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Regular Meeting of the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) Board Of Managers, for Wednesday, December 7, 2016 6:00 p.m. at the office of the CRWD, 1410 Energy Park Drive, Suite 4, St. Paul, Minnesota. REGULAR MEETING AGENDA Materials Enclosed I.

Call to Order of Regular Meeting (President Joe Collins) A) Attendance B) Review, Amendments and Approval of the Agenda

II.

Public Comment – For Items not on the Agenda (Please observe a limit of three minutes per person.)

III.

Permit Applications and Program Updates (Permit Process: 1) Staff Review/Recommendation, 2) Applicant Response, 3) Public Comment, and 4) Board Discussion and Action.) A) Permit #16-024 Hmong Academy Expansion (Kelley) B) Permit #16-027 RiverEast School (Hosch) C) Permit #16-028 Adams School (Kelley)

IV.

Special Reports – Monitoring Program Review, Britta Suppes and Bob Fossum

V.

Action Items A) AR: Approve Minutes of the November 16, 2016 Regular Meeting (Sylvander) B) AR: Approve 2017 Partner Grants (Schwantes) C) AR: Approve 2017 Special Grants (Zwonitzer) D) AR: Approve Contractor for Highland Ravine #3 Outlet (Eleria)

VI.

Unfinished Business A) FI: TBI Repairs Station 0+00 – 28+49 (Eleria) B) FI: 2016 CRWD Awards Program Update (Bromelkamp) C) FI: 2017 Budget Update (Doneux)

VII.

General Information A) Administrator’s Report (Doneux)

VIII. Next Meetings A) Wednesday, December 14, 2016 CAC Meeting B) Wednesday, December 21, 2016, Board Meeting, 5:00 PM at Wilder Foundation (Room 2410) IX.

Adjournment

Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District


Capitol Region Watershed District Applicant:

Pao Yang Hmong Academy 1515 Brewster Street St. Paul, MN 55108

Permit 16-024 Hmong Academy Expansion Consultant: John Brandel Kodet Architectural Group 15 Groveland Terrace Minneapolis, MN 55403

Description: School expansion and construction of new athletic fields Stormwater Management: Three underground infiltration systems, one artificial turf field, and one infiltration basin. District Rule: C D F Disturbed Area: 12 Acres Impervious Area: 5.89 Acres

Snelling Ave

STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve with 8 Conditions: 1.Receipt of $29,445 surety and documentation of maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County. 2.Provide plans signed by a professional engineer per the Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID. 3.Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 4.Provide documentation from the MPCA stating infiltration on the site is allowed. 5.The infiltration basin (Pond 2P) can be removed from the plan set and the HydroCAD model. The basin is not needed to meet CRWD rate, volume, and water quality standards. However, if the basin remains, resolve the following items: a. The Minnesota Stormwater Manual does not recommend infiltration basins within 10 feet of a building. b. The peak elevation for the infiltration system is 908.79 and the adjacent building elevation is 908.7. c. The overflow grate for the basin is a 6-inch horizontal orifice in HydroCAD. All other catchbasins in HydroCAD have a 15.4-inch horizontal grate. Provide a detail to substantiate this orifice. 6.Adjust the HydroCAD with the following changes: a. Remove Ponds 4P (Trench Drain 1), 3P (CB 5), & 1P (CB6) from the model. They are not necessary to meet rate control. b. Increase the weir height in STMH-1 to 908.0 on Detail C1on Sheet C4.3. This will keep the peak elevation at 907.9. 7.Revise the HydroCAD modeling for BMP2a and BMP2b. The outflow rate is greater than the inflow rate for both. 8.Include a typical detail or specification for catchbasin grates. The specified grates on St. Paul typical details are all solid covers.

Permit Location Permit Report 16-024

Brewster

Aerial Photo Board Meeting Date: 12/07/16


Capitol Region Watershed District Permit Report CRWD Permit #:

16-024

Review date:

November 30, 2016

Project Name:

Hmong Academy Expansion

Applicant:

Ed Kodet & John Brandl Kodet Architectural Group 15 Groveland Terrace Minneapolis, MN 55403 612.377.2737 ekodet@kodet.com jbrandel@kodet.com

Purpose:

Expansion of Hmong Academy, construction of exterior play and sport spaces, and associated parking.

Location:

1515 Brewster Ave, St. Paul, MN 55108

Applicable Rules:

C, D, and F

Recommendation:

Approve with 8 Conditions

EXHIBITS: 1. Civil Plans (Sheets C0.1, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.1, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 4.1, 4.2, & 4.3), by Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc., dated 11/30/16, rcvd. 11/30/16. 2. Stormwater Calculations, by Hansen Thorp Pellinen Olson Inc., dated 11/30/16, rcvd. 11/30/16. 3. Maintenance Agreement for Best Management Practices, not dated, rcvd. 10/24/16. 4. Site Survey, by Harry S Johnson Co, Inc., dated 7/18/16, rcvd. 10/14/16. 5. Phase I Environmental Assessment – Addendum 01, by Professional Service Industries, Inc,, dated 10/3/16, rcvd. 10/14/16. 6. Geoprobe Test Results, by Pace Analytical, dated 11/30/15, rcvd. 10/14/16. 7. Asbestos, Lead-Based Paint, & Regulated Waste Survey Report, by Professional Service Industries, Inc,, dated, 12/16/15, rcvd. 10/14/16. 8. Response Action Plan (RAP), by Professional Service Industries, Inc, dated 9/16, rcvd. 10/14/16.

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9. Underground Storage Tank (UST) Removal, by Professional Service Industries, Inc, dated 9/14/16, rcvd. 10/14/16. 10. Geotechnical Engineering Services Report, by Professional Service Industries, Inc,, dated 8/30/16, rcvd. 10/14/16. 11. Geotechnical Engineering Services Report, by Professional Service Industries, Inc,, dated 12/11/16, rcvd. 10/14/16. 12. Minnesota Pollution Control Agency Investigation Report Form, by Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, dated 11/1/13, rcvd. 10/14/16. 13. Phase I Environmental Assessment Report, by Professional Service Industries, Inc,, dated 11/27/15, rcvd. 10/14/16. 14. Limited Phase II Environmental Site Assessment Report, by Professional Service Industries, Inc,, dated 12/16/15, rcvd. 10/14/16.

HISTORY & CONSIDERATIONS: Contaminated soils and groundwater are present onsite. Three spills have been reported from the underground storage tanks (UST). The spills occurred in 1993 and 2012. The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) has closed both investigations as of November 2013. Contamination above acceptable levels was reported in soil and groundwater samples taken from the soil boring logs on 8/17/16. RULE C: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Standards  Proposed discharge rates for the 2-, 10-, and 100-year events shall not exceed existing rates.  Developments and redevelopments must reduce runoff volumes in the amount equivalent to an inch of runoff from the impervious areas of the site.  Stormwater must be pretreated before discharging to infiltration areas to maintain the long-term viability of the infiltration area.  Developments and redevelopments must incorporate effective non-point source pollution reduction BMPs to achieve 90% total suspended solid removal. Findings 1. A hydrograph method based on sound hydrologic theory is used to analyze runoff for the design or analysis of flows and water levels. 2. Runoff rates for the proposed activity do not exceed existing runoff rates for the 2-, 10-, and 100-year critical storm events. Stormwater leaving the project area is discharged into a well-defined receiving channel or pipe and routed to a public drainage system. 3. Stormwater runoff volume retention is achieved onsite in the amount equivalent to the runoff generated from 1.1 inch of rainfall over the W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2016\16-024 Hmong Academy Field and Expansion\16-024 Permit Report_R5.doc Page 2 of 5


impervious surfaces of the development. It is not certain if infiltration is recommended on the site since groundwater contamination is present; a Response Action Plan (RAP) was submitted to the MPCA and is under review. a. The amount of proposed impervious onsite is 256,525 square feet. b. Volume retention required: 256,525 ft2 x 1.1 inches x 1 ft/12 inches = 23,515 ft3 Volume Volume 1.1 inch Retention Retention BMP Runoff Required Provided below (cu. ft.) (cu. ft.) outlet (cu. ft.) BMP 1 – Underground 5,051 5,925 Infiltration BMP 2a – Underground 4,476 4,671 Infiltration BMP 2b – Underground 23,515 2,696 2,752 Infiltration BMP 3 – Underground 11,369 10,412 Infiltration Total 23,760 CF

4. 5. 6. 7.

2 inch Runoff (cu. ft.) 9,184 8,140 4,901 20,672

c. Banking of excess volume retention is not proposed. d. Infiltration volume and facility sizes have been calculated using the appropriate hydrological soil group classification and design infiltration rate. e. The infiltration areas are capable of infiltrating the required volume within 48 hours. f. Stormwater runoff is pretreated to remove solids before discharging to infiltration areas. Alternative compliance sequencing has not been requested. Best management practices achieve 90% total suspended solids removal from the runoff generated on an annual basis. A recordable executed maintenance agreement has not been submitted. Adequate maintenance access is provided for surface and/or underground systems. A site specific plan, schedule, and narrative for maintenance of the proposed stormwater management practices has been submitted.

RULE D: FLOOD CONTROL Standards  Compensatory storage shall be provided for fill placed within the 100-year floodplain.  All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to a project site shall comply with District freeboard requirements. Findings W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2016\16-024 Hmong Academy Field and Expansion\16-024 Permit Report_R5.doc Page 3 of 5


1. There is no floodplain on the property according to FEMA. 2. All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to the project site do not comply with CRWD freeboard requirements. The infiltration basin is within 10-feet of a building and 100-year event is not 2feet below the low opening. RULE E: WETLAND MANAGEMENT Standard  Wetlands shall not be drained, filled (wholly or in part), excavated, or have sustaining hydrology impacted such that there will be a decrease in the inherent (existing) functions and values of the wetland.  A minimum buffer of 25 feet of permanent nonimpacted vegetative ground cover abutting and surrounding a wetland is required. Findings 1. There are no known wetlands located on the property. RULE F: EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL Standards  A plan shall demonstrate that appropriate erosion and sediment control measures protect downstream water bodies from the effects of a landdisturbing activity.  Erosion Control Plans must adhere to the MPCA Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas Manual. Findings 1. Erosion and sediment control measures are consistent with best management practices, as demonstrated in the MPCA manual Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas. 2. Adjacent properties are protected from sediment transport/deposition. 3. Wetlands, waterbodies and water conveyance systems are protected from erosion/sediment transport/deposition. 4. Project site is greater than 1 acre; an NPDES permit is required. A SWPPP has been submitted and satisfies NPDES requirements. RULE G: ILLICIT DISCHARGE AND CONNECTION Standard  Stormwater management and utility plans shall indicate all existing and proposed connections from developed and undeveloped lands for all water that drains to the District MS4. Findings 1. New direct connections or replacement of existing connections are not proposed. 2. Prohibited discharges are not proposed. W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2016\16-024 Hmong Academy Field and Expansion\16-024 Permit Report_R5.doc Page 4 of 5


Recommendation: Approve with 8 Conditions Conditions: 1. Receipt of $29,445 surety and documentation of maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County. 2. Provide plans signed by a professional engineer per the Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID. 3. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 4. Provide documentation from the MPCA stating infiltration on the site is allowed. 5. The infiltration basin (Pond 2P) can be removed from the plan set and the HydroCAD model. The basin is not needed to meet CRWD rate, volume, and water quality standards. However, if the basin remains, resolve the following items: a. The Minnesota Stormwater Manual does not recommend infiltration basins within 10 feet of a building. b. The peak elevation for the infiltration system is 908.79 and the adjacent building elevation is 908.7. c. The overflow grate for the basin is a 6-inch horizontal orifice in HydroCAD. All other catchbasins in HydroCAD have a 15.4-inch horizontal grate. Provide a detail to substantiate this orifice. 6. Adjust the HydroCAD with the following changes: a. Remove Ponds 4P (Trench Drain 1), 3P (CB 5), & 1P (CB6) from the model. They are not necessary to meet rate control. b. Increase the weir height in STMH-1 to 908.0 on Detail C1on Sheet C4.3. This will keep the peak elevation at 907.9. 7. Revise the HydroCAD modeling for BMP2a and BMP2b. The outflow rate is greater than the inflow rate for both BMPs. 8. Include a typical detail or specification for catchbasin grates. The specified grates on St. Paul typical details are all solid covers.

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Capitol Region Watershed District Applicant:

Rosemary Dolata St. Paul Public Schools 1930 Como Avenue St. Paul, MN 55108

Permit 16-027 RiverEast School Consultant: Joel Maier BKBM Engineers 5930 Brooklyn Blvd Minneapolis, MN 55429-2518

Description: Construction of a new K-8 special education facility. Stormwater Management: One underground infiltration system. District Rule: —C D F Disturbed Area: 5.56 Acres Impervious Area: 2.303 Acres STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve with 5 Conditions: 1. Receipt of $16,100 surety and documentation of maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County. 2. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 3. Label or specify the pretreatment sump depth. Per EPA guidance, sump depths shall be four times the outlet pipe diameter. 4. Provide adequate maintenance access for the underground infiltration system. 5. Revise SWPPP to include the following: a. Disturbed soils shall be stabilized within 7 days of inactivity per Appendix A, Section C.1 of the Minnesota NPDES. b. Infiltration perimeter control and erosion control practices shall remain in place until the final completion of the project or vegetation has been established (whichever is later). c. Installation of infiltration practices shall be done during periods of dry weather and completed before a rainfall event. Placement of engineered soils shall be on dry native soil only. d. Excavation of infiltration areas shall be completed using a backhoe with a toothed bucket. e. Native soils in infiltration areas shall be de-compacted to a minimum depth of 18 inches prior to placing engineered soil. f. The bottom excavation surface of infiltration areas shall be level without dips or swales. g. Engineered soil shall remain uncontaminated (not mixed with other soil) before and during installation. h. During construction, stormwater must be routed around infiltration areas until all construction activity has ceased and tributary surfaces are cleaned of sediment.

Dale St.

Jessamine Ave.

Permit Location Permit Report 16-027

Aerial Photo Board Meeting Date: 12/07/2016


Capitol Region Watershed District Permit Report CRWD Permit #:

16-027

Review date:

November 17, 2016

Project Name:

RiverEast SPPS

Applicant:

Joel Maier BKBM Engineers, Inc 5930 Brooklyn Boulevard Minneapols, MN 55429 (763)-843-0420

Purpose:

Addition of a new building, parking lots, and playground area

Location:

1050 Kent Street, St Paul, MN

Applicable Rules:

C, D, and F

Recommendation:

Approve with 5 Conditions

EXHIBITS: 1. Hydrology Calculations for SPPS River East, by BKBM Engineers, dated 11/15/16, rcvd. 11/17/16. 2. Geotechnical Report, by Northern Technologies, LLC, dated 9/23/16, rcvd. 11/17/16. 3. Civil Set (Sheets 200.CD, 200.CG, 200.CU, 200.CP, 200.DT, 201.DT, & 200.SW), by BKBM Engineers, dated 11/16/16, rcvd. 11/17/16. 4. Maintenance Agreement, by BKBM Engineers, not dated, rcvd. 11/17/16. HISTORY & CONSIDERATIONS: None. RULE C: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Standards  Proposed discharge rates for the 2-, 10-, and 100-year events shall not exceed existing rates.  Developments and redevelopments must reduce runoff volumes in the amount equivalent to an inch of runoff from the impervious areas of the site.  Stormwater must be pretreated before discharging to infiltration areas to maintain the long-term viability of the infiltration area. W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2016\16-027, RiverEast, SPPS\16-027 Permit Report.doc Page 1 of 4


ďƒ˜ Developments and redevelopments must incorporate effective non-point source pollution reduction BMPs to achieve 90% total suspended solid removal. Findings 1. A hydrograph method based on sound hydrologic theory is used to analyze runoff for the design or analysis of flows and water levels. 2. Runoff rates for the proposed activity do not exceed existing runoff rates for the 2-, 10-, and 100-year critical storm events. Stormwater leaving the project area is discharged into a well-defined receiving channel or pipe and routed to a public drainage system. 3. Stormwater runoff volume retention is achieved onsite in the amount equivalent to the runoff generated from 1.1 inch of rainfall over the impervious surfaces of the development. a. The amount of proposed impervious onsite is 100,325 square feet. b. Volume retention required: 100,325 ft2 x 1.1 inches x 1 ft/12 inches = 9,196 ft3 Volume Volume 1.1 inch 2 inch Retention Retention BMP Runoff Runoff Required Provided below (cu. ft.) (cu. ft.) (cu. ft.) outlet (cu. ft.) Underground 12,385 22,519 13,547 Infiltration 9,196 Total 13,547 cf c. Banking of excess volume retention is not proposed. d. Infiltration volume and facility size have been calculated using the appropriate hydrological soil group classification and design infiltration rate. e. The infiltration area is capable of infiltrating the required volume within 48 hours. f. Stormwater runoff is pretreated to remove solids before discharging to infiltration areas. However, it is not known if pre-treatment is sufficient; the sump depth was not provided. 4. Alternative compliance sequencing has not been requested. 5. Best management practices achieve 90% total suspended solids removal from the runoff generated on an annual basis. 6. A recordable executed maintenance agreement has been submitted. Adequate maintenance access is not provided for surface and/or underground system. Maintenance agreement includes a site specific plan, schedule, and narrative for maintenance of the proposed stormwater management practices. RULE D: FLOOD CONTROL

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Standards  Compensatory storage shall be provided for fill placed within the 100-year floodplain.  All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to a project site shall comply with District freeboard requirements. Findings 1. There is not floodplain on the property according to FEMA. 2. All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to the project site comply with CRWD freeboard requirements. RULE E: WETLAND MANAGEMENT Standard  Wetlands shall not be drained, filled (wholly or in part), excavated, or have sustaining hydrology impacted such that there will be a decrease in the inherent (existing) functions and values of the wetland.  A minimum buffer of 25 feet of permanent nonimpacted vegetative ground cover abutting and surrounding a wetland is required. Findings 1. There are no known wetlands located on the property. RULE F: EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL Standards  A plan shall demonstrate that appropriate erosion and sediment control measures protect downstream water bodies from the effects of a landdisturbing activity.  Erosion Control Plans must adhere to the MPCA Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas Manual. Findings 1. Erosion and sediment control measures are consistent with best management practices, as demonstrated in the MPCA manual Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas. 2. Adjacent properties are protected from sediment transport/deposition. 3. Wetlands, waterbodies and water conveyance systems are protected from erosion/sediment transport/deposition. 4. Project site is greater than 1 acre; an NPDES permit is required. A SWPPP has been submitted but does not satisfy NPDES requirements. RULE G: ILLICIT DISCHARGE AND CONNECTION Standard  Stormwater management and utility plans shall indicate all existing and proposed connections from developed and undeveloped lands for all water that drains to the District MS4.

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Findings 1. New direct connections or replacement of existing connections are not proposed. 2. Prohibited discharges are not proposed. Recommendation: Approve with 5 Conditions Conditions: 1. Receipt of $16,100 surety and documentation of maintenance agreement recorded with Ramsey County. 2. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 3. Label or specify the pretreatment sump depth. Per EPA guidance, sump depths shall be four times the outlet pipe diameter. 4. Provide adequate maintenance access for the underground infiltration system. 5. Revise SWPPP to include the following: a. Disturbed soils shall be stabilized within 7 days of inactivity per Appendix A, Section C.1 of the Minnesota NPDES. b. Infiltration perimeter control and erosion control practices shall remain in place until the final completion of the project or vegetation has been established (whichever is later). c. Installation of infiltration practices shall be done during periods of dry weather and completed before a rainfall event. Placement of engineered soils shall be on dry native soil only. d. Excavation of infiltration areas shall be completed using a backhoe with a toothed bucket. e. Native soils in infiltration areas shall be de-compacted to a minimum depth of 18 inches prior to placing engineered soil. f. The bottom excavation surface of infiltration areas shall be level without dips or swales. g. Engineered soil shall remain uncontaminated (not mixed with other soil) before and during installation. h. During construction, stormwater must be routed around infiltration areas until all construction activity has ceased and tributary surfaces are cleaned of sediment. Note: Applicant proposes 4,351 cf of additional volume retention. The applicant may be interested banking the additional volume.

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Capitol Region Watershed District Applicant:

Kelly Wilcox St. Paul Public Schools 1930 Como Avenue Saint Paul, MN 55108

Permit 16-028 Adams School Consultant: Mitchell Cookas Solution Blue 318 Cedar Street St. Paul, MN 55101

Description: Expansion of existing school building Stormwater Management: Underground filtration system District Rule: C D F Disturbed Area: 1.95 Acres Impervious Area: 1.27 Acres STAFF RECOMMENDATION: Approve with 5 Conditions: 1. Provide plans signed by a professional engineer per the Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID. 2. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 3. Revise Grad-3: Underground Storm Chambers on Sheet C8.0: a. Include filter media and drain tile. At a minimum, the Minnesota Stormwater Manual requires 18” of filter media. b. Adjust the sump depth noted on the inlet manhole detail. The detail says the sump is 4’ deep, while Sheet C5.0 shows a 3’ sump. 4. Revise SWPPP per report conditions a-d. 5. Revise proposed drainage area map and HydroCAD model. Drainage areas A, B, C, 1, and one-half of 3 shall be routed to the proposed filtration system. Existing impervious area in these drainage areas is not subject to CRWD volume retention rule, but areas must be included to accurately determine high water levels and discharge rates.

Second Ave

Permit Location Permit Report 16-028

Aerial Photo Board Meeting Date: 12/17/16


Capitol Region Watershed District Permit Report CRWD Permit #:

16-028

Review date:

November 18, 2016

Project Name:

Adams Spanish Immersion School Expansion

Applicant:

Mitchell Cookas Solution Blue, Inc. 318 Cedar Street Saint Paul, MN 55101 651-294-0038 mcookas@solutionblue.com

Purpose:

Redevelopment of the SPPS Adams school with two new buildings and parking lots.

Location:

615 South Chatsworth Street, St Paul, MN 55101

Applicable Rules:

C, D, and F

Recommendation:

Approve with 5 Conditions

EXHIBITS: 1. Civil Plan Set (Sheets C1.0, C1.1, C2.0, C3.0, C4.0, C5.0, C6.0, C7.0, C8.0, L1.0, L2.0, & L3.0) by Solution Blue, not dated, rcvd. 11/17/16. 2. SPPS Adams School Stormwater Management Plan & Report, dated 11/15/16, rcvd. 11/17/16. 3. Geotechnical Report, by Braun Intertec, dated 9/2/16, rcvd. 11/17/16. HISTORY & CONSIDERATIONS: None. RULE C: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT Standards  Proposed discharge rates for the 2-, 10-, and 100-year events shall not exceed existing rates.  Developments and redevelopments must reduce runoff volumes in the amount equivalent to an inch of runoff from the impervious areas of the site.

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 Stormwater must be pretreated before discharging to infiltration areas to maintain the long-term viability of the infiltration area.  Developments and redevelopments must incorporate effective non-point source pollution reduction BMPs to achieve 90% total suspended solid removal. Findings 1. A hydrograph method based on sound hydrologic theory is used to analyze runoff for the design or analysis of flows and water levels. 2. Runoff rates for the proposed activity do not exceed existing runoff rates for the 2-, 10-, and 100-year critical storm events. Stormwater leaving the project area is discharged into a well-defined receiving channel or pipe and routed to a public drainage system. 3. Stormwater runoff volume retention is achieved onsite in the amount equivalent to the runoff generated from 1.1 inch of rainfall over the impervious surfaces of the development. a. The amount of proposed impervious onsite is 55,467 square feet. b. Volume retention required: 55,467 ft2 x 1.1 inches x 1 ft/12 inches = 5,084 ft3 Volume Volume 1.1 inch 2 inch Retention Retention BMP Runoff Runoff Required Provided below (cu. ft.) (cu. ft.) (cu. ft.) outlet (cu. ft.) None, filtration is proposed 5,084 Total cf c. Filtration using sand media (55% credit) is proposed due to shallow bedrock. However, an 18” sand layer is not shown on detail Grad 3 on Sheet C8.0. If that layer is added to the detail, the information below will likely satisfy volume retention requirements. Filtration required: 5,084 ft3 x 1.82 = 9,253 ft3 Filtration Filtration 1.1 inch 2 inch Volume Volume BMP Runoff Runoff Required Provided below (cu. ft.) (cu. ft.) (cu. ft.) outlet (cu. ft.) Underground Filtration 10,728 4,423 9,328 9,253 Total 9,328 cf d. Banking of excess volume retention is not proposed. e. Filtration volume and facility size have been calculated using the appropriate hydrological soil group classification and design infiltration rate. f. The filtration area is capable of filtering the required volume within 48 hours.

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g. Stormwater runoff is pretreated to remove solids before discharging to filtration areas. 4. Alternative compliance sequencing has not been requested. 5. Best management practices achieve 90% total suspended solids removal from the runoff generated on an annual basis. 6. An agreement exists between CRWD and Saint Pal Public Schools. Adequate maintenance access is provided for surface and/or underground system. Maintenance agreement does not include a site specific plan, schedule, and narrative for maintenance of the proposed stormwater management practices. RULE D: FLOOD CONTROL Standards  Compensatory storage shall be provided for fill placed within the 100-year floodplain.  All habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to a project site shall comply with District freeboard requirements. Findings 1. There is not a floodplain on the property according to FEMA. 2. It is not known if all habitable buildings, roads, and parking structures on or adjacent to the project site comply with CRWD freeboard requirements. The area directed to the underground filtration system in HydroCAD is not correct. RULE E: WETLAND MANAGEMENT Standard  Wetlands shall not be drained, filled (wholly or in part), excavated, or have sustaining hydrology impacted such that there will be a decrease in the inherent (existing) functions and values of the wetland.  A minimum buffer of 25 feet of permanent nonimpacted vegetative ground cover abutting and surrounding a wetland is required. Findings 1. There are no wetlands located on the property. RULE F: EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL Standards  A plan shall demonstrate that appropriate erosion and sediment control measures protect downstream water bodies from the effects of a landdisturbing activity.  Erosion Control Plans must adhere to the MPCA Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas Manual. Findings

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1. Erosion and sediment control measures are consistent with best management practices, as demonstrated in the MPCA manual Protecting Water Quality in Urban Areas. 2. Adjacent properties are protected from sediment transport/deposition. 3. Wetlands, waterbodies and water conveyance systems are protected from erosion/sediment transport/deposition. 4. Project site is greater than 1 acre; an NPDES permit is required. A SWPPP has been submitted and satisfies NPDES requirements. RULE G: ILLICIT DISCHARGE AND CONNECTION Standard  Stormwater management and utility plans shall indicate all existing and proposed connections from developed and undeveloped lands for all water that drains to the District MS4. Findings 1. New direct connections or replacement of existing connections are not proposed. 2. Prohibited discharges are not proposed. Recommendation: Approve with 5 Conditions Conditions: 1. Provide plans signed by a professional engineer per the Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID. 2. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 3. Revise Grad-3: Underground Storm Chambers on Sheet C8.0: a. Include filter media and drain tile. At a minimum, the Minnesota Stormwater Manual requires 18” of filter media. b. Adjust the sump depth noted on the inlet manhole detail. The detail says the sump is 4’ deep, while Sheet C5.0 shows a 3’ sump. 4. Revise SWPPP to include the following: a. Filtration perimeter control and erosion control practices shall remain in place until the final completion of the project or vegetation has been established (whichever is later). b. Installation of filtration practices shall be done during periods of dry weather and completed before a rainfall event. Placement of engineered soils shall be on dry native soil only. c. Engineered soil shall remain uncontaminated (not mixed with other soil) before and during installation. d. During construction, stormwater must be routed around filtration areas until all construction activity has ceased and tributary surfaces are cleaned of sediment. 5. Revise proposed drainage area map and HydroCAD model. Drainage areas A, B, C, 1, and one-half of 3 shall be routed to the proposed filtration system. Existing impervious area in these drainage areas is not subject to CRWD volume retention W:\07 Programs\Permitting\2016\16-028 Adams School\16-028 Permit Report_R1.doc Page 4 of 5


rule, but areas must be included to accurately determine high water levels and discharge rates.

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December 7, 2016 Board Meeting IV. Special Report: Monitoring Program Review (Fossum)

DATE: TO: FROM:

December 1, 2016 CRWD Board of Managers Bob Fossum, Water Resource Program Manager Britta Suppes, Monitoring Program Coordinator

SUBJECT:

Review of Monitoring Program Review and 2014-2016 Recommendations

Background Capitol Region Watershed District established a water quality monitoring and data collection program in 2004 (now called Monitoring, Research, and Maintenance Division (MRM)). Over the program’s 12-year history, improvements and enhancements have been made in order to develop a comprehensive monitoring program that collects robust, scientifically-sound data that can be utilized to support District initiatives and to better understand the District’s water resources. In 2013 (approximately the 10-year program anniversary), the District conducted an internal review of the monitoring program to evaluate and refocus program goals, approaches, methods, and deliverables. The primary outcome of the program review was the development of 17 recommendations intended to guide the monitoring program’s initiatives for a 3-year period (2014-2016). These recommendations were included in the Monitoring Program Review and 2014-2016 Recommendations (enclosed), which was adopted by the Board of Managers on April 14, 2014. Issues Since the adoption of the Monitoring Program Review and 2014-2016 Recommendations, MRM has been working to implement each recommendation. With the end of the recommendation period coming to a close in 2016, MRM staff would like to review each recommendation made in the Monitoring Program Review and 2014-2016 Recommendations and report upon the progress made to date on each of the initiatives. While several of the recommendations have been fulfilled to dates, others are currently in progress, partially complete, or are incomplete (Table 1). MRM staff will also review other major program accomplishments achieved in 2016 that are not included in the guidance document. In addition, staff will suggest future recommendations for the program (2017-future). Requested Action No action requested. enc:

Table 1: Progress chart for completing recommendations 1-17 from the Monitoring Program Review Report: Monitoring Program Review and 2014-2016 Recommendations, final

W:\07 Programs\Monitoring & Data Acquisition\0 Projects\2013 Program Evaluation\2016 Review of Program Recommendations\Brd Memo Mont Prog Review 12-116.docx

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District


Table 1: Progress chart for completing recommendations 1-17 from the Monitoring Program Review and 2014-2016 Recommendations.

Recommendation # 1

Description of Recommendation New goal/mission statement for Monitoring Program

2014

2015

Completed In Progress In Progress

2 3

Better incorporate data into other District programs Develop a comprehensive monitoring database

4 5

Improvements to monitoring reports Consider stand-alone subwatershed reports (Como, Trout Brook)

Completed In Progress

Completed Completed 6

Develop enhanced monitoring partnerships

7 8 9 10

Improve staff organization and training Install AC power and remote data access at baseline sites Sample preparation and lab improvements Adjust sampling frequency for baseline sites

11 12 13

Evaluate adjusting some existing monitoring sites Evaluate discontinuing some existing chemical analysis Evaluate adjusting qualitative lakes data collection

14

Expand Lakes Monitoring to include additional biological data

15

Consider expanding analysis to others stormwater parameters

16

Consider monitoring of previously unmonitored subwatersheds

17

Consider additional BMP monitoring

Completed Completed Completed Completed In Progress Completed Completed Completed Completed Completed

In Progress In Progress In Progress In Progress

2016

Comments New monitoring goals/mission adopted in 2014 and incoprorated into annual CRWD 2014 Stormwater Monitoring Report. BMP Performance (e.g. Green Line; TBNS); In-Lake Mgmt initiatives (e.g. Como & McCarrons, In Progress 2016). Need improvements in reporting (e.g. data analysis & reporting tool) to perform spatial analysis, target CIPs, provide education, and understand TMDL compliance. Sought out Kisters WISKI, 2014. Implemented WISKI software in 2015. 2015-2016-- sought CRWD staff input on reporting (e.g. what analysis is needed? How can report be In Progress improved). Produced a shortened "data report" in 2016 to meet internal needs that were expressed. Fall 2016-- developing work plan for building an online "data analysis and reporting tool". Incomplete Awaiting improvements in data analysis and reporting methods in order to complete. MRM has worked to solidify and improve key partnerships with City of St Paul, RCD, RWMWD, Completed MWMO, and UMN through various projects, meetings, workshops, and communications. Also, a partnership with MPCA and St Paul Port Authority was further enhanced by collaborative monitoring. In 2014, staff training was improved by providing a more comprehensive training along with more frequent feedback and communication with new employees. Completed Installed AC or solar power and remote access at all baseline stations and others (11 stations). Completed Improved lab communication; finalized QAPP in 2016. In Progress Reduced baseflow sampling; developing sampling criteria in 2017 based on storm size by month. Each station is evaluated annually to determine if station is meeting monitoring goals and District Completed initiatives. Incomplete Evalutaion of chemical analysis has not been completed. Ceased qualitative lakes monitoring in 2014. In 2014, expanded biological monitoring in lakes (fish, macrophytes, phyto- and zooplankton). Annual Completed water chemistry sampling expanded to include April and October. Began looking into bacteria and chloride. Partnered with MPCA to evaluate CECs. Interest in In Progress evaluating trash, PAHs, and other emerging contaminants. Began monitoring several new subwatersheds (Hidden Falls, Green Line, Swede Hollow, TBNS), but In Progress interested in continuing to expand monitoring efforts in CRWD. Began performance monitoring plan at TBNS. Partnering with MPCA on Exfiltration Monitoring plan. In Progress Collaborative monitoring at Central High School and Great River School. Future research could inlcude "microsite" monitoring, or climate change adaptation monitoring.

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District


Monitoring Program Review and 2014-2016 Recommendations

Capitol Region Watershed District Saint Paul, MN April 2014


1. Background Capitol Region Watershed District established a Monitoring Program in 2004. Over the program’s nine year history incremental improvements and enhancements have been made. In 2013, the District sought to complete a comprehensive review of the program to analyze, and if necessary, refocus the goals, approach, methods, and deliverables of the Program.

2. Program Review District staff completed a review of the existing program and discussed its strengths and weaknesses. The first step in the review was a staff retreat that took place the morning of November 1, 2013 at the Wilder Foundation Offices. Elizabeth Beckman facilitated the discussion and the following District staff participated in the retreat: Anna Eleria, Britta Suppes, Forrest Kelley, Mark Doneux, Corey Poland, Joe Sellner, Nate Zwonitzer, Gustavo Castro, Stephanie Herbst, and Bob Fossum. Discussions at the retreat resulted from consideration of the following questions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

What do we do well? Why monitor in CRWD? How can our monitoring data be used in other CRWD programs? Who are the audiences for our data? What do our audiences need to effectively make use of our data? Who are potential new monitoring program partners who could strengthen our work? What changes can we make to improve the efficiency of our data collection? To best use our finite resources, where are areas we could reduce or eliminate collection efforts? 9. Is there anything that should be added to the program?

A summary of the retreat, responses to the questions above, subsequent discussions, and initial recommendations are found in Appendix 1.

3. Program Evaluation and Recommendations Following the retreat, staff of the Monitoring, Research, and Maintenance Division developed a list of recommendations for the Monitoring Program. These recommendations were focused on the 3-year time period of 2014—2016. A summary table of all recommendations including a proposed schedule and estimated additional cost is found at the end of this document. The recommendations are grouped by the questions from the retreat that they address. (Note: no recommendations are linked to questions 1 and 4)

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Question #2--Why monitor in CRWD? Recommendation 1 Currently, in Annual Monitoring Reports, the stated goal/objective of the monitoring program as follows: In 2004, CRWD established a monitoring program to assess water quality and quantity of various subwatersheds and stormwater best management practices (BMPs) owned and/or operated and maintained by CRWD‌..The objectives of the program are to identify water quality problem areas, quantify the subwatershed runoff pollutant loadings to the Mississippi River, evaluate the effectiveness of BMPs, and provide data for the calibration of hydrologic, hydraulic, and water quality models.

It is recommended that the District adjust the goal/objective of the Monitoring Program as follows: CRWD monitors waters within the District to: identify problem areas, quantify subwatershed runoff pollutant loadings, evaluate effectiveness of BMPs, provide data to calibrate hydrologic, hydraulic, and water quality models, and promote understanding of District water resources and water quality.

Question #3-- How can our monitoring data be used in other CRWD programs? Recommendation 2 The District should better incorporate monitoring data into the following work of the District. Specifically, better utilizing monitoring data within the following programs should be evaluated: a) BMP Performance b) Targeting CIPs, grants and education c) In-lake management decisions d) Spatial Analysis e) MS4 permit, specifically TMDL compliance/progress

Question #5--What do our audiences need to effectively make use of our data? Recommendation 3 Develop a comprehensive monitoring database that could more effectively manage the large data sets of the District. This would improve: data organization, data accessibility, data querying, and data analysis. The database should have components useable to both District staff and the general public. Recommendation 4 Complete a comprehensive evaluation of and implement improvements to the District’s reporting methods. The evaluation should focus on improvements to: format, frequency, analysis types, generation of figures & tables, data cleaning. 3


Recommendation 5 Consider expanded stand-alone sub-watershed reports that would contain a more comprehensive analysis of monitoring data in the subwatershed. This could include reports for the Como Lake and/or Trout Brook Subwatersheds. Further consider a subwatershed summary document that would be focused to inform the general public.

Question #6--Who are potential new monitoring program partners who could strengthen our work? Recommendation 6 Based on the idea that a true partnership needs to mutually benefit all parties, 5 specific partners should be prioritized for actively developing or enhancing our monitoring partnerships over the next 3 years. The 5 priority partners are: a) University of Minnesota b) City of St Paul c) Ramsey County (Conservation District and Public Works) d) Ramsey Washington Metro Watershed District (RWMWD) e) Mississippi Watershed Management Organization (MWMO) The District would continue to actively communicate and partner with several other entities but would not actively attempt to develop/nurture new partnerships during the next three year period unless mutually beneficial outcomes can be realized.

Question #7--What changes can we make to improve the efficiency of our data collection? Recommendation 7 Improve staff organization and training. This includes creation of the District’s Monitoring, Research, and Maintenance Division as well as more formal and comprehensive training of new District staff. Recommendation 8 Install AC Power and Remote Data Access to baseline sites (6). This would improve the monitoring program as follows: a. Temperature control (heating & cooling) of sampling equipment b. Year-round sampling c. Reduced frequency of site visits d. Analyze and report data more quickly e. Improved data quality Recommendation 9 4


Improve methods and efficiency of sample preparation and lab analysis, including: a. Submittal requirements and procedures b. Laboratory results reporting c. Sample Bottle Cleaning d. Finalize Quality Assurance and Project Plan (QAPP) Recommendation 10 For baseline sites, adjust sampling frequency as follows: a. Fewer baseflow samples (1x per month vs 2x per month) b. Focus sampling towards larger storm events

Question #8--To best use our finite resources, where are areas we could reduce or eliminate collection efforts? Recommendation 11 Evaluate and consider adjusting monitoring parameters and frequency at the following locations: a. Arlington-Pascal Infiltration Trenches (T5E, T4W, T4E) b. Como Regional Pond Inlet and Outlet c. Arlington Hamline Underground (AHUG) Outlet d. Como 3 Subwatershed e. Stormwater Pond Level Loggers Recommendation 12 Evaluate and consider discontinuing analysis of the following chemical parameters: a. Nitrogen b. Metals with negligible concentrations (Nickle, Cromium) Recommendation 13 Evaluate and consider adjusting Qualitative Lakes Data Collection. Consider utilizing citizen volunteers to accomplish this work.

Question #9--Is there anything that should be added to the program? Recommendation 14 Enhance lake monitoring and conduct more complete analysis. Regularly collect and analyze the following data: a. Biological data i. Fisheries ii. Macrophytes 5


iii. Phyto/Zooplankton b. Temperature c. Ice cover/Ice out d. Sediment Recommendation 15 Historically, the District has focused on more typical stormwater parameters such as phosphorus and total suspended solids. The District should consider expanding its analysis of other stormwater parameters, including: a. Bacteria/microbial source tracking b. Chloride c. Trash d. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) Recommendation 16 Consider monitoring and/or analysis of previously unmonitored subwatersheds. This effort should focus on: a. Subwatersheds with land uses/source areas different than existing monitored locations b. Utilize modeling to simulate loading

Recommendation 17 Consider additional BMP monitoring, such as: a. Research based BMP monitoring b. “Microsite� monitoring (roofs, parking lots, greenspace, construction sites, private BMPs) c. Climate change adaptation monitoring

6


7

# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Name New goal/mission statement for Monitoring Program Better incorporate data into other District programs Develop a comprehensive monitoring database Improvements to monitoring reports Consider stand-alone subwatershed reports (Como, Trout Brook) Develop enhanced monitoring partnerships Improve staff organization and training Install AC power and remote data access at baseline sites Sample preparation and lab improvements Adjust sampling frequency for baseline sites Evaluate adjusting some existing monitoring sites Evaluate discontinuing some existing chemical analysis Evaluate adjusting qualitative lakes data collection Expand Lakes Monitoring to include additional biological data Consider expanding analysis to others stormwater parameters Consider monitoring of previously unmonitored subwatersheds Consider additional BMP monitoring

2014

Schedule and estimated additional costs beyond typical annual monitoring cost

Monitoring Program Review Recommendations

2015

2016

Estimated Additional Cost Question Addressed $ 2 $ 3 Budgeted for in 2014 5 $ 5 $ 5 $ 2,500 6 $ 5,000 7 Budgeted for in 2014 7 $ 5,000 7 $ 7 $ 8 $ 8 $ 8 Budgeted for in 2014 9 Budgeted for in 2014 9 $ 9 $ 9 $ 12,500


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December 7, 2016 Board Meeting V. Action Item A) Approve Minutes of November 16, 2016 DRAFT Regular Board Meeting (Sylvander)

Regular Meeting of the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) Board of Managers, for Wednesday, November 16, 2016 6:00 p.m. at the office of the CRWD, 1410 Energy Park Drive, Suite 4, St. Paul, Minnesota. REGULAR MEETING MINUTES I. A) Call to Order of Regular Meeting (President Joe Collins) Managers Joe Collins Seitu Jones absent w/notice Mary Texer Mike Thienes Shirley Reider B)

Staff Present Jessica Bromelkamp, CRWD Mark Doneux, CRWD Elizabeth Hosch, CRWD Forrest Kelley, CRWD Michelle Sylvander, CRWD

Public Attendees

Review, Amendments and Approval of the Agenda

President Joe Collins opened the meeting at 6:00 p.m. and asked for any additions or changes to the agenda. There were no changes. Motion 16-260: Approve the November 16, 2016 agenda. Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved II.

Public Comment

No Comments. III. Permit Applications and Program Updates A)

08-011 Mississippi Riverfront - Closure (Hosch)

Ms. Hosch reviewed that the permit issued for the repair of riprap along the Mississippi River between Smith Avenue and Wabasha Street and construction of an observation deck. A variance from stormwater requirements was approved for the observation deck with no other treatment requirements. The project is complete and stable. No surety was required by this public project. Motion 16-261: Approve Certificate of Completion for permit #08-011, Mississippi Riverfront. Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District


B)

Permit # 09-001 Seafoam Stadium – Closeout (Hosch)

Ms. Hosch reviewed that the permit issued for the construction of an athletic stadium, parking facilities, and associated utilities on the campus of Concordia University, St. Paul. Stormwater treatment was achieved with a subsurface drain tile system and one surface infiltration basin, both of which have been inspected and are functional. The project is complete and stable. $18,500 surety is available to return. Motion 16-262: Approve Certificate of Completion for permit #09-001, Seafoam Stadium and return $18,500 surety. Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved C)

Permit # 15-003 A-line BRT – Closeout (Hosch)

Ms. Hosch reviewed for the Managers that the permit was issued for the construction of new bus rapid transit stations along Snelling Avenue. Stormwater treatment requirements were met through contribution to the Stormwater Impact Fund. The project is complete and stable. No surety was required by this public project. Motion 16-263: Approve Certificate of Completion for permit #15-003, A-line BRT. Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved D)

Permit # 16-020 Dorothy Day Place – Review extension request (Hosch)

Ms. Hosch shared with the Managers that the permit issued for the Dorothy Day Place will expire on November 24th, 2016. The applicant has requested a second extension to the 60-day review period. Remaining items are still being addressed by the engineer. Motion 16-264: Approve second 60-day review period extension for permit 16-020 Dorothy Day Place to expire on January 23, 2017. Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved E)

Permit # 16-026 St. Anthony Park Elementary (Kelley)

Mr. Kelley reviewed permit #16-026 St. Anthony Park Elementary. The applicant, St. Paul Public Schools, plan to design and expand the elementary school entrance. The applicable rules are Stormwater Management (Rule C), Flood Control (Rule D) and Erosion and Sediment Control (Rule F). The disturbed area of this project is 1.43 acres with .2169 acres impervious surface.

Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


Motion 16-265: Approve the permit with 11 conditions: 1. Provide final plans signed by a professional engineer per the Minnesota Board of AELSLAGID. Plans submitted were singed but marked preliminary. 2. Provide a copy of the NPDES permit. 3. Provide addition detail for how the roof runoff from the proposed building will flow into the bioretention basin. 4. Revise the HydroCAD to use Atlas-14 depth for the 100-year event for the existing and proposed conditions. A depth of 5.9� is used for the 100-year event. Atlas-14 lists the 100-year as 7.45�. 5. Clarify the outlet structure for the rain garden (Pond 7P). It does not appear the outlet pipe is connected to the storm sewer. 6. Remove Geotextile Fabric from the Pond Cross Section. 7. Provide plans delineating the extent of the proposed staging area, temporary erosion and sediment controls, and restoration plans. 8. Add the following to the Pond Cross Section Detail: a. Excavation of infiltration areas shall be completed using a backhoe with a toothed bucket. b. Native soils in infiltration areas shall be de-compacted to a minimum depth of 18 inches prior to placing engineered soil. c. The bottom excavation surface of infiltration areas shall be level without dips or swales. d. Engineered soil shall remain uncontaminated (not mixed with other soil) before and during installation. 9. Provide a site-specific plan, schedule and narrative for maintenance of the proposed stormwater management practices that includes the following. a. Establish a watering plan that extends a minimum of one year after planting. b. At a minimum, require annual maintenance of infiltration areas to include trimming vegetation, replacing vegetation where needed, mulch replacement, and removal of accumulated sediment and debris. 10. Revise plans to include the following: a. Provide specific erosion control on the perimeter of the rain garden and bioretention basin. The erosion control should limit construction activity on top of the infiltration basin to prevent sediment deposition and compaction of subsoils. b. Provide perimeter control along the western side of the site to prevent sediment transport to Langford Park. c. Provide inlet protection for the proposed catch basins immediately downstream of disturbed areas on Gordon Ave and Knapp St. d. Add the following notes to Sheet C250: i. Perimeter control and erosion control practices shall remain in place until final completion of the project or vegetation has been established (whichever is later). ii. Installation of infiltration practices shall be done during periods of dry weather and completed before a rainfall event. Placement of engineered soils shall be on dry native soil only. iii. During construction, stormwater must be routed around infiltration areas until all construction activity has ceased and tributary surfaces are cleaned of sediment. 11. Provide a landscaping plan to include the following: a. Specify potted plants or plant plugs to vegetate infiltration/filtration areas. Basin seeding should be avoided. b. Specify deep rooted, salt tolerant, native plants according to Plants for Stormwater Design (Shaw and Schmidt, 2003). Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


Reider/Texer Unanimously approved IV.

Special Reports – Upper Villa Stormwater Improvement Project, Forrest Kelley

Mr. Kelley reviewed for the Managers the Upper Villa Stormwater Improvement Project. Mr. Kelley has presented this project at Storm Con and will be presenting at MAWD. Mr. Kelley noted that he is currently requesting the final payment to try and complete the project in 2016. Mr. Kelley reviewed projects around the Lake McCarrons area in recent years. In 2004 Lake MaCarrons was treated with alum. The Villa Park Wetland System is undersized for the large volume of stormwater that is treated in the wet cell system. In 2013 the wet cells in Villa Park were dredged for trapped sediment and to help reduce flow. The B-Dale softball field was identified by the City of Roseville and the Parks and Recreation Department as a site that could benefit from reuse of stormwater. The project proposed a tight schedule due to the softball seasons schedule. Mr. Kelley reviewed the construction process and shared a time lapsed video of the project. The system is designed to hold 13,000 cf of stormwater runoff that can provide watering for the ball field for two weeks. The system had been turned off to repair a leak. The repairs seem to have worked. Manager Texer asked about the system capturing floatables. Mr. Kelley replied that the City of Roseville will be dredging a pond this winter and that should help to reduce the amount of floatables that need to be cleaned out of the system. The Board thanked Mr. Kelley for his work on the project. V.

Action Items A)

AR:

Approve Minutes of the November 2, 2016 Regular Meeting (Sylvander)

Motion 16-266: Approve Minutes of the November 2, 2016 Regular Meeting. Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved B)

AR:

Approve October 2016 Accounts Payable and Receivables (Sylvander)

Motion 16-267: Approve October 2016 Accounts Payable and Receivables. Thienes/Reider Unanimously approved C)

AR:

Approve 2016 Watershed Steward Awards (Bromelkamp)

Ms. Bromelkamp reviewed that the nominations for the 2016 Watershed Steward Award Program were accepted through Monday, October 17, 2016. The Awards Committee met on November 1, 2016 to review nominations and recommend winners for each category. The committee was comprised of CAC members, Pat Cavanaugh and Mike MacDonald; Board Managers, Mary Texer and Joe Collins, and CRWD staff, Mark Doneux and Jessica Bromelkamp. The Awards Committee is recommending the CAC and Board make two exceptions to the CAC Award Program Guidelines in 2016. The guidelines state that “No more than one award will be given annually in each category.” The committee felt strongly that both individuals nominated for the Watershed Citizen Award should be recognized in 2016. Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


Janna Caywood and Patricia Ohmans are doing exceptional work in their communities to support CRWD’s mission to protect, manage and improve water resources of the District. The guidelines also state that “Current members of the CAC, Board or staff are not eligible to receive awards.” The committee would like to honor David Arbeit with the Lifetime Stewardship Award for his outstanding work around Como Lake and the development of CRWD. Motion 16-268: Suspend CAC Award Program Guidelines to recognize multiple nominees and a CAC member in 2016 and approve the following list of 2016 Watershed Steward Awards winners: Watershed Citizens of the Year: Janna Caywood, Patricia Ohmans Watershed Partner of the Year: District 6 Planning Council Watershed Project of the Year: Bang Brewing Young Watershed Steward of the Year: Olive Murdoch-Meyer and Bridget Moynihan Lifetime Stewardship Award: David Arbeit Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved Manager Reider requested that signage be installed at Bang Brewing. Ms. Bromelkamp replied that she is working on a design D) AR: Amend Administrator Contracting Authority for Due Diligence of 595 Aldine St. (Doneux) Administrator Doneux reviewed with the Board of Managers that at the July 20th meeting, the Board of Managers approved the purchase of 595 Aldine St. and 1736 Thomas Ave. The Board also authorized Administrator Doneux Contracting Authority for due diligence not to exceed $50,000. To date $73,350 in consulting agreements have been executed with $53,350 being authorized. At this time, CRWD needs to develop a Remedial Action Plan (RAP). This plan will provide both the seller and CRWD on the basic requirements to address the Phase II findings. Motion 16-269: Authorize Administrator Contracting Authority for due diligence of 595 Aldine St. and 1736 Thomas Ave., St. Paul, not to exceed $110,000. Texer/Reider Unanimously approved Manager Texer asked about the progress of Phase Two due diligence. Phase Two is complete. E)

Administrator Doneux replied that

AR: Authorize Request for Qualifications for professional services for 2017-2018 (Doneux)

Administrator Doneux shared that in 2010 CRWD adopted a policy for soliciting professional services. Staff have prepared a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for general water resource professional services for 2017 and 2018. This would include requesting information regarding personnel, similar projects, billing rates and availability of staff. In addition, each firm would also be able to identify which service area they are interested in working in and are uniquely qualified.

Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


The District will review all submittals and determine which firms are qualified in each of the eight service areas. Those firms qualified in each area will be placed in a pool of professional service consultants for calendar years 2017-2018. Administrator Doneux added that list will include women owned and certified minority owned businesses.

Motion 16-270: Authorize Request for Qualifications for professional services contracting for 2017-2018. Reider/Thienes Unanimously approved F)

AR:

Appoint 2016 MAWD Annual Meeting Delegates (Doneux)

Administrator Doneux reviewed that each year the watershed districts are asked to appoint and certify two delegates and one alternate for the Minnesota Association of Watershed District (MAWD) annual meeting. Motion 16-271: Appoint Manager Texer and Manager Thienes as Delegates and President Collins as the alternative to the MAWD Annual Meeting. Texer/Reider Unanimously approved G)

AR:

Approve 2016 MAWD Resolution and Strategic Plan Recommendations (Doneux)

Administrator Doneux shared with the Board of Managers that as part of the annual meeting of the Minnesota Association of Watershed District (MAWD), delegates are asked to consider and take action resolutions submitted to the membership. This year several resolutions are being considered at the annual meeting. Administrator Doneux provided the managers with copies of the resolutions to be presented at the MAWD Board of Directors meeting scheduled on Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016 at 3:00 pm at Arrowwood Conference Center. The MAWD Board of Directors Personnel Succession Plan was developed by MAWD in response to: 



Goal of Ray and Peg Bohn of Media & Government Affairs, who are part-time contract agents, to retire. Ray Bohn, by Jan 1, 2018 from all administrative functions, and Jan 1, 2019 from lobbying; Peg Bohn by Jan. 1, 2017 from all but basic administrative tasks until the administrative transition is complete. Data collected through the training survey conducted by Cliff Aichinger and the survey conducted by the MAWD Strategic Planning Committee indicated an absolute need for full time activities to deliver the desired services. Both were done at the request of the MAWD Board.

The Managers discussed the items of the resolution and were in consensus for the CRWD Delegates to provide recommendations regarding MAWD Annual meeting resolutions. VI. A)

Unfinished Business FI: TBI Repairs Station 0+00-28+49 (Eleria) Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


No update was available. VII.

General Information

A) VIII. A) B) C)

Building Update (Doneux) Next Meeting

Wednesday, December 7, 2016 Board Meeting Wednesday, December 14, 2016 CAC Meeting, Manager Thienes will attend Wednesday, December 21, 2016 Annual Board Meeting and Awards Ceremony, meeting at 5:00pm, ceremony at 7:00pm XI.

Adjournment

Motion 16-272: Adjournment of the November 16, 2016, Regular Board Meeting at 7:25 p.m. Reider/Texer Unanimously Approved Respectfully submitted, Michelle Sylvander W:\04 Board of Managers\Minutes\2016\November 16, 2016 Draft.docx

Our mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


December 7, 2016 Board Meeting V. Action Items B) Approve 2017 Partner Grants (Schwantes)

DATE: TO: FROM: RE:

November 30, 2016 CRWD Board of Managers Lindsay Schwantes Approve 2017 Partner Grants

Background At the September 7, 2016 Board Meeting the Board commented on and approved the 2017 Partner Grant Application form and distribution list. Board Managers, Jones and Reider were appointed to the Partner Grant Review Committee and Manager Thienes as an alternate. The Board requested two CAC members be appointed to the Committee at the October November 12, 2015 CAC meeting. Issues The District received 19 Partner Grant applications during the application period of September 9 – October 31, 2016 totaling $277,433 in requests. The 2017 Partner Grants budget is $90,000. Staff reviewed all applications and made preliminary recommendations for the Partner Grant Review Committee to review and adjust. On November 22, the Partner Grant Review Committee of Board Managers Thienes and Reider and CAC members, Gwen Willems and Kathryn Swanson reviewed 2017 CRWD Partner Grant applications and made award recommendations totaling $87,000. The enclosed table includes the Partner Grant Committee’s 2017 Partner Grant funding recommendations and comments for 13 proposals. Six proposals were pulled from the Partner Grant pool because the proposals were better aligned to other District programs such as Stewardship Grants or general Education and Outreach. Enclosed is a list of these proposals. Staff will review these proposals with the Board and share recommended next steps with the partner organizations.

Request Action Approve 2017 Partner Grant funding as recommended by the Partner Grant Review Committee and authorize Administrator to enter into grant agreements with grantee organizations. enc:

2017 CRWD Partner Grant Applications (electronic only) 2017 CRWD Partner Grant funding recommendations table List of proposals that may fit in other budgets

W:\07 Programs\Stewardship Grant Program\Partner Grants\2017 Grants\BM Approve 2017 Partner Grants.docx


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2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-31 11:15:43

Project Information Project Name:

Connecting underrepresented groups to urban waterways

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Saint Paul Natural Resources 1100 Hamline Ave N Saint Paul, Minnesota 55108 Faith Krogstad (651) 632-2455 faith.krogstad@ci.stpaul.mn.us

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? The City of Saint Paul How much are you requesting? $16,000 How did you hear about our grants? Past recipient

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. The mission of Saint Paul Natural Resources (SPNR) is to create lifelong connections to a healthy environment for all. SPNR is composed of Environmental Education, Environmental Services, Volunteer Resources, Arts & Gardens, and Forestry and is a section of Saint Paul Parks and Recreation. This proposal would be implemented by Environmental Education staff. Research suggests that contact with nature is linked to many benefits including improved physical and emotional health [1]. Unfortunately, environmental benefits are not enjoyed equally in Saint Paul. For example, people of color use regional parkland at markedly lower rates than the white population [2] due to a variety of reasons including a lack of awareness of park resources, safety and security concerns, and 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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lack of transportation [3]. This proposal connects underrepresented audiences to parks and water resources in the Capitol Region Watershed District such as Como Lake, Trout Brook, Lower Phalen Creek, and the Mississippi River, facilitating positive experiences to instill a value for environmental conservation and sustainability. Focusing on regional parks allows SPNR to allocate additional staff time to support the programs, as Faith Krogstad’s time is funded by Metropolitan Council Legacy funds. This proposal comprises two projects: The first project continues the sPARK program, supported in 2015 and 2016 by CRWD, which brings youth from affordable housing and nonprofit community centers on regularly occurring trips to a park in their community for experiential education on water quality, ecology, conservation, and stewardship. Over the course of the program, youth learn how our natural resources take care of people and how people take care of natural resources. They become more comfortable outdoors and invested in the park as they play an active role in its restoration. Youth will study water quality and how it relates to the health of plant life, wildlife, and humans. Hands-on experiences will include inquiry into mammals, pollinators (including an in-hive bee class), and macroinvertebrates. This program will serve approximately 60 unduplicated youth. In 2017, components of sPARK will also be incorporated into a new summer day camp pilot at Hidden Falls Regional Park carried out at Hidden Falls Creek and the Mississippi River. The YMCA, Saint Paul Parks and Recreation, Wilderness Inquiry, and other partners will establish the camp to primarily serve children of color and children from low-income families as part of the Saint Paul Cities Connecting Children to Nature (CCCN) initiative, which is supported by the National League of Cities and Children and Nature Network. Faith Krogstad leads the Saint Paul CCCN initiative and CCCN grant funds will complement Partner Grant funds. The sPARK activities in the day camp pilot will serve approximately 100 unduplicated youth. The second project continues and expands the Parks Ambassadors program. Piloted in 2016 with CRWD Partner Grant funds, the Parks Ambassador program builds relationships between Saint Paul Natural Resources (SPNR) staff and underrepresented groups in regional parks to break down barriers to park use and nature access. In 2016, SPNR staff met with the Skyline Tower Elders group to introduce them to park amenities and learn about their interests in and barriers to visiting parkland. SPNR staff provided van transportation and accompanied the group to answer questions about park rules, environment, and assets. Despite living only a few miles from Como Park and residing in Saint Paul for 15-20 years, many of the predominantly East African immigrant participants had never visited Como Lake or Como Zoo and were pleased to experience these nearby amenities and expressed interest in further exploration. For 2017, Partner Grant funds would enable SPNR staff to continue to introduce the Skyline Elders group to more park destinations and expand the Parks Ambassador program to meet demand from other groups, serving approximately 100 people. For example, Women’s Advocates, a women’s shelter in Saint Paul has expressed interest in the program for mothers and their children. Partner Grant funds will support outreach and relationship-building with underrepresented groups as well as excursions to parks. The Parks Ambassadors program is driven by the interests of the participants. While participants may choose to visit park sites across the city, Partner Grant funds would only be used for outings within the watershed district, introducing residents to natural resources and sparking inquiries and discussions about them. REFERENCES [1] Keniger et al (2013). “What are the benefits of interacting with nature?” International Journal of 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Environmental Research and Public Health, 10(3), 913-935. [2] Metropolitan Council (2009). “Metropolitan Council regional parks and trails survey 2008.” http://bit.ly/1Xq2Yhs [3] Metropolitan Council (2014). “Regional park use among select communities of color: A qualitative investigation.” http://bit.ly/10sQ2LV Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. The ultimate aim of education and outreach efforts is to develop environmental literacy in residents and cultivate positive environmental behaviors. The sPARK program aims to enhance the knowledge and skills of youth in protecting and improving water quality in Saint Paul through in-depth, hands-on learning and stewardship experiences in natural areas. Youth will care for native wetland plugs during the summer and plant them in riparian areas or rain gardens in parks at the close of the program. These plants will stabilize the soil, slow overland movement of water, and take up dissolved nutrients. The Parks Ambassador program will engage people who are typically underrepresented in regional parks, such as racial and ethnic minorities, youth, young adults, older adults, new immigrants, and families with children [4]. The program improves access to urban water systems and other natural resources in parks by breaking down barriers such as lack of awareness of park amenities and rules, lack of transportation, and safety concerns. Research suggests that experiences in nature, particularly in early childhood, “significantly influence the development of lifelong environmental attitudes and values.” [5] By increasing awareness of and access to urban water resources and parkland among underrepresented groups, the ultimate goal is to cultivate positive environmental behaviors to protect and conserve water resources. REFERENCES [4] Metropolitan Council (2016). “Small share of Legacy funds to be spent to ‘Connect people and the outdoors’ in regional parks.” http://bit.ly/2eYKoMX [5] Strife, S and L. Downey (2009). “Childhood development and access to nature: A new direction for environmental inequality research.” Organization & Environment, 22(1): 99–122. http://bit.ly/2f7Ih5C If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. CommonBond Communities is the Midwest’s largest nonprofit provider of low-income housing with services. Youth from Skyline Tower (along I-94 near Lexington Parkway) and other sites will participate in the sPARK program in summer 2017. CommonBond staff will communicate with families of youth, obtain permission slips, and chaperone the youth during outings. Adults from Skyline Tower's Elder Group will participate in the Parks Ambassador program and go on outings to visit parks and water resources in Saint Paul. CommonBond staff will publicize the outings and recruit participants. CommonBond successfully participated in sPARK and Parks Ambassadors in 2016. Hallie Q. Brown (HQB) Community Center "is an African American, nonprofit social service agency open to all." Youth from HQB's Youth Enrichment program will participate in the sPARK program. HQB staff will communicate with families of youth, obtain permission slips, and chaperone the youth during outings. HQB participated in sPARK in 2016. SPNR staff will collaborate with the YMCA, National Park Service, and Wilderness Inquiry to pilot a summer day camp at Hidden Falls. The effort is part of a citywide initiative to equitably connect children to nature and is led by Faith Krogstad, the Environmental Education Coordinator for SPNR. This team will develop curriculum for the day camp, which will include water-focused activities from the sPARK 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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program, and recruit youth-serving organizations to bring youth to the camp. For the Park Ambassador program, SPNR staff will partner with groups that are underrepresented in regional parks including Skyline Elders program, Women’s Advocates, and Hmong American Partnership. SPNR staff will recruit additional groups to participate in the program in the course of 2017. The role of the groups is to publicize the meetings and outings and recruit participants for the program.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. sPARK: This project will be successful if participants report and/or demonstrate 1) positive experience in the program, 2) increased understanding of, and connection to, the environment, and 3) increased competency and self-efficacy in environmental improvement. Evaluation strategies include group reflection and debriefs, informal interviews with individuals and staff observations of participants behavior and skills throughout the program. Parks Ambassadors: This project will be successful if participants spend time in parks and report having a positive experience and plan to return to the same parks in the future.

Project Tasks Task 1 Name sPARK education program

Estimate Completion Date 09/2017

Description Engage 60 youth in environmental education in Saint Paul parks. Recruit 1-2 additional organizations for participation (CommonBond and HQB are on board already), develop and sign organizational agreements, refine curriculum, provide transportation, supply materials and equipment, and implement program. Funds to be spent as follows: $4000 for transportation, $5500 for staff time, $1000 for materials, and $500 for in-hive bee classes at Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary. SPNR will commit additional Legacy-funded staff time and in-kind program resources to this program.

Task 2 Name sPARK activities in new day camp

Estimate Completion Date 09/2017

Description Engage 100 youth in environmental education activities at Hidden Falls Regional Park. Create curriculum in partnership with the YMCA, Wilderness Inquiry, and the National Park Service, recruit youth-serving organizations for participation, and implement program. Partner grant funds will support $1000 in staff time at the camp. SPNR will commit additional staff time funded by Legacy dollars and National League of Cities/Children & Nature Network grant funds to the development and implementation of this program.

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Task 3 Name Parks Ambassadors

Estimate Completion Date 11/2017

Description Description Build relationships with 5 community groups, elucidate interests in parks, plan at least 10 outings and engage 100 people in parks. Provide transportation and knowledgeable staff to facilitate discussions about natural resources. Partner grant funds will support $4000 in staff time for this program. SPNR will commit transportation and additional Legacy-funded staff time to this program.

Task 4 Name Program evaluation

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description Conduct debriefs, interviews, and observations and collect data to assess the results of the programs.

Project Budget Tasks Personnel / Staff Costs sPARK education $14,000.00 program sPARK activities in new$5,500.00 day camp Parks Ambassadors $9,000.00 Program evaluation $500.00 Totals $29,000.00

Other Expenses $1,000.00

Total Cost $15,000.00

$500.00

$6,000.00

$3,000.00 $0.00 $4,500.00

$12,000.00 $500.00 $33,500.00

Grant Funding Tasks

Requested CRWD Funding Approved $11,000.00 ($11,000)

sPARK education program sPARK activities in new$1,000.00 ($1,000) day camp Parks Ambassadors $4,000.00 ($4,000) $0.00 Program evaluation Totals $16,000.00($16,000)

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Other Source Funding Total $4,000.00

$15,000.00

$5,000.00

$6,000.00

$8,000.00 $500.00 $17,500.00

$12,000.00 $500.00 $33,500.00

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2 2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-27 18:27:37

Project Information Project Name:

Urban Roots Conservation Youth Internships

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Urban Roots 463 Maria Ave St. Paul, Minnesota 55106 Patsy Noble (651) 228-7073 pnoble@urbanRootsmn.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? Urban Roots serves St. Paul, with a focus on the East Side Dayton’s Bluff and Payne Phalen neighborhood. Our youth internships serve 14-21 year-old low-wealth teens of color. The teens who participate in our program reflect the demographics of their community- Hmong, African American, Latino, East African, Caucasian, and American Indian youth. How much are you requesting? $15,000 How did you hear about our grants? On-going partnership

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. . Urban Roots is a St. Paul based organization with a mission to build vibrant and healthy communities through food, conservation and youth development. We cultivate youth leaders and healthy communities on the Eastside of St. Paul, through paid internships that provide hands-on learning and foster critical lifeskills around entrepreneurial skills, collaboration, and resilience. Our experiential “earn as you learn” programs are grounded in improving urban food systems and supporting a connection to and restoration of our local parks and watershed while supporting active living. 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Our gardening, cooking and conservation programs engage youth to: • Become environmental leaders, stewards and active participants in their community • Develop skills in work, environmental restoration, entrepreneurship, gardening, cooking, and public speaking • Make connections to career opportunities and professionals in the natural resources and food fields Our Conservation Program actively engages youth in the restoration of shorelines, local parks and natural areas through the planting and maintenance of rain and pollinator gardens and the removal of invasive plant material and installation of native plants. Youth also engage in a variety of citizen science projects, such as insect surveys, water sampling and forest inventories. Interns share this knowledge with classrooms, and student and community groups through tours and presentations, developing key communication and leadership skills while actively engaging the public in restoration and watershed projects. A key component of our internship program is the progressive program model. Youth evolve through program levels and have the opportunity to become an advanced intern-mentoring new interns and serving as an ambassador to to the goals of vision of their program. Last year we were able to hire a five-year intern for a key position as summer staff in the Market Garden Program. Her success was geometric, both in her grasp of the tasks at hand and in her mentoring of new youth. This summer we will offer a summer staff position to an advanced intern in the Conservation Program, extending their reach into the community for restoration and water quality work. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. Urban Roots youth interns will engage in direct action projects resulting in increased stewardship of their watershed. In addition to our on-going projects with key partners (noted below), we will be developing a GIS map of completed restoration work in our key work areas along the Mississippi River Valley. Our goal is to better inform staff and interns (and our partners) of what's working in restoration as well as identify areas that need improvement. Multiple partners will be involved in the project as will a variety of volunteer groups. Also new this year is our work at Rivoli Bluff. Conservation interns hope to work with Dayton's Bluff Neighborhood Housing Services and CRWD to develop a planting plan for the shoreline of the catchment pond. Urban Roots Market Garden Program will be farming .5 acre adjacent to the pond and we have been asked to share pond management with DBNHS. We will continue to search for funding to cover the creation of a new rain-garden model to replace our current model, but in the meanwhile, the model is useful as an interactive tool for large group presentations such as the State Fair and community gatherings-helping us to reach over 600 people this year with rain-garden presentations. We will continue to enhance our office site with a variety of water quality demonstration projects. Interns installed a Purple Rain Garden this year-a hit with the many groups that visit our site. Next season we will implement a gravel bed nursery to increase the survival rate of trees and shrubs for restoration projects we are involved in. We also hope to implement parking lot BMP on-site. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. National Park Service-training for interpretive tours of Mississippi River valley Mississippi Park Connection-liaison with NPS Friends of Swede Hollow-Support our work in Swede Hollow Park St Paul Parks and Rec and MN DNR-collaboration, support and guidance on restoration projects in parks and exposure to professionals in Natural Resource fields Lower Phalen Creek Project–financial and public support in restoration work at Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary MN Pollution Control Agency–staff support via MN GreenCorps member who will assist with outreach and volunteer management Dayton’s Bluff Elementary and Sunray Library–key partners in outreach efforts and Schoolyard Rain Garden Demonstration Project DNR-youth intern projects around stream monitoring (stormwater and groundwater) and wetland restoration in Mississippi River floodplain 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Twin Cities Academy-Working with the environmental club to enhance rain catchment on-site Dayton's Bluff Neighborhood Housing Services-planning shoreline plantings at catchment pond at Rivoli Bluff Village

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. Number of acres of wetland restored Number of acres of parkland restored, measured also through sq ft of invasives removed and number of new plants added Number of rain gardens maintained and/or built Number of youth and community members reached through outreach efforts Number of interns employed 28 Percent of interns that identify a change in behavior from engagement in restoration projects Development of staff position for advanced intern in the Conservation Program

Project Tasks Task 1 Name GIS Training and Mapping

Estimate Completion Date 05/2017

Description Staff will complete GIS training over the winter and initiate mapping project with interns in spring. Focus areas will be the Bruce Vento Nature Sanctuary and Swede Hollow Park. We are also hoping to engage the community around Swede Hollow through Friends of Swede Hollow to determine our role in the water restoration projects underway. Shoreline restoration of the ponds has been proposed, but further exploration into findings of the committee is needed.

Task 2 Name Youth recruitment and training

Estimate Completion Date 05/2017

Description Conservation Program interns are recruited over the winter by visiting SPPS and community partners and presenting the projects and trainings that the interns will be engaged in. After the extensive hiring process (including parent interviews) youth are offered positions in our spring session. The training that they receive will include BMP's for field projects as well as community engagement activities, including tours of our office demonstration site and work sites (Swede Hollow Park, DNR site, BVNS, SunRay Natural Library). Frost seeding, participation in the Phalen Freeze Fest, native plant growing activities with Dayton's Bluff Elementary youth and presentations/events with the SunRay Library keep interns engaged over the winter months. Visits with professionals engaged in environmental restoration efforts complement their training.

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Task 3 Name River Valley Habitat Restoration

Estimate Completion Date 10/2017

Description Youth interns and staff will continue their work with parkland restoration and raingarden maintenance. Guided by the mapping project outcomes, youth will design, plan, coordinate with partners, install and maintain restoration projects. Interns will install gravel bed nursery for tress and shrubs at our demonstration site.

Task 4 Name Rivoli Bluff/TCA Catchment Pond Enhancement

Estimate Completion Date 10/2017

Description Staff have met with Twin Cities Academy staff to initiate a project for youth interns and students to enhance the "shoreline"of the water catchment pond on school grounds. The planting could extend to the adjacent parking area as well. We are also in conversation with Dayton's Bluff Neighborhood Housing Services Rivoli Bluff about shoreline plantings for the water catchment pond adjacent to our future farm plot. (-and assume we will need to work through with CRWD, as per recent conversations with staff). DBNHS assumes that Urban Roots will help manage the pond in return for the use of the farm land, so the project could extend over many years.

Project Budget Tasks GIS Training and Mapping Youth recruitment and training River Valley Habitat Restoration Rivoli Bluff/TCA Catchment Pond Enhancement Totals

Personnel / Staff Costs Other Expenses $11,232.75 $4,000.00

Total Cost $15,232.75

$22,465.50

$7,469.00

$29,934.50

$33,698.25

$7,469.00

$41,167.25

$22,465.50

$7,469.00

$29,934.50

$89,862.00

$26,407.00

$116,269.00

Requested CRWD Funding Approved $1,000.00 $1,000

Other Source Funding Total

Grant Funding Tasks

GIS Training and Mapping Youth recruitment and $6,000.00 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

$6,000

$14,232.75

$15,232.75

$23,934.50

$29,934.50 4


training River Valley Habitat Restoration Rivoli Blu/TCA Catchment Pond Enhancement Totals

$6,000.00

$5,000

$35,167.25

$41,167.25

$2,000.00

$0

$27,934.50

$29,934.50

$101,269.00

$116,269.00

$15,000.00 $12,000

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-31 10:45:16

Project Information Project Name:

Watershed Education and Rain Garden Maintenance

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Urban Boatbuilders Inc. 2288 University Avenue West Saint Paul, Minnesota 55114 Michael Wurth (651) 644-9225 michael@urbanboatbuilders.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? Urban Boatbuilders hires youth that are eligible for free or reduced price lunch or have a barrier to employment, including but not limited to students with IEPs, limited English proficiency, juvenile offenders and youth in diversion programs, youth with chemical dependency issues, or youth who are parenting. Approximately 80% of youth Apprentices live within the Saint Paul Public School district, with the remaining 20% coming from surrounding areas. How much are you requesting? $2,000 How did you hear about our grants? We are on your mailing list.

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. Our mission is to empower youth to succeed in work and life through woodworking and experiential learning. In addition to gaining woodworking skills, apprentices attend field trips to different work environments and participate in skill-building workshops such as resume writing, job interviewing and 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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goal setting. The program is comprehensive, and seeks to empower youth through hands-on learning projects while working to expand the possibilities and paths they envision for their futures. Additionally, youth test their craftsmanship by paddling the boats they build on local lakes and rivers. They also attend camping trips on the St. Croix and Mississippi rivers, and in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area. Youth are experiencing firsthand various waterways throughout the program, and recently the program has aimed to help youth understand the importance of water quality. Workshops have been administered to educate youth on water quality and the importance of a healthy watershed district. Going forward, we believe that through experiential learning, youth will benefit from helping the community at large by educating community stakeholders on the importance of a healthy watershed, and maintaining existing rain gardens. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. We will target numerous rain gardens near our workshop in Saint Paul. Through our efforts, we will increase their efficiency and effectiveness by maintaining them appropriately. This will reduce the amount of storm water runoff, and the pollutants associated with it. Additionally, youth will educate the public on the benefits of rain gardens and other mechanisms intended to improve the quality of the watershed. This will enhance the community mindset towards water quality. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. Capital Region Watershed District has been involved with the installation of approximately 120 rain gardens in neighborhoods near our workshop. They may communicate which rain gardens are in need of maintenance, and we will provide the labor in maintaining them. Through current outreach events, youth are asked to describe their experience, which includes this project. Additionally, if there are outreach events hosted by Capitol Region Watershed District that need additional staffing, Urban Boatbuilders may provide youth and adults to assist.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. Through existing evaluation tools, youth that complete the Apprenticeship program evaluate the overall program. Based on the results of this, we will identify if the project was successful. Additionally, identifying how many people attend outreach events and the number of events during the grant period will help us identify the number of people educated about this project.

Project Tasks Task 1 Name Rain Garden Maintenance

Estimate Completion Date 11/2017

Description Through working with Capitol Region Watershed District, Urban Boatbuilders will target existing rain gardens in the Hamline-Midway and/or the Macalester-Groveland neighborhoods. Youth will be responsible for maintaining them, which is includes, but isn't limited to weeding, mulching, and 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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improving the drainage of these rain gardens as deemed appropriate. Through this process, youth will further understand how rain gardens function, their importance to the environment, and witness the results of healthy rain gardens. Additionally, there will be enrichment workshops on water quality to supplement the experiential learning. Urban Boatbuilders will provide the vehicles, tools, and labor required to complete this project.

Task 2 Name Community Outreach

Estimate Completion Date 11/2017

Description Through existing outreach events and social media, Urban Boatbuilders youth will help to educate the public on the importance of water quality. During a calendar year, Urban Boatbuilders attends approximately 10 outreach events, including the Minnesota State Fair. Through these events, youth communicate to the public their experience in the program and identify components that they believe are important, including this project. Additionally, there may be occasions where the Capitol Region Watershed district can utilize additional staffing at outreach events. In this occurrence, Urban Boatbuilders may be able to provide youth and adults to help staff the event.

Task 3 Name N/A

Estimate Completion Date 2017

Description N/A

Task 4 Name N/A

Estimate Completion Date 2017

Description N/A

Project Budget Tasks Rain Garden Maintenance Community Outreach N/A N/A Totals

Personnel / Staff Costs Other Expenses $1,266.00 $400.00

Total Cost $1,666.00

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,266.00

$334.00 $0.00 $0.00 $2,000.00

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

$334.00 $0.00 $0.00 $734.00

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Grant Funding Tasks Rain Garden Maintenance Community Outreach N/A N/A Totals

Requested CRWD Funding Approved $1,666.00 $1,666

Other Source Funding Total $0.00

$1,666.00

$334.00 $334 $0.00 $0.00 $2,000.00 $2,000

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00

$334.00 $0.00 $0.00 $2,000.00

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2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-31 12:29:51

Project Information Project Name:

Little Mekong Night Market & Asian Business Outreach

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Asian Ecomonic Development Association 377 University Avenue West, Suite D St. Paul, Minnesota 55103 Jeffrey Whitman (651) 222-7758 jeff@weda-mn.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? The Asian Economic Development Association (AEDA) creates thriving, sustainable multi-cultural neighborhoods based on strong community leadership and economic and racial equity. To achieve this mission, we lift lower income Asian Pacific Islander (API) families, mainly Southeast Asian immigrants and refugee communities, out of poverty by increasing and facilitating their access to economic opportunities, specifically through small business and micro-entrepreneurship assistance strategies, civic engagement, and arts and culture-based creative "placemaking" efforts which support economic development and improve neighborhood livability and sustainability. In February 2012, we launched the Little Mekong Business & Cultural District (http://littlemekong.com) as an asset-based economic development strategy to turn a six block strip of University Avenue in Frogtown into a world-class destination on the Green Line. Little Mekong is helping to build a healthier, more livable community and will create family wealth assets using business development strategies, arts and culture, design, and sustainable physical development including improving neighborhood infrastructure with green stormwater management systems. The Little Mekong Night Market and Clean Waters Education Project will build upon this work and further advance our goals for neighborhood livability and sustainability by helping Little Mekong small businesses, Frogtown residents, and micro-entrepreneurs and other Southeast Asians beyond the neighborhood and Saint Paul gain a better understanding of the need for water quality protection and move them to take actions which make them better stewards of local water resources. How much are you requesting? $18,500

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How did you hear about our grants? Previous Grants

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. The Asian Economic Development Association (AEDA) creates thriving, sustainable multi-cultural neighborhoods based on strong community leadership and economic and racial equity. To achieve this mission, we lift lower income Asian Pacific Islander (API) families, mainly Southeast Asian immigrants and refugee communities, out of poverty by increasing and facilitating their access to economic opportunities, specifically through small business and micro-entrepreneurship assistance strategies, civic engagement, and arts and culture-based creative "placemaking" efforts which support economic development and improve neighborhood livability and sustainability. In February 2012, we launched the Little Mekong Business & Cultural District (http://littlemekong.com) as an asset-based economic development strategy to turn a six block strip of University Avenue in Frogtown into a world-class destination on the Green Line. Little Mekong is helping to build a healthier, more livable community and will create family wealth assets using business development strategies, arts and culture, design, and sustainable physical development including improving neighborhood infrastructure with green stormwater management systems. The Little Mekong Night Market and Clean Waters Education Project will build upon this work and further advance our goals for neighborhood livability and sustainability by helping Little Mekong small businesses, Frogtown residents, and micro-entrepreneurs and other Southeast Asians beyond the neighborhood and Saint Paul gain a better understanding of the need for water quality protection and move them to take actions which make them better stewards of local water resources. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. The 12 month-project will aim to inform, educate, and change behaviors and practices of Southeast Asians, mainly lower income Limited English Proficient; immigrants and refugees who live, work and own businesses in Saint Paul's Frogtown neighborhood as well as those who visit the Little Mekong Business and Cultural district for events to help reduce water pollution in the community and across the region. We will incorporate water quality protection functional activities in several ways. 1) Our ongoing small and micro-business assistance program will incorporate materials and education and into our intake/orientation process. 2) In 2017, we will be collaborating with Northern Spark to produce an allnight “node” in conjunction with our Little Mekong Night Market. The theme of this year’s Northern Spark is Climate Change. Our ‘node” will focus on water and water quality. The Night Market is a multi-day family friendly summer outdoor event offering arts and culture to bring Little Mekong alive with social and economic activities. In 2016, the event attracted almost 20,000 people from across the region. We will work with artistic partners and the University of Minnesota’s College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources to create an interactive experience to educate participants about water quality issues, raising their awareness about protecting and improving water quality and activating them to adopt practices as individual consumers, households, home-based micro-entrepreneurs, and small business owners which help reduce water pollution and keep water safe and clean for future generations. 3) Face to face meetings and outreach education to local businesses regarding water quality issues in relation to the districts businesses. Our target population will be Southeast Asians whom English is not their primary language. 5) We will promote clean water quality initiatives on our social media pages and newsletter, estimated to reach around 15,000 people. 6) We will provide water quality education at our vendor orientation before the Night Market. This population are micro- and small businesses who are primarily immigrants with English as a second language.

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If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. The University of Minnesota Department of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources: hiring undergrad or graduate students to provide onsite education to attendees of Northern Spark and the Night Market. The City of Saint Paul Planning, Public Health, and Business Permitting Departments - Provides permits for the public events to AEDA and vendors and conducts public health training for participating vendors; Metropolitan Council - Supports event marketing outreach located along the Green Line to regional audiences; Center for Hmong Arts and Talent Support recruitment of Hmong artists and performers; Springboard for the Arts: Provides arts programming assistance and resources, assists with community engagement efforts in planning and neighborhood development activities; Frogtown Planning Council (District 7), Summit-University Planning Council (District 8).

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. We will measure project success by tracking the number of small businesses who participate in educational activities and request additional information about water quality protection practices (storing and disposing of water waste, chemicals, etc.); number of vendors who complete pre-Night Market orientation workshops and surveys; number of attendees at our 2017 event; number of people who visit the Little Mekong green stormwater management infrastructure exhibit displayed at our event and provide their contact information to learn more about the project and/or participate in community planning sessions. We will follow-up with water quality projection advocates and entities to determine the number of materials they distributed about water quality protection practices and numbers of people they were able to reach during the event. Later in the year, we will incorporate questions in our annual survey of Little Mekong businesses determine if owners have changed practices to reduce water pollution.

Project Tasks Task 1 Name Small Business Education

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description We will incorporate information about potential pollutants businesses can generate that end up in storm water runoff and water quality protection practices into the intake process of our business team’s financial and business planning services. When we conduct workshops to small businesses we will distribute information and discuss the contents of the information to small business owners. The workshops and information provided will inform the entrepreneurs about safe wastewater/hazardous liquids storage and disposal strategies, public health requirements and city codes for small businesses.

Task 2 Name Little Mekong Night Market Vendor Education

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Estimate Completion Date 07/2017

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Description We will prepare Southeast Asian and other vendors to participate in the Night Market by hosting an orientation training workshop which will include water quality protection practices as a topic for discussion. The workshop will inform the entrepreneurs about safe wastewater, hazardous liquids storage and disposal strategies, public health requirements and city for events and small businesses. In this orientation we will discuss the importance of gray water disposal at the site. We will ensure there are sufficient gray water disposal sites for our vendors.

Task 3 Name Little Mekong Night Market Public Education and Northern Spark Node

Estimate Completion Date 07/2017

Description We will engage a team of artists to plan and develop art and cultural programming for the events. We will offer booth space and opportunities for water quality protection advocates and groups to distribute materials and engage attendees. The events will include an educational exhibit of Green Storm Water Management infrastructure designs developed by the Metropolitan Design Center to generate interest among residents in neighborhood revitalization and development activities. We will offer a stipend to an undergraduate or graduate student from the University of Minnesota’s College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resources to be on scene for more technical questions and answers the public attendees may have. We will also recruit volunteers with water training to assist in educating the public.

Task 4 Name Evaluation

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description We will incorporate questions in our annual survey of Little Mekong businesses about new practices of storage and disposal of waste water, chemicals, etc. that local small entrepreneurs have adopted to reduce storm water pollution in our annual survey.

Task 5 Name Social Media & Newsletter

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description We will use our social media sites to disseminate wastewater, winter salt, and hazardous liquid storage and disposal to all those who follow us

Project Budget Tasks Small Business Education

Personnel / Staff Costs Other Expenses $4,000.00 $1,000.00

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Total Cost $5,000.00

4


Little Mekong Night Market Vendor Education Little Mekong Night Market Public Education and Northern Spark Node Evaluation Social Media & Newsletter Totals

$4,000.00

$1,000.00

$5,000.00

$4,000.00

$1,000.00

$5,000.00

$1,500.00 $750.00

$1,000.00 $250.00

$2,500.00 $250.75

$14,250.00

$4,250.00

$18,500.00

Requested CRWD Funding Approved $5,000.00 $2,000

Other Source Funding Total

Grant Funding Tasks Small Business Education Little Mekong Night Market Vendor Education Little Mekong Night Market Public Education and Northern Spark Node Evaluation Social Media & Newsletter Totals

$5,000.00

$0

$0.00

$5,000.00

$0.00

$5,000.00

$5,000.00

$5,000

$0.00

$5,000.00

$2,500.00 $1,000.00

$1,000 $0

$0.00 $0.00

$2,500.00 $1,000.00

$0.00

$18,500.00

$18,500.00 $8,000

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

5


5 Capitol Region Watershed District 1410 Energy Park Drive, Suite 4 Saint Paul, MN 55108 capitolregionwd.org (651)644-8888

PARTNER GRANT APPLICATION FORM

PROJECT INFORMATION __________________________________________________________________________ Project Name: Bringing the Frogs Back to Frogtown APPLICANT INFORMATION ___________________________________________________________________________ Organization or Agency: Frogtown Green Address: 843 Van Buren Avenue, Saint Pal, MN 55104 Contact Person: Patricia Ohmans, MPH, 651-757-5970, patricia.ohmans@gmail.com Geographic Area Served: directly, Frogtown (Thomas-Dale neighborhood) and indirectly, all of St Paul/CRWD region Request: $19,600 How did you hear about CRWD grants? Frogtown Green has worked with CRWD through three previous partnership grants.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION ____________________________________________________________________________ 1. Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them: Since 2014, Frogtown Green, a neighborhood sustainability initiative, has worked with the Capitol Region Watershed District to increase water consciousness and stewardship in our low-income, racially and ethnically diverse neighborhood. The mission of Frogtown Green is to build a healthier, wealthier, safer and more beautiful Frogtown, concentrating on the creation of gardens, parks, urban farms and other spaces where residents can enjoy the very real benefits of the natural environment. Equal access to clean water is a basic tenet of environmental justice, a cause to which Frogtown Green is implicitly and explicitly devoted.

Frogtown Green

CRWD application

1


2. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. In 2016, Frogtown Green received funding and technical support from the CRWD for “Bringing the Frogs Back to Frogtown,” a water stewardship education project based at Hmongtown Marketplace, incorporating: • media coverage and awareness building of water issues; • a children’s water festival to build engagement in water stewardship; and • physical enhancement of a retaining pond at the Marketplace. 
 With support from additional funders, we were able to significantly these CRWD-funded activities, by creating “FrogLab”, a childrens’ science education program held biweekly at the Markeplace. In 2017, with support from CRWD and other funders, we plan to: 1. expand the offerings of FrogLab, our summer science program, by moving to weekly instead of biweekly sessions, and by incorporating more expert visitors and programming from local environmental agencies; 2. complete the renovation and water-protective landscaping of the Marketplace retaining pond and adjacent pocket park; 3. add educational signage to the pond; 4. document water stewardship activities in a half-page section of six issues of the neighborhood newspaper, Greening Frogtown; and 5. celebrate the completion of the pond renovation as well as the end of the season with a repeat performance of Frog-A-Rimba, our fall water-themed festival. Each of these activities will contribute to CRWD’s efforts to protect and improve water quality in the Capitol Region Watershed District. Outreach and education are critical to engaging citizens in water stewardship. By making water stewardship efforts visible and comprehensible on the site of a retaining pond, we will further public awareness and understanding of CRWD’s more “invisible” infrastructure work. In addition, the physical location of “Bringing the Frogs Back to Frogtown” —a large immigrant bazaar in an ethnically diverse neighborhood—will enhance the CRWD’s efforts to reach immigrant and non-English speaking audiences. Frogtown Green hires bilingual and bicultural Hmong-American staff to carry out “Bringing the Frogs Back” activities, which is a key component of our successful outreach. Below is further detail on each of our planned 2017 activities: Expand FrogLab offerings: In 2016, FrogLab was offered on alternate Saturdays from early April until mid-October. Science activities (including water quality testing, exploration of aquatic habitat, and visits from live frogs and other amphibians) made the FrogLab booth a popular place at the Market. Our attendance varied, but our season total was approximately 450 visitors (many of them “regulars” among the children of the Marketplace’s customers and vendors.)

Frogtown Green

CRWD application

2


Given the first season’s success, we want to offer FrogLab sessions every week from early spring until fall, within a more visible location in the Marketplace offering ample space for handson activities. We also intend to invite more guest visitors and speakers. For example, we had a very successful session with Kao Thao, one of only two Hmong-speaking naturalists with the Minnesota DNR. We will invite Mr Thao back, along with other scientists, naturalists and water experts from various agencies and museums. Complete renovation of the pond: Hmongtown Marketplace owners and managers have been wonderfully welcoming of our suggestions for more water-friendly land contouring and planting for their parking lot retaining pond (which was originally installed with CRWD technical assistance.) Our joint efforts were unavoidably delayed this summer, however, when a runaway car drove completely into the pond, dislodging the pond’s impervious liner. Undeterred, Toua Xiong and his Marketplace manager, Jameson Liu, have proceeded with curb installation, re-contouring and re-seeding the area around the pond (along with replacing the damaged liner.) We propose to continue our partnership with Hmongtown Marketplace owners and Christine Baeumler, Artist-in-Residence with CRWD. Together, we will work with landscapers and plant experts to complete a planting plan for the pond area; install native trees, shrubs and grasses; and explore the incorporation of seating, water features and/or sculpture that will draw people to view and appreciate the pond. Add educational signage to the pond: Visitors to Hmongtown Marketplace will be much more likely to learn about water quality and stewardship if they are attracted to the pond by its amenities. Once there, they can read educational signage about the pond, its function, and the importance of citizen efforts to protect water. Using CRWD approved graphics, we propose to design and install signage that will illustrate all of these concepts, within a culturally appropriate context for a multinational, multilingual audience. Document activities in neighborhood newspaper: Frogtown Green publishes a bimonthly newspaper called Greening Frogtown and distributes it to every household in the neighborhood, as well as to businesses along commercial arteries. In 2017, we propose to run a half-page feature in each issue of the paper, highlighting an aspect of water quality and stewardship relevant to our urban neighborhood. These feature stories might include one or more profiles of neighborhood Water Stewards; inform residents about the AdoptA-Storm Drain program, or cover other topics determined in collaboration with CRWD. Articles will be accompanied with attractive and compelling photos or illustrations. Repeat and grow the Frog-A-Rimba festival On October 15 2016, festively masked and costumed children performed “A Pond Story”, capering on a stage at the Hmongtown Marketplace, not far from the Market’s actual pond.Their play, whose theme was the importance of clean water, was accompanied by a marimba band concert by high school students from Breck School. The event, attended by approximately 100 people (not including performers) was the culmination of 2016 activities, and included information tables from the CRWD and Ramsey County Master Gardeners. In 2017, we plan to recreate the festival, building on its most successful elements and incorporating even more educational activities and partners.

Frogtown Green

CRWD application

3


3. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. Frogtown Green will work with a variety of (sometimes overlapping) individual and organizational partners. These include: FrogLab Frogtown Green plans to again hire Chee Yang, a University of Minnesota-trained environmental education specialist who was critical to the success of FrogLab. Along with Emily Greger, program director at the River Bend Nature Center in Fairbault, Ms Yang provided essential planning and implementation for our first year’s activities. Pond renovation “Bringing the Frogs Back to Frogtown” is hosted at Hmongtown Marketplace, LLC, a 12-year old market venue for over 200 vendors, nearly all of whom are Hmong-American. Our most essential collaboration is with the owners and managers of Hmongtown Marketplace, Toua Xiong, his wife Nou, and their Marketplace manager, Jameson Liu. The Marketplace was founded in 2004 by Mr Xiong, a Hmong-American who came to Minnesota as a teenaged refugee. Since purchasing the former Shaw Lumber yard at Como Avenue in 2004, he has built a thriving indooroutdoor market which is open seven days a week, providing economic opportunities to over 200 small businesses and vendors. The Marketplace attracts thousands of visitors and customers each month. “Bringing the Frogs Back to Frogtown” also incorporates the considerable talents of Christine Baeumler, who, as Artist in Residence at the Capitol Region Watershed District (CRWD) co-directs the project with Patricia Ohmans and Toua Xiong. A committed environmentalist, Baeumler explores art as a catalyst to increase awareness about ecological issues and to facilitate stewardship. She is an Associate Professor in the Department of Art at the University of Minnesota. Ms Baeumler’s art practice is collaborative and involves the transformation of urban sites by increasing biodiversity, providing habitat, and improving water quality. Educational signage Design of the pond signage will be informed by the ideas and suggestions of Sieng Lee, an artist currently employed by Public Arts Saint Paul. Mr Lee is a first-generation Hmong American refugee, whose family came to the U.S. in 1991 from Thailand. He is a graphic designer and community organizer, whose recent work includes designing and developing the We Are Hmong/Peb Yog Hmoob Minnesota exhibit at the Minnesota History Center. Newspaper coverage Resident Water Steward Lauren Colwell and others will be encouraged to contribute to newspaper stories. Stories will be created by Anthony Schmitz, editor of Greening Frogtown and a 35year resident of the neighborhood. Photographs will be made by Hans Bremhorst, who created unforgettable images of our first year of FrogLab. Festival Summer 2016 activities culminated with “FrogaRimba!”, a puppet and mask pageant orchestrated by In the Heart of the Beast artist Laurie Witzkowski and other puppeteers. Pageant participants were drawn from students at St Paul City School, an elementary school a few blocks from the Hmongtown Marketplace. Musical accompaniment for the pageant was provided by the marimba players of Bato! Bato! an ensemble of high school students from Breck School, direct-

Frogtown Green

CRWD application

4


ed by Carey Siriani. We hope to again enlist the aid of artists-in-residence with In the Heart of the Beast puppet and mask theater, whose skilled guidance helped make the Frog-A-Rimba performance perfectly appropriate to the developmental levels of the children involved. We also hope to invite back the musicians of Bato! Bath Marimba band, and to involve musicians who play other traditional Hmong instruments. Finally, Christine Bauemler will bring in the Backyard Phenology Climate Chaser, a citizen science mobile laboratory that records “ordinary� citizens’ observations of environmental change. We will hire a Hmong interpreter specifically to interview Hmong speakers about their observations regarding climate change and water.

MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION ____________________________________________________________________________ 4. Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. Although it is often difficult to directly evaluate and document the success of our projects in regard to actual behavior change, we feel confident that our outreach and capacity-building efforts will lead to neighborhood-wide changes in attitudes and knowledge. Each task described below will be evaluated for its success in furthering the overall goal of increased awareness and intended behavior change related to water stewardship, using the following measures: FrogLab Numbers of participants in weekly sessions; responses to brief baseline and post-session questions. Pond renovation Continuing interest and collaboration from Marketplace management; interest manifested by Marketplace visitors in finished pond area. Educational signage Interest manifested by Marketplace visitors in signage; responses to survey regarding appropriate messages for signs. Newspaper coverage Number of papers distributed Festival Attendance at festival responses to brief pre- and post-festival survey; participation in Climate Chaser interviews.

Frogtown Green

CRWD application

5


PROJECT TASKS ____________________________________________________________________________ Please break down your project into major tasks and briefly describe them in the space provided and estimate completion date for each. ____________________________________________________________________________ 1. Task Name: FrogLab Estimated completion date: November 1, 2017 Working with environmental educator Chee Yang, we will develop and deliver 20 weekly handson and engaging educational sessions for FrogLab, with an expected average attendance of 30 children and 10 adults. Sessions will bring in expertise from local and regional water quality and environmental stewardship agencies and organizations. ___________________________________________________________________________ 2. Task Name: Pond renovation

Estimated completion date: December 30, 2017

Working with management of Hmongtown Marketplace and CRWD Artist in Residence Christine Baeumler, we will develop detailed planting plans for the newly landscaped area around the retaining pond. Supervised by landscape architect Fred Rozumalski, plants will be installed by Frogtown Green volunteers and Marketplace staff. ____________________________________________________________________________ 3. Task Name: Educational signage

Estimated completion date: October 1, 2017

Collaborating with artist Sieng Lee, we will develop culturally appropriate and translated signage informing visitors to the renovated pond of its water filtration function and educating them about steps they can take to ensure clean water. We will consult with CRWD in order to provide the most accurate and site-appropriate information about stormwater infrastructure and rain gardens. ____________________________________________________________________________ 4. Task Name: Newspaper coverage

Estimated completion date: December 30, 2017

Working with staff at CRWD, six articles on aspects of water stewardship in Frogtown will be published in six separate issues of Greening Frogtown. These will be delivered door-to-door to every household in the neighborhood as well as to commercial establishments and public gathering places. ____________________________________________________________________________ 5. Task Name: Festival

Estimated completion date: October 15, 2017

Working with In the Heart of the Beast Theater, Bato! Bath Marimba Band and a local school, as well as with FrogLab participants, we will produce a second Frog-A-Rimba festival, to celebrate the completion of the remodeled pond and to highlight water concerns in the neighborhood.

Frogtown Green

CRWD application

6


PROJECT BUDGET ____________________________________________________________________________ Complete the following table for all project tasks for which you will be requesting grant funds. Note: Matching funds are not required, but preference may be given projects with dedicated funds. Match funds must be cash (in-kind labor not considered.) TASKS

PERSONNEL/STAFF COSTS

OTHER EXPENSES

Task 1: FrogLab

$3,000 FrogLab educator/ coordinator: 20 weekly, 3 hour sessions @ $15/ hour

$500 Supplies and equipment

TOTAL COSTS $8,000

$2,000 FrogLab space rental, booth at Marketplace

$2,500 Frogtown Green project coordinator 100 hours @ $50/hr Task 2: Pond renovation

$2,000 landscape architect

$4,000 plant materials and seating

$6,000

Task 3: Educational signage

$100 Installer

$4,000 2 podium-style signs @ $2,000 each

$6,100

$2,000 graphic designer and translator for signs Task 4: Newspaper coverage

$1,200 writer/editor: six issues x 4 hours per feature @ $50/hour

$2,400 printing @ $400 per issue x six issues

$3,600

Task 5: Festival

$1,500 Frogtown Green project coordinator 30 hours @ $50/hr

$5,000 Artist in residence program from In the Heart of the Beast

$8,000

$1,500 Water festival coordinator, 100 hours @ $15/hr TOTALS

Frogtown Green

$13,800

CRWD application

$17,900

$31,700

7


Frogtown Green

CRWD application

8


PROJECT FUNDING ____________________________________________________________________________ Please fill in the table below with how you plan to allocate your funding. Note: The total cost from the table above and the total funding below should be the same.

TASKS

CRWD FUNDING Approved

FUNDING FROM OTHER SOURCE

TOTAL COSTS

Task 1: FrogLab

$7,000 $1,000 of $7,000 FrogLab space rental, booth fee donated by Hmongtown Marketplace

$8,000

Task 2: Pond renovation

$2,000 $4,000 $0 carry-over from 2016 funding that was not spent because of pond liner repair delays

$6,000

Task 3: Educational signage

$4,000 $100 Installer to be hired by $0 Hmongtown Marketplace

$6,100

$2,000 graphic designer and translator for signs to be paid by Public Arts Saint Paul

Task 4: Newspaper coverage

$3,600 $2,000

$3,600

Task 5: Festival

$3,000 $5,000 $3,000 Artist in residence program from In the Heart of the Beast may be covered by Cultural STAR grant

$8,000

TOTALS

Frogtown Green

$19,600 $12,000

CRWD application

$12,100

$31,700

9


PARTNER GRANT APPLICATION FORM Capitol Region Watershed District

Please submit form and required materials to: LINDSAY SCHWANTES lindsay@capitolregionwd.org

1410 Energy Park Drive, Suite 4 Saint Paul, MN 55108 Capitolregionwd.org (651) 644-8888

PROJECT INFORMATION Engaging Youth at CRWD Project Sites

APPLICANT INFO

APPLICANT INFORMATION ORGANIZATION OR AGENCY Great River Greening ADDRESS

CITY

ZIP

35 W Water Street #201

St. Paul

55107

CONTACT PERSON

PHONE

EMAIL ADDRESS

Deborah Karasov

651-272-3990

dkarasov@greatrivergreening.org

WHAT GEOGRAPHIC AND/OR DEMOGRAPHIC AREA DO YOU SERVE? Statewide; although CRWD for this proposal. Our target demographic area includes inner-city teens of color between the ages of 13-18. $20,000

HOW DID YOU HEAR ABOUT OUR GRANTS? We are a current grantee

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

PROJECT BACKGROUND

1.) DESCRIBE THE MISSION AND GOALS OF YOUR ORGANIZATION AND HOW YOUR PROJECT HELPS MEET THEM Great River Greening’s mission is to engage and inspire local communities to care for the land and water that enrich our lives. Focusing on several CRWD sites with water quality benefits--Trout Brook Nature Sanctuary, Willow Reserve and Victoria Park--this project will engage CRWD youth to educate them about water resources, inspire them to consider relevant academic, job or volunteer paths, and realize the positive impact they can have on our waterways. Saint Paul Parks and Recreation, which owns two of the sites, has no educational budget and partners with GRG for this purpose. In other words, Great River Greening’s youth programs in CRWD are filling a very important gap. CRWD is just starting the restoration of Willow Reserve and we are eager to partner, given its location in an underserved area, and the opportunity to build on the outreach we have done with Trout Brook Nature Sanctuary nearby. We will engage at least 250 youth through the following: a) Field Learning for Teens (FLT) targets CRWD schools and groups serving minority youth, bringing them to the three CRWD sites for experiential learning about science, water quality and environmental careers. In addition to learning about the site, teens engage in field work and/or science activities and discussions with community mentors about environmental jobs. Last year CRWD helped us to use water testing kits as one of the activities. FLT sessions are reinforced through classroom curriculum developed with the teacher to prepare students for experiential learning in the field. The combination of classroom learning and hands-on activities helps students better understand the importance of protecting, managing, and improving water resources in CRWD.

1

6


b) Public stewardship events at Victoria Park and Willow Reserve include hundreds of volunteers helping to implement restoration activities. Volunteers are at least 30% youth and include civic groups, corporations, schools, and faith communities. In small groups, at midpoint during the event, Great River Greening ecologists teach volunteers about the water quality benefits and science behind the site’s restoration activities. These small group discussions result in increased understanding of and participation in clean water actions. 2.) DESCRIBE HOW YOUR PROJECT WILL PROTECT OR IMPROVE WATER QUALITY.

Not surprisingly, most youth don’t think about where their water comes from or where it goes when it rains. Reconnecting people to the water that flows around them and beneath their streets is key to District water quality goals. We need future stewards, champions, and managers to take care of our precious and threatened natural resources. Dense commercial and residential growth, and the community’s cultural and racial diversity challenge the development of future stewards. Fortunately, bringing youth to sites where they experience water management is transformative. Suddenly youth begin to understand our delicate ecosystem, as well as how their actions affect water quality. Hearing from community mentors that there are jobs that involve the issues is even more so. Although a lot of water quality instruction happens in the classroom, field work reinforces classroom lessons. It makes learning fun for both the student and the teacher, and increases personal engagement with the issues. We work with the teachers to prepare the youth for the field sessions and help us evaluate the activities. Our Field Learning for Teens program engages 80% minority youth, and capitalizes on our unique strengths: access to a variety of sites of ecological significance, environmental professionals that make the field and hands‐on activities so memorable, and 21 years of experience restoring thousands of acres of critical habitat across the CRWD and state of Minnesota.

PROJECT BACKGROUND

3.) IF APPLICABLE, PLEASE LIST OTHER PARTNERS AND THIER ROLE IN YOUR PROJECT.

a) Saint Paul Parks & Recreation: land manager (NOTE: Saint Paul Parks & Recreation has few funds budgeted for education and engagement, and partners with us for implementation and outreach; through a grant from the National Fish & Wildlife Foundation (NFWF), we are also helping Parks & Recreation to employ summer youth crew targeting diverse youth) b) CRWD: resource for Field Learning for Teens and for internships; c) Various schools in the CRWD: source for recruiting youth for Field Learning for Teens. Previous school

MEASUREMENT ANDMinnesota EVALUATION partners have included Math and Science Academy, Twin Cities Academy, and Laura Jeffrey Academy. d) Various businesses and professional organizations: source for recruiting community mentors d) The NFWF grant helps to fund a Community Outreach Coordinator, only a small portion of which is included in our proposed budget, to help expand Great River Greening’s partners within diverse communities. 4.) BRIEFLY DESCRIBE HOW WILL YOU MEASURE THE SUCCESS OF YOUR PROJECT?

Our overall goal is to educate CRWD residents, primarily youth, about water pollution in their community. With increased knowledge of water quality issues (e.g., stormwater runoff), residents become committed stakeholders in our effort to protect, manage, and improve water resources. We measure success by achieving outcomes related to number of volunteers engaged (including demographic targets), knowledge gained, acres restored, and a reduction in pollutants. The University of Minnesota developed an evaluation plan for FLT specifically, which incorporates written feedback surveys, pre and post surveys, staff SWOTs, observation, and video interviews that involve teachers, youth, staff, and mentors. See below for objectives included in the University of Minnesota’s evaluation plan:

a) Youth will understand the importance of environmental stewardship, why water resource issues affect them, and knowledge of actions they can take.

b) Youth will learn science concepts related to the field activity and restoration of the site. c) Youth will understand the jobs behind creating water resource projects, including presence of skills required and meaningfulness of these life choices. We also track the number of participants in Field Learning for Teens and the number of partnering schools or groups serving diverse populations participating in volunteer and youth events. These measures are part of Great River Greening’s diversity plan and goals for the organization.

2


PROJECT TASKS 5.) IN THE SPACE BELOW, PLEASE BREAK DOWN YOUR PROJECT INTO MAJOR TASKS (UP TO 5), BRIEFLY DESCRIBE THEM IN THE SPACE PROVIDED AND ESTIMATE COMPLETION DATE FOR EACH.

1

TASK NAME: Youth Engagement

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y): 12/31/17

DESCRIPTION:

Minimum of 250 youth engaged through Field Learning for Teens and stewardship events. Implementation and photo documentation. With CRWD funds, we continue to increase the number of youth we can engage.

2

TASK NAME: Program Evaluation

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y): 12/31/17

DESCRIPTION:

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Demographic data and outcome evaluations that document percent knowledge and understanding gained by youth, as well as assessment of program strength and areas to improve.

3

TASK NAME:

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y):

DESCRIPTION:

4

TASK NAME:

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y):

DESCRIPTION:

5 TASK NAME: DESCRIPTION:

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y):

3


PROJECT BUDGET COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING TABLE FOR ALL PROJECT TASKS FOR WHICH YOU WILL BE REQUESTING GRANT FUNDS. NOTE: MATCH FUNDS ARE NOT REQUIRED, BUT PREFERENCE MAY BE GIVEN TO PROJECTS WITH DEDICATED FUNDS. MATCH FUNDS MUST BE CASH (IN-KIND LABOR NOT CONSIDERED).

OTHER EXPENSES (MATERIALS / SUPPLIES)

TOTAL

$34,800.00

$5,650.00

$40,450.00

$8,050.00

$1,500.00

TASKS TASK 1: Youth Engagement TASK 2: Program Evaluation TASK 3:

PROJECT FINANCIALS

TASK 4:

TASK 5:

$42,850.00

GRANT FUNDING PLEASE FILL IN THE TABLE BELOW WITH HOW YOU PLAN TO ALLOCATE YOUR FUNDING. NOTE: THE TOTAL COST FROM THE TABLE ABOVE AND THE TOTAL FUNDING BELOW SHOULD BE THE SAME.

TASK TASK 1: Youth Engagement

TASK 2: Program Evaluation

REQUESTED CRWD FUNDING Approved

$16,000.00 $13,000 .00 $4,000.00 $2,000 .00

FUNDING FROM OTHER SOURCE

TOTAL

$24,450.00

$40,450.00

$5,550.00

$ 9,550.00

TASK 3:

$ 0.00 TASK 4:

$ 0.00 TASK 5:

$ 0.00 TOTALS

$ 20,000.00 $15,000.00

$ 30,000.00

$ 50,000.00

4


2016 Field Learning for Teens

Students test the turbidity and pH level of water in a local stream.

Volunteer mentor speaks to teens about career opportunities in the environmental field.

Students identify macroinvertebrates as a way of testing water quality.

Students learn how to use GPS technology for a geocaching activity.

Visiting author, Drew Lanham, speaks to teens about the importance of conservation.

Teens learn how to use water testing kits with a volunteer mentor.


DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

CITY OF SAINT PAUL Mayor Christopher B. Coleman

400 City Hall Annex 25 West 4th Street Saint Paul, Minnesota 55102 www.stpaul.gov/parks

Telephone: 651-266-6400 Facsimile: 651-292-7311

November 7, 2016 Lindsay Schwantes Community Outreach Coordinator Capitol Region Watershed District 1410 Energy Park Drive, Suite 4 Saint Paul, MN 55108

Dear Lindsay, I am writing to express the City of Saint Paul, Department of Parks and Recreation’s support for Great River Greening’s grant application to the Capitol Region Watershed District. We look forward to working with Great River Greening on restoration of Victoria Park and its connection to the Mississippi floodplain. The City of Saint Paul has worked in partnership with Great River Greening on natural resource restoration activities for over a decade, and they have been a trusted partner and important community asset. We have worked together in improving many natural areas in the city; including Crosby, Cherokee, Indian Mounds, and Meeker Dam Regional Parks, as well as parts of Como and the Mississippi River blufflands. Last year, they helped us to fund our Right Track workers. Most recently we have partnered with them in a series of new parks, including Trout Brook Nature Sanctuary and Victoria Park. For all of these parks, Great River Greening has helped to secure state funds, collaborated with parks staff on planning, and engaged the community in their restoration. Equally important Great River Greening has used these sites as a field laboratory for their premier Field Learning for Teens program, where city schools with high minority populations learn about stewardship, water quality, and maybe even job paths in the environment. Great River Greening’s work with youth deals with a critical issue for our community, reaching and nurturing environmental stewards from all backgrounds, and they have a track record of over 10,000 youth since they began. These types of programs have a positive impact on our youth and our community. Please feel free to contact me if you have additional questions about our support for this grant. Sincerely,

Alice Messer Senior Landscape Architect

An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer CAPRA Accreditation

National Gold Medal Award


7 Capitol Region Watershed District 1410 Energy Park Drive, Suite 4 Saint Paul, MN 55108 Capitolregionwd.org (651) 644-8888

PARTNER GRANT APPLICATION FORM Please submit form and required materials to: LINDSAY SCHWANTES lindsay@capitolregionwd.org

PROJECT INFORMATION PROJECT NAME

Urban Water Management Education and Implementation Support

APPLICANT INFO

APPLICANT INFORMATION ORGANIZATION OR AGENCY

Macalester-Groveland Community Council

ADDRESS

320 Griggs Street South

CONTACT PERSON

Britta Sherrill/ Liz Boyer

CITY

PHONE

651-695-4000

ZIP 55105

Saint Paul

EMAIL ADDRESS

mgcc@macgrove.org

We serve the Macalester-Groveland neighborhood, but this project would be city-wide. See neighborhood map on our website: macgrove.org WHAT GEOGRAPHIC AND/OR DEMOGRAPHIC AREA DO YOU SERVE?

HOW MUCH ARE YOU REQUESTING? (BETWEEN $2,000 AND $20,000)

HOW DID YOU HEAR ABOUT OUR GRANTS?

$5990

A member of our Environment Committee proposed the grant opportunities during

a committee planning session.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

PROJECT BACKGROUND

1.) DESCRIBE THE MISSION AND GOALS OF YOUR ORGANIZATION AND HOW YOUR PROJECT HELPS MEET THEM

The Macalester-Groveland Community Council (MGCC) is an established 501c(3) non-profit organization and part of the City of Saint Paul’s District Council system. We are a recognized community institution dedicated to community engagement around a myriad of issues including land use, transportation, and sustainability. Our mission is to foster citizen participation in government and community decisions that make our neighborhood a desirable place to live, work, and play. The MGCC has been a leader in environmentally-focused sustainability initiatives that benefit our neighborhood and the City of Saint Paul by helping individuals lower their environmental impact. MGCC’s strong focus on the environment stems from the geography of the district, as many of the houses are located in low-lying areas, which frequently cause problems for residents: The soil in the district is primarily clay-based, resulting in slow infiltration; many homes in the area need sump pumps; and there are even underground streams that cause foundation problems. (Continued on next page) 1


A broader goal of MGCC’s work is to support community-driven initiatives through our volunteer committees. To this end, we have a long-standing Environment Committee made up of dedicated volunteers who have successfully implemented climate change awareness initiatives (e.g. Stop the Rain Drain (2010), rain barrel workshops (2008), storm drain stamping (2004)), a wasted food reduction project and an organics recycling program which was started in our neighborhood in 2012 and now expanded to serve Ramsey County). In additional to their dedication, our long-time volunteer committee members have the professional expertise required for this project. Our committee includes award-winning environmental educators specializing in sustainability, watershed management and water conservation. Our steering committee for this project will draw on this expertise and proven ability of our dedicated volunteers to contribute high-level educational material for the benefit of MGCC initiatives, the Macalester-Groveland community and the City of Saint Paul. Additionally, we recently completed our 10-year plan as required by the City of Saint Paul. Through the process, we conducted extensive community outreach to learn what our neighborhood residents envisioned for the next decade. We heard that our community would like to continue to lead the City in sustainability with an emphasis on climate change, stormwater management and water resources protection. This project would serve all of these community and MGCC goals. We make every effort to maximize our work for the benefit of the entire City, not just Macalester-Groveland. Through recent grant projects, we’ve demonstrated our capacity to successfully implement complex projects with city-wide implications on timely and sensitive issues. In 2015 – 2016, the committee focused on organizing the trash collectors in the city of Saint Paul, in an effort to reduce wear and tear on roads and alleys, and increase efficiency of garbage collection while reducing costs for residents. Due to the committee’s efforts, the City of Saint Paul dedicated $330,000 in the 2016 budget and has now begun the process of implementing organized trash collection city-wide. We have the skilled staff, the strong community partnerships, the committed volunteers and the experience conducting in-depth engagement efforts that this project will require. We are wellpositioned to equip the community with stormwater management strategies, by providing the necessary resources, learning tools, and support.

2.) DESCRIBE HOW YOUR PROJECT WILL PROTECT OR IMPROVE WATER QUALITY.

Our project is designed to educate and inform individuals and families about actions they can take on their urban property to protect and improve water quality region-wide. We will follow up with customized support for implementation of specific projects and connections to additional resources. We will hold a separate forum for community institutions to ensure that our materials reach beyond individual homeowners. We will help all participants understand that even small actions can add up to big improvements and that no action is too big for them to implement with the right assistance and resources. (Continued on next page)

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Workshops Our project would consist of a series of workshops covering a range of urban stormwater management topics. We would offer incentives for participation in all workshops in the series, including up to 2 hours of consultation with a certified Master Water Steward to assist in the design of a stormwater management feature, such as rain gardens, rain barrels, diverting gutters, installing permeable surfaces, and more. We will also offer products and/or discounts from local retailers, who incorporate environmentally-friendly products and/or strategies in their businesses. Our workshops would be family-friendly with food and childcare provided. We would advertise and promote our events through established MGCC and City-wide communication channels. All of our workshops and incentives would be open to all residents of the City of Saint Paul. Additionally, all workshop materials will be made available online after the sessions. Workshop topics and collaborators: 

Climate Change Resiliency and Stormwater Management Dr. Christie Manning, Macalester College Learning Objectives: sustainable stormwater management practices with a focus on climate change adaptation and resiliency Dr. Christie Manning, Macalester College, will collaborate for one session on sustainable stormwater management practices with a focus on climate change adaptation and resiliency. Climate change is no longer a distant theoretical possibility and we know, in general, what climate change will bring to our region: stronger and more sudden storms, warmer and icier winters, a tendency toward longer dry spells, higher likelihood of extreme heat waves. All of these effects have implications for management of our stormwater resources. This workshop will cover the latest research findings, best practices, tools and strategies.

Stormwater Management in your Backyard. Mr. David Pasiuk, Master Water Steward Learning Objectives: Practical, household level strategies for sustainable management of stormwater on urban lots. David Pasiuk will collaborate for one session focused on strategies, methods and practices for more sustainable management of stormwater where it falls – in backyards, driveways and rooftops. Topics will include fertilizers (what/how to use), landscaping and lawn care tips for managing stormwater, how to plan and incorporate features like rain barrels or raingardens, and other practical tools/tips.

At least one, and up to three, additional workshops will be developed by the steering committee using community input and feedback on additional needs or interests.

(Continued on next page)

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Follow-up Support By following-up our educational workshops with individual support, participants are much more likely to follow through on water resource protection and improvement projects that will directly protect or improve water quality. The individual support will include up to 2 hours with a Master Water Steward to assist in the design of a stormwater management feature (planning/planting a rain garden, diverting gutters, installing permeable surfaces, building a rain barrel, etc). We will offer at least five of these individual support follow-up sessions to participants who complete the entire workshop series. This will serve as an incentive to attend all sessions as well encourage follow-through by participants. The workshops and follow-up sessions will be open to all residents in the City of Saint Paul. If we have more eligible participants than available individual sessions, we will select participants to receive a follow-up session in a random drawing. We will also conduct outreach to local business/retailers who incorporate environmentallyfriendly products and/or strategies in their businesses. We will invite these businesses to offer products and/or discounts to workshop participants as further incentive for participation. Community Institution Forum In order to further the reach of our educational workshop materials, MGCC will engage local community institutions for a forum in the fall of 2017. The project steering committee will compile content from all workshops and make any necessary adaptations to make the material more relevant for institutional uses (churches, schools as well as businesses). We will invite representatives from local churches, businesses, and schools to our community forum designed to educate and encourage larger scale water quality improvement projects. MGCC will also invite experienced institutions in stormwater management, such as Plymouth United Methodist, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, and Great River Charter Montessori School to attend and share any additional insights. The goal of this forum would be to position MGCC and participants for collaboration in future projects, as well as to spread awareness of additional resources and services offered by the CRWD.

PROJECT BACKGROUND

3.) IF APPLICABLE, PLEASE LIST OTHER PARTNERS AND THIER ROLE IN YOUR PROJECT.

Dave Pasiuk (Master Water Steward): Mr. Pasiuk is a long-time Macalester-Groveland resident and dedicated MGCC volunteer. He brings a wealth of experience from his career as a production/ capacity planner, system designer and home remodeler. He believes that sunlight and rainwater are necessities for life and that we must do everything possible to use every ray and drop. To this end, he is a fierce advocate for sustainability initiatives. He and his wife have 24 solar panels at their home and have landscaped their house and yard to capture 90% of storm water runoff. In 2016, he became a Master Water Steward to assist others in the community. David will use his experience and training to assist in the development of workshop content as well as provide follow-up home visits. (Continued on next page)

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Christie Manning: Christie Manning is an Assistant Professor (non tenure track) of Environmental Studies and Psychology at Macalester College. She is also the Associate Director of the College’s Educating Sustainability Ambassadors initiative. Dr. Manning’s research explores people’s cognitive and emotional response to climate change. Working with Dr. Roopali Phadke of Macalester College, Dr. Manning has spent the last three years facilitating the Ready and Resilient project to build capacity for climate adaptation in vulnerable communities of Saint Paul. Dr. Manning will collaborate with MGCC for our first workshop focused on stormwater impacts of climate change. She will assist with the development of workshop content as well as delivery.

MEASUREMENT AND EVALUATION 4.) BRIEFLY DESCRIBE HOW WILL YOU MEASURE THE SUCCESS OF YOUR PROJECT?

We will measure the success of the education component of our project by number of participants— our goal is 50 people at each workshop—as well as the results of a postworkshop survey including self-reported actions completed. We will measure the success of the follow-up implementation support component by number of consultations completed and number of projects implemented. These projects could include but are not limited to: planting a rain garden, diverting gutters, installing permeable surfaces, building a rain barrel, etc. Finally, we will measure the success of the institutional engagement portion of the project by the number of institutions participating as well as follow-up points of contact.

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PROJECT TASKS 5.) IN THE SPACE BELOW, PLEASE BREAK DOWN YOUR PROJECT INTO MAJOR TASKS (UP TO 5), BRIEFLY DESCRIBE THEM IN THE SPACE PROVIDED AND ESTIMATE COMPLETION DATE FOR EACH.

1

TASK NAME: Planning Stage, January to March

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y): 3/2017

DESCRIPTION:

Form steering committee. Consult with project partners. Finalize schedule and content for all workshops

2

TASK NAME: Marketing Stage, February to June

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y): 6/2017

DESCRIPTION:

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Promote, publicize and advertise workshops. Specific outreach to area elementary and middle schools to reach families.

3

TASK NAME: Action Stage, April to October

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y): 10/2017

DESCRIPTION:

Conduct workshops for City residents and community forum for neighborhood institutions.

4

TASK NAME: Support Stage, June to August

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y): 8/2017

DESCRIPTION:

Schedule and complete follow-up support visits with Master Water Steward.

5 TASK NAME: Review Stage, October to December DESCRIPTION:

ESTIMATED COMPLETION DATE (M/Y): 12/2017

Report and evaluation.

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PROJECT BUDGET COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING TABLE FOR ALL PROJECT TASKS FOR WHICH YOU WILL BE REQUESTING GRANT FUNDS. NOTE: MATCH FUNDS ARE NOT REQUIRED, BUT PREFERENCE MAY BE GIVEN TO PROJECTS WITH DEDICATED FUNDS. MATCH FUNDS MUST BE CASH (IN-KIND LABOR NOT CONSIDERED).

OTHER EXPENSES (MATERIALS / SUPPLIES)

TASK 1: Planning Stage

$ 930.00

$ 0.00

TASK 2: Marketing Stage

$ 390.00

$150.00

$ 390.00

$ 1720.00

$1700.00

$ 3420.00

$ 400.00

$250.00

$ 650.00

$ 450.00

$0.00

$ 450.00

$ 3890.00

$ 2100.00

TASK 3: Action Stage TASK 4: Support Stage TASK 5: Review Stage

TOTALS

PROJECT FINANCIALS

TOTAL COST

PERSONNEL / STAFF COSTS

TASKS

$ 930.00

$ 5990.00

GRANT FUNDING PLEASE FILL IN THE TABLE BELOW WITH HOW YOU PLAN TO ALLOCATE YOUR FUNDING. NOTE: THE TOTAL COST FROM THE TABLE ABOVE AND THE TOTAL FUDNING BELOW SHOULD BE THE SAME.

REQUESTED CRWD FUNDING Approved

FUNDING FROM OTHER SOURCE

TASK 1: Planning Stage

$ 930.00 $ 800.00

$ 0.00

$ 930.00

TASK 2: Marketing Stage

$ 390.00 $ 400.00 $ 3420.00 $ 3,000.00

$ 0.00

$ 390.00

$ 0.00

$ 3420.00

$ 0.00

$ 650.00

$ 0.00

$ 450.00

$ 0.00

$ 5990.00

TASK

TASK 3: Action Stage TASK 4: Support Stage TASK 5: Review Stage

TOTALS

$ 650.00 $ 400.00 $ 450.00 $ 400.00 $ 5990.00 $ 5,000.00

TOTAL

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2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-29 13:47:44

Project Information Project Name:

Parkview Water Project (PWP)

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Parkview Center School 701 County Road B West Roseville, Minnesota 55113 Jenny Eckman (651) 487-4360 jennifer.eckman@isd623.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? Parkview is a choice school for the Roseville School District. The program attracts students from throughout the Roseville School District which serves Falcon Heights, Lauderdale, Little Canada, Maplewood, and Shoreview, Minnesota, as well as from St. Paul and neighboring suburbs. Parkview is the only K-8 option in the district and serves a population of approximately 750 students. A lottery system insures equitable access and the school has a population that includes diverse racial, cultural, and language groups. Parkview has an E-STEM focus (environmental science, technology, engineering and math) and oers an inclusive educational program with some additional unique elements. The Special Education program has a full continuum of services for children with disabilities including IShine (developmental and cognitive disabilities) and Home Base (emotional and behavioral disabilities) programs. How much are you requesting? $5,500.00 How did you hear about our grants? grant author worked with CRWD at previous school

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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In addition to the E-STEM focus, Parkview uses the acronym PEACE as a way to integrate important components into the educational program. Peace --- Promoting peace in our world Equity --- Equitable acceptance Action --- Acting with responsibility to others, ourselves, and places Community --- Community building through service learning Environment --- Encouraging earth friendly endeavors The Parkview Water Project is a perfect fit with our PEACE integration. We want to give students not only rich knowledge about water quality and conservation but also motivation and skills to act on what they know. The grant author, Jenny Eckman came to Parkview this year after 3 years of successful water based partner grants at Parkview’s neighboring school Harambee Elementary. This project is an attempt to replicate the program from Harambee at a school with similar mission and goals. With this project, we want to reproduce the successful experiences of the past 3 years at Harambee with a goal of making water quality and conservation education a permanent part of the Parkview program. The grant contains three major components; resources for teachers, resources and experiences for students, and time for staff to meet and plan. We will focus initially on grades 1-4. Jenny is working closely with Mary Sweeney, Parkview’s E-STEM specialist and Laura Dodge, a 3rd/4th grade teacher. With Jenny working in grades 1 and 2, Laura working in grades 3 and 4, and Mary working with all of the grade 1-4 classrooms, we are confident this is the most effective way to bring the water conservation and quality focus to Parkview. At Harambee, the water focus in primary grades was created around the pond/wetland habitat. The Harambee 1st grade teachers participated in a morning workshop about plants, animals, and insects that rely on ponds and wetlands and then an afternoon field experience in the wetland/pond area of the school catching and identifying dragonflies and damselflies. Teachers rated this one of the best staff development choices of the year and following that workshop day, all 3 first grade teachers reported they had made the pond/wetland a permanent part of their curriculum planning. Students began to see how human actions would impact the health of the pond. We see this easily adapting to Parkview. At Parkview, students in grades 1 and 2 currently learn about water in the context of weather and in a unit called Solids and Liquids. We believe we can extend and enhance the water themes that already exist by including the focus on pond and wetland habitats. In 1st grade, we will focus specifically on the life cycle of odonata. In 2nd grade we will expand to include a microinvertebrate water sampling experience. Because Parkview does not have a pond/wetland on site, our program will focus on water in the Parkview school forest and then include a field trip to either the Harambee pond/wetland site or to nearby Lake McCarrons for the odonata or water sampling experience. Parkview 3rd and 4th graders learn about water as a component of the water cycle and in the context of landforms and geology. Again, we see the chance to extend this learning to include water quality and water conservation through authentic experiences and service learning. We will take the existing water curriculum and add a focus on reducing water use and more focus on the impact of people on water quality. The 3rd/4th grade elements of the grant project will include activities with Wilderness Inquiry and the Race 2 Reduce program both in Parkview school forest and at a local lake. Finally, we know the invaluable element of teacher development and time. Our teachers need to feel confident about making these connections for kids. We’ve seen that participating in high quality professional development with a focus on water ecology/conservation/quality can make that happen. Jenny, Mary and Laura are all passionate about this project based on their own experiences with professional development around water. Student resources will include books and activities about water habitats and human impacts on water. We have seen that without time for teachers to meet, plan, assess, and adjust, all of the materials and resources lose their value. Because our goal is to have all students across the four grade levels have experiences and opportunities to learn about water quality 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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and conservation, we need time to make these a part of the regular curriculum. We believe that the Parkview Water Project is a way for us to bring our PEACE acronym focus to life for our students and families! Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. We believe that in order to be active in protecting water quality and water resources, students need both knowledge and motivation. Staff can't provide these for students unless they too are informed and motivated. We see this project as a way to provide these elements for both students and teachers.
 Our families are actively involved in their students' education and have sought this school out of many potential choices for their children. Parkview has an active parent advisory council and a vibrant green school committee. We know that our work with water will be supported and valued by our families. We believe this project will also affect students' families and home communities. We have a wide variety of racial, cultural, religious, and socio-economic groups represented in our school community. Many of families and students are in groups the have traditionally not been involved in environmental education or advocacy. This project is a way to connect them to a vitally important topic and make it interesting and relevant. We believe that with information and motivation, our students and families are much more likely to be good stewards of water resources into the future. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. Parkview has committed to partner with the Jeffers Foundation and already has an existing relationship with the MN Department of Natural Resources. We will use resources and materials from these two organizations along with Wilderness Inquiry and Race 2 Reduce. Jeffers Foundation will supply free staff development, science journals, and other environmental education resources that will support the project. Wilderness Inquiry provides both staff development and student experiences at a significant reduction in order for us to afford them (even with grant support). We have just begun conversation with Race 2 Reduce but believe the strong foundation they’ve established with White Bear and Mahtomedi school districts will be extremely valuable for our work on this project.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. In addition to water related standards on the 5th grade MCA science assessment, we are working on multiple ways to measure how students understand water concepts. This is where Parkview will benefit from the previous work at Harambee and the work happening with Race 2 Reduce in two other school districts. During our teacher meeting and planning times we look at student work and teacher notes to determine how well we think students are understanding the concepts. We will examine and adapt what has been used at Harambee and in the White Bear and Mahtomedi schools. Race 2 Reduce has already created assessments to measure student understanding and aligned projects to MN state standards. We will look critically at how to improve the experiences to impact attitudes and interest as well. Most importantly, we are looking at ways students are getting involved and taking action. One Harambee teacher reported that after the Wilderness Inqury canoe experience, one of her students told her she had changed what she wanted for her birthday. She had previously asked for an iPad but was now hoping for a canoe! Another Harambee student designed and implemented a lesson about oil spills that she taught to younger students. Some 1st graders started cleaning up the trash that blows into the fences overlooking the pond because they didn’t want pollution causing problems for dragonfly larvae! We believe that with Parkview’s PEACE focus, the service learning and community outreach components of this grant have the support to be successful. Our goal is to have students who see water as a critical and important resource. We are looking for evidence that students have the information about water quality 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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and protection and are motivated to take action!

Project Tasks Task 1 Name Pond/Wetland Study

Estimate Completion Date 06/2017

Description Both 1st and 2nd grade will use the pond/wetland habitat as a focus for our water study in addition to the connections in the Solids/Liquids and Weather units already used at Parkview. For these students, water education begins with the body of water closest to them. Teachers will work with Ami Thompson, author of Dragonfly Curriculum Guide. She will provide information about the importance of pond and wetland habitats for these insects as well as activities and ways to introduce to students. She will provide field experiences for 6 classrooms. 1st grade: to catch and identify dragonflies and damselflies in the Harambee wetland/pond area or Lake McCarrons County Park 2nd grade: to conduct macroinvertebrate water sampling to identify organisms and explore how these populations can indicate water quality Cost for Ami $500 per grade Cost for subs $500 per grade Cost for student materials and resources connected to the pond study $500 Total: $2,500

Task 2 Name 3rd grade field day

Estimate Completion Date 06/2017

Description Staff from Wilderness Inquiry will visit Parkview to work with 3rd grade students and teachers. Wilderness Inquiry will lead water conservation activities in Parkview school forest. Focus will be related to the Race 2 Reduce project for 3rd grade "Awareness" phase where students complete a water use analysis and conservation plan. Race 2 Reduce curriculum has been offered for free use! Approximate cost $2000; with Wilderness Inquiry scholarship; $1,000

Task 3 Name 4th grade field day

Estimate Completion Date 06/2017

Description Staff from Wilderness Inquiry will lead water quality testing and canoe experience at Lake McCarrons 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

4


County Park. Parkview will organize and coordinate for water quality activities with CRWD, MN DNR and other partners to create a full day of water related learning at the park. All activities will be coordinated with outcomes from the Big River Journey field experience that 4th grade participates in currently at Parkview Approximate cost $3000; with Wilderness Inquiry scholarship: $1,000

Task 4 Name Teacher Planning

Estimate Completion Date 06/2017

Description The E-STEM specialist (Mary) and/or Jenny and Laura will meet with grade level representatives to plan and implement the water quality and conservation education integration project . This will include the creation of documents that will become part of the expected environmental science curriculum at Parkview 8 subs @ approx. $125 =$1000

Project Budget Tasks Pond/Wetland Study 3rd grade field day 4th grade field day Teacher Planning Totals

Personnel / Staff Costs $2,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $3,000.00

Other Expenses $500.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $0.00 $2,500.00

Total Cost $2,500.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $1,000.00 $5,500.00

Grant Funding Tasks

Requested CRWD Approved Funding Pond/Wetland Study $2,500.00 $2,500 3rd grade field day $1,000.00 $1,000 4th grade field day $1,000.00 $1,000 Teacher Planning $1,000.00 $1,000 Totals $5,500.00 $5,500

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Other Source Funding Total $0.00 $1,000.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $3,000.00

$2,500.00 $2,000.00 $3,000.00 $1,000.00 $8,500.00

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9

2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-31 12:15:11

Project Information Project Name:

Environmental Art Workshops for Western Sculpture Park

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Public Art Saint Paul 381 Wabasha Street North Saint Paul, Minnesota 55102 Colleen Sheehy (651) 290-0921 colleen@publicartstpaul.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? This request is for the Western Sculpture Park neighborhood, which primarily serves the population of the Central Corridor in the Summit University and Frogtown neighborhoods. The population of census tracts 336 + 337 is 3,100. Of the population in census tract 337, immediately surrounding the Park, 63% are foreign born and more than 50% speak English less than “very well.� How much are you requesting? $10,000 How did you hear about our grants? Through continued partnership and previous grants with CRWD.

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. Mission: Public Art Saint Paul makes St. Paul a better city, placing artists in leading roles to shape public spaces, improve city systems, and deepen civic engagement. Goals: Though daring leadership we will champion innovative public art practice, imagining and creating with artists, civic leaders, and our neighbors a 21st century city that is just, sustainable, and beautiful.

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Since 1998 PASP has worked to produce Western Sculpture Park’s high quality exhibitions and educational programs. Our weekly Environmental Art Workshops serve 500-600 youth each summer in a densely populated and diverse core City neighborhood of the Central Corridor. They take place in a City park bordered by the Capitol, I-94, University Avenue, and Dale Street. Youth and families of this core City neighborhood are underserved by community centers located across the great divides of I-94 and University Avenue. They are the primary audience for our summer Environmental Art Workshops. Since 2009, the Workshops have served over 3,000 children from this and surrounding neighborhoods. Since 2014, Environmental Art Workshops have integrated artmaking with water quality awareness and education about water as a vital environmental resource. Many children return each year to learn and grow with the program, creating effective impact on learning knowledge, developing skills, building relationships, fostering community involvement and caring, and fostering positive interactions among youth and teaching artists and other program personnel. In 2016, we were able to realize the installation of a rain garden in the Park, a tie to the water stewardship themes of the Park, with support from our Partners including CRWD, RCD, and St. Paul Parks. Our Workshops in the coming years will leverage the rain garden as an engagement and education tool for our artistic water quality education programs. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. - Artistically engage youth and families who participate in our Environmental Art Workshops, about water quality as they develop understanding of the rain garden’s contributions to the environment and issues of sustainability; - Demonstrate to Workshop participants, through hands on actions, the important role they play in preserving our environment as they participate in maintenance and care for the rain garden, alongside Workshop staff; - Transferring skills to youth by providing opportunities to lead in rain garden maintenance tasks, furthering their confidence and enthusiastic understanding of the water system; - Teach Workshop participants about water pollution issues and the environment, and help them to understand their role in solving them. Help them to see that they can achieve positive changes in the neighborhood, as they become responsible stewards in their own community; - As people observe and care for the rain garden together, they will share information about its impacts on our water system, building positive relationships within the community—with plants, pollinators, peers, families, and themselves; - The children who participate in Workshops become a valuable resource for spreading water system awareness and prompting behavior change throughout the neighborhood, across language and cultural barriers. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. - CRWD Community Outreach Coordinator Lindsay Schwantes has remained a valued consultant and resource since the 2014 pilot year, and we invite her continued input in our rain garden focused Workshop content. - The City of Saint Paul’s Parks and Recreation, Maintenance, Sewer Utility Division, and Public Works provide running water access, heated-water truck for annual sculpture maintenance, information and maps of water resources in the Park, storage space, and additional resources; - The Minnesota Department of Health Clean Drinking Water Section, a valued partner since 2014, has featured the Workshops in their publication Waterline, as well as provided financial support; - Mississippi Market has provided gift cards since 2014 for purchasing nutritious snack items for Workshop participants – helping to illuminate the role urban farmers play in the watershed; - Musicians from McNally Smith College of Music and ComMusication perform water themed music during 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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the break at Workshops; - The Saint Paul Mounted Police and their horses have visited Workshops since 2015, inviting children to feed, water, and pet horses all the while building strong community connections; - The Saint Paul Promise Neighborhood, Sprockets, and the Summit University and Frogtown District Councils help us to engage young people and families throughout the Western Sculpture Park neighborhood.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. In 2017 we will produce 12 new Environmental Art Workshops that focus on the water system and water quality that meets our high artistic standards and models engaging and rigorous water quality education as defined with our partners. We will measure the success of Workshops by measuring the number of new and returning participants, their attendance frequency, the number of new and existing partnerships built and strengthened, and the number of partners, teachers, and water quality professionals that support and contribute to the program. We will focus on increasing knowledge of the urban water system by Workshop participants by informally surveying youth and their families through conversation to assess their response and enthusiasm for Workshops and water quality practices and knowledge. (With this population, typical methods of written surveys are not appropriate or effective.) The program manager will monitor attendance as well as statistical and geographic information of the Workshop participants. Teaching artists will provide weekly evaluation of their workshop projects and experiences. Public Art Saint Paul’s staff, and stakeholders will contribute their ideas as we reflect upon evaluation outcomes. Evaluation results will be used to refine and enrich Workshop content to bring forth the urban water system, to strengthen and expand partnerships in the community, and to more fully engage the Western Sculpture Park community.

Project Tasks Task 1 Name Planning

Estimate Completion Date 05/2017

Description Building from the 2016 rain garden installation project in Western Sculpture Park, and in coordination Ramsey Conservation District and Capitol Region Watershed District, we will plan for the removal of excess soil remaining in the rain garden, so as to meet the original design specs.

Task 2 Name 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Estimate Completion Date 3


Rain Garden Soil Amendment

06/2017

Description Soil removal work and related work- uprooting plants, replanting/replacing plants post soil removal—anticipated to be executed by original contractor, so as to meet original design specs of the contract. In the event the contractor does not agree to complete the work, we will consult with Lindsay Schwantes about engaging 6 Master Water Stewards to complete the work, and seek the guidance of Joe Lochner, of Ramsey Conservation District, who is the designer of the rain garden.

Task 3 Name Summer Workshop Planning

Estimate Completion Date 06/2017

Description Based on input via discussion and evaluation with 2014-2016 Workshop participants, teaching artists, partners, program staff and interns, we will refresh and grow our art and water quality based Workshop lessons in Western Sculpture Park. We will create an overarching theme for 2017 Workshop content that will embrace the repair work necessary to fix the rain garden as a teaching moment, and that will employ the rain garden as primary teaching tool to demonstrate how participants’ behavior can protect the water system and improve its quality. We will plan for consistent hands-on engagement rain garden activities for participants – from care and maintenance to artistic fence design – effectively building artmaking skills and environmental awareness.

Task 4 Name Workshop Production

Estimate Completion Date 09/2017

Description We will engage a cohort of professional teaching artists that are knowledgeable about water issues, artmaking approaches, and with techniques to engage youth, to lead 12 Environmental Artmaking Workshops in Western Sculpture Park, bringing our innovative artistic water quality Workshops to over 500 youth.

Task 5 Name Evaluation

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description We will focus on understanding the increase in knowledge of the workshop participants about the water system and water quality by informal feedback from workshop youth throughout the summer. We will informally survey the youth through conversation to assess their response and enthusiasm for Workshop lessons, especially pertaining to the rain garden.

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Project Budget Tasks Planning Rain Garden Soil Amendment Summer Workshop Planning Workshop Production Evaluation Totals

Personnel / Sta Costs Other Expenses $500.00 $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00

Total Cost $500.00 $1,000.00

$15,000.00

$0.00

$15,000.00

$32,000.00 $2,200.00 $50,700.00

$11,800.00 $0.00 $11,800.00

$43,800.00 $0.22 $62,500.00

Requested CRWD Funding Approved $500.00 $0 $1,000.00 $0

Other Source Funding Total

Grant Funding Tasks

Planning Rain Garden Soil Amendment Summer Workshop $0.00 Planning Workshop Production $7,500.00 Evaluation $1,000.00 Totals $10,000.00

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

$0.00 $0.00

$500.00 $1,000.00

$0

$15,000.00

$15,000.00

$7,500 $1,000 $8,500.00

$36,300.00 $1,200.00 $52,500.00

$43,800.00 $2,200.00 $62,500.00

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2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-31 11:37:35

Project Information Project Name:

Water Wise

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Summit Hill Association 860 St. Clair Avenue St. Paul, Minnesota 55105 Nelima Sitati (651) 122-2222 nelima@summithillassociation.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? The Summit Hill Association is the District Council 16 of the city of St. Paul. We serve the Summit Hill community, as well as partner to serve the surrounding communities. How much are you requesting? $15,000 How did you hear about our grants? Through the CRWSD Email blast and CRWSD staff.

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. The Summit Hill Association/District 16 Planning Council represents all those who live, own property or own a business in District 16. We are governed by an all-volunteer board of directors of home-owners, renters, and business owners. As a Planning Council, District 16 is part of the larger Saint Paul Planning Council system that serves as a liaison between the neighborhood and the various city departments and entities. Our mission is to enhance the quality of life in our neighborhood through a wide range of community projects and programs. We strive to be a resource to District 16 by working towards the following goals: • To promote effective communication within the district 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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• To enhance the quality of life within the district • To address business concerns and business impact in the district • To facilitate citizen participation in community affairs • To encourage environmental stewardship within the district • To increase crime prevention strategies within the district • To respond to on-going zoning and land use issues. The overall goal of the project is to increase knowledge and awareness on water issues. Through activities and education, we hope to educate as well as influence a change in behavior and practices to enhance the protection and quality of water. The project will enable us to increase environmental stewardship which will enhance the quality of life of the Summit Hill community. It will also enable us to effectively communicate the importance of water quality and storm water management; as well as work with the businesses to help them improve their water waste. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. Through hosting workshops and action events, we will work to increase education in the community on water issues, such as conservation, pollution and water quality. This will help improve water quality by reducing wastage and also by having more people who are intentional about implementing best practices. The project will also help revitalize our existing rain garden, which will in turn reduce storm water runoff and decrease pollutants from flowing into water sources. Also, by recruiting a critical number of community members who will be trained on how to maintain the garden, and also by creating a manual, it will ensure that the garden will be maintained for the long term. By increasing awareness and education on how to prevent water pollution and wastage, we will increase the number of people who are knowledgeable on this, and also who will proactively stay committed to this cause. Working with the schools, will help in raising an environmentally conscious generation of water stewards. Working with the businesses, we will help them re think their water use and give them tools to explore how to control waste and also be better stewards. Educational materials will also be produced for all these activities to increase and pass on knowledge. We will build a critical constituency dedicated to clean water. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. SHA, as the district council enjoys great working relationships with other organizations in the District. We will partner with the local schools, Linwood Monroe Arts Plus, St. Paul Academy and St. Thomas Moore School to get their students involved in early learning on these issues and host learning events. We will also partner with the Grand Avenue Business Association to work with the businesses to host workshops and conversations with them and get some of them to commit to implementing some of the best practices they learn. We will also partner with Women’s Advocates to host community education sessions. We will also share the educational material we produce, and also what we learn with other District Councils within the District Council system, as well as partner with at least 1 DC to host a workshop and a clean water action activity.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. We will host at least 1 large communitywide event that will result in advancing clean water. We will partner with at least 2 other community organizations for these events. This will increase community knowledge on water issues, as well as collaboration in addressing these issues. 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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We will host at least 3 community workshops that will serve as an avenue to educate community members and businesess on water issues such as water conservation, pollution and clean water. We will produce educational materials for these workshops, and also brochures that can be distributed in the community. We will recruit at at least 20 community members to participate in the revitalization of our existing rain garden, so we can bring it back to its functional state. At least 10 of these members will be trained on how to continue maintaining the garden in future, so that they can serve as stewards of the garden, who will be able to continue to educate other community members and lead in continued upkeep of the garden. We will produce a manual for the rain garden. This will ensure that there will always be institutional memory, and a guide for future use, so as to ensure continued knowledge on the maintenance and upkeep of the garden. Through our bimothly Newsletter ‘The Summit’, that is distributed by main to over 4,010 households and partners, we will carry an article in every issue that will help to increase knowledge on water issues. Through all our workshops, activities and events, we will seek to reach at least 200 community members directly whose knowledge on clean water will be increased. The shared knowledge with other district councils, educational materials, newsletter article, E-Newsletter articles and website will enable us to reach a greater number of people. We will seek to have at least 1 community partner that we work with, commit to changing their practices that will lead to better water quality protection behaviors.

Project Tasks Task 1 Name Estimate Completion Date Recruit and train a base of community volunteers to act as stewards 05/2017 of rain garden Description We will reach out to the community and recruit at least 10 community members who will commit to being stewards of the existing rain garden. These lead volunteers will learn about the rain garden – history, purpose and usefulness. We will also tap into expertise knowledge to help them learn about appropriate plants to use in the rain garden and how to maintain the garden. This knowledge will help them determine and pick the new plants that will go into the existing rain garden. These volunteers will also lead the effort in planning for a work day and recruiting volunteers to plant new plants into the existing rain garden. They will also produce a plan on how to maintain the garden and lead its implementation effort.

Task 2 Name Revitalize the existing rain garden at Summit Hill

Estimate Completion Date 08/2017

Description Having committed, and gained the knowledge, the rain garden stewards will work to pick suitable plants that are easily maintained to be planted into the rain garden to revitalize it. They will also lead in recruiting and organizing work days to prepare the garden, as well as plant the appropriate plants in the 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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rain garden. We will once again tap into experts to enable us to do the job right.

Task 3 Name Produce manual to maintain rain garden

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description Having gained the knowledge, and successfully revitalized the rain garden, the garden stewards and participating volunteers will be instrumental in creating a manual for the rain garden. The manual will include information such as the history of the rain garden, its purpose and usefulness. It will also contain detailed information on the plants that the revitalized garden will have and how to maintain them. It will also contain the maintenance plan that the group will have worked to create. This will ensure that institutional memory on how to maintain the garden is preserved.

Task 4 Name Estimate Completion Date : Education workshops and activities to increase knowledge on water 12/2017 issues Description We will work with facilitators knowledgeable in water issues to lead workshops to educate the community on water issues. We will partner with local schools to have at least one educational event. We will host one workshop for community members to educate them on water issues in the home, and one that will target institutions and the business community. By targeting dierent facets of our community, we will be able to address dierent angles of the issue as well as make the information relevant to our dierent constituencies. Through this work, we also aim to have at least 1 institution commit to look into adopting new practices that promote water protection. We will host a community wide cleanup event and partner with at least 1 community partner as an action to promote water protection. This activity will incorporate educational activities on the topic. This even will serve as a venue to engage a larger community beyond Summit Hill to gain knowledge, by helping in the planning of the event, participating in the event, and also partake of the educational activities and materials we will produce while at the event.

Task 5 Name Create educational materials on water issues.

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description We will produce materials in the form of easy to understand handouts that can be handed out for community education on how to increase water protection. We will also use creative materials such as magnets and posters that can easily be hang in prominent places to promote and practice good water stewardship. By producing these materials that can will be distributed in the community, we hope to have the conversation and education continue even after the completion of the project.

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Project Budget Tasks Personnel / Sta Costs Recruit and train a $1,500.00 base of community volunteers to act as stewards of rain garden Revitalize the existing $3,000.00 rain garden at Summit Hill Produce manual to $1,500.00 maintain rain garden : Education workshops $2,000.00 and activities to increase knowledge on water issues Create educational $1,500.00 materials on water issues. Totals $9,500.00

Other Expenses $1,000.00

Total Cost $2,500.00

$3,000.00

$6,000.00

$1,000.00

$2,500.00

$3,000.00

$5,000.00

$2,000.00

$2,000.15

$10,000.00

$19,500.00

Grant Funding Tasks

Requested CRWD Funding Approved $2,000.00 $1,000

Recruit and train a base of community volunteers to act as stewards of rain garden Revitalize the existing $5,000.00 rain garden at Summit Hill Produce manual to $2,000.00 maintain rain garden : Education workshops $4,000.00 and activities to increase knowledge on water issues Create educational $2,000.00 materials on water issues. Totals $15,000.00

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Other Source Funding Total $500.00

$2,500.00

$0

$1,000.00

$6,000.00

$0

$500.00

$2,500.00

$2,000

$1,000.00

$5,000.00

$0

$1,500.00

$3,500.00

$3,000.00

$4,500.00

$19,500.00

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11

2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-31 15:47:42

Project Information Project Name:

Linking Master Water Stewards with Cities & Neighborhoods

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Alliance for Sustainability 2801 21st Ave S Ste 100 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55407 Sean Gosiewski (612) 250-0389 sean@afors.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? The Alliance for Sustainability works with volunteers teams from congregations, neighborhoods and city environmental commissions throughout the Twin Cities. In 2014 through 2016 we have become a key outreach partner with the Fresh Water Society for their Master Water Stewards Program by linking Master Water Stewards with volunteer teams in congregations, neighborhoods and environmental commissions to help with rain garden design, planting and maintenance and to help with resident and business outreach campaigns for water quality including fall clean ups, adopt a drain and chloride education. Through this project with Capitol Region Watershed District we will be able to connect Master Water Stewards and Master Gardener and other community volunteers from St. Paul, Roseville and Falcon Heights with our metro wide spring and fall rain garden maintenance days with the Fresh Water Society and Metro Blooms that are also engaging Master Water Stewards and Master Gardeners in Minneapolis, Bloomington, St. Louis Park, Edina and Minnetonka. We will also connect east and west metro community volunteers to share their experiences on fall clean ups, adopt a drain and chloride education to help expand these projects into more neighborhoods. How much are you requesting? $10,000 How did you hear about our grants? Capitol Region Email update 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. The Alliance for Sustainability links citizens, congregations and cities for sustainable communities. In 2014 through 2016 we have become a key outreach partner with the Fresh Water Society for their Master Water Stewards Program by linking Master Water Stewards with volunteer teams in congregations, neighborhoods and environmental commissions to help with raing arden design, planting and maintenance and to help with resident and business outreach campaigns for water quality including fall clean ups, adopt a drain and chloride education. With hundreds of rain gardens in the ground in yards, boulevards and congregations through cost share grants and the capstone projects of Master Water Stewards it is important that more Master Water Stewards, Master Gardeners and other motivated volunteers learn the best methods for maintaining these rain gardens to keep them functioning well. For 2017, $5,000 of our proposed project with the Capitol Region Watershed District we will be for connecting Master Water Stewards and Master Gardener and other community volunteers from St. Paul, Roseville and Falcon Heights with our metro wide spring and fall rain garden maintenance days and residential and business outreach efforts with the Fresh Water Society, Metro Blooms and Hamline. Through this project we will connect east and west metro Master Water Stewards and community volunteers to share their experiences on rain garden maintenance, fall clean ups, adopt a drain and chloride education to help expand these projects into more neighborhoods. www.allianceforsustainability.com/cleanwaterpledge For 2017 the second half of this grant ($5,000) for the Alliance with Capitol Region Watershed District would help support our Spring and Fall 2017 Resilient Cities Cluster gatherings in Ramsey County for city staff, commission and community volunteers and elected leaders from St. Paul, Roseville and Falcon Heights and eight other cities to learn and share best examples of climate resilience goals and strategies for their Comprehensive Plan updates including preparing for bigger rain events and reduce urban heat islands through new de-centralized strategies including MIDS, living streets, urban forestry, and storm water re-use, etc.. We will invite staff from the Cities of St. Paul and Maplewood and from Capitol Region & RWMWD to share their examples and lead the small group discussions with staff and commission volunteers on adaptation/ surface water plans and water supply plans In 2016 more than 450 staff, commission and community volunteers and elected leaders from 72 metro cities participated in our Planning for Resilient Cities Workshops. In 2017 we will bring these local leaders back together in the spring and fall for Resilient Cities Clusters gatherings in Anoka, Dakota, Hennepin, Ramsey, Washington counties to learn from the best examples from other cities of sample goals and strategies for including resilience in their comprehensive plans including mitigation/energy, adaptation/water, transportation /land use, health/equity. www.allianceforsustainability.com/sustainablecommunities Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. Objective 1 – Build community and friendship among 15 Master Water Stewards and Master Gardeners (in the Capitol region watershed) connecting them with 40 west metro Stewards in annual spring and fall rain garden maintenance volunteer days to maintain 30 to 50 rain gardens (mulch, weed, & clean grit chambers). ($2,500 CRWD 2017 request) Methods – 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

2


- Training - Through email, mail and phone invitations we will support 50 Stewards/ Master Gardeners to participate in the Metro Blooms rain garden maintenance class for para professionals. - Call Stewards to let us know their rain garden maintenance needs for projects they have installed. Set up routes for groups of Stewards to follow to maintain nearby rain gardens. - Social events/ work days – Alliance staff will work with Stewards to organize spring and fall rain garden maintenance days for 50 Stewards/Master Gardeners to volunteer to mulch and/or weed 30 to 50 rain gardens planted by Master Water Stewards (and/or rain gardens recommended to us as needing maintenance by Metro Blooms or the CRWD) and meeting up at the end of the day at a central location for a social event. - Bulk Purchasing and Delivery of Mulch – Alliance staff will work with Metro Blooms and Stewards to arrange delivery of lower cost or free mulch for the rain garden owners in advance of the Spring work day. - Weed identification and native plant subdividing – During our fall and spring maintenance volunteer days we will make sure each volunteer team includes a Steward with good knowledge of plant ID. When native plants need to be subdivided, we will create system for redistributing plants to other gardens. - Collaboration with Metro Blooms – we will match Master Water Stewards up with future Neighborhood Rain Garden Maintenance events organized by Metro Blooms and Great River Greening. Outcomes – 15 Master Water Stewards/ Master Gardeners in the CRWD area in 2017 will - Participate in Metro Blooms Rain Garden Maintenance trainings to learn weed and native plant ID - work together to maintain/improve 10 to 30 rain gardens (mulching, weeding, adding needed plants, cleaning out grit chambers, etc.) Activity 2 – Sharing lessons between Master Water Stewards/ Master Gardeners in the East and West metro to bring education and behavior change campaigns to new neighborhoods (engaging 100 residents and/or businesses in the CRWD area.) ($2,500 CRWD 2017 request) Methods - Adopt a Drain – In close collaboration with Hamline and CRWD the Alliance will support volunteers to bring the adopt a drain program to one new neighborhood in St. Paul, Roseville or Falcon Heights. (engaging 50 households in the CRWD) - Community Clean Ups for Water Quality – In close collaboration with Hamline, Fresh Water Society and and CRWD the Alliance will support volunteers to bring the fall community clean ups program to one new neighborhood in St. Paul, Roseville or Falcon Heights. To support neighbors to rake the leaves from their street (before it rains or snows) and report the numbers of bags of leaves they collect at http://freshwater.org/WorkForWater/report.php (engaging 25 individuals or teams - in the CRWD) - Chloride outreach with businesses – Master Water Stewards in the West Metro, will meet up with interested Stewards and volunteers in the east metro to share how they are reaching businesses to to ask their winter snow contractors to attend the winter parking lot and sidewalk salt trainings sponsored by local watershed districts. (engaging 25 businesses in the CRWD) Activity 3 - Resilient Cities Clusters – Fall and Spring 2017 for Ramsey County cities - ($5,000 CRWD) The Alliance for Sustainability will work closely with Ramsey County staff to convene our Spring and Fall 2017 Resilient Cities Cluster gatherings for 100 staff, commission and community volunteers and elected leaders from 12 cities in Ramsey County (including St. Paul, Roseville and Falcon Heights) to learn and share best examples of climate resilience goals and strategies for their Comprehensive Plan updates including preparing for bigger rain events and reduce urban heat islands through new de-centralized strategies including MIDS, living streets, urban forestry, and storm water re-use, etc.. We will invite staff from the Cities of St. Paul and Maplewood and from Capitol Region & RWMWD to share their examples and lead the small group discussions with staff and commission volunteers on adaptation/ surface water plans and water supply plans. Outcomes – eight or more cities in Ramsey County will be able to use examples from leading cities in 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Ramsey County to include stronger climate resilience goals and strategies in their comprehensive plan updates and surface water plans and water supply plans by December 2017 to prepare for bigger rain events and reduce urban heat islands through new de-centralized strategies including MIDS, living streets, urban forestry, and storm water re-use, etc. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. Fresh Water Society/ Watershed Partners – Jen Kader and Peggy Knapp – the Alliance is a core outreach partner with the Fresh Water Society for their Master Water Stewards (MWS) program. We will be working closely with member groups in Hamiline’s Watershed Partners Programs to highlight the new shared behavior change campaign resources (i.e. newsletter articles, leaf campaigns, etc.) with Master Water Stewards volunteering with their City’s Environmental Commission’s water teams. Fresh Water Society - Building engagement among Master Water Stewards & growing the Community Clean Ups for Water Quality - Peggy Knapp 651-313-5809 pknapp@freshwater.org Deidre Coleman, dcoleman@freshwater.org Jen Kader 651-313-5807 jkader@freshwater.org Metro Blooms –we will support Master Water Stewards to participate in their new Rain Garden Maintenance training - Becky Rice becky@metroblooms.org Hamline CGEE/ Watershed Partners – we will work together to bring the adopt a drain program to more neighborhoods and cities - Tracy Fredin tfredin@hamline.edu Community Partners – we will support Commission volunteers and Master Water Stewards in St. Paul, Roseville, Lauderdale and Falcon Heights to engage residents and businesses through neighborhood associations, congregations and neighborhood and city newsletters, newspapers, facebook and Next Door For our Master Water Steward Rain Garden Maintenance days we will start early, doing surveys and calls with Master Water Stewards to see the kind of maintenance help they would like for the rain gardens they had planted for their capstone projects. Each Steward seeking help for their own garden will be asked to help two or more other stewards with maintenance on their rain gardens, so we can reach our goal of engaging 40 Master Water Stewards to maintain 30 to 50 of their rain gardens in 2017. From this activated base of Master Water Stewards we will support them to get involved with one additional focused behavior change campaign to engage residents, block clubs or businesses in their neighborhood – including the options of adopt a drain (with Hamline) rain garden maintenance event (with Metro Blooms) Community Clean ups for Water quality (with Fresh Water Society) business outreach on chloride (for the fall sidewalk & parking lot maintenance classes) For our Spring and Fall 2017 Resilient Cities Cluster gatherings with 12 cities in Ramsey County we will invite staff from the Cities of St. Paul and Maplewood and from Capitol Region & RWMWD to share their examples and lead the small group discussions with staff and commission volunteers on adaptation/ surface water plans and water supply plans.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. Our long term goal is to support Master Water Stewards to become long term resource people that are imbedded in their communities. The Fresh Water Society is working with Macalester to track the impacts master water stewards are having over time by geography. We will send our outreach results to Peggy so they can add this to their long term study. Rain Garden Maintenance 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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- We will work with metro blooms to use their criteria system for evaluating the health of rain gardens as we support Master Water Stewards to request help to maintain their past capstone projects. We will track all the rain gardens that stewards maintain together in a spreadsheet, with notes and before and after photos and will share this info with the MCWD cost share specialist and with Metro Blooms. - As we support Master Water Stewards to participate in the Metro Blooms rain garden maintenance classes we will ask metro blooms to share the participant evaluation surveys with us to see how their confidence level has changed. Targeted Education/Action Campaigns – we will use the evaluation tools that our partners have developed for each of these campaigns. Together we will support the Master Water Steward teams in Minneapolis, Edina, SLP, Hopkins & Minnetonka to engage 400 residents and or businesses to pledge and take one or more actions for clean water - Adopt a Storm Drain – sign up 50 new adopt a drain volunteers in the CRWD area volunteers cleaning out a storm drain 3 times a year or more. All the Adopt a Drain folks will be entered into the official Hamline/City web site. Adopt a drain volunteers will sign up and report their results through the adopt a drain web site. - Community Clean Ups for Water Quality – together we will engage a total of 25 block CRWD volunteers to rake the leaves from their street (before it rains or snows) and report the numbers of bags of leaves they collect at http://freshwater.org/WorkForWater/report.php - Suburban Chloride outreach with businesses – in the CRWD area engage businesses, Building Manager’s or Multifamily owners to send 25 winter snow contractor staff to the winter parking lot and sidewalk salt trainings & publically recognize businesses that improve. For our Spring and Fall 2017 Resilient Cities Cluster gatherings with 12 cities in Ramsey County our lead contacts within each city will share with us the innovative climate resilience goals and strategies they plan to include their comprehensive plan updates and surface water plans and water supply plans by December 2017 to prepare for bigger rain events and reduce urban heat islands through new decentralized strategies including MIDS, living streets, urban forestry, and storm water re-use, etc.

Project Tasks Task 1 Name Rain Garden Maintenance Days

Estimate Completion Date 11/2017

Description Build community and friendship among 15 Master Water Stewards and Master Gardeners (in the Capitol region watershed) connecting them with 40 west metro Stewards in annual spring and fall rain garden maintenance volunteer days to maintain 30 to 50 rain gardens (mulch, weed, & clean grit chambers). ($2,500 CRWD 2017 request)

Task 2 Name Behavior Change Campaigns

Estimate Completion Date 11/2017

Description 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Sharing lessons between Master Water Stewards/ Master Gardeners in the East and West metro to bring education and behavior change campaigns to new neighborhoods (engaging 100 residents and/or businesses in the CRWD area.) ($2,500 CRWD 2017 request) Methods - Adopt a Drain – In close collaboration with Hamline and CRWD the Alliance will support volunteers to bring the adopt a drain program to one new neighborhood in St. Paul, Roseville or Falcon Heights. (engaging 50 households in the CRWD) - Community Clean Ups for Water Quality – In close collaboration with Hamline, Fresh Water Society and and CRWD the Alliance will support volunteers to bring the fall community clean ups program to one new neighborhood in St. Paul, Roseville or Falcon Heights. To support neighbors to rake the leaves from their street (before it rains or snows) and report the numbers of bags of leaves they collect at http://freshwater.org/WorkForWater/report.php (engaging 25 individuals or teams - in the CRWD) - Chloride outreach with businesses – Master Water Stewards in the West Metro, will meet up with interested Stewards and volunteers in the east metro to share how they are reaching businesses to to ask their winter snow contractors to attend the winter parking lot and sidewalk salt trainings sponsored by local watershed districts. (engaging 25 businesses in the CRWD)

Task 3 Name Spring and Fall Resilient Cities Cluster - Ramsey County Cities

Estimate Completion Date 11/2017

Description Activity 3 - Resilient Cities Clusters – Fall and Spring 2017 for Ramsey County cities - ($5,000 CRWD) The Alliance for Sustainability will work closely with Ramsey County staff to convene our Spring and Fall 2017 Resilient Cities Cluster gatherings for 100 staff, commission and community volunteers and elected leaders from 12 cities in Ramsey County (including St. Paul, Roseville and Falcon Heights) to learn and share best examples of climate resilience goals and strategies for their Comprehensive Plan updates including preparing for bigger rain events and reduce urban heat islands through new de-centralized strategies including MIDS, living streets, urban forestry, and storm water re-use, etc.. We will invite staff from the Cities of St. Paul and Maplewood and from Capitol Region & RWMWD to share their examples and lead the small group discussions with staff and commission volunteers on adaptation/ surface water plans and water supply plans. Outcomes – 8 or more cities in Ramsey County will be able to use examples from leading cities in Ramsey County to include stronger climate resilience goals and strategies in their comprehensive plan updates and surface water plans and water supply plans by December 2017 to prepare for bigger rain events and reduce urban heat islands through new de-centralized strategies including MIDS, living streets, urban forestry, and storm water re-use, etc.

Project Budget Tasks Personnel / Staff Costs Rain Garden $2,000.00 Maintenance Days Behavior Change $2,000.00 Campaigns Spring and Fall $5,000.00 Resilient Cities Cluster - Ramsey County Cities 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Other Expenses $500.00

Total Cost $2,500.00

$500.00

$2,500.00

$0.00

$5,000.00

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Totals

$9,000.00

$1,000.00

$10,000.00

Requested CRWD Funding $2,500.00

Other Source Funding Total

Grant Funding Tasks

Rain Garden Maintenance Days Behavior Change $2,500.00 Campaigns Spring and Fall $5,000.00 Resilient Cities Cluster - Ramsey County Cities Totals $10,000.00

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

$2,500.00

$5,000.00

$2,500.00

$5,000.00

$5,000.00

$10,000.00

$10,000.00

$20,000.00

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2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-31 22:52:43

Project Information Project Name:

Water Quality Chorus

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Northern Lights.mn 2751 Hennepin Ave. South #231 Minneapolis, Minnesota 55408 Steve Dietz (952) 994-4118 stevedietz@northern.lights.mn

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? Twin Cities Metro How much are you requesting? $20,000 How did you hear about our grants? Christine Baeumler

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. Founded in 2009, Northern Lights.mn (NL) supports artists in the creation and presentation of art in the public sphere, focusing on innovative uses of technology to imagine new interactions between audience, artwork and place and to explore expanded possibilities for civic engagement. In 2014 NL partnered with Minnehaha Creek Watershed District to create Ruination: City of Dust, a multiplayer mystery landscape game in which environmental science informed a sci-fi narrative intertwining art elements with physical and mental challenges. This and other environmental partnerships spurred NL to organize around the theme of artists’ responses to climate change, and in 2016 we kicked off two years of programming on this theme under the curatorial umbrella Climate Chaos 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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| Climate Rising. NL brings a long history in curating and producing innovative public engagement platforms designed to connect the public with big ideas through the unique skills of artists. We’re partnering with Plotform as the artists to lead this project because of their deep knowledge of environmental issues and experience creating artworks that involve communities in understanding their water resources in new ways. Plotform is a collective formed by Jane D. Marsching + Andi Sutton in the spring of 2012 with the aim of creating projects activating engagement with local ecologies. Their works combine art practice with science research to promote public understanding of the present and future impacts of climate change. These interdisciplinary pieces combine strategies of citizen science, ecological design, empathetic making, communication engagement, tactical urbanism and art, and often involve close collaboration with residents, organizations, and activists in local contexts. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. Overview The Water Quality Chorus (WQC) is an art-science engagement and education project that transforms water quality sampling data into musical interpretation for singalong songs and collects stories from water volunteers to illustrate the value and importance of water quality. Through two public events and a tool for future community outreach and education — the Water Quality Songbook— we seek to unite the community-building quality of sing-alongs with American storytelling traditions as a way to turn CRWD water quality data — which can seem to many to be abstract and opaque — into a sensory and emotional experience that engages a wider public audience and effectively communicates the urgent challenges facing our riparian habitats. A note about the project timeline: Water Quality Chorus officially launches February 1, 2017, however preliminary research and development conducted fall and winter 2016 by Plotform and Northern Lights.mn is informing the project design, and has allowed us to organize project partners and water sampling volunteers to ensure success in spring 2017. Specifically, WQC is designed to address the need for greater public awareness of the impacts of storm water runoff and climate change on local waters. Water Quality Chorus is grounded in a collaboration with community organizations working to improve water quality, particularly the CRWD Water Stewards, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, Minneapolis office of Clean Water Action and Mississippi Park Connection. Through the Water Quality Chorus events and podcast, and with expert support from our community partners, we will communicate the challenges of runoff pollution in Minnesota from industrial agriculture to lawn care, and how this pollution affects human and nonhuman health and ecologies. Some of the questions this project will answer through story and song will include: What is phosphorus pollution? Who and where are the sources? How can the problem be remediated Who is affected? How is phosphorus pollution becoming more of a problem with climate change’s increased temperatures and precipitation? In addition, WQC seeks to expand the audience for water advocacy and volunteer involvement.

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Northern Lights.mn has learned through recent project partnerships with water advocacy organizations, including MCWD and Mississippi Park Connection, that communities need fresh new ways of attracting a broad public and organizing around environmental issues, new ways of understanding scientific data to include more people, and new sources of inspiration and hope for constituents to act on. Plotform’s embodied arts approach to environmental education adds another tool to the outreach toolkit of our partner organizations, who rely on commitments from volunteers and advocates in the community to help fulfill their missions and affect long-term behavioral and policy changes. Organizations need creative ways to strengthen volunteer commitment and energy for this work. Based on our years of experience in large-scale public engagement work through the arts, Water Quality Chorus is designed to strengthen existing volunteer commitment through recognition and self-expression, while educating the wider public on pressing water quality concerns and spurring action through a unique emotional connection to the issues. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. Mississippi Park Connection (MPC) - Katie Nyberg, Executive Director - facilitating outreach to citizen science participants, event participants, and marketing. MPC has committed staff time in areas including education, volunteer outreach, marketing, and administration. MPC will collaborate on outreach to prospective project stakeholders and event attendees including citizen scientists and activists and community organizations. MPC’s education staff will help shape the water quality story that the project tells and serve as advisors to the artists on the science and public outreach tactics of the project (event and songbook). Additionally, MPC will advertise our events and opportunities to their lists (print, email, social media, and web) and help bring their constituents out for the public elements of the piece. Clean Water Action MN (CWA) - Steve Schultz, Program Coordinator - advising on data-driven water quality story and statewide policy implications, facilitating outreach to project participants, and marketing. CWA has committed staff time in areas including participant outreach, marketing, and research. CWA will also outreach to project stakeholders (see above); additionally, they will help shape the water quality story that the project tells, providing access to research, individuals, and associated statewide policy and activism initiatives and serve as advisors to the artists on the science and public outreach tactics of the project (event and songbook). Prairie Fire Lady Choir - Twin Cities-based 60-person women’s choir (PFLC): PFLC, in collaboration with a local composer (TBD), has committed to arranging songs for the songbook and performance and contributing singers to lead the Storycycle public event in June. PFLC’s involvement may be supported by additional participation from: Singing in the Light/ Morning Star Singers: Minneapolis songleader Barbara McAffee has committed to assisting with singer outreach and possibly additional collaboration including songleading. MN Community Sings: Co-leader Bret Hesla, a songwriter who specializes in community singing, has committed to assisting with singer outreach and possibly additional collaborating including song arranging and songleading.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. We have identified the following metrics and evaluation tactics to gauge the success of our project design and efforts: Robust involvement of water samplers and water stewards: in a successful scenario we will meet and 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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build collaborative relationships with approx 7 water samplers and 8 water stewards (total of 15 participants), conducting interviews, performing site documentation, and securing 7-10 of these participants as performers in the Water Support Group storytelling event Quantitative measurement: 15 total collaborating participants secured by January 2017 Qualitative measurement: Collaborating participants conduct clear and regular communication with Plotform artists throughout project; bring family and community members to each of the two public performances; engage in conversation with the public before, during, and after about their experiences 30-50 attendees at Water Support Group and 75-100 attendees at the culminating Water Quality Chorus event (not including singers, performers, etc. ) Quantitative measurement: Count event RSVPs and event attendance rates; compare with participation rates at other MCWD events Measured change in sense of connection to local waterways: Quantitative measurement: Count email & volunteer sign-ups and note increases; track and document increase in social media activity (facebook page/twitter engagement) Qualitative measurement: Multiple choice and short-answer entrance and exit surveys in each event (questions such as “Indicate your understanding of challenges to CR watersheds”; “Indicate your understanding of why it is important to understand, observe, and track these challenges”;”Indicate your level of commitment to water quality and ecosystem health in the CRWD”) Storytelling event-specific: Concluding facilitated discussion that includes: : public reflections on content and experience (ex. what surprised you? What are your personal experiences with local waters that are relevant? What in these stories do you want to bring to your communities and what are ways you might do that? What are areas of engagement that you see and opportunities that may be available for visibilit, initiative-taking, personal or collective change?) Outcome: Consolidated collection of contributions archived paper, project website, shared with CRW and linked to podcast New interest in and volunteers for CRWD initiatives Quantitative measurement: count number of new volunteers who join after the first and second event; count social media activity spikes and email list sign ups Qualitative measurement: Multiple choice and short-answer entrance and exit surveys in each event (i.e. Indicate likelihood of participation in future CRWD initiatives? Contact me about volunteering?) Measured change in sense of local and wider purpose among collaborating water samplers and water stewards; renewed engagement and commitment to their work Quantitative measurement: return of stewards/volunteers in 2017-2018 year (recruitment of others to join in work) Qualitative measurement: entrance and exit surveys and in-person interviews (beginning of engagement process (November/December) and end of process (June/July) This is a survey/interview process that is tailored specifically for the water samplers/water stewards

Project Tasks

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Task 1 Name Water Stories

Estimate Completion Date 05/2017

Description Overview March 2017: Plotform gathers personal water quality stories from sampling volunteers, including their photos and videos of the sites where they sample, at a Water Support Group event at a venue in the CRW. Partner organization volunteers and staff are invited and the event is open to the public. Expected water sampling volunteer storytellers: 10 - 15, expected participants 30 - 50. February - March 2017: Plotform gathers personal stories from people who have been adversely affected by nitrates and other types of pollution to present at March event and inform short narratives for June event. Water Stories from Sampling Volunteers via “Water Support Group” In collaboration with the Water Stewards program and the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, we are currently reaching out to a group of citizen scientists— volunteers who are already collecting water samples from CRW bodies of water— and inviting them to contribute stories, photo and video portraits of their collection sites. 7-10 key individuals (water samplers and other organizational volunteers) from CRWD, MPCA, MCP and CWA-MN will be invited to share stories of their experience and research regarding nitrate pollution at an evening storytelling and community discussion event in March 2017. These stories will be performed for members of the public and fellow volunteers and the event will culminate in a facilitated group discussion and resource-share. A select group of storytellers at this event will be invited to further develop their narratives and share them again at the at the larger CRW public sing-along in June and at Northern Spark 2017. The event will be organized by Northern Lights.mn and hosted by Plotform. To gather diverse stories, we are reaching out to Minnesota Public Radio, which just completed a month of water stories; the Water Bar, a Northeast Minneapolis project dedicated to water research, dialogue, and activism; Toxic Taters, an activist organization in northwestern MN doing work on the impact of industrial agriculture on water and community health, and, through our community partners, making other connections to individuals impacted by nitrogen in their water systems. For example, we are seeking a big ag whistleblower, a dog owner whose dog died from exposure to an algae bloom, a longtime resident of a local bay who has seen fish die-offs or noted other changes in her lake ecosystem. The goal is to expand event participants’ understanding of the issue, promote engagement in water quality improvement activities and organizations, and motivate change. These stories will be collected by Plotform and re-told during the sing-along event in June through images, video, and printed programs. They will also be archived online and in print for future use. Story gathering with both water sampling volunteers and wider public participants will happen via recorded phone interviews, one-on-one conversations, facilitated group discussions, and at the Water Support Group event in March. All of these stories will be recorded with permission of the participants; people who may not want to perform their story in front of an audience but have important content to contribute to the project are still able to participate. Several of these will be selected, edited, and performed (by that person or a performer) at the culminating event.

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Task 2 Name Water Songs

Estimate Completion Date 06/2017

Description February - May 2017: Plotform works with project partner sta and a composer to interpret CRW water quality data into song arrangements for Prairie Fire Lady Choir (PFLC) June 2017: Public Sing-along event (Anticipated attendance: 75-100) at venue in CRW includes: water stories told by Plotform and volunteers water quality sing-along led by PFLC PFLC performance of songs interpreting water quality data projections of video and photos of sample sites in CRW display of Water Quality Songbook, telling water quality story of CRW tabling by project partner organizations for water education and volunteer signup Water Quality Data into Song We will focus on key sites in the CRW for our data gathering. We will use existing data on watershed health through the CRW data and 2016 data from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency's Citizen Monitoring Stations. (2016 MCWD report will also be used depending on when it becomes available). Using this data, we will work with Prairie Fire Lady Choir, a Twin Cities-based community choir, to lead a sing-along of the water quality story that our target sites tell. The libretto will be composed through close collaboration with a composer and/or a small group of arrangers from PFLC who have experience composing and arranging works for voice. It will be sung by the choir with the participation of members of the audience. Experiments with techniques for translating data into song were performed during Northern Spark 2016, and demonstrated that the two strategies of call-and-response and of word substitution were most eective for communicating water quality information, and provoking empathy and increased understanding in the audience. PFLC and other arrangers/songleaders from the community will work on creating the libretto from February through May. They will arrange 4-6 songs for performance and another 3-4 for sing-a-long. Public Sing-along Event in June Water Quality Chorus, the working title of the sing-along event, will be held at Northern Spark/Little Mekong Night Market June 10, 2017. This evening-length public performance and gathering will include: water stories about nitrogen pollution and climate change told by Plotform and volunteers American water songs sing-along led by PFLC PFLC performance of songs interpreting water quality data projections of video and photos of sample sites in CRW display of Water Quality Songbook, telling water quality story of CRW tabling by project partner organizations for water education and volunteer signup The event audience is encouraged to contribute their voices in song and words throughout the evening. Not just passive viewers, we ask that audience members take a stand and involve themselves in the creation of stories, activist campaigns, and a rich imaginary spectacle that takes data and media spin and turns it into felt cultural narrative. Audience members at both this event will be invited to take action in a number of ways: A Sing-along with PFLC from printed songsheets, in which the audience will be invited to raise their collective voices in alarm, understanding, and action. 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Working with CWA-MN, we will create small postcard-writing and tweeting stations around the venue for viewers to contribute their voices to a current national CWA water quality campaign connected to nitrate pollution To supplement and enhance the audience experience of singing and listening to stories, Plotform will create three art pieces for the June event: 60 masks representing various plants and animals, microorganisms, and other elements who are involved in, impacted by, and have an impact on Minnesota water ecosystems (invertebrates, invasives, native species, human-made chemicals, machines) — these will be worn by the PFLC singers during their performance 60-90 minute video projection consisting of video and photo documentation of water sampling sites, water samplers, and CRW waterways 20-page large format accordion-fold Water Quality Songbook

Task 3 Name Water Quality Songbook

Estimate Completion Date 12/2017

Description February - May 2017: Plotform creates ďŹ rst iteration of Water Quality Songbook, a large format accordion fold book displaying songsheets, water stories, sample site images and water data visualizations that tells the story of CRW water quality June 2017: Songbook is used in sing-along events in CRW and at Northern Spark 2017, where more stories are gathered and its use is documented October 2017: Digital version of Songbook, including PDF of printed accordion-fold book and edited podcast recording of sing-along and storytelling performances, is made available to project partners We will archive images, data, and stories gathered through Parts 1 and 2 of the project in an oversize Water Quality Songbook, displayed as an enormous 30-page printed book at the culminating performances in June 2017 at Northern Spark. The book will also be available as a pdf download. The images, information, and song lyrics designed and printed as three by four feet pages will allow the viewers to peruse the strategies, data, politics, and complex information that informs the performance and evening experience. This prototype version of the songbook, containing documentation of all events and complemented by an edited podcast recording of the June sing-along event will be available to all project partners in fall of 2017. Through meetings and dialogues with Water Stewards and water samplers, we will work together to determine the speciďŹ c ways such a songbook can be used in communities to educate, inspire, and connect. Our long-term goal is to help water stewards, community orgs, and citizen samplers recruit, share info, and create durable understandings of complex water quality issues, and to give community organizations like churches, schools, and choral groups a tool for bringing local water issues into their community events through song. If funded, this new tool will be sent to CRW and distributed to collaborating partners (water stewards/samplers) upon completion in 2018.

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Project Budget Tasks Water Stories Water Songs Water Quality Songbook Totals

Personnel / Sta Costs $6,000.00 $9,000.00 $5,000.00

Other Expenses $4,000.00 $4,000.00 $3,000.00

Total Cost $10,000.00 $13,000.00 $8,000.00

$20,000.00

$11,000.00

$31,000.00

Requested CRWD Funding $7,000.00 $10,000.00 $3,000.00

Other Source Funding Total $3,000.00 $3,000.00 $5,000.00

$10,000.00 $13,000.00 $8,000.00

$20,000.00

$11,000.00

$31,000.00

Grant Funding Tasks Water Stories Water Songs Water Quality Songbook Totals

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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13

2016 Partner Grant Application Form Submission Timestamp:

2016-10-27 11:48:03

Project Information Project Name:

Trees for Clean Water in Saint Paul

Application Information Organization or Agency: Address: Contact Person: Phone: Email Address:

Tree Trust 2231 Edgewood Ave S St. Louis Park, Minnesota 55426 Kim Lawler (952) 767-3881 kim.lawler@treetrust.org

What geographic and/or demographic area do you serve? The Tree Trust Community Forestry program primarily serves the Twin Cities metro area, and occasionally greater Minnesota. This project would serve the City of Saint Paul. How much are you requesting? $20,000 How did you hear about our grants? We were researching funds available through watersheds that could help with projects to plant more trees which will in turn help protect our water bodies.

Project Description Describe the mission and goals of your organization and how your project helps meet them. Tree Trust is a local nonprofit whose mission is “to improve the community environment by investing in people.” We were founded in 1976 to address two problems in the community at that time: high unemployment rates and the devastation of the tree canopy due to Dutch elm disease. We began combating these issues by providing out-of-work individuals with paid job training to reforest the Twin Cities. Forty years later, we've stayed true to our original mission and goals while being attentive to the 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

1


changing issues of society and the environment. We've expanded our forestry program to also provide environmental education to schools and tree distributions to residents; and we’ve enhanced our work experience programs to add case management, employment training, and career coaching to those we serve. We offer services throughout the metro and a limited area in greater Minnesota, and we maintain particular focus on underserved populations and distressed neighborhoods. The goals of our organization include developing greater awareness among residents about the urban forest, while also enhancing the tree canopy throughout the Twin Cities metro area. This project will aid in those goals by educating residents about the imminent threat of emerald ash borer, and by making trees available through a subsidized tree distribution program to homeowners who live in one of the areas that has been/will be hit the hardest by the effects of EAB causing the loss of thousands of ash trees. Describe how your project will protect or improve water quality. Urban trees play a critical role in a range of environmental issues, from climate change to air quality to stormwater management, but currently our urban forest is under attack by the invasive insect known as emerald ash borer (EAB). The state of Minnesota’s infestation of EAB began in Saint Paul in 2009 and will imminently kill millions of ash trees in the Twin Cities, and nearly a billion throughout Minnesota in the coming years. Trees are vital to the environmental health of our communities, so action must be taken soon. The implications of losing 20-30% of tree canopy across the state will be profound for water and air quality, property values and our sense of community. To understand the scale of this issue, an average mature ash tree will intercept 2,400 gallons of water and reduce atmospheric carbon by over 1,000 pounds, according to the National Tree Benefits Calculator. Additionally, the USDA Forest Service indicates that “the planting of trees means improved water quality, resulting in less runoff and erosion. This allows more recharging of the ground water supply. Wooded areas help prevent the transport of sediment and chemicals into streams.” It is critical to plant trees now in order to minimize the environmental degradation associated with losing many mature trees quickly as will happen in the next few years as Saint Paul is impacted by the devastation of emerald ash borer. If applicable, please list other partners and their role in your project. The City of Saint Paul has expressed the desire to work with Tree Trust to provide a tree distribution to residents for many years. Their role would be to promote the distribution throughout the City or within specific neighborhoods that they determine would benefit most from adding more trees. They would provide the location of the tree distribution on the day of the event and likely provide some staff to assist at the distribution. They also hope to provide some funding ($5,000) to contribute to the project, but need to get approval during the budget process. Bachman’s Wholesale Nursery is a long-standing partner of Tree Trust and will provide trees to us at a wholesale cost to reduce the expense of the program.

Measurement and Evaluation Briefly describe how you will measure the success of your project. The first measurable success will be easily quantifiable regarding how many trees get purchased, picked up, and planted in the Capitol Region Watershed District. 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

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Additionally, we will conduct surveys following each of our outreach/educational events in order to evaluate the change in behavior and knowledge regarding trees by residents in the community. We also plan to conduct a survey following the tree distribution to evaluate the overall effectiveness and efficiency of the program. The information gathered through surveys will be critical to evaluating our messages regarding the importance of trees in our communities in the face of such significant threats. Assisting citizens to recognize the benefits of trees in a way that is tangible and lasting is critical as we come to rely more and more on the benefits they provide to mitigate the effects of a changing climate.

Project Tasks Task 1 Name Estimate Completion Date PROMOTION, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION: Generate awareness 08/2017 about the tree distribution, educate the community about threats to trees in our urban environment, including emerald ash borer (EAB), and inform residents about the benefits of trees – especially the benefit to water quality. Description Tree Trust will attend community events where we can reach a large number of residential homeowners in Saint Paul about the benefits that mature, healthy trees provide. Tree Trust will also use social media and other forms of communication in collaboration with the City of Saint Paul and the Capitol Region Watershed District, to promote the tree distribution to the target audience. These communications will also provide information to educate residents about EAB, the danger of dead ash trees, and the necessity of planting new trees now so that we don’t compromise water quality as we lose trees to EAB. The result of this work will be a better-informed public who is interested in planting trees in their own yards, is excited about the tree distribution, and will better understand the connection between trees and water quality. It’s important for people to see the trees in their community forest as not just niceties that grace our streets, but as true nature-based solutions to nearly every environmental issue we face today.

Task 2 Name Estimate Completion Date TREE CARE WORKSHOPS: Train the tree recipients in proper planting 09/2017 procedures and tree care. Description Tree Trust will schedule and host 3-4 workshops prior to the tree distribution at locations in Saint Paul. These workshops will educate tree recipients on how to select a good location in their yard to plant their tree to maximize the benefit the tree can provide to both water quality as well as energy savings for their home. We will also train recipients on the proper method to plant their tree and provide information about how to properly care for their tree.

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Task 3 Name TREE DISTRIBUTION: Distribute 300 trees to residential property owners in the Capitol Region Watershed District – specifically Saint Paul.

Estimate Completion Date 10/2017

Description Research has shown that the best place to invest in community tree canopy lies within private property. Private property is quite often more amenable to successful tree growth, not only due to the soil composition, but also because there is a property owner on-site who can provide daily care to the tree. There will be a website set up through Tree Trust through which eligible Watershed residents can order their tree online during designated dates. Tree Trust will then organize and facilitate a tree distribution at a location in Saint Paul. Residents who successfully purchased trees will receive notification about when, where and how to pick up their tree. The outcomes of this task is that 300 trees will be sold, picked up, and properly planted at residences within the Capitol Region Watershed District with emphasis on tree placement for water quality.

Project Budget Tasks Personnel / Staff Costs $1,665.00 PROMOTION, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION: Generate awareness about the tree distribution, educate the community about threats to trees in our urban environment, including emerald ash borer (EAB), and inform residents about the benefits of trees – especially the benefit to water quality. TREE CARE $1,110.00 WORKSHOPS: Train the tree recipients in proper planting procedures and tree care. TREE DISTRIBUTION: $2,775.00 Distribute 300 trees to residential property owners in the Capitol Region Watershed District – specifically Saint Paul. 2016 Partner Grant Application Form

Other Expenses $1,522.00

Total Cost $3,187.00

$670.00

$1,780.00

$24,758.00

$27,533.00

4


Totals

$5,550.00

$26,950.00

$32,500.00

Requested CRWD Funding $3,112.00

Other Source Funding Total

Grant Funding Tasks

PROMOTION, OUTREACH AND EDUCATION: Generate awareness about the tree distribution, educate the community about threats to trees in our urban environment, including emerald ash borer (EAB), and inform residents about the benefits of trees – especially the benefit to water quality. $1,730.00 TREE CARE WORKSHOPS: Train the tree recipients in proper planting procedures and tree care. TREE DISTRIBUTION: $15,158.00 Distribute 300 trees to residential property owners in the Capitol Region Watershed District – specifically Saint Paul. Totals $20,000.00

2016 Partner Grant Application Form

$0.00

$3,112.00

$0.00

$1,730.00

$12,500.00

$27,658.00

$12,500.00

$32,500.00

5


Review summary

2017 Partner Grants Applications

No.

2017

Organization

1 Saint Paul - Natural Resources Section

Project name

Connecting underrepresented groups to urban waterways

Detailed Committee Recommendations

2017 Request

2017 Staff Recommendation

2017 Committee Recommendation

$16,000.00

$16,000.00

$16,000.00

2 Urban Roots

Urban Roots Youth Internships

$15,000.00

$10,000.00

$12,000.00

3 Urban Boat Builders

Watershed Education and Rain Garden Maintenance

$2,000.00

$2,000.00

$2,000.00

4 Asian Economic Development Association

Little Mekong Night Market and Asian Business Outreach

$18,500.00

$10,000.00

$8,000.00

5 Frogtown Green

Bringing the Frogs Back to Frogtown

$19,600.00

$10,000.00

$12,000.00

6 Great River Greening (GRG)

Engaging Youth at CRWD Project Sites

$20,000.00

$15,000.00

$15,000.00

7 Macalester-Groveland Community Council

Urban Water Management Education and Implementation Support

$5,990.00

$5,000.00

$5,000.00

8 Parkview Center School

Parkview Water Project

$5,500.00

$5,500.00

$5,500.00

9 Public Art St Paul

Rain Garden for Western Sculpture Park

$10,000.00

$7,500.00

$8,500.00

Water Wise

$15,000.00

$6,000.00

$3,000.00

10 Summit Hill Association

11 Alliance for Sustainability

Linking Master Water Stewards with Cities and Neighborhoods

$10,000.00

$0.00

$0.00

12 Northern Lights

Water Quality Chorus

$20,000.00

$0.00

$0.00

Committee Comments

sPARK Education Program ($11K), sPARK Day Camp at Hidden Falls ($1K), Park Ambassadors ($4K),

Great proposal, like the Parks Ambassadors and working with adults. Committee discussed why this would get fully funded and others only partially.

GIS Training and Mapping ($1K), Youth Intern Recruitment and Training ($6K), Restoration work at Swede Hollow and Bruce Vento ($5K)

Recommend idea of growing native plants to sell in addition to vegetables.

Rain Garden Maintenance ($1,666), Community Outreach Activities ($334)

Great idea, love that youth will be working and maintaining rain gardens.

Little Mekong Night Market Vendor Education ($2K), Little Mekong Night Market Public Education and Northern Spark node ($5K), Evaluation ($1K)

Recommend strengthening application for next year.

Continuation of FrogLab (7K), Greening Frogtown newspaper ($2K), Festival ($3K)

Follow up about resources for renovation and signage.

Field learning for Teens and restoration work at up to 3 CRWD sites ($13K), Program Evaluation ($2K)

Great work, reaches a lot of youth.

Steering Committee formation ($800), Marketing workshops ($400), Action, Implementing stage ($3000), Support or follow-up stage ($400), Review stage ($400)

Concentrate on fewer workshops to reach attendance goals. Work with them on implementation.

1st and 2nd grade Pond / Wetland Study ($2.5K), 3rd Grade Field Day ($1K), 4th Grade Great project, glad to continue working with the teacher from Harambee. Field Day ($1K), Teacher Planning ($1K)

Summer Workshop Production ($7.5K), Evaluation ($1K)

Look into Stewardship Grant funds for rain garden repairs.

Community Volunteer Group Formation ($1K), Education Workshops ($2K)

Provide Blue Thumb rain garden maintenance guide and look into stewardship grants for rain garden restoration work. Discuss what resources would be useful to them and provide them with things that exist rather than having them create them. Shirley was interested in Chloride idea but thought someone else may be better suited to provide trainings than DPC.

Committee was very interested in this but would like the proposal to have had a stronger connection to how it would impact CRWD; audiences, partners, deliverables connected to CRWD. Recommend to apply again next year and to keep in touch. Look into other residential tree sales for homeowners.

13 Tree Trust

Trees for Clean Water in Saint Paul

TOTALS

$20,000.00

$0.00

$0.00

2017 Request

2017 Staff Recommendation

2017 Committee Recommendation

$177,590.00

$87,000.00

$87,000.00


2017 Partner Grants Applications that staff will explore other CRWD funding options with Board, CAC and Applicant

Organization

Project name

Proposal summary

Alternative Funding Considerations

2017 Request

Hamline University, Center for Global Multimedia Module Development Environmental Education (CGEE)

$20,000

CRWD module development ($11K), group testing ($4K), community kiosks ($5K).

Consider funding through E/O Budget line

Lower Phalen Creek Project

Phalen Creek Daylighting Feasibility Study

$19,850

Technical and legal feasibility ($5,225), community engagement ($6.1K), water quality assessment ($5K), compile analysis and report ($2,325)

Stewardship or Special Grant funding

Mississippi Park Connection

Mississippi River Visitors Center

$20,000

Gravel bed nursery at Science Museum and planting events along Sheppard Road. gravel bed Consider stewardship grants for gravel bed. nursery construction ($1,526), plantings along Shepard Road ($17,974), education ($500).

Union Park District Council

Union Park Blooming Alleys for Clean Water

$8,200

Community Outreach ($2,350), Alley Analysis and Block Selection ($2,050), Engagement of Demonstration Blocks ($1.8K), Consultants and Modeling with WinSLAMM ($1K), Property Owner Commitment ($1K)

Stewardship Grant

University of Minnesota

Programming Evaluation for Adopt a Drain

$19,972

Adopt a Drain evaluation framing and scoping ($5,609), Adopt a Drain data gathering analysis ($8,244), Reporting and Recommendations ($6,119)

Consider funding through E/O Budget line

University of Minnesota

Programming Evaluation for Partner Grants

$11,821

Partner Grant evaluation framing and scoping ($2,475), Partner Grant data gathering and analysis ($6,871), reporting and recommendations ($2,475)

Consider funding through E/O Budget line

TOTAL

$99,843.00


December 7, 2016 V. Action Items C) Approve 2017 Special Grants (Zwonitzer)

DATE: TO: FROM: RE:

November 30, 2016 CRWD Board of Managers Nate Zwonitzer, Water Resource Project Manager and the Special Grant Review Committee 2017 Special Grant Award Recommendations

Background Each year CRWD budgets funds for Special Projects. The District typically sets a preliminary budget amount and then solicits applications for projects to fund. Applications for 2017 Special Grant funds were due on October 31, 2016. CRWD received five project applications totaling $503,000. Issues A review committee consisting of two board members and one Citizen Advisory Committee member met to review applications and develop a funding recommendation. Three projects were selected for full funding, and two projects were awarded partial funding to advance feasibility studies. Those projects may be eligible for additional Special Grant funds if feasibility studies identify viable water quality improvement opportunities. In total, $226,550 of the $350,000 budgeted are recommended for grant awards. The remaining funds will be reserved to supplement current projects if additional opportunities are identified or to fund additional projects that may come up in 2017. Action Requested Approve 2017 Special Grant awards as outlined in the following table and authorize Board President and Administrator to execute agreements pending approval of Assistant Ramsey County Attorney: Applicant St. Paul Public Schools St. Paul Public Schools BleuAnt Designs St. Paul Parks and Rec Wilder Square Cooperative CRWD

Project Recommended Award Highland Park Senior High $69,500 Adams Spanish Immersion School $56,500 The Union on Grand Condos $57,550 Jimmy Lee Play Area (feasibility funding) $25,000 Wilder Square Condo Stormwater (feasibility funding) $18,000 Special Grant Reserve $123,450 $350,000 TOTAL

\\CRWDC01\Company\06 Projects\Special Grants\2017\Bd Memo 2017 Special Grant Award Recommendations 12-07-2016.docx

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.


DATE: TO: FROM: RE:

November 28, 2016 CRWD Board of Managers and Staff Mark Doneux, Administrator November 2016 Administrator’s Report

1) Administrator Approved or Executed Agreements a) Consultant Services Agreement with Underground Architecture and Design for 2016 due diligence not to exceed $1,750. b) Cooperative Agreement with District 10 Planning Council for 2016 rain gardens not to exceed $8,000. c) Cooperative Agreement with Muffie and Tim Abrahmson for two rain gardens not to exceed $1,123. d) Amendment to Purchase Agreement for 595 Aldine and 1736 Thomas, 30-day extension. 2) Board Approved or Executed Agreements a) Cost Share Grant Funding with Saint Paul Port Authority for design and construction of BMP’s for Midway Office Warehouse for an amount not to exceed $120,000. 3) General updates including recent and upcoming meetings and events a) Urban BMP Specialist job posted November 21st. (Applications accepted until November 14th) 4) CRWD events and meetings a) CAC Meeting, 7:00 PM, Wednesday, December 14th b) Annual Meeting, 5:00 PM, December 21st, Wilder Foundation c) 2016 Awards and Recognition Program, 6:00 Reception, 7:00 Program, Wilder Foundation d) Metro MAWD is Tuesday January 17, 2017 from 7:00-9:00 p.m.

W:\04 Board of Managers\Correspondence\Administrator's Report 2016\Administrator's Report 10-27-16.docx

Our Mission is to protect, manage and improve the water resources of Capitol Region Watershed District.

December 7, 2016 meeting packet  
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