston), Steve Epstein (Huntress, Kona), Bryan Toney (Melee, Kona), Chris Donato (Benchmark, Kona), Tracy Epstein (Last Chance, Kona), Todd Barrett (Mama Jo, Kona), Steve Campbell (Blue Marlin Magic, Tonga), Greg Hopping (Pure Indulgence, Samoa), Tim Dean (Calypso, Port Stephens), Corey Hard (Askari, Cairns), Ross Finlayson (Bounty Hunter, Cairns), Mark Parkinson (Black Label, Cairns). There are plenty of others, but some skippers don’t like mentioning what lure they caught a fish on so as not to upset other lure makers.” Impressive list. Any records? “From memory, JB Lures hold five current IGFA world records, including the All-Tackle World Record and 37kg record (167.5kg southern bluefin tuna), and the Women’s and Junior Women’s 60kg record (104.6kg southern bluefin tuna). JB held the IGFA Junior 37kg SBT record four times and there’s a pending IGFA Junior 60kg record (82kg yellowfin). We also have a few Aussie records including the Men’s 24kg record (97.2kg big eye tuna) and the Junior 37kg record (246.7kg blue marlin). We also have the heaviest marlin off Sydney, a 361.1kg blue, the heaviest off Wollongong, a 338.4kg blue, and still hold the NSWGFA Men’s 24kg record (235kg black marlin) set back in November 2000 by yours truly. There are also numerous IGFA and GFAA Fly and Line Class records from teasing and switching on our lures. Dan O’Sullivan set a few off Exmouth in the ’90s.” Phew! That’s a serious trophy cabinet. Any unusual custom lures? “Plenty. I’ve made inserts with real diamonds and gold, human ashes, bones and marijuana leaves. The best one was a marriage proposal. It read, ‘Marry Me Mel’ on the top of the insert of a Mega Chopper.” I hope she said “yes”. What about your most memorable trips? “One December, a 350kg black marlin ate a live 3kg stripey, turned the hook back into the bait on a massive

INFO

Est. 1993 Location: Jervis Bay. NSW Website: jbmarlinlures.com

strike, then swallowed it and stripped 500m of line before regurgitating the bait. The following January, a 400kg-plus black ate a 10-inch medium Donger only to hang the hook on a trapline 40 minutes later. Then in March, a 400kg-plus blue ate a 10-inch Ripper and turned the ocean to foam, tearing 800m of line in the blink of an eye before throwing the hook. None of us will forget that one. It’s these fish that keep you coming back. These three fish were all raised on Reel Quick during the 2004– 2005 season.” Favourite lure (not yours)? “A 10-inch Joe Yee Bubble.”

www.thecaptain.tv

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

FATBOY SAM BAILLIE

SAM BAILLIE’S first attempts at lure building were pretty rudimentary — a barrel sinker insert with some dodgy brown resin poured into a plastic film canister (when photos were still shot on “film” for those folk too young to recall). It was Sam’s hobby. His real job was importing Coggin Lures from the US. In 2013, Sam teamed up with Peter Williams — who was importing Polu Kai Lures from Hawaii — to form a wholesale business, United Tackle. The boys identified a demand for an affordable lure that could be supplied in bulk. Enter the FatBoy, the name a tribute to Sam’s favourite motorcycle, the Harley-Davidson Fat Boy. At first there was the five-inch Mini Maverick, available in 13 colours. Today, the range includes six models across three sizes, available in more than 60 colour patterns. There’s also a range of teasers and other accessories to complement the lures. Sam reckons two things set FatBoy lures apart: consistent build quality and ease of use. “Every FatBoy that pops out of the mould is the same as the last one,” he says. “And you don’t need to be a Cairns skipper to rig one.”

THE KEY QUESTIONS

Sounds like the one for us, Sam. Tell us about the process. “All lure heads start in a computer drawing program and our masters are precision CNC-machined from aluminium, as opposed to the traditional method of a resin master being turned on a lathe. The inserts are poured using a pearlescent tinted resin. After decoration, the insert is placed into a one-piece silicon

mould then vacuum-degassed composite resin is poured. It’s impact-resistant and UV-stabilised so it won’t chip or crack like traditional polyester casting resin, or turn yellow. The heads go through a post-curing cycle in an oven, so no hand-polishing is required. The finished product has a crystal-clear, bubble-free finish and is super-durable.” Sounds impressive. Who’s using your lures around the world? “We’re based on the Gold Coast, so it’s no surprise some of the local captains run FatBoy lures —like Billy Billson on the Viking II, Ross McCubbin on the Lucky Strike and Elliot Muller on the Double Shot. Glenn ‘Johno’ Johnston on Gladius has also done really well with our smaller lures chasing white marlin in Morocco.” Most memorable fish/fishing trip? “Late October 2015, Ribbon Reef #5. We’d fished for five days for nothing of note. In the final 20 minutes of the last day, we sent out our biggest scaly as a Hail Mary. A seriously big fish climbed out of the water and was all over it, then clung to the reef edge for the entire fight. When we finally got the leader, the bow of the boat was right up in the breakers. Captain Billy reckoned it might have been the largest he’s ever caught.” Epic! What’s your favourite boat and why? “A 46ft custom Woodnutt called Viking II. She’s an incredible fishing platform — solid and stable, built with true old-school craftsmanship and performs like a thoroughbred. To be fair, that’s probably also got something to do with the skipper, Billy Billson.”

• • • • • •

www.thecaptain.tv

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INFO

Est. 2012 Location: Gold Coast, Qld Website: unitedtackle.com.au

• • • • • •

Family-owned and operated for 40 years Flat-back transoms, stringers and floors Chips, cracks, scratches, stress lines and holes Underfloor tanks and full stainless fit-outs Bow rails, snapper racks, rocket launchers Tuna tubes, dive compressors and much more...

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

TANTRUM NICK DURHAM

NICK DURHAM named his lures after a Sydney game-fishing boat owned by Glenn and Karen Wright. The duo gave him his first game-fishing experience, trolling skirted lures and catching big blue marlin on Hawaiian-style trolling lures. Intrigued by how the subtle differences in angles, tapers, weights and skirt materials could affect a lure, he decided to make his own. He bought a lathe, a tin of resin and a tub of silicon, and with the help of the late Captain Bart Miller, embarked on his lure craftsman journey.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

Tell us about your inspiration, Nick? “My inspiration comes from the old-school Hawaiian lure makers, but I apply a modern twist. I consider myself a perfectionist, constantly refining the shapes to make them the best they can be — an extra degree of angle on the face, an extra few grams of weight, a slight softening of the leading edge where the face meets the sides of the lure head — it all makes a difference. I also keep my finger on the pulse, fishing 150 days a year as a crewman in Australia and Kona, Hawaii. I also get feedback from some of the best lure fishermen around the world.” That’s a serious test bed. Tell us about your lure range? “I’ve traditionally targeted blue marlin with shapes from around 16 inches down to nine inches and I’m about to release a range of shapes in the Est. seven-inch size. They’re going to be lethal on 2004 striped marlin and small black marlin, so keep Location: an eye out for them.” Sydney, NSW Cool. Do you deliver? Tell us about the process? Website: “It’s very hands-on — from pouring molten tantrumlures.com lead for weights, cutting brass tubing, cutting shell and reflective tapes, to pouring, polishing and skirting every head one by one. The process is extremely involved and intricate. All the materials are the highest quality. The lure heads are high-grade resin that is virtually indestructible. We hand-cut vinyl skirts for our bigger lures because we know they run better.” Interesting. Preferred rigging style? “For big marlin on heavy tackle, I use a single hook cable stiff rig with 28ft of heavy leader. The point of the hook should be roughly around the end of the skirt. My preferred hook is a Pa’a. I orientate the hook using a rubber crimp lock. It points down on all angle-faced lures and points up on flat-face, cupped-face and bullets.” Nice tip. Which notable skippers are using your lures around the world? “Kona captains like Jason Holtz and Chip Van Mols, as well as Aussie captains Corey Hard, Simon Carosi, Daniel Klein, Brent James, Dave Cassar, Tim Dean and Luke Fallon.” Any records? “There has been multiple world and Australian records caught on the lures. They were used exclusively to set the record for the most blue marlin caught in a day in NSW waters — eight blue marlin on Cookie with Captain Daniel Klein and myself on the deck. They were also used exclusively to equal the record for most blue marlin caught in a day trolling Kona waters — seven blue marlin on Pursuit with Captain Jason Holtz and myself on the deck.” Funniest or most unusual lure made? “A Kona customer bought two lures, one for his father, Bob, and one for Bob’s mate Steve. The labels on the inside read ‘F##K YOU BOB!’ and the other read ‘F##K YOU STEVE!’ They got a lot of joy out of that one.” Too funny. Why do people lose fish? “Overcomplicating things. Keep it simple — stick with proven lures, single-hook rigs and only take advice from people who have been there and done it. Develop a systematic

INFO

www.thecaptain.tv

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approach to your lure choice, rigging, drag settings and lure placement. Don’t panic and change everything in the slow times.” I’ll try. Worst thing about the lure industry? “The recent influx of what I like to call Instagram lure makers. They catch a blue marlin and decide they’re going to become a lure maker, start flopping moulds, pour a few fancy looking lure heads then plaster themselves all over social media. It’s easy to make a beautiful-looking lure head; it’s much harder to make a perfectly running lure that will consistently perform.” What kind of fish do you love chasing and why? “That’s an easy one, Pacific blue marlin. The violent bites, incredible speed and agility make them the most challenging of all the marlin species.” Most memorable fish/fishing trip? “Alex, my wife’s 130lb Pacific blue marlin world record she caught in Kona with Captain Chip Van Mols on Monkey Biz II. The bite was incredible and after a few minutes of craziness we had the gaffs in. The fish went 960lb and has held the record since 2013.” What’s your favourite boat and why? “The 44ft Assegai/Pleysier Mauna Kea. It’s the most manoeuvrable boat I have ever fished — built for catching giant marlin and snagging records.” You haven’t seen The Captains’ 445, Nub Tub, back up on one. If you had to game-fish with one lure that wasn’t yours, which one would it be? “A great all-rounder is a nine-inch bullet in blue, silver or pink, from any one of about 10 lure makers. If you’re asking who my favourite lure maker is, it would have to be Scott Crampton.”

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

Dramatic Lures KURT KIGGINS

AN EX GIRLFRIEND encouraged Kurt to take up lure making. In return, he named the lures after her — “Dramatic”. It took months of trial and error until he was happy with the result, sanding and polishing each lure for 20 minutes after drying. The 1064 is Kurt’s most popular lure. He also has a King Kona, which is a tube and a bullet model ranging from seven to 14 inches.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

What’s special about Dramatic lures, mate? “I make my lures as natural as possible, imitating squid, flying fish, sauries and slimies. I even put real fish skin inside the lures.” Tasty. Preferred rigging style? “I learned a great technique from Glanville Heydenrych, captain of Mufasa out of the Gold Coast. It’s a kind of swivel rig and works very well for fussy marlin.” Best thing about being a lure craftsman? “Having boats and buddies to fish with all over the world.” Agreed. Favourite species? “I love chasing yellowfin tuna off Sydney. They make you work hard to outsmart them.” Most memorable fishing session? “We went 3–2–2 on big yellowfin and a solid blue marlin aboard Toona Time off Sydney. I caught them all on Dramatic lures. The other boats were fishing on top of each other at Brown’s Mountain, but we found the fish free-jumping in our own patch of water. I was literally watching the fish swim down sea and yelling to the skipper to turn hard left or right to run into them.” Very cool. We’re tipping that’s your favourite boat, then? “Yep, the Cabo 46 is the best boat I’ve fished on. It made me appreciate high-end electronic gear and it’s a glamour boat, too.” Favourite lure, not yours? “Koya jet bullet seven-inch.”

INFO

Est. 2017 Location: Port Hacking, NSW Contact: Facebook/Instagram

www.thecaptain.tv

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LEGENDS OF THE LURE

SC Lures SHANE COX

SHANE COX loves crafting his own stuff, so his love of fishing naturally led him to lure making. All his lures are handmade, keel-weighted and can be personalised if required. The range consists of cup-faced, bullet, flatfaced and plunger-style heads with Yo-Zuri skirts in a range of different styles and colours. The paua shell is sourced from New Zealand and Shane’s biggest challenge is pouring hard resin in Victoria’s ambient temperature. Distribution is mainly Victoria and the New South Wales south coast, but thanks to excellent reports from customers, he’s looking to grow nationally.

THE KEY QUESTIONS

Preferred rigging style? “A single stiff rig to IGFA standards, eliminating joins in the leader and tangles when hit by a marlin.” Favourite lure? “The SC baby mobile lure hanging from the panic handle above my daughter’s car seat. No, there’s no hook.” Cute. Best tips for staying connected? “Test your knots, perfect your hook style and Est. keep the line tight.” 2015 Biggest frustrations of being a lure maker? Location: “Copying and mass production from Seaspray, Victoria overseas. It’s a killer to the handcraftsmen.” Contact Most memorable fishing trip? Facebook/Instagram “Three Kings Islands in New Zealand. The beasts were breaking 100lb braid. We were all buckled over and I landed a 32kg model.” Best game-fishing boat? “You can’t beat the versatility of a walk-around cabin, and I’m a fan of alloy hulls. They’re not as precious as glass.” Favourite lure, (not yours)? “The JB Dingo personalised by Dave Venn. He’s a great bloke with great lures.”

INFO

www.thecaptain.tv

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RUM & RATIONS

RECIPE: MIGUEL MAESTRE IMAGES: MIGUEL MAESTRE, L U K E P O T T S & T H E C A P TA I N

FLAKE & CHIPS

The only thing better than fish and chips from a shop is a fresh serve — caught and cooked by you. In keeping with the sharkie theme this issue, I’m serving up my favourite flake and chip recipe. But wait, there’s more. This recipe includes my own tartare sauce and handmade chips. Oh, and beer, of course. Now all you need is a willing audience to marvel at your stories of shark gaffing while wiping the tartare sauce from their lips.

INGREDIENTS Miguel’s Tartare Sauce

6 soft-boiled eggs, runny (6 minutes, then straight to iced water to peel) 2 pink eschalots, finely diced 2 garlic gloves, finely diced 1 bunch chives, finely chopped ½ bunch dill, finely chopped 5 cornichons, finely diced 10 baby capers Splash of sherry vinegar (you can use white or cider vinegar instead) Splash of lemon juice Extra virgin olive oil, to combine

Miguel’s Mayonnaise:

1 whole egg straight from fridge 250ml light olive oil 1 pinch sea salt Splash of lemon juice ½ bunch dill, finely chopped Extra virgin olive oil, to combine Beer Battered Flake & Chips: 800g flake fillet 100g plain flour

Batter:

100g plain flour 100g self-raising flour 200g cornflour ½ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon turmeric 500ml of beer with a few ice cubes

Chips:

Sebago potatoes

METHOD Miguel’s Tartare Sauce

• In a large mixing bowl, combine all ingredients.

Miguel’s Mayonnaise

• In the glass of a stick blender, crack egg, add olive oil, lemon juice and a pinch of salt. • Insert stick blender all the way to the bottom of the glass, blend until set and slowly remove blender up the glass until of mayonnaise consistency. • Once combined, fold in all tartare ingredients and serve.

Beer Batter

• Whisk all ingredients until smooth. Your batter should be thin, but not too watery. • Place in fridge and allow to rest for 2 hours.

Beer Battered Flake & Chips

• You will need a plate with some plain flour to dust your flake fillets. • Using your deep fryer at 185 degrees Celsius, cook your chips for 3 minutes or until golden brown. • Take out and place on paper towel. • Dust your flake fillets with plain flour and place in batter. • Only fry half the amount of flake at one time to leave room in the fryer. • Take the fillets out of the batter one at a time, using the side of the bowl to wipe off excess batter. • Fry for 2–3 minutes depending on the size and thickness of your fillets. • Place on paper towel on plate. • Repeat with the rest of the flake. Note: Serves 4. Best served on large platters with an ice-cold beer.

Handmade Chips

• Peel potatoes and cut into thick, long chips, about 15mm wide and as long as the potato will allow. • First blanch your chips at 160 degrees Celsius for 5 minutes • Then turn the deep fryer — or pot of oil — off and leave the chips to keep cooking for a further 3 minutes. • Take them out and place in the fridge to cool down until you’re ready to use them.

www.thecaptain.tv

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“Now all you need is a willing audience to marvel at your stories of shark gaffing.”

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COMING NEXT ISSUE

hty tale s Mig

SEX ON THE SEA

HOW TO BANG ON A BOAT

WHITSUNDAYS IN A WHITTLEY

THE CAPTAIN BUSTS OUT HIS SPEEDOS

700HP WHITEPOINTER

WE WATER-TEST THE MEANEST ONE YET

www.thecaptain.tv

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FOUNDING C0-CAPTAINS

A tribute to the good folk who put the wind in The Captain’s sails... Bruce Franks Jake McGowan Alan Ball Andrew Westlake Paul Martin Harry Foullas Deb Bibby Richard Curie Mark Stav Theo Gorgorinis Phillip Agius Rick Forsyth

Steven Gusman Shane May Boba Bibby Stephen Curwood Daniel Suttil David Montague Louise Chellingworth ReelTackle Ben Bylett Mark Irvine Joel Agresta Paul Flynn

Jamie Coleman Neil McAully Sean Bidder Jeri Murphy Carissa Louise Lorenzo Lorusso Paul Bruun Andrew Armitage Max Bibby Originals Josh Ruxton Tony Barber Millie Middis-Engelaer Thomas Smith Joel Ryan Tom van Vliet Patrick Jones Marcus Watton C. James Hook Dennis Brazakka Wallace Chris Murphy Steven Foullas Keith Saunders Robbie Adamo Jon Hetherington

Foundation Member Profile Name: Louise Chellingworth (right, bottom)

Lives: Richmond, NSW (on Sydney’s exotic fringe). Job: I’m a graphic designer. At work, they call me the “zhush master”. Boat owned: One of those blue plastic pool shells from Kmart. I use it to wash the dogs. As kids, my sisters and I used to launch it into the backyard dam. That’s growing up in ’90s rural Australian for you. Dream boat: A Viking ship — preferably with a sword-swinging Viking husband. Best boating or fishing adventure: Being escorted by The Captain’s crew around Pittwater on Sydney’s Northern Beaches back in 2015. We dived, had a picnic and cast lures to surface-feeding kingies. It was ace. I was with my German friend, Nina, chucking a sickie. My boss also happens to be a father of one of the The Captain’s crew, so hopefully he’s not reading this. I lost my iPhone that day, then found it a couple of hours later, glistening underwater — and it still worked. Favourite yarn in The Captain to date: Nothing beats seafood and beer. Will definitely be trying the roasted octopus pulpo al horno this summer. Favourite captain : Captain Joe. He’s a famous YouTuber and has taught me everything I know about aviation.

www.thecaptain.com.au www.thecaptain.tv

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EXTREME

ON EVERY LEVEL

POWER AND THRUST

TOUGHNESS AND RELIABILITY

SYSTEM INTEGRATION CONTROL, CONVENIENCE AND CARE

DISCOVER EXTREME RELIABILITY

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Profile for TheCaptainMag

The Captain - Issue 13