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The ReCap 2015 Issue 3 | Page 0


President’s Welcome Dear Ladies, It is the end of another inspiring year at Capital W. This year the team welcomed new sponsors, the madness of O-week, the celebration of International Women's Day, the Annual Dinner, our in-house sponsor events and numerous skill workshops. I want to thank you all for joining Capital W on your journey through university and making it the society that it is today. I hope that you are able to look towards Capital W for inspiration, advice, and a network of like-minded friends as I have over my university career. Remember that you can always reach out to us - our inbox is always open.

CONTENTS Exclusive Articles 2 Market ReCap By Tina Vo

3 CONF DENCE: Iclosethegap By Lauren Maxwell

4 Bank of America Merrill Lynch Exclusive Interview with Annabel James

5 Commonwealth Bank Exclusive Interview with Livia Lam

Whether you are embarking on your first internship or a refreshing holiday during the summer, you forge your future with the decisions you make today!

6 Goldman Sachs

With 9 years behind us, and many more ahead, Capital W looks forward to seeing you again in 2016!

7 Macquarie

Yafei Fang | President 2015

8 Morgan Stanley

Exclusive Interview with Trista Miller

Exclusive Interview with Kim Nguyen

Exclusive Interview with Nancy Tchou About Us

9 PwC

Capital W is the first and only dedicated undergraduate women’s business society at UNSW Australia, and open to female students from all universities. It was founded in 2007 as a grassroots approach to bridging the gap between university and the corporate world. We aim to motivate and educate talented female students of today – to give them the skills, confidence and inspiration they need to become future successful business leaders. Editors Mary Ye, Vidushi Sharma, Kinza Memon Our contributors for this edition Yafei Fang, Tina Vo, Lauren Maxwell, Caroline Wong, Beatrice Lau, Jennie Yiu, Courtney Moses

Exclusive Interview with Meredith Chester

10 UBS Exclusive Interview with Tara Foord

11 Westpac Institutional Bank Exclusive Interview with Preeta Seshachari

12 Woolworths Limited Exclusive interview with Maysoon El-Ahmad

Stay Connected Facebook www.facebook.com/capitalwinc

Special Thanks to Our Contributing Sponsors Bank of America Merrill Lynch, CBA, Goldman Sachs, Macquarie Group, Morgan Stanley, PwC, UBS, Westpac Institutional Bank, Woolworths Limited

Website www.capitalw.org

Disclaimer:

Instagram @capital_w

"The Market ReCap" article is general in nature and written by a student. The information should not be construed as professional financial advice and/or opinion. Statements and opinions expressed are of the author and do not represent the opinion of Capital W. The author and Capital W will not be held responsible for any liability arising from your actions. Please do your own research and come to your own conclusions, or consult with a licensed professional.

The ReCap 2015 Issue 3 | Page 1

LinkedIn www.linkedin.com/company/capital-w


Market ReCap Tina Vo IT Director Tina Vo IT Director Bachelor of Commerce/ Advanced Mathematics with Honours

The second half 2015 saw a whirlwind of events hit global markets – starting with Greece’s missed bailout payment in July, to the Chinese stock suspension and shock Yuan devaluation – causing investor confidence to plummet, with major listed exchanges following suit. Powerhouse US was wary with its first interest rate rise in September since 2006, ultimately causing the Federal Reserve to delay interest rate rises for the time being. Greece Greece missed its first ever payment to the IMF on the 2nd July causing not only shocks throughout the EU but throughout the world. A referendum was held shortly after to decide whether stricter austerity measures, including increases to tax receipts and delaying public servants pensions, were going to be accepted as part of a new bailout package from the EU. Although citizens voted against initial austerity measures, new bailout terms were successfully negotiated, prolonging Greece’s position within the EU. China Over half of the stocks listed on China’s Shanghai Composite and Shenzhen Exchange were suspended from trading during July when concerned investors started selling their shares. More than $3.2 trillion worth of value were wiped in less than a month. Built upon a foundation of margin trading – where personal assets are placed as collateral to increase borrowings and to maintain margin calls – Chinese investors have been placing their life savings into the stock market which has in turn caused many of the listed-company stocks to be highly over-valued. The Chinese Central Bank aggressively conducted a series of intervention

strategies, such as cash injections, restrictions on IPOs and selling of stakes by major shareholders, to stop the massive rout by concerned investors. Shortly after in August, the People’s Bank of China went through two consecutive days of Yuan devaluation in an attempt to make the Yuan become a more flexible currency. On Tuesday 11th, daily fix rates were fixed at 1.87% above previous day’s rate – the largest percentage change in comparison to previous 1% cumulative fix spread over a few months. Global equities dropped in response to this second devaluation as investors feared the deflationary pressures that the Chinese economy may place on global growth. United States The Federal Reserve of US were set to lift interest rates in September even amongst global concerns from China’s shock Yuan devaluation. Although inflation rates were not in line with the Federal Reserve benchmark, other indicators such as retail expenditure and jobless rates were exceeding expectations, causing markets around the world to prepare for the United States’ first series of interest rate rises since 2006. Australia With slowing global economic growth prospects and growing concerns from major economies such as the US and China, both of which Australia is heavily dependent upon, Australia’s economic growth has been stagnant with the expected annual GDP growth for 2014 to be around 2.4%. Lower commodities prices, driven by new oil contracts from Iran and US and an ever-increasing supply, have continued to contribute to weaker performance of all Australian exports and weaker consumer confidence. Even with interest rates kept at an all-time low of 2%, Australia, coming out from a business cycle dependent on commodities, needs to quickly find a new source of revenue, whether this is through targeted government policies to stimulate expenditure or investments into other industries to drive economic growth.

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CONF DENCE Lauren Maxwell Marketing Director, Capital W Bachelor of Commerce and Media

THE Workplace Gender Equality Agency indicates that, in Australia, 42.0% of women have achieved a bachelor degree whereas only 30.6% of men have the same qualification. Even though female students are evidently more qualified than their male counterparts, these figures are not translating into leadership positions in the workplace. We have all heard talk of ‘the pay gap’, ‘the gender gap’, and ‘the ambition gap’ however a new ‘gap’ has entered conversation regarding women in the workplace. ‘The confidence gap’ has recently become popular following the release of Katty Kay and Claire Shipman’s book: ‘The Confidence Code’. After an extensive study on the issue of gender inequality, Kay and Shipman found that the biggest cause of this gender inequality in leadership was the significant gap that females experience between their competence and their confidence. So how do we close it? The first step is awareness. Not everyone is born with an in-built sense of self-confidence however this doesn’t mean that you can’t develop it. With work, confidence can be acquired and where you find confidence, you find success. I have recently started a campaign called “CONF DENCE #ICloseTheGap” which aims to rectify this gendered disparity in leadership by making female university students aware that they need to close the gap between competence and confidence in order to achieve career success.

The campaign begins with a list of four key confidence builders: 1) Make positivity a mindset You need to believe in yourself in order to expect others to. Alicia Clark (PsyD, PLLC), a licensed clinical psychologist, shared her thoughts on the issue; “If we don’t value and respect ourselves, our thoughts, and our time, we can’t expect others to. This simple truth is nowhere more evident than in the workplace where leaders influence as much by what they do as by what they say.” 2) Accept failure and value criticism For those who lack confidence, identifying weakness is far too easy. In her article, ‘5 Ways to Develop Confidence in the Workplace’, Elli Thompson Purtell writes; “Rather than mentally berating yourself when you mess up or don’t do a perfect job, remember that it happens to everyone. The difference is that confident women don’t have time to wallow in failure. They’re busy fixing the problem and learning from it.” 3) Ditch Perfection. Nicole Fallon from Business News Daily writes that “Women often pressure themselves to reach imaginary, impossible standards of perfection, and become discouraged when they inevitably fail to achieve them.” The pursuit of perfection not only diminishes confidence, it also negatively impacts happiness and wellbeing. 4) Don’t Be Afraid To Be Audacious. Push past your comfort zone, be adventurous and be inquisitive. Don’t be afraid to share your opinion and never let a fear of failure prevent you from embracing opportunity. Keep these in mind throughout your studies and into your career. With work, confidence can be acquired and where you find confidence, you find success.

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Exclusive Interview with Annabel James Annabel James Analyst, Global Transaction Services. Bachelor of Commerce (International Business), Bachelor of Arts, (Political Science and International Relations) – Australian National University What is your background? I have a combined degree – a Bachelor of Commerce (International Business) and a Bachelor of Arts (Political Science & International Relations) – from the Australian National University. I did a Summer internship with BofAML, followed by 6 months working for an Australian domestic bank in business banking before starting in Treasury Management Analyst Program in GTS Australia. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? University is not just about getting good grades. Embrace campus life, get involved in clubs/events/societies/sports/charities, meet new people and enjoy this time of your life. Because I adopted this attitude, I was fortunate enough to gain leadership roles and work with different groups and types of people, which helped me to build on skills (and EQ) that are necessary for success in any career, particularly at a global bank. This attitude will enable you to diversify your resume! What advice would you give to young women in the industry who feel that their past success and failures define their future possibilities? Your past successes and failures DO define your future possibilities but the way in which you conduct yourself in response to these outcomes is more important.

Everyone will fail at something eventually – you just can’t let it stop you from trying to get it right the next time. This is how we learn. Similarly, be very proud of your successes, but you still have more to learn and improve on. Ultimately, it’s not the result ‘on paper’ that is the defining factor in your future possibilities, but the people involved in the process and how they see you conduct yourself. Where do you see yourself in the next year or two? I finish the graduate program in a year and then I hope to take a permanent role in the GTS Australia team. Ideally, in a couple of years I would like to be living and working overseas with the bank. The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today.’ Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly changing business industry? I feel that as an industry, there is a lot of focus on ‘Millennials’ and their ability to drive business consistent with the rapidly evolving markets. Yet, the business industry is rapidly evolving whether we are on board or not. If we don’t proactively seek to close the gap, we will be left behind. How do you suggest young women continue building their skills to make them better equipped for their future careers? Firstly, I think that identifying a colleague who can mentor and sponsor you is really important. Choose someone who has qualities that you want to work on. Secondly, if you’re not uncomfortable at least once a week, then you’re not being challenged or looking for new learning opportunities and responsibilities. The better you can cope with being out of your depth, the more flexible you will become as you move throughout your career.

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Exclusive Interview with Livia Lam What is your background? At university I studied a Bachelor of Business (Accounting) with a Bachelor of Science in Information Technology (Enterprise Systems Development) at UTS. I started off as an accounting cadet in my first year. The cadetship was great in teaching me the basics of the workplace and taught me many of the important soft skills very early on in my career. Towards the end of that year I realised that accounting was not for me. The more practical nature of my IT degree naturally drew me towards it - I liked that you could get to the end of the week and have both learned something interesting as well as created something to show others. Within my IT degree I had the opportunity to study subjects around human computer interaction which focuses on how we can make it easier for humans to use computer interfaces. I absolutely loved these subjects and launched my career in IT as a User Experience Analyst. After I graduated from university I joined the Enterprise Services graduate program at CBA. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? Participate in everything! Well not quite everything but your time in university is about the experience as a whole. This includes not just classes but extracurricular activities, volunteering, sports, and your clubs and societies. I've made so many friends through these activities and it makes university much more enjoyable and also gives you invaluable connections.

Where do you see yourself in the next year or two? In the next year or so I see myself helping the bank to internally spread the word on customer centric design. Customer centric design is about knowing who your customers are, knowing their goals, and how they will interact with your product and service (e.g. will they be in the office or on the road?) More and more, customers are expecting great customer service which means that as a bank, when we are designing new products or services, it is important to keep the customer in mind at all times. The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today.’ Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly changing business industry? In my first role at CBA I was working as a Business Solutions Consultant. This was an internal consulting role. We helped other business units with their IT strategies, provided technical project advice, as well as provided research for concept proposals and vendor selection. In this role it was important to keep up to date with both the latest technologies as well as the latest industry landscapes. This meant being proactive with research and with having conversations with those that are in the industry. If you can be proactive in keeping up to date, others will look to you for advice helping you to stand out.

Do you feel that the industry you work in enables and encourages you to progress and What advice would you give to young women in grow individually? the industry who feel that their past successes Most definitely. The IT industry is one of the and failures define their future possibilities? broadest. It covers every business sector and is truly When it comes to a new job or a new career, past global. The diversity of roles means that I have the successes and failures can only provide hints into choice to either build up my skills in one area, or to whether you'll be successful in the new job. I would move around and gain a wider array of skills. This focus on building your skillset up so that you are choice is important to me. I would recommend a better positioned to handle any situations that come career in IT to anyone – there is room to be truly up. The better you handle a situation, the more innovative, whether it be on the design side, the likely you are to be successful. consulting side, or the engineering and build side. The ReCap 2015 Issue 3 | Page 5


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Exclusive Interview with Kim Nguyen Kim Nguyen What is your background? I studied Commerce and Science, majoring in Finance and Mathematics at university. I currently work in the Risk Management Group in the energy and natural resources team where we primarily look at commodities based projects. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? Never hesitate or be afraid to step up and put yourself out there in order to gain exposure and knowledge of the industry. What advice would you give to young women in the industry who feel that their past successes and failures define their future possibilities? Always look into the future and use past experiences to make the most of your opportunities. Where do you see yourself in the next year or two? I would like to work at one of Macquarie’s international offices. I’d also like to excel within the natural resources sector and get a better understanding of the technical side of the industry.

The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today.’ Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly changing business industry? Your actions will define the opportunities you can achieve in the future. Take charge at what you’re doing at work, put your hand up and pursue your goals, as this will determine how successful you are in the future. How do you suggest young women continue building their skills to make them better equipped for their future careers? There’s a lot to learn from working in teams, as your colleagues will have a diverse range of experience and expertise. Having a mentor is helpful, as it will allow you ask the tough and in-depth questions. They will also provide you with handy tips and insights you might not be aware of. Do you feel that the industry you work in enables and encourages you to progress and grow individually? The opportunities I’ve received so far have been incredible in such a rapidly changing environment. My seniors and peers have pushed me hard to think outside the box and expand my horizons outside of work. They guide and nurture my understanding of the industry and technical ability.

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Exclusive Interview with Nancy Tchou What is your background? I am currently the Vice President of the investment banking division of Morgan Stanley. I have nine years in the investment banking industry - five at Morgan Stanley and over four years at Macquarie Group. I studied Commerce/Law with Finance Honours from UNSW, and a Masters of Finance from INSEAD. I have also been admitted to the Supreme Court of NSW. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? Being friendly, open and building strong relationships with people of all seniorities - you may never know when these networks will become handy. What advice would you give to young women in the industry who feel that their past successes and failures define their future possibilities? Firstly, nothing is too hard to achieve - whether something is difficult is often shaped by your own confidence. Secondly, if you want it, give it a go and you will never regret it. Confidence is a selfperpetuating trait. If you do well in one step, it will build your confidence for the next step and the next and next - you will be surprised. Thirdly, focus on your successes and not your failures. There's no point getting caught up on your past failures and the reality is, you're probably the only one dwelling over it and no one else has even noticed. Where do you see yourself in the next year or two? Building on my successes, developing my industry skills, maintaining and creating new networks, developing myself as a person and senior leader, and most importantly making sure that I am enjoying work!

The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today.’ Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly-changing business industry? Recognising trends in the industry and being proactive with clients on how changing trends, such as technology, can influence their business is important. This could mean being persistent with clients. Clients value these insights and also value your time, therefore you want to be the first person the client sees (not your competitors) when they put the idea into action. How do you suggest young women continue building their skills to make them better equipped for their future careers? Ensure that you create and maintain close networks and lean on each other for support. Keep a positive, open mind and give everything a go, do things outside of your comfort zone, it will push you to grow and learn more. Speak up and be confident if there are any concerns as no one can read your mind. Lastly, try to keep emotions out of the workplace, that is, don't take things personally. Do you feel that the industry you work in enables and encourages you to progress and grow individually? Yes - but it all comes down to yourself. You need to ask and chase what you want. The industry will be reshaped by those who are in it. If you don't have the courage or determination to reshape it, it is not going to happen by itself.

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Exclusive Interview with Meredith Chester Meredith Chester Associate Director, Corporate Value Advisory Bachelor of Mathematics and Accounting at the Queensland University of Technology

What is your background? I was a PwC Vacationer in Business Valuation in Corporate Advisory. Since then, I have completed the CFA and moved to Sydney for my current role. My passion is also in promoting women’s development, having established the Women’s Initiative in Brisbane. I now head up the Diversity and Inclusion Employee Network at PwC in Sydney. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? Getting involved and meeting as many people as possible. Professional services are a people’s business so you need to be comfortable talking to people, networking and so on. Join committees at university. A vacation program is also invaluable. What advice would you give to young women in the industry who feel that their past successes and failures define their future possibilities? It’s not necessarily about your successes and failures but the way you learn from experiences. Whether it be failing subjects or losing your job, being able to show that you’ve learnt something from that experience is the most powerful thing. The industry is agile and your ability to learn from your mistakes is very important.

five year period. I am just excited about building a team in the litigation and valuations space. The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today’. Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly-changing business industry? When I was unsuccessful on my promotion to manager, I realised that you needed to take people on a journey by telling them what you want and getting them to buy in on it from an early stage. It means having conversations about what and how you are going to achieve your goal. Elizabeth Broderick has a theory that people cannot envisage the future of someone who is different from them. Particularly in my field, where all partners were male and very different from me, it was all about being proactive in taking them on that journey. How do you suggest young women continue building their skills to make them better equipped for their future careers? Find good mentors - they challenge you and help you work towards your goals, and find different ways of doing things Do you feel that the professional services industry enables and encourages you to progress and grow individually? In the professional services industry, what we do is not always defined – it’s all about problem solving and thinking differently. I think the industry encourages proactive people who are passionate and it has recently acknowledged the importance of gender diversity to solve these problems. As a female, I am very supported both within PwC and the industry.

Where do you see yourself in the next year or two? I hope to be able to be promoted to Director. I aim to also become a Partner and focus on running my own business within PwC but that will be over a

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Exclusive Interview with Tara Foord Tara Foord What is your background? I studied a Bachelor of Commerce (Finance and Accounting) (2011) at The University of Sydney. I work at UBS Investment Bank in Equities, where I was an intern from December 2010 to February 2011. I then worked in Transition Management in 2012 and have been working in Electronic Trading since 2013. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? You need to be self-motivated. Always give 100% in your subjects. Ensure to keep up extra-curricular activities and always have some form of part-time job – you get asked about these in interviews far more than grades/university and it helps keep you grounded and exposes you to other life experiences. Apply for anything that you might be interested in (at university or regarding work opportunities), you can always say no but you never know what you might end up enjoying the most. What advice would you give to young women in the industry who feel that their past successes and failures define their future possibilities? One thing that has been apparent at the start of my career was that it’s not what you know coming into something but your attitude and how you learn that matters. If you put your mind to something and are genuinely keen and willing to learn you can always succeed. Obviously past successes can help but it's not make or break.

The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today.’ Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly changing business industry? Being proactive is ALWAYS important, not just in business! In terms of starting my career, being proactive in applying for internships, joining societies at university, going to networking events etc. was important. Also whilst I was interning, part of the reason I was successful in achieving a graduate position was that I proactively spent time with different people across the bank, which highlighted my interest in financial markets and helped me show my strengths. In my current role, being proactive with clients and their needs is key to our business, especially with technology and financial markets constantly changing. It has also been important to proactively communicate with my managers about career goals – they're all very supportive and help me achieve them! How do you suggest young women continue building their skills to make them better equipped for their future careers? I think having a mentor really helps, one mentor internally and another externally. It doesn't have to be a formal mentor, but someone you respect and trust. Also, network! Take the time to build and foster relationships and look for ways to help others and it comes back tenfold. Get involved in special projects outside your day job/university – consider ideas for special projects and pitch your idea. I also think young women need to be resilient and confident.

Do you feel that the industry you work in enables Where do you see yourself in the next year or and encourages you to progress and grow two? individually? Either in the same role I'm in now in our New York Definitely! It's a dynamic industry with many avenues or London office or doing something different at of opportunities, you can have as much or as little as UBS in Sydney within equities. UBS looks to you want, often you just have to be proactive and ask develop your career by allowing opportunities for it! across the bank or across different countries/regions and I plan to make the most of that! The ReCap 2015 Issue 3 | Page 10


Exclusive Interview with Preeta Seshachari Preeta Seshachari Associate Business Risk, Strategy & Ops Global Transactional Services What is your background? I studied Commerce/Law at UNSW and majored in Finance. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? Saying yes to the unfamiliar, especially when I felt a little bit out of my depth. When I started working, I found that being willing to step outside my comfort zone opened a lot of doors, including ones that I hadn’t anticipated. Where I am right now in my career is a complete departure from what I thought I’d be doing when I first joined the bank. What advice would you give to young women in the industry who feel that their past successes and failures define their future possibilities? The past does not define your potential. Your past experiences are important because they help build your character, but your future is heavily influenced by the roadmap you create for yourself. Admittedly, having a prior record of success does give you some level of confidence but if you happen to feel like you don’t have that kind of record there’s still nothing stopping you from being successful in the future if that’s what you want for yourself.

The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today.’ Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly changing business industry? From the moment I started working, I realised that being proactive is an essential part of what makes a great service provider. What we try to do on a day- today basis is to anticipate and articulate customer needs. This is particularly important now, considering how rapidly technology and the customer experience is evolving. How do you suggest young women continue building their skills to make them better equipped for their future careers? Try to broaden your experiences as much as possible so that you’re able to tackle the unexpected. You’ll be joining the workforce at a great time – the pace is rapid and there’s always something new and exciting to be a part of, but you’ll be best placed to handle the opportunities that come your way by being openminded and eager for a challenge. Do you feel that the industry you work in enables and encourages you to progress and grow individually? Absolutely. Ever since I joined Westpac I have felt that my workplace is committed to investing in my future. Every team that I have worked with has encouraged me to meet my full potential by supporting the development of my skills and by helping me figure out where I see myself in the future.

Where do you see yourself in the next year or two? I see myself staying in banking, but in a different role to ensure that I keep developing my skills and learning throughout my career.

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Exclusive Interview with Maysoon El-Ahmad Maysoon El-Ahmad Head of Customer Insights Masters in Commerce (Marketing, Strategy and Innovation); Bachelor of Economics at the University of Sydney

What is the general description and best part about your role? As Head of Customer Insights at Woolworths, I manage a broad range of customer insight / research programs and initiatives for the organization. These include the shopping experience, product and service development, advertising effectiveness analytics and evaluating social and consumer trends. I am responsible for bringing powerful insights into the organisation that help better understand consumer behaviour and market dynamics to strengthen business performance through greater levels of customer satisfaction. The best part of my role is that no one day is ever the same, it’s unpredictable and dynamic and being the inquisitive person I am, I love spending my days trying to get to the bottom of why people say, think and behave the way they do. What is one attitude you adopted in university that helped you become successful? To always keep an open mind. What advice would you give to young women in the industry who feel that their past successes and failures define their future possibilities? One should never assume their future is based on the past. We live in an ever changing world with new expectations and demands. You can create your future by continuously reinventing yourself. The world does not stand still and therefore you should never stand still.

The theme of this publication is ‘The Future is Today’. Can you recall a time where you realised how important being proactive was, especially in the rapidly-changing business industry? Yes – I decided to take up post-graduate studies and complete my Masters to refresh my formal qualifications and keep on top of the new thinking in this industry / business. It was the best thing I've ever done, not just from a formal qualification point of view, but also important in building my confidence at both a professional and personal level. How do you suggest young women continue building their skills to make them better equipped for their future careers? Take on any opportunity that comes your way, even if you don't think you are ready, you will eventually grow into it. Build a strong network of people across different industries and skill sets and spend time with big thinkers (even if it is just reading books by the big thinkers). If you feel you have a weakness in a particular skill set that is limiting your move into an opportunity, go out and do what you need to develop that skill and master it. I also suggest you find yourself an inspiring mentor who can be your torchlight as you navigate your way through your career. Do you feel that the retail industry enables and encourages you to progress and grow individually? The retail industry is a fun and dynamic industry. If you are looking for a challenging yet fulfilling career, the retail industry is one worth pursuing. I started when I was 14 and by 20 I was managing a business over $100mill in annual turnover. By 21 I was ready to take on the world. I owe this level of confidence to the endless opportunities that retail provided me as a young person. If you are a committed person and full of enthusiasm, there are endless opportunities available to you.

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About Us Capital W is the first and only dedicated undergraduate women’s business society at UNSW Australia, and open to female students from all Australian universities. It was founded in 2007 by UNSW Co-op scholars as a grassroots approach to bridging the gap between university and the corporate world. Our goal is to motivate and educate talented female students of today – to give them the skills, confidence and inspiration they need to become successful business leaders of the future.

Stay Connected! Keep up to date with the latest Capital W news, events and sponsor information via our website, capitalw.org, or like us on Facebook at facebook.com/capitalwinc.

The ReCap 2015 Issue 3 | Page 13

Profile for Capital W

The ReCap The Future is Today Edition 2015 No. 3  

Capital W's Summer ReCap 2015

The ReCap The Future is Today Edition 2015 No. 3  

Capital W's Summer ReCap 2015

Profile for capitalw
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