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CITIZENS GUIDE WASTEWATER OPTIONS January - February 2016


CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................................ 3 WHERE DO THINGS STAND?...................................................................................................... 4 WHAT ARE THE BASICS OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT? ................................................. 5 SEVEN WASTEWATER TREATMENT ALTERNATIVES FOR THE CORE AREA...................................................................................... 8 ONE PLANT WITH SECONDARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY ......................................................................................................................................10 ONE PLANT WITH TERTIARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY ......................................................................................................................................13 TWO PLANT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD............................................................................................................16 THREE PLANT SECONDARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + ESQUIMALT NATION ..............................................................19 THREE PLANT TERTIARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + ESQUIMALT NATION ..............................................................22 FOUR PLANT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + ESQUIMALT NATION + EAST SAANICH ...........................25 SEVEN PLANT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + EAST SAANICH + SAANICH CORE + ESQUIMALT NATION + LANGFORD + VIEW ROYAL......................................................28 SOLIDS PROCESSING FOR THE CORE AREA .......................................................................32

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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INTRODUCTION The future of wastewater treatment is of critical importance.

WHY DO WE NEED TO TREAT WASTEWATER? In order to meet federal and provincial laws, and to ensure the health of citizens and our marine environments, we must treat our wastewater.

WHO DOES THIS AFFECT, WHY AND WHEN? We need a new plan to treat wastewater for the Core Area of the CRD. This includes the following communities: Colwood, Esquimalt, Esquimalt Nation, Langford, Oak Bay, Saanich, Songhees Nation, Victoria, and View Royal. The Core Area Liquid Waste Management Committee must decide on a wastewater treatment plan to put forward to funders by March 31, 2016. Through a process of municipal, public and technical input, the CRD and its committees have developed new options for wastewater treatment and general approaches to treating the solids that remain after we treat sewage. These options will form the basis for a new plan that will be in place by spring 2016. Input from citizens is critical to making the most durable and acceptable decision. 

WHAT DOES THIS GUIDE DO? This guide is a non-partisan resource designed to help you think through a difficult issue in alternative ways, weighing and evaluating values, priorities, pros, cons, and tradeoffs. In this briefing package you’ll find the following: • Basics of Wastewater Treatment and Recovery

• Resource Recovery Alternatives

• Seven Wastewater Options Explained

• Your Opportunities to Participate

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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WHERE DO THINGS STAND? Who’s responsible for this process? The Core Area Liquid Waste Management Committee (CALWMC) of the CRD is made up of a group of elected directors and First Nations leadership. The Core Area includes the municipalities of Colwood, Esquimalt, Langford, Oak Bay, Saanich, Victoria and View Royal and the Esquimalt and Songhees First Nations. This group is leading the search for wastewater treatment solutions including a thorough technical analysis and public consultation process. The work is initiated through two sub-regional committees, Westside and Eastside Select Committees. Why are there two committees? The committees were struck to address the need to reflect diverse social and information needs among the participating municipalities. There is a commitment to collaboration between the committees to ensure solutions will work for the entire region. What has been the process to date? • Participating municipalities brought forward technically feasible sites for wastewater treatment facilities in Spring 2015. • Citizen engagement processes on the Westside and Eastside offered a clear look at community priorities, direction on possible sites, approaches to treatment, as well as a call for more detailed information including costs, specific sites and proposed technologies.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

• A team of technical consultants was tasked with a detailed engineering and economic study of possible options, their benefits, drawbacks and costs. • Now that the consultants have completed their study, we are taking seven emerging options back to the public for a second phase of consultation. • From January - February 2016, the public will have multiple opportunities to give input on solutions. 4


WHAT ARE THE BASICS OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT? WHAT IS WASTEWATER? Wastewater is water that has been used in homes and businesses in ways that negatively impact its quality. It is largely made up of human waste, oils, grease, chemicals, dirt and soaps from sinks, showers and washing machines and effluent from industries, commercial businesses and institutions.

WHY TREAT WASTEWATER? High concentrations of pollutants from wastewater can have negative effects on fish and wildlife and can result in beach closures and restrictions on shellfish harvesting. In 2006, an environmental report commissioned by the Ministry of Environment noted the contamination of seabed sites near the outfalls. As a result, in 2006 the CRD was mandated by the B.C. Ministry of Environment to plan for and initiate secondary treatment for the region. In 2012, the federal government passed a law requiring all high-risk Canadian cities to provide secondary sewage treatment by 2020 at the latest. The CRD’s core area was deemed to be in the high-risk category.

TYPES OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT Proper management of wastewater ensures the protection of public health and the environment. Treatment can encompass a number of steps to clean wastewater from start to finish. Source control focuses on the reduction or elimination of contaminants before they enter the sewer system rather than treating them after they have been mixed with other wastes. The CRD has been delivering a Regional Source Control program since 1994. Preliminary treatment removes grit (sand and gravel) and screens out coarse solids (rocks, rags, plastics, etc.) which are then sent to landfill. Preliminary screening is currently in effect at the CRD’s Clover Point and Macaulay Point pump station and outfall facilities, where wastewater is screened down to six millimetre sized particles. The screened wastewater is discharged through two deep ocean outfalls into the marine waters of Juan de Fuca Strait. Primary treatment is a physical process where gravity is used to settle solids, and grease, oil and fat are skimmed off. Secondary (or biological) treatment removes dissolved oxygen-demanding organic substances from wastewater by using bacteria to convert degradable organic matter into bacterial cells. The wastewater is then filtered by separating treated liquid from grown bacterial cells. Tertiary treatment is a final process to improve the quality of the effluent discharged after the wastewater treatment process. Membrane filters are often used for tertiary treatment. Advanced oxidization or UV systems can further reduce levels of pharmaceuticals and chemicals commonly found in wastewater.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Curie Road Pump Station

Costs of treatment: Each level of treatment adds an additional process which further improves the quality of effluent which will either be disposed of or re-used. As more processes are used, the costs of building the treatment systems goes up. This means that generally speaking a tertiary treatment facility will cost more than a secondary treatment facility if they are treating the same amount of wastewater. Resource Recovery Wastewater is a valuable source of resources that can be captured and used throughout the treatment process. Examples of resources include: Heat: Heat produced from raw sewage can be captured at the wastewater treatment plant and used to heat the facility. Excess heat energy can also be distributed throughout the local community to heat homes and buildings using a District Energy System. Solids in wastewater are a valuable source of nutrients. There are two approaches to solids treatment that are being considered for the Core Area wastewater project: Anaerobic Digestion: Is the digestion of organic solid materials in wastewater in the absence of oxygen. The anaerobic digestion treatment process produces biogas, which can be used as a fuel source. Gasification: Is a process that converts organic materials such as wastewater sludge, wood waste and kitchen scraps, into carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide. This is achieved by reacting the material at high temperatures without combustion, with a controlled amount of oxygen and/or steam, to produce a gas mixture called syngas. The solids treatment process provides several opportunities for resource recovery: Biogas: Residual solids are often treated using anaerobic digestion to stabilize and reduce solids, kill pathogens, and generate methane gas (biogas) for use onsite in the plant or offsite in the natural gas distribution system. Phosphate: During the residual solids treatment process struvite, which is a form of phosphate, can be extracted and then used in fertilizer. Solids: Wastewater residual solids that have been treated to reduce the volume, kill pathogens and have much of the water removed. These biosolids produced at CRD facilities can be used as a fuel substitute for cement kilns or for other beneficial uses. CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Project Charter – What Are the Criteria Guiding the Work? The project is guided by a set of goals and commitments that have been identified by CRD staff, elected directors, and informed by citizen and stakeholder input. THE GOALS ARE TO:

THE COMMITMENTS ARE TO:

• Meet or exceed federal regulations for

• Develop and implement the project in a

secondary treatment by December 31, 2020

• Minimize costs to residents and businesses

(life cycle cost) and provide value for money

• Produce an innovative project that brings in costs at less than original estimates

transparent manner and engage the public throughout the process;

• Deliver a solution that adds value to the

surrounding community and enhances the livability of neighbourhoods;

• Optimize opportunities for resource recovery

• Deliver solutions that are safe and resilient

• Minimize greenhouse gas production through

• Develop innovative solutions that account

to accomplish substantial net environmental benefit and reduce operating costs

the development, construction and operation phases and ensure best practice for climate change mitigation

to earthquakes, tsunamis, sea level rise and storm surges; for and respond to future challenges, demands and opportunities, including being open to investigating integration of other parts of the waste stream if doing so offers the opportunities to optimize other goals and commitments in the future; and

• Minimize greenhouse gas production through

the development, construction and operation phases and ensure best practice for climate change mitigation

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Columbia Boulevard Wastewater Treatment Support Facility, Oregon

SEVEN WASTEWATER TREATMENT ALTERNATIVES FOR THE CORE AREA The following section identifies seven alternatives to wastewater treatment and recovery for the Core Area municipalities of the CRD. We will describe each option in plain language including its key features, its benefits and implications. We also want to let you know the criteria and goals for this work.

BASE CRITERIA FOR ALL OPTIONS Each of these alternatives is based on criteria identified by elected directors, citizens and a range of community and technical stakeholders.

ALL OPTIONS WILL: • Meet or exceed government regulations;

• Balance environmental benefit with cost; and

• Provide the highest level of odour and noise control;

• Add benefit to host communities, including meaningful neighbourhood design and potential for needed amenities and co-location with other organizations or community uses.

• Be able to withstand challenges posed by estimated sea level rise, seismic activity and safe distances from residential homes and public spaces;

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS: • They represent a range of technologies for treatment and solids processing identified by technical experts with ideas and input from citizens; • They provide a range of alternatives to meet the questions and ideas of many participants with diverse perspectives; and • They ARE NOT fully designed or shovel ready, but they represent approaches to meet our provincial and federal commitments and to bring our infrastructure into the 21st century. Through design, rezoning and community consultation, we will shape these plants. CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Brightwater Wastewater Treatment Center, WA

HOW IS THE INFORMATION PRESENTED? Each option will present key information, benefits and implications.

SITES: • The sites proposed for each option will be identified as specifically as possible.

COSTS: • The costs are estimated looking at the initial costs to build – “infrastructure” as well as operating and management costs, and the potential to recover revenues through water and energy re-use.

HEAT AND WATER RECOVERY: • The options all provide varying levels of capacity to harness heat and water for reuse.

PIPES: • We will describe how much infrastructure, either retrofitting or new piping, is needed for each option.

OUTFALLS: • We will show where and how water that is not reused is returned to the ocean. Each option must provide access to ocean outfalls to allow for extreme flows during wet weather periods.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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1A

ONE PLANT WITH SECONDARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY SUMMARY: This 1 plant option has a treatment plant to service all of the Core Area in Rock Bay. This treatment plant is designed to treat wastewater to a secondary level before being released through the ocean outfalls. This plan has some additional tertiary treatment to allow for the reuse of water for irrigation, toilet flushing and other uses, close to the facility. Solids resource recovery could take place at Rock Bay or potentially at Hartland Landfill.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Option 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

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CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Pleasant St Site

David St Site

Bridge St Site

Store St Site

OPTION 1A: PROPOSED SITE LOCATIONS

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

VICTORIA • Victoria Public Works Yard, 417 Garbally Road, Victoria and/ or • Rock Bay / Port Ellice – near Pleasant, David and Turner Streets (owned privately) • or 2140 Store Street (owned by Transport Canada/ BC Hydro and Matullia)

OUTFALL: • Clover Point (back up at Macaulay Point)

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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OPTION 1A: KEY METRICS AND CONSIDERATIONS Estimated Capital Costs

$1.031 billion

Estimated Annual Operating Costs by 2030

$21.8 million

Estimated Annual Resource Income (heat/water) by 2030

Up to $0.9 million

Water Quality after Treatment for Core Area

90% secondary & 10% tertiary

Estimated Length of New Pipes Required

16.7 km

Potential Number of Heat Recovery Systems

1

Potential Number of Water Re-use systems

1

Carbon and Energy Footprint Rank

Lowest carbon and energy footprint among all options.

BENEFITS:

IMPLICATIONS:

• Meets government regulations.

• Does not offer the highest level of treatment.

• It is the simplest system to operate. • Water re-use and heat recovery potential around facility.

• Largest single facility footprint of the seven main options. Approximately 10 acres.

• Least amount of conveyance and pipe infrastructure required. • Lowest cost overall. • Available sites are suitable from a technical perspective and align with public input to date.

For more detailed information, including a breakdown of costs and deeper technical analysis, please see the technical report: www.CoreAreaWastewater.ca CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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1B

ONE PLANT WITH TERTIARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY SUMMARY: This 1 plant option has a treatment plant to service all of the Core Area in Rock Bay. This option is designed to provide all flows with a tertiary level of treatment to improve water quality before discharging through the ocean outfall. This option, designed to provide a tertiary level of treatment, allows for the reuse of water for irrigation, toilet flushing and other uses close to the facility. Solids resource recovery can take place at Rock Bay or potentially at Hartland Landfill.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Option 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

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Bridge St Site

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CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Pleasant St Site

David St Site

Bridge St Site

Store St Site

OPTION 1B: PROPOSED SITE LOCATIONS

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

VICTORIA • Victoria Public Works Yard, 417 Garbally Road, Victoria and/ or • Rock Bay / Port Ellice – near Pleasant, David and Turner Streets (owned privately) • or 2140 Store Street (owned by Transport Canada/ BC Hydro and Matullia)

OUTFALLS: • Clover Point (back up at Macaulay Point)

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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OPTION 1B: KEY METRICS AND CONSIDERATIONS Estimated Capital Costs

$1.131 billion

Estimated Annual Operating Costs by 2030

$26.4 million

Estimated Annual Resource Income (heat/ water) by 2030

Up to $0.9 million

Water Quality after Treatment for Core Area

100% tertiary

Estimated Length of New Pipes Required

16.7 km

Potential Number of Heat Recovery Systems

1

Potential Number of Water Re-use systems

1

Carbon and Energy Footprint Rank

3rd lowest carbon and energy footprint overall

BENEFITS:

IMPLICATIONS:

• Can treat all wastewater in the region to a tertiary standard.

• Added capital and operating costs associated with higher level of treatment.

• Opportunities for water reuse and heat recovery in the immediate neighbourhood regions.

• Like 1a, presents the largest single facility footprint of the seven main options, approximately 10 acres.

• Available sites are suitable from a technical perspective and align well with public input to date. • Least amount of conveyance and pipe infrastructure required.

For more detailed information, including a breakdown of costs and deeper technical analysis, please see the technical report: www.CoreAreaWastewater.ca CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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2

TWO PLANT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD SUMMARY: This 2 plant option has treatment plants located in Colwood and Rock Bay. The Colwood treatment plant would treat Colwood flows to a tertiary level for re-use around the facility or for ground discharge (i.e., streams, aquifers). The Rock Bay treatment plant would service the remainder of the Core Area and treat flows to a secondary level of treatment before discharging through the Clover Point outfall. The Rock Bay plant includes capacity to back up Colwood flows and facility.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Option 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4

Option 2, 3 & 4

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

i rk Se lk

CITY OF LANGFORD

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CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mx

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

CITY OF COLWOOD

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TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

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ROCK BAY

Colwood - Juan de Fuca Recreation

Pleasant St Site

David St Site

Bridge St Site

Store St Site

Metres CRD Sanitary Trunk 0 100 200 Projection:Municipal UTM ZONEBoundary 10N, NAD83

Juan de Fuca Recreation

Colwood Park and Ride

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

OPTION 2: PROPOSED SITE LOCATIONS VICTORIA • Victoria Public Works Yard, 417 Garbally Road, Victoria and/ or • Rock Bay / Port Ellice – near Pleasant, David and Turner Streets (owned privately) • or 2140 Store Street (owned by Transport Canada/ BC Hydro and Matullia)

COLWOOD • Juan de Fuca Recreation Centre, 1759 Island Highway, (publicly-owned) • or Colwood Park and Ride, Ocean Boulevard and Island Highway (publicly-owned)

OUTFALLS: • Clover Point (back up at Macaulay Point)

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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OPTION 2: KEY METRICS AND CONSIDERATIONS Estimated Capital Costs

$1.088 billion

Estimated Annual Operating Costs by 2030

$22.8 million

Estimated Annual Resource Income (heat, water) by 2030

Up to $2.4 million

Water Quality after Treatment for Core Area

20% tertiary for water reuse. 80% secondary

Estimated Length of New Pipes Required

36.2 km

Potential Number of Heat Recovery systems

2

Potential Number of Water Re-Use Systems

2

Carbon and Energy Footprint Rank

2nd lowest energy and carbon footprint overall

BENEFITS:

IMPLICATIONS:

• This option set represents a notable increase in water reuse from the 1-plant option with minimal extra conveyance infrastructure.

• The Colwood plant itself requires minimal new conveyance infrastructure but requires redundant capacity at Rock Bay to avoid a second outfall.

• There are water reuse systems possible at both Rock Bay and Colwood.

• A central plant at Rock Bay plus tertiary plant in Colwood increases capital and operating costs for expanded water reuse; capital and operating costs both rank 2nd among the option sets.

• Heat recovery systems possible in Colwood (e.g. civic recreational facilities) and next to the treated outfall route from Rock Bay to Clover point. • Available sites are suitable from a technical perspective and align with public input to date. • Both Rock Bay and Colwood are both situated in growth centers, one mixed-use and the other primarily industrial. • Resource incomes for the 2 plant option demonstrate the most cost- effective water reuse approach.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

• The two-plant option offers 20% tertiary treatment across the region. This is an improvement over option 1a, but does not rank among the highest levels of treatment.

For more detailed information, including a breakdown of costs and deeper technical analysis, please see the technical report: www.CoreAreaWastewater.ca 18


3A

THREE PLANT SECONDARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + ESQUIMALT NATION SUMMARY: This 3 plant option has treatment plants located in Colwood, Esquimalt Nation and Rock Bay. All of the plants in this option are designed to provide a secondary level of treatment. The plant at Colwood would treat all Colwood and Langford wastewater flows and would discharge out its own outfall into Royal Bay. All wastewater would be treated to a secondary level and then released at the ocean outfalls. This plan includes some additional tertiary treatment to allow for the reuse of water for irrigation, toilet flushing and other uses, close to the facility at Esquimalt and Rock Bay. Solids resource recovery can take place on site at Rock Bay or potentially at Hartland Landfill.

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Option 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4

Option 2, 3 & 4

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

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TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

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Colwood - Juan de Fuca Recreation

CITY OF LANGFORD

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CITY OF COLWOOD

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CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

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Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83

ESQUIMALT

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Esquimalt Nation

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CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Juan de Fuca Recreation

Colwood Park and Ride

Municipal Boundary

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Ad m

ira ls Rd

TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

SONGHEES NATION

ESQUIMALT NATION

TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Esquimalt Nation

Municipal Boundary

OPTION 3A: PROPOSED SITE LOCATIONS

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

VICTORIA • Victoria Public Works Yard, 417 Garbally Road, Victoria and/ or • Rock Bay / Port Ellice – near Pleasant, David and Turner Streets (owned privately) • or 2140 Store Street (owned by Transport Canada/ BC Hydro and Matullia)

COLWOOD • Juan de Fuca Recreation Centre, 1759 Island Highway, (publically owned) • or Colwood Park and Ride, Ocean Boulevard and Island Highway (publicly-owned)

ESQUIMALT • Esquimalt First Nations site, 1400 Block Admirals Road

OUTFALLS: • Clover Point, Macaulay Point, Royal Bay

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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OPTION 3A: KEY METRICS AND CONSIDERATIONS Estimated Capital Costs

$ 1.125 billion

Estimated Operating Costs by 2030

$23 million

Estimated Annual Resource Income (heat, water) by 2030

Up to $1.6 million

Water Quality after Treatment for Core Area

100% secondary at Colwood. 90% secondary and 10% tertiary for water reuse at Rock Bay and Esquimalt Nation

Estimated Length of New Pipes Required

34.5 km

Potential Number of Heat Recovery Systems

5th

Potential Number of Water Re-Use Systems

3

Carbon and Energy Footprint Rank

4th lowest carbon footprint

BENEFITS:

IMPLICATIONS:

• Meets government regulations.

• The Colwood and Langford plants requires new infrastructure and a new outfall.

• Wate re-use systems at Rock Bay and Esquimalt Nation for use in immediate areas. • Heat recovery opportunities for all three facilities.

• Does not provide as high a level of treatment as two plant option and is more expensive.

• Fourth highest ranking for resource income generated by heat and water,

For more detailed information, including a breakdown of costs and deeper technical analysis, please see the technical report: www.CoreAreaWastewater.ca CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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3B

THREE PLANT TERTIARY TREATMENT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + ESQUIMALT NATION SUMMARY: This 3 plant tertiary option has treatment plants located in Colwood, Esquimalt Nation and Rock Bay. The plant at Colwood would treat all Colwood and Langford wastewater flows to a tertiary level of treatment for water reuse around the plant with all unused flows discharged out its own outfall into Royal Bay. Flows would be treated at a secondary level at Rock Bay and Esquimalt Nation facilities, with some additional tertiary treatment for local re-use around the facilities. Solids resource recovery can take place on site at Rock Bay or potentially at Hartland Landfill.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

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Option 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4

Option 2, 3 & 4

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

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TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

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Colwood - Juan de Fuca Recreation

CITY OF LANGFORD

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CITY OF COLWOOD

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CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

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ESQUIMALT

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CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Juan de Fuca Recreation

Colwood Park and Ride

Municipal Boundary

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Ad m

ira ls Rd

TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

SONGHEES NATION

ESQUIMALT NATION

TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Esquimalt Nation

OPTION 3B: PROPOSED SITE LOCATIONS Municipal Boundary

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

VICTORIA • Victoria Public Works Yard, 417 Garbally Road, Victoria and/ or • Rock Bay / Port Ellice – near Pleasant, David and Turner Streets (owned privately) • or 2140 Store Street (owned by Transport Canada/ BC Hydro and Matullia)

COLWOOD • Juan de Fuca Recreation Centre, 1759 Island Highway (publicly-owned) • or Colwood Park and Ride, Ocean Boulevard and Island Highway (publicly- owned)

ESQUIMALT • Esquimalt First Nations site, 1400 Block Admirals Road

OUTFALLS: • Clover Point, Macaulay Point, Royal Bay

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OPTION 3B: KEY METRICS AND CONSIDERATIONS Estimated Capital Costs

$1.178 billion

Estimated Operating Costs by 2030

$24 million

Estimated Annual Resource Income (heat, water) by 2030

Up to $3.8 million

Water Quality after Treatment for Core Area

100% tertiary at Colwood. 90% secondary, 10% tertiary for water reuse at Rock Bay & Esquimalt Nation

Estimated Length of New Pipes Required

54.0 km

Possible Number of Heat Recovery Systems

3

Possible Number of Water Re-use Systems

3

Carbon and Energy Footprint Rank

6th lowest footprint overall

BENEFITS:

IMPLICATIONS:

• Exceeds government regulations with a higher level of treatment than 3 plant secondary.

• The Colwood and Langford plants require new infrastructure and a new outfall.

• Wate re-use and heat resuse systems at all three facilities.

• Second to last carbon and energy ranking due to factors like infrastructure.

• Tied for second highest projected resource income from heat and water reuse.

For more detailed information, including a breakdown of costs and deeper technical analysis, please see the technical report: www.CoreAreaWastewater.ca CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

24


4

FOUR PLANT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + ESQUIMALT NATION + EAST SAANICH SUMMARY: This 4 plant option located in Colwood, Rock Bay, Esquimalt Nation and East Saanich. Flows would be treated to a secondary level at Rock Bay and Esquimalt Nation treatment plants, with some additional tertiary treatment for local re-use around the facilities. The Colwood and East Saanich treatment plants would treat flows to a tertiary level for reuse around the treatment plants. Solids resource recovery could take place at Rock Bay or potentially at Hartland Landfill.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

25


Option 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4

Option 2, 3 & 4

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

Se lk

COLWOOD

TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

i rk

Tr e

stle

ROCK BAY

Colwood - Juan de Fuca Recreation

CITY OF LANGFORD

Bridge St Site

e Hillsid

Ave

CITY OF COLWOOD

Facility location within site has not been determined

a Blansh

David St Site Pleasant St Site

rd St

t

Is la

sS

nd

H wy

gla Dou

Bay St

Skinner St

e

Rd

B ay

ri St B

dge

CITY OF VICTORIA Store St Site

Saanich - East Saanich

Government St

Catherine St

Option 3 & 4

Ty e

Go

lds

tre am

Av e

Esquimalt Nation

Option 3 d Sooke R CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Pleasant St Site

EAST SAANICH Gordon Head Rd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83

David St Site

Bridge St Site

Store St Site

Cr

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83

ESQUIMALT a ig

flow

er R d

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

Ad m

DISTRICT OF

ill Cr SAANICH os s Rd

pl ar

Av

e

DISTRICT OF OAK BAY

SONGHEES NATION

Po

ESQUIMALT NATION

R ic h

Ceda

Shelbourne St

Colwood Park and Ride

Municipal Boundary

ira ls Rd

Still in discussion with Landowners

r Hill R d

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Juan de Fuca Recreation

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Facility location has not been determined

Ce da rH

CRD Sanitary Trunk

m on dR

TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

d

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Esquimalt Nation

Municipal Boundary

OPTION 4: PROPOSED SITE LOCATIONS

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Municipal Boundary

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

VICTORIA • Victoria Public Works Yard, 417 Garbally Road, Victoria and/ or • Rock Bay / Port Ellice – near Pleasant, David and Turner Streets (owned privately) • or 2140 Store Street (owned by Transport Canada/ BC Hydro and Matullia)

COLWOOD • Juan de Fuca Recreation Centre, 1759 Island Highway, (publicly-owned) • or Colwood Park and Ride, Ocean Boulevard and Island Highway (publicly-owned)

EAST SAANICH – TBD ESQUIMALT • Esquimalt First Nations site, 1400 Block Admirals Road

OUTFALLS: • Clover Point, Macaulay Point

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

26


OPTION 4: KEY METRICS AND CONSIDERATIONS Estimated Capital Costs

$1.195 billion

Estimated Annual Operating Costs by 2030

$25.3 million

Estimated Annual Resource Income (heat, water) by 2030

Up to $3.8 million

Water Quality after Treatment for Core Area

25% tertiary for water reuse, 75% secondary

Estimated Length of New Pipes Required

66.8km (includes reuse piping for Colwood and East Saanich)

Potential Number of Heat Recovery Systems

4

Potential Number of Water Re-Use Systems

4

Carbon and Energy Footprint Rank

5th lowest carbon and energy footprint overall

BENEFITS:

IMPLICATIONS:

• Exceeds regulations with tertiary treatment at Colwood and East Saanich plants.

• Saanich Core and East Saanich plants require additional redundancy capacity through Rock Bay to avoid outfalls.

• Water re-use systems and heat recovery at all four plants.

• This option shows 2nd highest cost.

• Potential resource incomes for the 4 plant option show the 2nd most cost effective water re-use approach. • With more plants we see smaller footprint for each facility.

For more detailed information, including a breakdown of costs and deeper technical analysis, please see the technical report: www.CoreAreaWastewater.ca CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

27


5

SEVEN PLANT ROCK BAY + COLWOOD + EAST SAANICH + SAANICH CORE + ESQUIMALT NATION + LANGFORD + VIEW ROYAL SUMMARY: This 7 plant option has treatment plants located in Rock Bay, Colwood, East Saanich, Saanich Core, Esquimalt, Langford and View Royal. Flows are treated on a municipal basis, however the Esquimalt treatement plant can also accomodate additional flows for Westside communities during wet weather events. The Rock Bay plant would provide the main treatment requirements for the Eastside (secondary). The East Saanich and Saanich Core treatment plants would treat flows to a tertiary level for reuse around those facilities. The Esquimalt plant would provide tertiary treatment for the flows from the two First Nations and the Town of Esquimalt. The Colwood, View Royal and Langford treatment plants would treat flows to a tertiary level for reuse around those facilities. Solids resource recovery could take place at Rock Bay or potentially at Hartland Landfill.

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

28


Option 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

Option 2, 3 & 4

Colwood - Juan de Fuca Recreation

Se lk

Bridge St Site

e Hillsid

CITY OF LANGFORD

Ave

Pleasant St Site

CITY OF COLWOOD

Facility location within site has not been determined

a Blansh

David St Site

COLWOOD

TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

i rk

Tr e

stle

ROCK BAY

rd St

e

Rd

B ay

Is la

ri St B

dge

CITY OF VICTORIA Store St Site

7 Plant Option

Go

lds

Saanich - Rudd Park tre am

Tra n

s- C

an a

da H

Rd

Saanich - East Saanich

Av e

ey

Option 3 & 4

Government St

Ty e

Ca r

Catherine St

t

nd

sS

H wy

gla Dou

Bay St

Skinner St

wy

a Sa

d Sooke R

Rd

Pleasant St Site

CRD Sanitary Trunk

icu

Store St Site

SAANICH CORE DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Gordon Head Rd

Rd Ha

e

o Cl

r ve

da

A le

ve

R ic h

Ceda

Po

pl ar

t

Av

W

et

Rd

DISTRICT OF OAK BAY

sS

Shelbourne St

si de

ine Rd

gla

r Hill Rd

DISTRICT OF

ill Cr SAANICH os s Rd

Bolesk

Do u

Ce da rH

Bu rn

rri

Still in discussion with Landowners

DISTRICT OF SAANICH

t dS

Facility location has not been determined

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83

Colwood Park and Ride

Municipal Boundary

Ti ll

Bridge St Site

Juan de Fuca Recreation

Blans har

EAST SAANICH

David St Site

m

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Rd

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83

ch ni

m on dR

d

Esquimalt - Bullen Park

7 Plant Option

Bu

Ob ed

Av

e

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83

Municipal Boundary

sid e

Rd

E

View Royal

7 Plant Option

ESQUIMALT

Admirals R d

rn

DISTRICT OF SAANICH

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

CITY OF VICTORIA

VIEW ROYAL

Finlay Me 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 1

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPla

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Rudd Park

Municipal Boundary

W Rd id e

alt R

d

B

Esqu im

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information an inaccuracies.

ur ns

TOWNSHIP OF ESQUIMALT

Hw y H

el

m

nd

y

en

on St Lamp s

Isla

nada Hw

ck

Facility location within site has not been determined

Langford

Plant Option

Trans-Ca

Rd

TOWN OF VIEW ROYAL

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

LANGFORD

Go ld

st r

eam

CRD Sanitary Trunk

View Royal Burnside & Watkiss South

Municipal Boundary

A ve

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83

Bullen Park

CITY OF LANGFORD

Jac

klin

Rd

DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

Ve

ran te

or em sM

ia l

Pk

y

CITY OF COLWOOD

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

Langford at Meaford Ave Alternatives January – February 2016 CITIZENS’ GUIDE toVMP Wastewater

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Municipal Boundary

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

29


OPTION 5: PROPOSED SITE LOCATIONS VICTORIA • Victoria Public Works Yard, 417 Garbally Road, Victoria and/ or • Rock Bay / Port Ellice – near Pleasant, David and Turner Streets (owned privately) • or 2140 Store Street (owned by Transport Canada/ BC Hydro and Matullia)

COLWOOD • Juan de Fuca Recreation Centre, 1759 Island Highway, (publically owned) • or Colwood Park and Ride, Ocean Boulevard and Island Highway (publicly-owned)

EAST SAANICH – TBD SAANICH CORE • Rudd Park, 3528 Irma Street (publicly-owned)

ESQUIMALT • Bullen Field, 1140 Lyall Street (publicly-owned)

LANGFORD • Veteran’s Memorial Way (privately owned)

VIEW ROYAL • Burnside + Watkiss Way (BC Hydro-owned)

OUTFALLS: • Clover Point, Macaulay Point, Royal Bay

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

30


OPTION 5: KEY METRICS AND CONSIDERATIONS Estimated Capital Costs

$1.348 billion

Estimated Operating Costs by 2030

$26.6 million

Estimated Resource Income (heat, water) by 2030

Up to $4 million

Water Quality after Treatment for Core Area

45% tertiary for water reuse. 55% secondary

Estimated Length of New Pipes Required

86.7 km

Potential Number of Heat Recovery Systems

5

Potential Number of Water Re-use Systems

7

Carbon and Energy Footprint Rank

highest energy and carbon footprint overall

BENEFITS:

IMPLICATIONS:

• All flows meet or exceed regulations including 45% of all flows treated to tertiary levels – six of the seven plants will provide tertiary treatment.

• Six tertiary treatment plants coupled with a large secondary treatment plant at Rock Bay reflect the highest capital and operating costs.

• Distributed treatment maximizes water reuse potential with plants located in regional growth centers.

• Saanich Core and East Saanich plants require additional redundancy capacity through Rock Bay to avoid outfalls.

• Provides increased resilience and reduces the local footprint of each plant.

• Net present value for the 7 plant option is approximately 25% higher than for Option 1a. • Resource incomes are only slightly higher than the 4 plant due to lack of demand relative to supply.

For more detailed information, including a breakdown of costs and deeper technical analysis, please see the technical report: www.CoreAreaWastewater.ca CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

31


SOLIDS PROCESSING FOR THE CORE AREA This section looks at possible approaches to processing the solids that are left after wastewater treatment. We want to get your feedback on proposed sites and methods. What are wastewater solids? Wastewater solids are the solid materials left after wastewater is treated. The solids are separated and thickened during the treatment process. The liquid goes on to be treated separately and discharged into the ocean or reused.  Solids or residuals must be processed, offering a possibility to harness heat and other forms of energy. What do you need to know? • Our technical study has found that two accepted solids processing methods – gasification and anaerobic digestion – can produce energy that can be converted to electricity or other forms of usable energy.  • The overall capital and operating costs of anaerobic digestion and gasification were considered comparable in this technical study. The study also recommends the CRD canvass the market to determine the most cost-effective and environmentally-beneficially alternatives. These are possibilities, but not proposed options.  In order to gain meaningful public input, we are using these two solids-energy recovery options to demonstrate what technologies could be used to process solids on available sites.  1. Anaerobic digestion Anaerobic digestion breaks down and reduces sludge to produce biogas and biosolids. This process happens in a sealed, oxygen-free tank called an anaerobic digester. Depending on the system design, the resource recovered (biogas or biosolids) from this process can run a generator producing electricity and heat, be burned as a fuel in a boiler or furnace, or be cleaned and used as a natural gas replacement. What could a “digester” look like?

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

32


2. Gasification Gasification is a process that converts the solids into a synthetic gas that can be used as fuel to generate electricity. As this process requires high temperatures, it is critical that materials that feed the gasifier can maintain the high temperatures to get energy out of the process – they must be dry. This means adding other forms of solid waste or materials like food scraps and yard waste.  What could a “gasifier” look like?

TWO POSSIBLE SITES HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AS FEASIBLE FOR HOSTING SOLIDS PROCESSING: OptionBay: 1a,1b, 2, 3 & 4 Rock

Se lk

i rk

Tr e

st l e

Victoria - Rock Bay and Garbally Landing

Bridge St Site

Hillsid

Blansh

David St Site

e Av e

ard St

Pleasant St Site

g la Dou

Bay St

sS

Skinner St

e

Rd

r St B B ay

idge

CITY OF VICTORIA Store St Site

Government St

Catherine St

t

Ty e

CRD - Parks & Environmental Services - Environmental Engineering - Dec 1, 2015 - Technologist: SR/JPB - Map Document: CALWMCMediaPlantOptionsSites.mxd

CRD Sanitary Trunk

Pleasant St Site

David St Site

Bridge St Site

Store St Site

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

Metres 0 100 200 Projection: UTM ZONE 10N, NAD83 DISCLAIMER This map is for general information and may contain inaccuracies.

33


Hartland Landfill:

Regardless of the wastewater treatment option that is chosen, there will be a central location for solids treatment. For either of the two sites, solids will need to be moved to the site via truck or pipe. Key Considerations: • Hartland landfill already receives different solid wastes, which could help integrate solid waste into wastewater solids processing. This would help facilitate gasification. • Integrating waste at Rock Bay could increase land requirements. • Industrial land in Rock Bay is about five times more costly (per hectare) than land at Hartland Landfill. • Processing all wastewater solids at Rock Bay would eliminate trucking/pumping to Hartland Landfill. • Having wastewater solids treatment at Rock Bay would avoid conveyancing costs. • Excess energy from the landfill energy generation facility could be used to off-set operating costs. 

CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

34


CITIZENS’ GUIDE to Wastewater Alternatives January – February 2016

35

ONE PLANT Rock Bay Tertiary

$1.131 billion $26.4 million Up to $0.9 million 100% tertiary for some water re-use

ONE PLANT Rock Bay Secondary

$1.031 billion $21 million Up to $0.9 million 90% secondary, 10% tertiary for water re-use

CAPITAL COST

OPERATING COST

EST. ANNUAL INCOME

QUALITY OF WATER AFTER TREATMENT

80% secondary, 20% tertiary for water re-use

Up to $2.4 million

$22.8 million

$1.088 billion

Rock Bay & Colwood Secondary & Tertiary

TWO PLANT

90% secondary, 10% tertiary for water reuse, 100% secondary at Colwood

Up to $1.6 million

$23 million

$1.125 billion

Esquimalt Nation, Rock Bay & Colwood Secondary

THREE PLANT

100% tertiary at Colwood, 90% secondary at Rock Bay & Esquimalt Nation and 10% tertiary

Up to $3.8 million

$24 million

$1.1776 billion

Esquimalt Nation, Rock Bay & Colwood Tertiary

THREE PLANT

75% secondary, 25% tertiary for water reuse

Up to $3.8 million

$25.3 million

$1.195 billion

Esquimalt Nation, Rock Bay, Colwood & East Saanich

FOUR PLANT

55% secondary, 45% tertiary for water reuse

Up to $4 million

$26.6 million

$1.348 billion

Langford, Colwood, View Royal, Rock Bay, East Saanich, Saanich Core & Esquimalt

SEVEN PLANT

Profile for Capital Regional District

Citizens Guide Wastewater  

Citizens Guide Wastewater