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introduction

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CAPE TOWN PARTNERSHIP AN N UAL R E P O RT

2012

COLLABORATION FOR URBAN TRANSFORMATION

financials

che e ri n g


premier business lo cat io n

introduction

r ow in g

quality urban environment

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financials

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CONTENTS

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CONTENTS AN INTRODUCTION TO THE CAPE TOWN PARTNERSHIP WHY COLLABORATION?

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MAKING COLLABORATION VISIBLE TO THE HUMAN EYE: A GUIDE TO THIS REPORT

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TIME AND TRUST: THE POWER OF LONG-STANDING RELATIONSHIPS: A REPORT FROM OUR MANAGING DIRECTOR BULELWA MAKALIMA-NGEWANA

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CITIES AND CROSS-SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS: THE IMPORTANCE OF THE SPACES IN BETWEEN: A STATEMENT FROM OUR CHIEF EXECUTIVE ANDREW BORAINE STORYTELLING FOR SOCIAL COHESION: TRANSFORMING THE CITY THROUGH CONVERSATION AND COLLABORATION: A MESSAGE FROM OUR CHAIRPERSON NJABULO NDEBELE

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INTRODUCING THE CENTRAL CITY DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY

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CULTIVATING CAPE TOWN AS A PREMIER BUSINESS LOCATION CREATING A QUALITY URBAN ENVIRONMENT IN CAPE TOWN

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SUSTAINING THE CENTRAL CITY AS A POPULAR DESTINATION GROWING CAPE TOWN AS A KNOWLEDGE HUB CONNECTING THE CENTRAL CITY AS THE CROSSROADS OF CAPE TOWN

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FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

PHOTOGRAPHERS Anita van Zyl, Bruce Sutherland, Caroline Jordan, Jacques Marais, Justin Patrick, Lisa Burnell, Sarah Scott, Shaen Adey, Sydelle Willow Smith

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premier business lo cat io n

introduction

r ow in g

quality urban environment

po p u l ar d e st i n at io n

ste e ri ng

k n o w l e d g e h u b

crossroads

coachi ng

financials

c h e e ri n g

CONTENTS

ROWING

Leading and implementing projects in a much more hands-on manner

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THE CCID: SETTING THE STAGE FOR BUSINESS IN THE CENTRAL CITY THE ECONOMIC POWER OF CREATIVITY

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HOW CLUSTERING IS CREATING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY IN THE FRINGE A UNIQUE CROSS-SECTOR PARTNERSHIP

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REIMAGINING HARRINGTON SQUARE IN THE FRINGE DISTRICT

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THE SPIRIT OF COLLABORATION: WHAT DRIVES WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL 2014 INTER-CITY EXCHANGE: LESSONS IN PUBLIC SPACE FROM TIMES SQUARE

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OPENING UP THE CITY THROUGH CREATIVITY DESIGN STORMING: COLLECTIVE SOLUTIONS TO COMMON PROBLEMS

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OPENING UP CITY HALL WITH SOUND

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CONNECTING THE CITY WITH STORIES CREATING A MORE CARING, INCLUSIVE CAPE TOWN

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introduction

premier business lo cat io n

r ow in g

quality urban environment

ste e ri ng

po p u l ar d e st i n at io n

k n o w l e d g e h u b

crossroads

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CONTENTS

STEERING

Facilitating key conversations and giving guidance, leadership and strategic direction

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CONNECTING ECONOMIC NODES AND DIVERSE SOCIAL STAKEHOLDERS IN HOUT BAY REIMAGINING HARRINGTON SQUARE IN THE FRINGE DISTRICT

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THE SPIRIT OF COLLABORATION: WHAT DRIVES WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL 2014 CREATING A 24-HOUR CITY

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GREENING CAPE TOWN’S EVENTS SCENE TAKING THE PULSE OF THE CITY: THE STATE OF CAPE TOWN CENTRAL CITY REPORT THE FRINGE: A KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE FOR ENTREPRENEURS

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CREATING A MORE CARING, INCLUSIVE CAPE TOWN

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introduction

premier business lo cat io n

r ow in g

quality urban environment

po p u l ar d e st i n at io n

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CONTENTS

COACHING Sharing our experience in partnerships and collaboration

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THE EDP: BUILDING EFFECTIVE PARTNERSHIPS FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH THE ECONOMIC POWER OF CREATIVITY

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HOW CLUSTERING IS CREATING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY IN THE FRINGE THE SAFETY LAB: A PARTNERSHIP IN PROGRESS

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CHANGING THE FACE OF CAPE TOWN THROUGH URBAN DENSIFICATION

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introduction

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quality urban environment

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CONTENTS

CHEERING Offering support, encouragement and networking opportunities

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THE EDP: BUILDING EFFECTIVE PARTNERSHIPS FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH

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THE ECONOMIC POWER OF CREATIVITY HOW CLUSTERING IS CREATING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY IN THE FRINGE

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THE SAFETY LAB: A PARTNERSHIP IN PROGRESS

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CHANGING THE FACE OF CAPE TOWN THROUGH URBAN DENSIFICATION WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO MAKE OUR CENTRAL CITY CLEAN, SAFE AND CARING? THE SPIRIT OF COLLABORATION: WHAT DRIVES WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL 2014

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GREENING CAPE TOWN’S EVENTS SCENE R690-MILLION EXTENSION FOR THE CTICC

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DESIGN STORMING: COLLECTIVE SOLUTIONS TO COMMON PROBLEMS TAKING THE PULSE OF THE CITY: THE STATE OF CAPE TOWN CENTRAL CITY REPORT THE EDP AS A KNOWLEDGE-SHARING CENTRE

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CREATING A MORE CARING, INCLUSIVE CAPE TOWN

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MISSION

WHAT WE DO We strive to realise the vision of Cape Town as a sustainable, inclusive and vibrantly liveable city. Formed in 1999 as a unique collaboration between the public and private sectors, we are an independent, non-profit development facilitation agency that encourages urban regeneration, mobilises relevant stakeholders and forges strong cross-sector partnerships with the aim of promoting Cape Town as a leading centre for commercial, residential, cultural, tourism, educational and leisure activities. In addition, Cape Town Partnership acts as an incubator for a wide range of advocacydriven programmes, offering strategic support to similarly partnership-minded organisations, projects and programmes.

Our core programmes include: • Creative Cape Town, which communicates, supports and facilitates the development of the creative and knowledge economy in the Central City of Cape Town; • City Hall Sessions, which works to rejuvenate a key strategic asset within the Central City, Cape Town City Hall, through the hosting of diverse sound experiments appealing to the full spectrum of Cape Town residents; and • The Fringe, which facilitates and develops the east city as a design, technology and innovation district with the aim of stimulating economic growth in the area. Incubated programmes include: • The Economic Development Partnership, which aims to create effective partnerships for inclusive economic growth in the Western Cape • The Safety Lab, a cross-sector; partnership hosted by the Cape Town Partnership with the aim of designing projects that reduce the opportunity for crime in the Western Cape; • World Design Capital 2014, an independent company currently being founded to oversee the planning, coordination and rollout of Cape Town’s World Design Capital 2014 designation; and • The Hout Bay Partnership, a crosssector organisation looking to foster integrated social and economic development in Hout Bay.

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W H Y C O L L A B O R AT I O N

WHAT DRIVES THE CITY WHAT GIVES IT LIFE? AND MAKES IT MOVE? WHAT MAKES IT WORK? These are questions we grapple with every day at the Cape Town Partnership. And what we’ve come to realise over more than 12 years of operating is that, more than infrastructure, the built environment or a skyline, the city comes to life every day because of its people – people coming together in a common space to live, to work, to learn, to play. What makes a city work is the ability of those people to share resources, ideas, information. To collaborate. So how do we foster the kind of collaboration that can see our city into a more sustainable, inclusive future? How do we come together as an urban community to help solve some of our city’s most intractable problems?

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Quite simply, we need to give the people of Cape Town space, time and a sense of common purpose. To collaborate, people need safe spaces – spaces in which they can share their ideas, their challenges, their hopes for the future without fear, and so co-create solutions. They also need time: collaboration is about the process, not the destination. It’s the means by which we bridge the space between you and me, us and them, past and present, haves and have nots, town and township. We need time if we’re going to evolve, to remain flexible, to be perpetually relevant to the most pressing issues of our time and place. Finally, we need a common purpose: collaboration is a journey towards understanding, towards common ground. And as with all journeys, it’s better to have a map. Join us on this journey, as we celebrate the time taken over the last year to foster trust and build relationships, the space given and taken to sharing our common problems and co-creating their solutions, and the sense of purpose that drives us to do it.

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N AV I G AT I O N

N AV I G AT I O N

HOW CAN YOU MAKE

COLLABORATION VISIBLE TO THE HUMAN EYE?

How do you demonstrate the power of long-term relationships in an environment too often driven by and dependent on short-term outcomes? It’s a challenge with which we’re regularly faced at the Cape Town Partnership: as a non-profit organisation, we don’t own property and we don’t sell goods. If there’s anything we do sell, it’s the power of partnerships to create urban change. So how do we demonstrate our value if it’s in many ways invisible? How do we document our achievements over the last year if they’re in many ways shared successes, co-owned with our partners? For the layout of this particular annual report, we’ve taken our inspiration from nature, and one of its organising principles: the hexagon. Nature follows the path of least resistance, choosing forms that are economical, using the least amount

of energy and materials necessary. In times of large-scale urbanisation, growing populations and scarce resources, cities are increasingly under pressure to be socially, economically and environmentally sustainable – and are turning to nature’s solutions for inspiration. According to AskNature, the world’s first digital library of nature’s solutions, “three-way junctions of 120° angles occur quite widely in nature, being the most economical angle for joining things together.” Cape Town, a city historically divided by apartheid but trying to reposition and remake itself as an inclusive city for the future, needs collaboration and partnerships – natural organising principles that help bring people together, allowing for contrast and juxtaposition, while still allowing for fit. Just as the honeybee, with few resources and labour, creates a lightweight yet extraordinarily

strong space-frame for the whole hive, so we at the Cape Town Partnership continue to work at creating spaces that bring people together and can endure robust debate and difference, with a view to shaping a sustainable space and a secure urban future for Cape Town. True to the natural form, then, this annual report has to be read as a living document: it highlights a cross-section of conversations and collaborations, projects and programmes that are representative of our successes over the last year, but given the networked nature of partnerships and the breadth and scope of our work, we have had to be selective around what to profile. Consider this document not just a report on the year that has gone, but also a framework for the year that is to come, the work to which we have committed ourselves, and the journey which we’d like to walk with you.

NAVIGATING THIS REPORT

As a collaborative intermediary organisation – one that operates in the space in between, bringing diverse sets of people together in this space – we see our role as four-fold. As you navigate your way through this annual report you will notice that we have mapped our four roles using the following icons:

ROWING Leading and implementing projects in a much more hands-on manner

STEERING Facilitating key conversations and giving guidance, leadership and strategic direction

COACHING Sharing our experience in partnerships and collaboration

CHEERING Offering support, encouragement and networking opportunities

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In addition, this report is divided into the following sections:

Premier business location

Quality urban environment

Popular destination

Knowledge hub

Crossroads

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world that have weathered tough times well, it becomes clear that the common denominator is cross-sector partnerships formed around a common vision and clear goals. That’s why collaboration plays a central role in everything we do at the Cape Town Partnership. In a very real sense, it is the reason for our existence. It’s what brought us into being in 1999, and what continues to make our work relevant, not only in Cape Town today but also in what is globally an increasingly urbanised world. We are only as strong as the support we get from our partners – relationships that are built with time and trust. Perhaps one of the best examples of this kind of partnership at work is our longstanding relationship with the Central

City Improvement District. Now in its 13th year, this relationship maximises the strategic role of the Cape Town Partnership and the operational focus of the Central City Improvement District to great effect, firmly pairing vision and action. It is largely the reason that Cape Town’s Central City is now recognised as one of the safest, cleanest and most caring CBDs in South Africa. It is on this firm foundation that our expanding role as a collaborative intermediary organisation is based: our experience in the power of collaboration to drive urban transformation, gained in the Central City, forms the basis for our evolution. Having established our core mandate to promote and develop Cape Town’s Central City, the Cape Town

Looking at cities around the world that have weathered tough times well, it becomes clear that the common denominator is cross-sector partnerships formed around a common vision and clear goals.

Commuters at a MyCiTi station. Cape Town now boasts a vastly improved public bus transportation system.

TIME AND TRUST THE POWER OF LONG-STANDING RELATIONSHIPS

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MESSAGE FROM OUR MANAGING DIRECTOR BULELWA MAKALIMANGEWANA Cities are for people. They are socially cohesive spaces which attract people looking for opportunities, and for them to be truly liveable, the quality of life afforded to these people should be given utmost priority. But ensuring an acceptable quality of life for a great number of people with a great quantity and variety of needs isn’t easy. What I’ve learnt through my work at the Cape Town Partnership is that no one organisation alone can hope to cater to all these needs successfully, rather, it takes symbiotic collaborative partnerships working in tandem. Looking at cities around the

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I NTR OD U CTI ON Cape Town by night. The Central City is now thought of as an attractive place to work, live and play. Below: The Cape Town International Jazz Festival attracts 35 000 people annually.

We are only as strong as the support we get from our partners – relationships that are built with time and trust.

Partnership is currently broadening its focus to include a wider socio-economic role, acting as an incubator for new projects, programmes and partnershipminded organisations who don’t necessarily operate in our core area. Our focus spans programmatic divides – from economic development to grassroots community activation – as well as geographic divides, starting in the Central City, and extending to include the Table Bay district with a strong influence over the wider metro area and some parts of the Western Cape. It’s in this context that I must thank the members of the board for their patience, trust, and willingness to steer the organisation into new terrain. Moving

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beyond the Central City comes with a certain level of risk, and yet it is a risk we cannot afford not to take. For Cape Town to be sustainable, the Central City cannot be seen out of context of the metro and its future. It is unacceptable to have an island of prosperity within a sea of poverty. Assuring Cape Town’s urban future demands brave decisions and bold action, and our board has demonstrated a remarkable understanding of and appetite for the kind of change that Cape Town needs. Their wisdom and experience in helping steer our course safely is invaluable. It is with a deep sense of gratitude that we thank Kevin Roman for his 13 years of service on our board, four of which

he served as our chairman. Kevin has always been a great source of inspiration, both as a leader and as a passionate advocate for Cape Town’s future. Kevin, we wish you well in what lies ahead. Joining us in the capacity of our new chairperson is Professor Njabulo Ndebele, and I know I speak on behalf of both Cape Town Partnership staff and partners in welcoming Professor Ndebele to our organisation. He brings with him a formidable reputation as a leader, a teacher, a thinker and a communicator, and we are very excited about working with him in the future. In addition, we are very fortunate to have six new board members joining us, each of whom brings a wealth of knowledge to bear on the work of the Cape Town Partnership. I’d like to thank our partners in general for their trust and support, and more

specifically our funding partners – namely the City of Cape Town, whose financial support allows us to operate and continue doing the work we do, as well as the Western Cape Government, whose project funding has allowed us to expand our mandate and incubate projects such as the Western Cape Economic Development Partnership, The Fringe, Hout Bay Partnership and The Safety Lab. Finally, I would like to emphasise that none of our achievements would have been possible without the passion, dedication and hard work of the Cape Town Partnership team. They are the foundation of our relationships, our partnerships, the basis of all collaborations that take place. It has been a privilege to work with such a motivated and knowledgeable group of people, and I know that, as long as we continue to

invest in our people, we at the Cape Town Partnership will continue to see the kind of success that will move Cape Town into a more sustainable and inclusive future. We strive to be an employer of choice. Cities are for people. And it’s the passion and dedication of people – people at the Cape Town Partnership, on our board, at our gatherings, in our partner organisations – and their willingness to share experiences, resources, ideas and information over time that ultimately advances the goals and vision of the Central City Development Strategy.

BULELWA MAKALIMA-NGEWANA

The Cape Town Partnership is currently broadening its focus to include a wider socio-economic role, acting as an incubator for new projects, programmes and partnership-minded organisations.

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We’ve learned that partnerships work best when the partners involved enjoy shared values.

CITIES AND CROSS-SECTOR PARTNERSHIPS THE IMPORTANCE OF THE SPACES IN BETWEEN

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A STATEMENT FROM OUR CHIEF EXECUTIVE ANDREW BORAINE

For partnerships to flourish, they must deliberately create space: space in which partners can connect, collaborate, experiment and create solutions. Cities and partnerships mirror each other in two important ways: both require people to function and both are by their nature inherently collaborative. Unlike private spaces at home or in the work place, the public spaces of a city do not belong to any one group of people. Public space is the place where we can engage with a wide variety of people, drawn from an array of different backgrounds. If the

public space of a city is not safe or well located, it will not be used. Likewise, if public space is fenced off or privatised it will become inaccessible. If, however, public space is welcoming and inclusive, it can become a powerful agent for change in our cities, fostering social cohesion and civic understanding by allowing us the freedom to meet, mix and mingle with our fellow citizens. Partnerships are much the same. To work well, partnerships need to create spaces that are both safe and accessible to a wide range of people and interests. When a safe space is provided for partners to collaborate, the results can be very powerful – this space ‘in between’ can encourage the freedom to

experiment, innovate and discover new ways of thinking and doing, all of which are necessary to implement the vision of a new society. During the past year, the Cape Town Partnership has grown into a truly multi-disciplinary organisation, one that is home to an array of initiatives and partnerships working across an ever-widening variety of fields, from economic development to innovative safety solutions and transformative design. We’ve also seen the expansion of our training, coaching and knowledge transfer roles: Cape Town Partnership is now recognised as an incubator of collaborative intermediary organisations and a centre for sharing knowledge. Although urban management and development in the Cape Town Central City – where we started in 1999 – will always be central to what we do, we are now also a resource agency for partnerships in other parts of the city, province and country.

We’ve learned that people are central to the success of any partnership – and not just people, but the ‘right’ people. By that we mean those who have the capabilities of collaborative leadership – people who are able to see the big picture, who can translate different perspectives, who are able to motivate and inspire others to attain common goals. We’ve learned that partnerships work best when the partners involved enjoy shared values. This is not to say that partners need always to agree, in fact differences of opinion and even a degree of conflict can be beneficial since this often sparks creative solutions. However, it is essential for partners to commit to a common sense of purpose or a shared goal. We’ve also learned to move beyond the traditional model of bargaining for trade-offs, based on the assumption that others’ interests create obstacles to pursuing one’s goals. More effective is when partners are able to ‘leave their

Cape Town skyline by night. The Central City is increasingly a 24-hour city.

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I firmly believe that if we continue to work together, as people, partners and players in society, we can achieve our vision of making Cape Town a liveable, sustainable and accessible city for all. Left: The Company’s Garden, an example of an accessible public space. Opposite page: The Foreshore is the site of a number of new property developments. Above: City Hall and the Grand Parade, both important heritage spaces in the Central City.

jackets at the door’. Being able to shrug off institutional or historical identities frees partners to enter into real dialogue and joint action. We’ve recognised that to be effective, partnerships need to be based on mutual accountability, where partners take equal responsibility for implementation, in order to avoid ‘paper’ visions that are never realised. The ability to translate good ideas into joint action is something that we constantly focus on. We’ve learned how important it is to harness the mandates of partners, rather than try and substitute them. It is helpful to have a clear division of labour so as to avoid the mistake of competing and overlapping mandates. In our experience it is far more effective to identify the strengths of partners and help them to deliver on their own mandates. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all our partners, board members and networks for the support they have shown in allowing us the space to experiment and evolve as an organisation, and for their unwavering belief in the values that underpin the work of the Cape Town Partnership and

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all the other projects here: the Western Cape Economic Development Partnership, Urban Age Network, Creative Cape Town, World Design Capital, The Fringe, CCID, Central City Development Strategy, Safety Hub, City Hall Sessions. I firmly believe that if we continue to work together, as people, partners and players in society, we can achieve our vision of making Cape Town a liveable, sustainable and accessible city for all.

In our experience it is far more effective to identify the strengths of partners and help them to deliver on their own mandates.

ANDREW BORAINE

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Below: A view towards the Cape Flats. The historical divides of apartheid are now being redressed.

STORYTELLING FOR SOCIAL COHESION TRANSFORMING THE CITY THROUGH CONVERSATION AND COLLABORATION

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A MESSAGE FROM OUR CHAIRPERSON PROFESSOR NJABULO NDEBELE

Stories are powerful things. They are the means by which we understand the world around us and our place in it. As a storyteller, I appreciate how a good story can open up space for conversation as well as help bridge the divides of time and space, history and infrastructure. Stories project honesty, and when you work with honesty you are likely to achieve the best results. Stories can become powerful agents of change in society, by

encouraging empathy and understanding between people and fostering a sense of shared identity and common purpose. Cape Town is a place of infinite stories. There are as many stories in our city as there are people and communities. Too often, however, we tell one story of Cape Town: a tale of two cities, where a glittering city of first-world infrastructure and beautiful natural landscapes stands in stark contrast to a place of unrelenting poverty and deprivation. Yes, our city is riven by the divisions of history and infrastructure, but I would like to suggest that if there is one thing that

defines our sense of being indigenous as South Africans, it is our multicultural connections reaching out towards a cohesive identity. If we are to move beyond being a city and a people divided by apartheid, then we have to learn to tell our many stories and celebrate our multiplicity, for we all carry one another inside of us. As we make our city, so we make our communities: The fates of both are inseparable, connected to each other in a continuous experience of mutuality. I look forward to a time when more people who come into the city are able to see something of themselves in it – from

those living in the CBD, to those living further afield in our city and our country, and those coming from the African continent and the world. There should be space for all of us in the human fabric of the quilt that the Western Cape is putting together. Achieving this is a tremendous challenge, but also a gift that the city can give. In 10 years’ time, I hope to see a Cape Town that is a very diverse yet integrated city. I hope to see a city where previously excluded groups become central in contributing to the decisionmaking, leadership and aspirations of Cape Town.

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This is where the work of the Cape Town Partnership is so vital. In its inherently collaborative approach lies the recognition that there is no room for isolation in today’s world of integration and interconnectedness. Cape Town’s CBD is no island, but is fundamentally connected to the lives and livelihoods of surrounding communities – and vice versa. Successful urban partnerships, like good stories, allow space for divergent views and multiple voices, and the recognition that, even in our difference, there is common ground on which we can forge a sense of common purpose. It is my privilege to assume the role of chairperson to the board of such an organisation. I hope that I can bring to the Cape Town Partnership my experience in how easy it is to integrate with different people. I grew up in a township on the

Below: Many of Cape Town’s citizens travel vast distances to work or study in the Central City. Right: The Cape Town Partnership strives to realise the vision of Cape Town as a liveable city within the Western Cape and South Africa.

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East Rand, speaking several languages, surrounded by a diversity of people and cultures, and in proximity to different classes. This kind of experience gives one a tremendous sense of social flexibility. I would also like to take this opportunity to welcome the new board members – Amelia Jones, CEO of the Community Chest of the Western Cape; Leila Mahomed Weideman, director of Genesis Eco-Energy; Ralph Hamann, research director and associate professor as the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business; Refqah Fataar Ho-Yee, director of Smith Tabata Buchanan Boyes Attorneys; Hanns Bohle, vice-president of the Cape Chamber of Commerce; and Thabo Mashologu, who is managing director of Msingi Construction Project Management. Individually and collectively, they bring with them a great diversity of experience and a wealth of knowledge. Together with the board as a whole, I hope that we can continue to have honest and robust conversations

around Cape Town’s future, exemplified by a willingness to hear each other’s views in a manner that encourages tolerance and mutual respect. These are soft things, but we couldn’t do without them. In fact, soft is just a metaphor for things that we can’t see. Actually, those things become quite hard when you have to live without them. By having these sorts of robust conversations, and fostering spaces in which honesty and mutual respect is paramount, we can start to shape a different story and future for Cape Town – let’s make it rich in community, humanity and mutual understanding.

I hope that we can continue to have honest and robust conversations around Cape Town’s future, exemplified by a willingness to hear each other’s views in a manner that encourages tolerance and mutual respect.

NJABULO NDEBELE

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Because spatial logics vary depending on the outcome or programme being pursued, the CCDS has adapted fluid definitions for the central city boundaries. Narrowly defined, the central city consists of the central business district (CBD) and the property owners who are part of the Central City Improvement District (CCID). The functional central city economic region defines the economic character of the central city. Initially, the Central City Development Strategy

was applied to this region. Casting the net wider, the residential central city is anything within a ten kilometre radius of the CBD. This area is closely aligned with the Table Bay planning district (a City of Cape Town district). This is the broadest definition of the central city. It includes the Atlantic Seaboard from Camps Bay to the Foreshore, the CBD, the East City to Observatory, Milnerton, Pinelands, Maitland, Epping, Acacia Park, Thornton and Langa.

Timeline of geographic focus & operational mandates: 1999-2008: CBD CCID boundaries 2008-2011: Central City economic region CBD, Foreshore, Green Point, East City, Woodstock 2011-2018: Table Bay District Camps Bay to Foreshore, CBD, East City to Observatory, Salt River, Pinelands, Milnerton, Maitland, Epping, Acacia Park, Thornton, Langa

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THE FUTURE OF CAPE TOWN A COLLECTIVE VISION FOR

“In the next ten years, the Cape Town Central City will grow and greatly enhance its reputation as a dynamic business and people centre.” A shared vision for Cape Town’s Central City was borne out of a collaboration between the City of Cape Town and the Cape Town Partnership in 2008, when we joined forces to create a workable plan for our urban future – one that set out a clear development path for the Central City until 2018, connected to measurable outcomes. Out of a series of interactive workshops, held city-wide and including participants from all sectors of the economy, local government and the private sector, the Central City Development Strategy (CCDS) emerged. Its five key outcomes were to transform the Central City into a premier business location; a high quality sustainable urban environment; a popular destination for Capetonians and visitors; a leading centre for knowledge, innovation, creativity and culture in Africa and the South; and a crossroads that connects Capetonians to each other and to the rest of the city. In this, the fifth year of this 10-year strategy, we have also been instrumental

in coordinating the Central City Development Review, an important opportunity for all those involved to pause and reflect on the progress that has been so far and the challenges that remain. At the Cape Town Partnership we recognise the vital role of the Central City to the future of Cape Town as a whole and we look forward to the next five years as a chance to further the goals of the CCDS, while also using the lessons learned in the Central City to facilitate positive change in the wider metro-region of Cape Town and the Western Cape. Join us now as we look back at the work of the Cape Town Partnership and celebrate the central role that collaboration has played in helping us achieve our goals over the past year.

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Portside, one of the Central City’s newest property developments, currently under construction.

by Cape Town Partnership CE Andrew Boraine, the EDP was officially launched on Thursday 26 April at Cape Town Film Studios – an event attended by over 250 people and multiple economic stakeholder representatives. Since this launch, the EDP’s board has been nominated and selected, and will be chaired by former Minister of Health and Minister of Public Enterprises Barbara Hogan. Appointed board members include: Ashoek Adhikari (Media 24 General Counsel of Regulatory and Corporate Affairs); Blum Khan (Metropolitan Health CEO); Carli Bunding-Venter (George Municipality Economic Development Manager); Dhiresh Ramklass (National Treasury Capital Projects Advisor); Jenny Cargill (investment expert and special advisor on the green economy to the department of the Premier of the Western Cape); Professor Julian May (Director for the Institute for Social Development at the University of the Western Cape); Kashif Wicomb (Psiclone Renewable

CULTIVATING CAPE TOWN AS A PREMIER

BUSINESS LOCATION

Over the past decade we have worked hard to create the necessary conditions for private investment and economic growth within the framework of public policy in the Central City. Now more than ever we understand the need for an inclusive and collaborative approach to economic development in Cape Town and the Western Cape. Cape Town Station, a hub of transport in the Central City.

THE EDP: BUILDING EFFECTIVE PARTNERSHIPS FOR INCLUSIVE GROWTH Between 2001 and 2010, the real economy of the Western Cape expanded by close to 45%, while the regional workforce grew by only about 16%. There are roughly 56 000 people in the province without work. Twothirds of these are young people. It’s in this context that the Western Cape Economic Development Partnership (EDP) was formed. “We’re trying to create

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and do something different because the economy of the world is demanding that we do something different,” says Western Cape MEC for Finance, Economic Development and Tourism Alan Winde. “We can’t sit indefinitely with the problem of 22% unemployment because otherwise we run risks in this country of not having a stable economy.” Conceived around the idea of building effective partnerships for inclusive growth, founded on the principle of collaborative leadership, and convened

Energy Solutions Director); Pieter Lodder (Klein Karoo Agri-Business Centre General Manager); Vuyiseka Dubula (Treatment Action Campaign Secretary General); and Xoliswa Daku (CEO of property investment, development and management company DCI Holdings). “The EDP’s first board represents the exciting diversity of experience of each member. By embracing this diversity we acknowledge that the critical element in the success of the EDP will be the building of collaborative relationships that cut across many fault lines. The EDP is an innovative organisation beyond politics: it’s about good people coming together to do good work and make a real difference to the economic future of the Western Cape and to the country as a whole,” said Barbara Hogan at the board announcement. An independent, non-partisan organisation to be held accountable by its members, the EDP already has well over 130 organisations interested in becoming fully fledged members – including public entities; business, industry and professional organisations; knowledge, research and policy institutes; civil society; those involved as economic development promotion and intermediary support organisations; and trade unions.

SNAPSHOT OF THE EDP IN 2011/2012 • Over 130 organisations interested in working together. • 11 board members appointed, with Barbara Hogan as chairperson. • A long-term economic development strategy formulated for both metro and province, under the title One Cape 2040. • A competitiveness index to measure and improve the Western Cape’s business and investment climate currently in development. • A National Jobs Fund application submitted for a project that would create 10 000 work opportunities in support of 414 of the province’s poorest schools. • Funding secured for an executive leadership programme focused on the economy, for economic leaders from the Western Cape, Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal, in collaboration with National Treasury.

www.wcedp.co.za

ONE CAPE 2040 The Western Cape’s 2040 vision: to create a resilient, inclusive and competitive region with higher rates of employment, producing growing incomes, greater equality and an improved quality of life. One Cape 2040 articulates a vision about how we, the people of the Western Cape, can work together to develop our economy and our society. It seeks to set a common direction to guide planning and action and to promote a common commitment and accountability to sustained longterm progress. It is not a statutory plan of government. Nor does it replace any

existing statutory plans required of either province or municipalities. It is rather intended as a reference point and guide for all stakeholders in order to: • Promote fresh thinking and critical engagement on the future. • Provide a common agenda for private, public and civil society collaboration. • Help align government action and investment decisions. • Facilitate the necessary changes we need to make to adapt to our (rapidly) changing local and global context. • Address our development, sustainability, inclusion and competitiveness imperatives.

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THE ECONOMIC POWER OF CREATIVITY Did you know over 600 creative businesses operate in the CBD every day? That’s half of the City Bowl’s 1 200 creative firms and encompasses everything from design studios to film makers, architects to crafters and all the economic entities that support them. This sector of the local economy is one of the fastest growing, offering great potential for sustainable economic growth and job creation. In fact, creative industries have now been recognised by UNESCO as one of the key areas of growth in global trade. Both the City of Cape Town and the Western Cape Government’s department of economic development and tourism have created initiatives to support and encourage the growth of the local creative industries. In addition, Cape Town Partnership-based programme Creative Cape Town works to communicate, support and develop the creative economy in the Central City through a range of innovative events, publications and projects. www.creativecapetown.net Performers use the city as a stage as part of 2011 Infecting the City festival.

THE CCID: SETTING THE STAGE FOR BUSINESS IN THE CENTRAL CITY Newspapers might continue to talk of a global recession and empty office space, but cranes on the Central City skyline tell a different story. At 32 floors and 142 metres (including roof structures), Cape Town’s tallest building, Portside, represents a R1.6-billion investment. while the development of Bowman Gilfillan offices at 22 Bree is bringing in another R360-million. Add to that the R12-million development at 107 Bree Street, which, once completed, will offer retail and mixed-use space on Bree Street, as well as the coming R690-million

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CTICC expansion, and numerous small food outlets opening in close quarters, and you have a vibrant business centre that is weathering a global recession well. “The scale and scope of recent and upcoming investments in the Central City tell the story of a place that is truly open for business. With major corporate construction developments, many of the area’s old buildings are being refurbished and we are seeing new food outlets opening in response to the uptick in development. These are all positive indicators of a healthy economy within Cape Town,” says Central City Improvement District Chairman Rob Kane. What does Cape Town’s business climate have to do with a clean and caring urban environment, you might ask? “CCID’s services support and augment

the City of Cape Town’s safety and cleaning efforts in the Central City, ensuring that the environment is well managed, that social development issues are addressed and that the area is promoted as a leading business destination. All of this means that new businesses coming into the area can be confident that they will be operating in a quality environment in the heart of the CBD, day and night,” Rob Kane emphasises. In the last year alone, the CCID has removed an average of 35 tons of waste (of which 70% is recycled), completed 155 road repairs and issued approximately R350 000 in fines every month. To date, the CCID, through the contributions of its members, has added R290-million to the Central City economy since 2000.

HOW CLUSTERING IS CREATING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY IN THE FRINGE Clustering, or proximity to other similar organisations, has been shown to foster better economic outcomes for smaller organisations, particularly in the creative industries. The reasons for this are diverse: co-locating companies working within complementary fields allows for the sharing of knowledge between individuals, the better leveraging of common customer databases and the shared use of local resources and infrastructure. It’s this clustering effect and its economic spin-offs on which The Fringe – Cape Town’s up-and-coming design and innovation district in the east city – is looking to capitalise. According to The Fringe project coordinator Yehuda Raff, the economic

pay-off of collaboration is often overlooked: “Many people wouldn’t see collaboration as an economic driver, but it’s how the creative industries can turbo-charge their growth. It’s time to make use of collective resources, common goals and shared space.” An economic impact study, prepared by Barry Standish, Antony Boting and Brian Swing of Economics Information Services on behalf of The Fringe and completed in late 2011, has shown that the area has the potential to contribute 3 500 jobs and over R1-billion to the economy of Cape Town over the next 20 years. Ralph Baumgarten, head of social entrepreneurship incubator Brightest Young Minds and a business resident, sees The Fringe as an entire district dedicated to the power of collaboration: “The physical incubation area of The Fringe, drawing creative talent from across the sector, encourages collaboration simply through proximity, and this fast-tracks the innovation process. It’s a globally tried and tested model.”

HOW COMMUNICATION DRIVES INNOVATION The Fringe, in partnership with the City of Cape Town’s telecoms department and MTN, was part of facilitating free high-speed wireless in City Hall for a week in September 2012, when the Loeries, South Africa’s top advertising awards, were in town. Why? Because communication is vital to innovation, and this was an opportunity to show what broadband as a conduit for effective communication can do for local business. This pilot project is an excellent example of how a demand-led collaboration between the City of Cape Town and the private sector can convert one of the more obviously historic, heritage-protected buildings in the city into a world class, fibre-optic connected event and public use space.

CONNECTING ECONOMIC NODES AND DIVERSE SOCIAL STAKEHOLDERS IN HOUT BAY Hout Bay – despite being in many ways a divided community, with many development challenges – is also home to a diverse set of players with an enormous amount of goodwill and drive to turn their community around.

There are examples of strong leadership within sectors like business and within grassroots organisations, but the challenge remains how to get these initiatives working together. What is needed is to harness the reservoir of talent and resources within Hout Bay to development outcomes that are in everybody’s interest: job creation and an enabling economic environment, greater quality of life through social

Above: A MyCiTi station on Riebeeck Street under construction.

Clustering, or proximity to other similar organisations, has been shown to foster better economic outcomes for smaller organisations, particularly in the creative industries.

cohesion, improved educational outcomes, and a better built and natural environment. It’s in this context that the Cape Town Partnership, with seed funding from the Western Cape Government, will be incubating the Hout Bay Partnership – an organisation we have supported and coached over the years – bringing our experience in collaboration for urban transformation to bear.

www.capetownccid.co.za

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THE SAFETY LAB: A PARTNERSHIP IN PROGRESS

CREATING A

QUALITY URBAN ENVIRONMENT IN CAPE TOWN

The Central City is now home to a thriving cafe culture.

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Today, Cape Town is recognised as having one of the cleanest and safest city centres in South Africa – but it wasn’t always that way. The Central City’s transformation from a place afflicted by crime, grime and capital flight to a destination that people and the private sector wanted to be is in no small part an example of the power of collaboration to create urban change. It’s this experience in partnerships, gained over the last 13 years, that we’re drawing on when incubating other urban-minded initiatives.

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The Safety Lab is one of the newest initiatives incubated within the Cape Town Partnership. It’s an “ideas lab” that aims to deliver effective, innovative and streetready approaches to safety and security. Although the Lab is already exploring a wide range of ideas, it has a common objective: reducing opportunity for crime in the Western Cape. An experimental testing place with no pre-conceived notions of outcomes or fear of failure, the Lab is establishing its approach to identify, develop, evaluate, modify and test ideas. Through its inquiry and experimentation it aims to ask and answer heretical and unorthodox questions to challenge the status quo, constructively. At its core, the Lab is an independent, cross-sector partnership, incubated by the Cape Town Partnership with seed funding by the Western Cape Government’s Department of Community Safety, and supported by the University of Cape Town’s Centre of Criminology.

It is a powerful example of the opportunities created when a variety of stakeholders, drawn from a diverse range of fields, come together in pursuit of a solution to a common challenge. In the words of Colin Douglas, one of the founding facilitators of the project, the establishment of the Lab is part of a “whole of society” approach to improve safety and reduce crime: “This approach recognises that the state must provide the necessary institutions and infrastructure to uphold the law and provide basic services, but understands that a successful society depends on active citizens constantly striving and innovating to improve their lives – including their safety and that of their communities. Drawing on lessons from successful public-private partnerships, including Cape Town’s city improvement districts, The Safety Lab is seeding and developing smart ideas to mobilise the resources, knowledge, creativity and concern of all roleplayers – including government, civil society, business, and individual citizens – to build safe communities on a partnership basis.” www.safetylab.co.za

Although the Lab is already exploring a wide range of ideas, they have a common objective: reducing opportunity for crime in the Western Cape.

A UNIQUE CROSS-SECTOR PARTNERSHIP Cape Town Partnership and the Central City Improvement District might be two very different organisations, yet they continue to work closely together to manage, develop and promote the Central City of Cape Town. This partnership is unique, marrying strategy to operations, concerns of the here and now with visions of the city’s future, and innovation with implementation. Not only do we share office space, but also key office support services and an integrated communications team – and were recently awarded an International Downtown Association Merit Award for this collaborative leadership model.

The Company’s Garden is the Central City’s green lung and a great public space in which Capetonians can read, rest and relax.

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CHANGING THE FACE OF CAPE TOWN THROUGH URBAN DENSIFICATION

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WHAT DOES IT TAKE TO KEEP OUR CENTRAL CITY CLEAN, SAFE AND CARING? • The CCID divides its activities into four main operational arms, each of which focuses on specific outcomes and geographic areas. In the last year the CCID’s urban management, security, social development and communications teams have once again been busy working to ensure that Cape Town remains an attractive place to live, work and play. In the last year alone: • An average of 35 tons of refuse was removed each month, in addition to that removed by the City of Cape Town.

Organisations, to facilitate dialogue and encourage concrete change. Events such as the two-day Reviving Our Inner Cities workshop and symposium, held in August this year and co-hosted by the Cape Town Partnership, have illustrated the renewed interest from both City and Provincial officials to partner together with the private sector to create economically viable, socially cohesive housing developments that will ensure mediumdensity communities located on public transport lines and in close proximity to economic hubs. In the words of Mayoral Committee Member for Economic, Environmental

• CCID’s security team assisted over 200 members of the public on the streets of Cape Town’s Central City every month. • 53 cleaning staff were employed full-time, and were responsible for keeping the streets clean, storm drains clear, and pavements well maintained. • 82 homeless people were reunited with their families, thanks to the efforts of the social workers that make up the CCID’s social development team. • Over 300 jobs have been created through collaboration with the NGO Straatwerk.

and Spatial Planning Alderman Belinda Walker, the City of Cape Town is working to make Cape Town a more integrated city. “Through our policies, strategies and budget allocations we intend to build a city in which there is a place for everyone – a place within the built environment and a place within the economy. They call for a re-ordering of the current spatial form of Cape Town to build an inclusive, integrated and vibrant city making the best use of our existing infrastructure and the opportunities offered by city living.” By harnessing the power of partnership, affordable housing in the Central City is now closer to becoming a lived-in reality.

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Commuters at Cape Town Station.

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For Cape Town to be a thriving metropolis, the CBD needs to be accessible to a great diversity of people who might access the economic, retail and social opportunities to be found there. While delivery on our integrated public transport system is moving apace, helping connect people to opportunity and each other, there continues to be a lack of affordable rental housing close to the city centre. This is an issue we can’t afford to ignore. Adequate housing connected to urban nodes can quite literally change the face of Cape Town – by breaking down old socio-economic inequalities of the past, encouraging higher urban densities, reducing transport costs for lower-income individuals and easing the environmental payload that sprawling low-density housing units put on our delicate ecosystem. For its inhabitants, affordable rental housing means better access to all the amenities and infrastructure of the city. It means having access to schools and hospitals and parks, it means less time spent commuting to work and more time spent with family and friends. For people already living in the Central City and its surrounds, more integrated residential areas means less rush hour congestion, more customers for local businesses and more lively, liveable neighbourhoods. For the city of Cape Town as a whole, integrated residential areas would help to create a socially cohesive city, brimming with colour and diversity, which is home to a true cross-section of South African society. In short, it means a more liveable Cape Town. With this in mind, the Cape Town Partnership has made it a priority to collaborate with City and Provincial government, the private sector and the National Association of Social Housing

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Thanks to the collaborative efforts of The Fringe and the local architecture and design community, Harrington Square is set for a redesign.

REIMAGINING HARRINGTON SQUARE IN THE FRINGE DISTRICT Harrington Square is at the heart of The Fringe district, and although it is currently being used as a parking lot, the square offers enormous potential as a viable and vibrant public space in the east of the city. Now, thanks to the collaborative efforts of The Fringe and the local architecture and design community, Harrington Square is set for a redesign. As a first step, an Urban Design Framework was created as a means of understanding the history of the square as well as the possible ways it could be used in the future. Next, architecture firm DesignSpaceAfrica came up with a proposal that takes into account the historical use of the site as a church and a public byway. Arranging the elements of the proposed square along a diagonal axis, the proposal includes elements of a park and a public performance space. According to Yehuda Raff, The Fringe project coordinator, Harrington Square will become a public space that is useful, accessible and multifunctional: “In essence what we would like to see is a park for adults, with space for resting, for public interaction and for public

performance.” As an important first step, Luyanda Mpahlwa of DesignSpaceAfrica has proposed a temporary art installation in the space that makes the effects of time visible by marking the square with the historical footprint of the space. “Community buy-in is vital to the success of the space,” explains Yehuda. “That’s why we’re looking into temporary interventions and short-term experiments in which we can test out possible futures for Harrington Square. We’re preparing for World Design Capital 2014, trying out the idea of The Fringe being used as a testing ground for urban change, while still being sensitive to the social fabric around us.”

Top: Children enjoy food from one of the food trucks on Harrington Square. Above: The Limoncello food truck has proved a popular choice with city patrons.

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Cape Town’s World Design Capital 2014 bid has been a thrilling rollercoaster ride – from our shortlisting in June over a year ago and our designation in October 2011 to the signing of the host city agreement in June this year, and the ongoing establishment of an independent, not-for-profit company that will drive and direct the 2014 World Design Capital programme. While there will be a dedicated organisation running the World Design Capital 2014 project, the spirit of collaboration and inclusivity that defined Cape Town’s bid process will continue. The board of the implementation company will comprise a wide range of skills and expertise, from business and government through to community-based organisations, academia and the design and creative industries – with collaborative leadership capabilities a common thread. The Cape Town Partnership will continue to support the World Design Capital project

P O P U L A R D E S T I N AT I O N

CREATING A 24-HOUR CITY

POPULAR DESTINATION THE SPIRIT OF COLLABORATION: WHAT DRIVES WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL 2014

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Left: Long Street by night. A recent survey showed that 80% of people believe Cape Town’s nightlife to be both inclusive and accessible.

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Ensuring that Cape Town remains a popular destination where people from all walks of life come together for both work and play will require close collaboration between the public and private sectors, as well as active citizenship. It will mean activating our public spaces, amplifying the city’s events strategy and creating a sense of inclusion for visitors and locals alike.

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via our various programmes, including Creative Cape Town and The Fringe, which already play a vital role in mobilising, strengthening and connecting Cape Town’s creative and design communities. In addition, the Cape Town Design Network, itself a Creative Cape Town legacy project, is set to be expanded and developed through the World Design Capital 2014 designation. The City of Cape Town will provide seed funding for the World Design Capital 2014 project, with the balance of the budget to be raised from other partners in the public and private sectors. In addition, the City of Cape Town’s internal World Design Capital 2014 department has been tasked with creating an enabling context for the successful implementation of Cape Town’s World Design Capital 2014 programme, and will ensure that the benefits of the designation are felt by all the citizens of Cape Town. Stellenbosch, a partner in Cape Town’s successful bid, will continue to play an important role. More will be done in the coming months to connect designers with communities and to educate the broader public about the transformative power of design. This education process started with Cape Town’s bid, and continued at Design Indaba 2012,

In the last decade Cape Town has seen a 76% increase in residential population. This positive trend is set to continue with the Central City now being recognised as a place to live and play as well as work. In addition to more people living in the space, the Central City has also taken its rightful place as the premier entertainment and eventing space in the region with events contributing around R1.5-billion to the GDP. Home to some 40 coffee shops and over 70 bars and nightclubs, the Central City is becoming an attractive entertainment destination by day and by night. More positive still, a recent survey of CBD users conducted by the Central City Improvement District showed that 80.7% of respondents think that Cape Town’s night life is both inclusive and diverse.

where a custom stand created by local firm Xzibit (and staffed by teams from the City of Cape Town, Cape Town Partnership and World Design Capital 2014 Interim Steering Committee) informed expo attendees about sustainable design. The stand also invited expo-goers to determine what design should solve for them by filling in yellow post-it notes. What did Design Indaba attendees say design must solve for them? • An overwhelming 46% of respondents called for design to address problems in the city of Cape Town. • More abstract notions of world peace, beauty and self-expression were highlighted by 34% of respondents. • Design advocacy was top of mind for 20% of respondents. Of the 46% seeking to redesign Cape Town, 26% wanted more of a focus on environmental issues such as sustainable power solutions, viable recycling systems and urban farming initiatives. Public transport solutions, including better infrastructure for cyclists, was highlighted as a concern by 15% of respondents. Reuniting a city divided by apartheid was another top concern for 12% of respondents, who mentioned not only geographical divisions, but also cultural and racial tolerance, and overall city accessibility. Public art, public spaces, social ills, poverty, housing, education, employment, health

and food made up the remaining 47% of concerns that design can address in Cape Town. Executive Mayor Patricia de Lille’s own humble post-it note said: “To solve how to use design to transform government to deliver services faster.” As an example of how World Design Capital 2014 is already being used to transform city government to deliver services faster, industrial designer Richard Perez has been appointed as internal director of the World Design Capital 2014 project within the City of Cape Town. Richard underscores the need for a new way of thinking about design: “Cape Town as World Design Capital 2014 presents a fantastic opportunity to speak about the role of design, not just in 2014 but also in 2020 and 2040, as a means to create the future we want. In the past, when it came to urban problems, the focus in government has been about managing risk and eliminating all uncertainty before starting anything – looking to history to plan the future. This type of thinking doesn’t foster innovation, and although this is something that a lot of people are growing to understand, they don’t necessarily know how to go about changing it. World Design Capital 2014 is a platform to do just that.” Bulelwa Makalima-Ngewana agrees: “Being named World Design Capital 2014 is a unique opportunity to change perceptions and to reposition Cape Town, South Africa

and Africa on a world stage through design. We want to show what design can do for our city, country and continent, and that investment in design is an investment in our future. Cape Town’s bid was defined by a spirit of collaboration and inclusivity, and it’s that spirit that will see us through to 2014 and beyond.”

SNAPSHOT OF WORLD DESIGN CAPITAL 2014 IN 2011/2012 • Shortlisted from 56 applicant cities alongside Dublin, Ireland and Bilbao, Spain for the title of World Design Capital 2014. • Designated World Design Capital 2014 in October 2011 at the IDA Congress in Taipei. • The City of Cape Town signed the host city agreement with the International Council for the Societies of Industrial Design in June 2012. • Received 103 nominations for an initial nine positions on the board of the World Design Capital 2014 implementation company. • Facebook community grew by more than 200%, to over 7 900 fans. www.capetown2014.co.za

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GREENING CAPE TOWN’S EVENTS SCENE

Tim Tompkins, president of the Times Square Alliance, in the Central City.

INTER-CITY EXCHANGE: LESSONS IN PUBLIC SPACE FROM TIMES SQUARE Healthy public space is not only used in a variety of ways by a diverse range of people, it also tells a multi-faceted story of the past and present. This was just one of the insights arising from the debates and discussions during Times Square Alliance president Tim Tompkins’s visit to Cape Town during July this year – the visit itself a collaboration between Cape Town Partnership, the CCID and the City of Cape Town, and an example of the power of an inter-city exchange. Over the course of five days, Tim was given the opportunity to explore a number of different faces of Cape Town, from a walking tour of the Central City to a visit to Langa and Gugulethu. Along the way he shared the history and success of the Times Square Alliance, an organisation dedicated to keeping New York’s iconic Times Square “clean, safe and fun”. Tim’s visit proved to be a catalyst for debate about the effective use of public space in Cape Town, encouraging a wide range of individuals from both the public and private spheres to join in the conversation around how best to harness the enormous potential of Cape Town’s public spaces. According to Tim, attention to detail, consistency and engaging with all stakeholders in order to build communities are some of the most effective ways

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that the Alliance has found to implement lasting and positive change. In the case of Cape Town, Tim lauded the work that the CCID does, saying that this on-the-ground approach was the foundation of positive change. “Supporting micro-attention to detail on the street is paramount. This is what people respond to daily.” Engaging with all stakeholders to build communities is equally important. “Speak with people,” Tim urged. “Engage with them on the grounds of their social and economic interests.” Lastly, the point that Tim underscored most heavily was the need for consistency. “Reaching a critical mass is vital. Very large interventions or interventions with no follow up and management will not result in success.” When asked what he would take away from his visit to Cape Town, Tim was enthusiastic about the future of the city, saying, “I’ve been overwhelmed by the energy of the people from the city, the CCID, the Partnership – by their commitment to fight the battle, not just for neighbourhoods, but for the soul of the city. Public space has always been about the alchemy of urban life, the friction and the tension that makes it work. During my trip to Cape Town I’ve taken inspiration from the large and the small.” The visit formed the basis of a public space think tank made up of city and Cape Town Partnership officials, and inspired the focus of Creative Week Cape Town 2012: unlocking and reimagining our city’s public spaces through the creative industries.

Public space has always been about the alchemy of urban life, the friction and the tension that makes it work.

SNAPSHOT OF CREATIVE WEEK 2011/2012 • Over 100 Creative Week events held in 2011 (more than three times that in 2010). • Over 150 Creative Week events held in 2012. • More than R2.7-million worth of media exposure achieved in 2012. www.creativeweekct.co.za

Cape Town continues to excel as an event host city, with a number of headline events bringing an influx of people and capital into the Central City. In the last year the Cape Town International Jazz Festival and the Design Indaba Expo each attracted 38 000 people, while Decorex and the Good Food and Wine Show enjoyed attendance figures of 40 000 and 35 000 people respectively. In addition, a number of successful events and concerts were held at the Cape Town Stadium. Not only do these major events make a significant economic contribution to the city, but they also play an important role as ambassadors for Cape Town, both within South Africa and abroad. Better yet, through the concerted efforts of both the private and public sectors, Cape Town is becoming a more sustainable events city, through the provision of relevant public transport and a safe environment in which people feel comfortable walking, together with the activation of the public spaces connecting key venues, such as the Fan Walk. The location of large environmentally minded events – such as the Green Buildings Council of South Africa convention and the Sustain our Africa summit – in the Central City, coupled with localised, ecoactivist events like Critical Mass and Moonlight Mass, help to set Cape Town on the path to a more sustainable future.

Above: Crowds gather for a concert on Greenmarket Square, as part of the Cape Town International Jazz Festival.

OPENING UP THE CITY THROUGH CREATIVITY Inspired by Tim Tompkins’s visit and his presentations on how the creative arts have been used to re-energise Times Square, Creative Cape Town decided to take its annual Creative Week celebration outdoors and into the city streets. A usergenerated series of events held from 15 to 23 September 2012, Creative Week became an opportunity to collaborate with other creative happenings taking place in Cape Town during the month of September – such as the Loeries, Open Book and Architecture ZA Biennial – by activating the spaces (in time and place) in between key events. Creative Cape Town, with

the support of its 10 000-strong Facebook support base as well as key partners like The Fringe and the City of Cape Town, facilitated street art exhibitions and creative gatherings to entertain and delight festival-goers and citizens alike. The theme of Creative Week was to celebrate the opportunities we have to enhance the use of public spaces – by using them for creative pursuits. This year’s festival built on the success of Creative Week 2011, which saw creativity celebrated through events as diverse as a graffiti walking tour through the streets of Cape Town, the launch of City Hall Sessions, and the transformation of urban parking spots into mini parklets.

Proudly South African dancers take part in the 2012 Cape Town Carnival celebrations in the Central City.

R690-MILLION EXTENSION FOR THE CTICC The Cape Town International Convention Centre is one of Cape Town Central City’s most glittering success stories. To date it has already created over 60 000 jobs and ensured that Cape Town is responsible for 50% of the market share for conferences held in Africa. What’s more, the CTICC already has over 850 conferences booked up until 2020. To ensure that the CTICC retains its place as one of Africa’s premier convention venues, the centre is investing in a R690-million environmentally friendly extension that will double its conference hosting capacity, adding an additional 10 000 square metres of new convention space, retail opportunities, a hospital, hotel and new office tower. The extension will also act as a catalyst for greater Foreshore investment and better connect to the rest of the city by creating a more pedestrian-friendly space.

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GROWING CAPE TOWN AS A

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Cape Town is well placed to become the premier destination for the design and knowledge economies in South Africa. Cape Town Partnership programmes and projects, like Creative Cape Town and the city’s bid for World Design Capital 2014, have made great strides towards putting Cape Town on the map as a hub of knowledge and creativity.

DESIGN STORMING: COLLECTIVE SOLUTIONS TO COMMON PROBLEMS

Right: Children in Khayelitsha show off one of the by-products of Design Storming – a simple illustration.

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Cape Town, in bidding for World Design Capital 2014, committed itself to transforming lives by design – rebuilding community cohesion; reconnecting communities through infrastructure enhancement; and repositioning the city for the knowledge economy. A grand vision, no doubt, but how do you get designers and communities talking the same language and collectively solving pressing social problems to get us there? Creative Cape Town, in collaboration with the Cape Town Design Network, and in partnership with the Social Justice Coalition and other community-based organisations, developed one strategy in 2012: Design Storming.

Learners add to the post-it note suggestions on Cape Town’s World Design Capital 2014 stand at the 2012 Design Indaba Expo.

SNAPSHOT OF CREATIVE CAPE TOWN IN 2011/2012 • Facebook community grew by more than 50%, to over 10 500 fans. • Twitter following doubled to over 7 000.

The idea was inspired by the structure of a science hack which puts a group of people together for a short but intense period to brainstorm potential solutions on a clearly defined problem. For Cape Town’s Design Storming sessions, a multi-disciplinary group of professional designers, design students and creative practitioners were partnered with members of a community for 12 hours (two days with six hours of workshopping on each day) to generate ideas aimed at addressing a problem, as previously defined by community members themselves. The first Design Storm took placed in late June 2012 – as part of a celebration of World Industrial Design Day – at VPUU Precinct 3 in Khayelitsha, and the Social Justice Coalition defined the first design challenge around refuse collection and removal in townships. Refuse collection is a critical component in ensuring that communities are kept clean and safe. Failure to adequately collect and dispose of refuse leads to the spread of disease, pests such as rats, contamination of water sources, and blockage of sewerage systems. “While complex issues like refuse collection can’t be solved overnight,

the ideas developed at the first Design Storming suggest that there are tangible interventions which could drastically improve quality of life,” says Social Justice Coalition coordinator Gavin Silber. “It also illustrates the importance of partnerships across Cape Town’s historical divides in improving the quality of services in neglected communities.” The first two-day session was attended by 50 people and resulted in a range of innovative ideas and new methods of design interaction and collaboration to enable communities to be more closely involved in the design of their own futures. “The fact that we could deliver a presentation of workable ideas from the session just proves how fruitful this approach to problem solving can be,” says Bruce Snaddon, chairman of Cape Town Design Network. “It was significant that the mayor of the City of Cape Town herself said that she wished she could have such creative people available to her on a daily basis and her willingness to pilot some of the proposed ideas is a victory for collaborative design and will also hopefully lead to the future implementation of many more real solutions.”

• Listed by Memeburn as one of South Africa’s most influential Twitter accounts, with the ability to retain the attention of a diverse community while acting as a point of connection. • Appointed a new programme manager, Farzanah Badsha, in June 2011. www.creativecapetown.net

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Right: Students outside the 11 Adderley Street building. The Central City is home to 49 tertiary educational institutions.

The report is already proving to be a valuable resource, not only for the wealth of information it contains, but also in the dedication it shows to forging an in-depth understanding of the Central City.

THE FRINGE: A KNOWLEDGE RESOURCE FOR ENTREPRENEURS

TAKING THE PULSE OF THE CITY: THE STATE OF CAPE TOWN CENTRAL CITY REPORT How many people come to the Central City every day? What is the current value of Central City property? How many pedestrians use public transport? These are just some of the many questions that have been answered in the inaugural issue of The State of Cape Town Central City Report. A collaboration between the Cape Town Partnership and Central City Improvement District, the

report has been created for anyone with an interest in the Central City: residents wanting to find out more about the place in which they live, companies looking to forge stronger business connections in Cape Town and urban developers seeking a better understanding of the ways in which the Central City is currently being used. The report is already proving to be a valuable resource, not only for the wealth of information it contains, but also in the dedication it shows to forging an in-depth understanding of the Central City and the role it plays in the wider metro-region.

The Fringe’s vision for the future is to become to entrepreneurs what a library is to students: a valuable knowledge resource that is open and accessible to all. A number of initiatives are already under way to achieve this objective, foremost among them the proposed creation of a design park in collaboration with the Cape University of Technology. This idea has several global precedents, most notably the 22@Barcelona science park, in which the clustering of design, science and private sector entities has resulted in a vibrantly innovative district that acts as a support and stimulus to the local knowledge-based economy.

THE EDP AS A KNOWLEDGESHARING CENTRE THE CENTRAL CITY BY NUMBERS

77%

of all pedestrians who come into the Central City use public transport.

350 000

people travel through the Central City every day.

R21 BILLION

is the current value of property in the Central City.

380 000 M2

is the amount of retail space in the Central City. Above: Heath Nash and Thingking’s installation in The Fringe, erected during Creative Week 2011, was made almost entirely out of recycled waste.

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The EDP may be a new force in the field of economic development in the Western Cape, but it has already proven itself to be effective in creating knowledge-sharing networks and training opportunities for economic development leaders. Convenor of the EDP, Andrew Boraine, is passionate about partnership training and development. In his words: “People are central to partnerships. We have also learned that it’s about getting the right people, by which we mean those who have the capabilities of collaborative leadership.” Professor Ralph Hamann, a Cape Town Partnership board member and research professor at the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business

SNAPSHOT OF THE FRINGE IN 2011/2012 A graffiti walking tour of The Fringe with artist Mak1one during Creative Week 2011.

(UCT GSB), identifies the following as traits of collaborative leadership: “Collaborative leaders are capable of translating different perspectives. They are able to see the big picture and are good at motivating others to create a shared vision or goal. Collaborative leaders have a win-win attitude when it comes to negotiation.” Creating effective economic leaders who are good decision makers is essential to the future economic development of Cape Town and the Western Cape. In recognition of this, the EDP is collaborating with UCT Graduate School of Development Policy and Practice to create an economic leadership development programme, taking place in November 2012, that aims to provide participants with the skills required of good economic development leaders.

• The Fringe is currently home to 180 businesses of which 41% are based in the creative industries. • Employment in the area has increased by 29% since 2011, when research was last conducted on the area. What’s more, the eight largest firms in the area have showed an increase in employment of 67%. • The Fringe Facebook community grew by more than 350%, to over 1 700 fans. www.thefringe.org.za

Collaborative leaders are capable of translating different perspectives; they are able to see the big picture and are good at motivating others to create a shared vision or goal. 37


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City Hall Sessions might involve a series of sound experiments, but the real test is how music can help people from across Cape Town connect to each other and their city.

THE CENTRAL CITY AS THE

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Cape Town Central City is a place rich in cultural memory. Engaging with this in an inclusive and collaborative way, designating historical spaces as public domains, and honouring the role and history of a diverse range of people will help ensure that the Central City remains a vibrant and welcoming space that’s accessible to all.

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OPENING UP CITY HALL WITH SOUND City Hall has had many incarnations over the years, as City Council offices, a library, a classical and choral performance space, and a venue for political rallies. But how can this iconic building begin to play a more central role in the city’s public and cultural life? How can Capetonians themselves feel a sense of ownership of the space? City Hall Sessions – a concert series launched in 2011 by Creative Cape Town, with support from the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund – is a sound experiment aimed at doing just that. How? By staging a number of unusual concerts and music collaborations in the venue that draw people from all walks of life – not simply to rub shoulders, but to share in a profoundly moving sound experience. The first City Hall Session took place last year in City Hall’s auditorium space and featured Thandiswa Mazwai, Congolese-born pianist Ray Lema and Brazilian guitarist Chico César. The concert was timed to coincide with Cape Town’s Creative Week and espoused the values of pan-Africanism, inclusivity and creative collaboration by showcasing the work of artists drawn from the Cape, Africa and the South.

The 2012 season began with a celebration of Human Rights Day on 20 March featuring Senegal’s Ismaël Lô and Azania Ghetto Sound band, a popular reggae group from Nyanga, Cape Town. In July, audiences were treated to a three-day mini music festival that showcased headliners like Maskanda guitar legend Madala Kunene and renowned vocalist Caiphus Semenya, as well as a unique musical collaboration entitled The Bridge. Directed by drummer Kesivan Naidoo and featuring musical arrangements by pianist Andre Petersen, The Bridge took audience members on a musical adventure in which the line-up of musicians seamlessly entered and exited the stage in varying combinations. The line-up included the talents of luminaries such as Afropop singer Zolani Mahola of Freshlyground, guitarist Errol Dyers, and saxophonists Khaya Mahlangu and Morris Goldberg, as well as local acts like Joe Nina, MXO, and Closet Snare with a string section. According to Steve Gordon, producer of the series and well-known music documentarian and organiser, the artists selected for the series reflect the unique mix of histories and culture that make up Cape Town: “Ports throughout the world are places

Above left: The Company’s Garden is one of Cape Town’s most beloved public spaces. Above right: Thandiswa Mazwai lights up City Hall at the inaugural City Hall Session.

SNAPSHOT OF CITY HALL SESSIONS IN 2011/2012 of cultural fusion. Cape Town has layers of music, starting with the indigenous sounds, through to the influences – good and bad – which came with colonisation. It’s no coincidence that cities such as New Orleans, Rio de Janeiro, Dakar or Dar es Salaam have powerful musical voices. The demographic of the Cape – with its primary groups of isiXhosa, Afrikaans and English speakers – gives us a unique flavour.” In recognition of the power of music to start conversations and transform lives, the July series of events also included a number of learner workshops which gave young people the chance to gain a better understanding of what it takes to work as a professional musician. The workshops were facilitated by Dianne Rossi of the SA Association of Jazz Educators, with modules on musical instrumentation prepared by the Silent Revolution duo Kesivan Naidoo and Lee Thompson, themselves the whizz kids behind successful Central City jazz club The Mahogany Room. Making Music

Productions crew offered learners insight into the technical and production framework with which a young artist must engage. The learners were also given the chance to meet established musicians and hear how these artists got to where they are today. In the words of Cape Town Partnership Managing Director Bulelwa Makalima-Ngewana: “The intention of these workshops was to share the resources of the show with young people who are at the beginning of their careers. By using these concerts to cross-fund and share resources we can still invest in the future of the creative industries, despite the erosion of support for arts development.” City Hall Sessions might involve a series of sound experiments, but the real test is how music can help people from across Cape Town connect to each other and their city. As Steve Gordon puts it, “City Hall is iconic – flowing a diversity of music and audience through that space can project a powerful statement for and about Cape Town.”

• Over 4 600 people have attended three series of events since the launch of City Hall Sessions in September 2011, with performers drawn from Senegal, France, DRC, USA and Brazil featured alongside musicians from Cape Town, Durban and Johannesburg. • Each show provides freelance employment for a core production team of 12 crew, with services such as sound, lights, transport, cleaning, ushers, safety and security augmenting the number of individuals employed to a total of 100 people each show day. • The City Hall Sessions mini festival in July afforded a group of 32 Western Cape high school students access to a three-day programme of music workshops mentored by some of South Africa’s top music talent. www.cityhallsessions.co.za

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CONNECTING THE CITY WITH STORIES Despite infrastructure enhancements like IRT, Cape Town remains a city divided by apartheid planning. Until that urban logic fundamentally changes, how can we help Capetonians connect to each other and to the city? It might seem like such a simple solution, but stories can help us pave the way. Sharing Cape Town’s stories in a way that promotes inclusivity and understanding can help people connect across geographic and demographic divides. This is where City Views, a monthly community paper co-published by the Cape Town Partnership and the Central City

C R O S S R OA D S

Improvement District, comes into play. Instead of projecting a one-dimensional vision for the future of the Central City (and acting simply as a mouthpiece for both organisations), City Views encourages a multiplicity of views: it gives locals a voice and a platform to tell others about their lived experience of Cape Town, while promoting the Central City as a place for all people and a range of experiences. Much of the success of City Views can be attributed to its collaborative approach to content creation. The paper doesn’t just publish stories about local people and places, it considers its readers as cocreators. Everyone who is interviewed is given the chance to approve and amend their text proactively, photographs are not

SNAPSHOT OF CITY VIEWS • 50 000 copies distributed each month in the Central City and surrounding residential areas. • Increase of 6 000 readers in the last year simply by making monthly editions available online and connecting with avid readers on social media. • City Views was awarded a prestigious International Downtown Association Merit Award for 2012 in the category of marketing and communications, and received five awards from the South African Publication Forum in 2012 for excellence in writing, excellence in design and excellence in communication, as well as second runner-up for best newspaper and finalist for the best publication with limited resources. • Despite being a community paper focused on the Central City of Cape Town, City Views enjoys a far more global readership, with copies being sent on request as far afield as Paris, Helsinki and parts of Russia. www.capetownpartnership.co.za/city-views

only taken but also given (interviewees are sent high-quality images of themselves for their own use) and every article carries action items at the end, giving readers the chance to get in touch, find out more and provide feedback. At present 50 000 copies of City Views are distributed each month in the Central City and broader afield, both through the CCID’s local job creation and rehabilitation programme with local NGO Straatwerk, as well as at transport hubs, to surrounding suburbs and on the streets themselves. City Views has enjoyed an overwhelmingly positive response this last year, and evidence of its status as a valuable city resource can be seen in the growing number of requests for copies each month – from such diverse sources as local government offices, small businesses and even schools. In addition, City Views was recently awarded the prestigious International Downtown Association Merit Award in the category of marketing and communications for 2012. The publication doesn’t necessarily influence city planning or build bridges across divided neighbourhoods, but it is helping to connect citizens to the Central City and to each other – one person, one paper, one story at a time.

52.1%

of Central City users say that the single biggest reason that the CBD is so well regarded is that it’s so multicultural. This is according to a survey of the CBD conducted by the CCID in March 2012, in which over 1 500 people were interviewed at random (one every eight minutes during a two week shift) at various times of the day.

CREATING A MORE CARING, INCLUSIVE CAPE TOWN

Far left: City Views has proved to be a popular resource for learners in the Central City. Left: 50 000 copies of City Views are distributed monthly, both on the streets and in residential areas surrounding the Central City. Above: Participants in the CCID/ Straatwerk job rehabilitation scheme. Above right: The Company’s Garden provides green space in the Central City.

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The Central City Improvement District has long been known as the driving force behind keeping Cape Town safe and clean. Now, more than ever before, the CCID is also channeling its energy towards helping some of the most vulnerable members of our Central City society. The current recession has meant that many people are facing the spectre of poverty and homelessness. Often these people seek economic opportunity in the Central City, where they come in search of jobs. Sadly, if they are unable to find work these people often end up on the streets of the city. The CCID has taken the plight of these people to heart and has stepped up its fieldwork activities, enabling three full-time social workers to concentrate their efforts on helping homeless children and adults to get off the streets, rejoin their

families, or find a place at a city shelter. In the last year alone, the CCID has reunited 82 people with their families and staged over 300 interventions with homeless adults and children. Apart from reaching out to those people living on the streets, the CCID also provides job opportunities for those who have been homeless through its long-standing collaboration with the NGO Straatwerk. What started out small as the brainchild of CCID COO Tasso Evangelinos has now grown to support 300 people, in three levels of job creation: entry-level work that deals with basic services; technical work and more complicated jobs; and positions on the maintenance team, which offers full-time employment for six months to a year. To date, this programme has helped hundreds of people connect to opportunity, financial independence and a sense of their own worth within a larger Central City economy.

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FINANCIALS

FINANCIALS

Cape Town parTnership npC

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dIrectors’ responsIbIlIty for the fInancIal statements

annual finanCial sTaTemenTs for The year enDeD 30 June 2012 auDiTeD (reg no: 1999/009660/08)

ConTenTs dIrectors’ report

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Independent audItor’s report statement of comprehensIve Income statement of fInancIal posItIon

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statement of changes In reserves statement of cash flows notes to the fInancIal statements detaIled Income statement

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dIrectors’ responsIbIlIty statement

The directors are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the annual financial statements of Cape Town Partnership NPC, comprising the statement of financial position at 30 June 2012, and the statement of comprehensive income, changes in reserves and cash flows for the year then ended, and the notes to the financial statements, which include a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards and the requirements of the Companies Act of South Africa. In addition, the directors are responsible for preparing the directors’ report. The directors are also responsible for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and for maintaining adequate accounting records and an effective system of risk management as well as the preparation of the supplementary schedules included in these financial statements. The directors have made an assessment of the company’s ability to continue as a going concern and have no reason to believe the business will not be a going concern in the year ahead. The auditor is responsible for reporting on whether the annual financial statements are fairly presented in accordance with the applicable financial reporting framework. approval of The annual finanCial sTaTemenTs The annual financial statements of Cape Town Partnership NPC, as identified in the first paragraph, were approved by the board of directors on 24 August 2012 and are signed on its behalf by:

N Ndebele (Chairman)

aM Boraine (Chief Executive)

declaratIon by company secretary In my capacity as company secretary, I hereby confirm, in terms of the Companies Act, 2008, that for the year ended 30 June 2012, the Company has lodged with the Registrar of Companies all such returns as are required of a company in terms of this Act and that all such returns are true, correct and up to date.

Nazeer Rawoot (Company Secretary) Cape Town Partnership NPC

f i n a n c i a l s

dIrectors’ report

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012 The directors have pleasure in presenting their report for the year ended 30 June 2012. business aCTiviTies To develop, manage and promote the City of Cape Town as a place for all, and a leading centre for retail, commercial, residential, cultural, tourism, education, entertainment, and leisure activities. general review of operaTions The business and operations of the Company during the year under review continued as in the past year and we have nothing further to report thereon. The financial statements adequately reflect the state of affairs and the results of the business operations of the Company no further explanations are considered necessary. subsequenT evenTs To The reporTing DaTe There are no subsequent events that need to be reported. share CapiTal The Company does not have share capital. DireCTors The directors who held office during the period and at the date of this report: director R Toefy N Badsha R Lombard Y Emeran AM Serritslev PJ Gordon HAS Khan EA Pieterse AM Boraine K Jacobs LAK Robinson KM Roman (Chairperson) A Ebrahim LA Muller (Alternate) R Kane H Bovensmann (Alternate) D Bryant A Jones H Bohle G Bloor L Mohamed–Wiedeman R Hamman T Mashologu N Ndebele (Chairperson)

date appointed

date Resigned

16 November 2011 20 April 2012 16 November 2011 16 November 2011 16 November 2011 16 November 2011 16 November 2011 25 May 2012

16 November 2011 20 April 2012 25 May 2012 25 May 2012 25 May 2012 25 May 2012 25 May 2012 25 May 2012

secretary N Rawoot Business address: 10th Floor The Terraces Cnr Bree & Riebeek Street Cape Town 8001

44

Postal address: PO Box 1997 Cape Town South Africa 8000

45


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

r o w i n g

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

s t e e r i n g

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

financials

Independent audItor’s report

To The members of Cape Town CenTral CiTy parTnership npC

financials

statement of comprehensIve Income for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

Note

We have audited the annual financial statements of Cape Town Central City Partnership NPC, which comprise the statement of financial position at 30 June 2012, and the statements of comprehensive income, changes in reserves and cash flows for the year then ended, and the notes to the financial statements, which include a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes, as set out on pages 47 to 61.

Revenue Operating expenses

DireCTors’ responsibiliTy for The finanCial sTaTemenTs The company’s directors are responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards and the requirements of the Companies Act of South Africa, and for such internal control as the directors determine is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

2011 R

21 234 314

11 771 886

(20 948 304)

(12 098 595)

Surplus/(deficit) from operations

3

286 010

(326 709)

Finance income

4

526 031

340 534

812 041

13 825

Net surplus for the year

auDiTor’s responsibiliTy Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audit. We conducted our audit in accordance with International Standards on Auditing. Those standards require that we comply with ethical requirements and plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance whether the financial statements are free from material misstatement.

2012 R

Other comprehensive income for the year Total comprehensive income for the year

– 812 041

– 13 825

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion. opinion In our opinion, the financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Cape Town Central City Partnership NPC, at 30 June 2012, and its financial performance and cash flows for the year then ended in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards and the requirements of the Companies Act of South Africa. oTher maTTers Without qualifying our opinion, we draw attention to the fact that supplementary information set out on pages 62 to 63 does not form part of the annual financial statements and is presented as additional information. We have not audited these schedules and accordingly we do not express an opinion on them. oTher reporTs requireD by The Companies aCT As part of our audit of the financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2012 we have read the Directors’ report for the purpose of identifying whether there are material inconsistencies between this report and the audited financial statements. This report is the responsibility of the directors. Based on reading this report we have not identified material inconsistencies between this report and the audited financial statements. However, we have not audited this report and accordingly do not express an opinion thereon. KPMG Inc.

Per: BR Heuvel Chartered Accountant (SA) Registered Auditor Director 24 August 2012

46

47


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

r o w i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

s t e e r i n g

k n o w l e d g e

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

c h e e r i n g

financials

financials

statement of fInancIal posItIon

statement of changes In reserves

aT 30 June 2012

Note

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012 2012 R

2011 R

asseTs NoN‑cuRReNt assets

accuMulated suRPlus R Balance at 1 July 2010 as previously reported Total comprehensive income for the year

Plant and equipment

6

cuRReNt assets Trade and other receivables

f i n a n c i a l s

7

656 197

1 481 291 13 825

523 067

7 236 258

8 871 551

2 910 377

1 071 008

Balance at 30 June 2011

1 495 116

Balance at 1 July 2011

1 495 116

total comprehensive income for the year Cash and cash equivalents

4 325 881

7 800 543

total assets

7 892 455

9 394 618

2 307 157

1 495 116

5 585 298

7 899 502

7 892 455

9 394 618

Balance at 30 June 2012

812 041 2 307 157

reserves anD liabiliTies ReseRves Accumulated surplus

cuRReNt lIaBIlItIes Trade and other payables total reserves and liabilities

48

8

49


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

r o w i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

s t e e r i n g

k n o w l e d g e

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

financials

financials

statement of cash flows

notes to the fInancIal statements

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

Cash flows from operating activities Interest received Net cash (outflow)/inflow from operating activities

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012 Note

2012 R

2011 R

9.1

(3 539 344)

7 544 440

526 031

340 534

(3 013 313)

7 884 974

Cash flows from invesTing aCTiviTies

1. reportIng entIty Cape Town Partnership NPC (the “Company”) is a company domiciled in South Africa. The address of the Company’s registered office is 10th Floor, The Terraces, 34 Bree Street, Cape Town. 1.1 basis of preparaTion 1.1.1 stateMeNt of coMPlIaNce The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) and the interpretations adopted by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) and the requirements of the Companies Act of South Africa. This is the first financial statements where IFRS has been applied. In principal, this framework has been applied retrospectively. No significant adjustments were required as a result of the adoption of IFRS 1 First Time Adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards.

Additions to plant and equipment

(461 349)

(245 417)

Net cash outflow from investing activities

(461 349)

(245 417)

1.1.2 BasIs of MeasuReMeNt The financial statements are prepared on the historical cost basis, except for certain financial instruments, which are carried at fair value. These financial statements are prepared on the going concern basis.

Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents

(3 474 662)

7 639 557

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year

7 800 543

160 986

1.1.3 use of estIMates aNd JudGeMeNts The preparation of financial statements requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of accounting policies and the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

4 325 881

7 800 543

Estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised and in any future periods affected.

2. sIgnIfIcant accountIng polIcIes The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these financial statements. 2.1 planT anD equipmenT Recognition and measurement Items of plant and equipment are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and accumulated impairment losses. Cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of the asset. When parts of an item of plant and equipment have different useful lives, they are accounted for as separate items (major components) of plant and equipment. Subsequent costs The cost of replacing part of an item of plant and equipment is recognised in the carrying amount of the item if it is probable that the future economic benefits embodied within the part will flow to the Company and its cost can be measured reliably. The costs of the day to day servicing of the plant and equipment are recognised in comprehensive income as incurred.

50

51


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

r o w i n g

s t e e r i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

financials

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD) for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

financials

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD) for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

2. sIgnIfIcant accountIng polIcIes (contInued) Depreciation Depreciation is recognised in profit or loss on a straight line basis over the estimated useful lives of each part of an item of plant and equipment. The estimated useful lives for the current and comparative periods are as follows: Computer hardware 3 years Computer software 2 years Fittings 3 years Furniture 6 years Office equipment 6 years Depreciation methods, useful lives and residual values are reassessed at the reporting date. 2.2 impairmenT The carrying amounts of the Company’s assets are reviewed at each reporting date to determine whether there is any indication of impairment. If any such indication exists, the asset’s recoverable amount is estimated. An impairment loss is recognised whenever the carrying amount of an asset or its cash–generating unit exceeds its recoverable amount. Impairment losses are recognised in profit or loss. (i)Calculation of recoverable amount The recoverable amount of other assets is the greater of their net selling price and value in use. In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre–tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. For an asset that does not generate largely independent cash inflows, the recoverable amount is determined for the cash–generating unit to which the asset belongs. (ii)Reversals of impairments An impairment loss is reversed if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. An impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortisation, if no impairment loss had been recognised.

2.3 finanCial insTrumenTs Measurement Non–derivative financial instruments Non–derivative financial instruments comprise trade and other receivables, cash and cash equivalents and trade and other payables. Non–derivative financial instruments are recognised initially at fair value plus any directly attributable transaction costs. Subsequent to initial recognition non–derivative financial instruments are measured as described below. A financial instrument is recognised if the Company becomes party to the contractual provisions of the instrument. Financial assets are derecognised if the Company’s contractual rights to the cash flows from the financial assets expire or if the Company transfers the financial asset to another party without retaining control or substantially all risks and rewards of the asset. Financial liabilities are derecognised if the Company’s obligations specified in the contract expire or are discharged or cancelled. Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash balances and call deposits. Non–derivative financial instruments are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate method, less any impairment losses. Subsequent to initial recognition these instruments are measured as set out below. Trade and other receivables Trade and other receivables originated by the Company are stated at cost less allowances for impairment losses. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents are measured at fair value. Trade and other payables Trade and other payables are recognised at amortised cost. 2.4 revenue Revenue comprises grant income, parking income, film income, project income and administration fees excluding Value Added Taxation. 2.5 finanCe inCome Finance income comprises interest income on funds invested. Interest income is recognised as it accrues, using the effective interest method. 2.6 governmenT granTs Government grants are recognised when there is reasonable assurance that: the company will comply with the conditions attaching to them; and the grants will be received.

52

53


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

r o w i n g

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

s t e e r i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

financials

financials

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

2. sIgnIfIcant accountIng polIcIes (contInued)

2.sIgnIfIcant accountIng polIcIes (contInued)

2.6 governmenT granTs (ConTinueD) Government grants are recognised as income over the periods necessary to match them with the related costs that they are intended to compensate.

2.10 provisions (ConTinueD) Where some or all of the expenditure required to settle a provision is expected to be reimbursed by another party, the reimbursement shall be recognised when, and only when, it is virtually certain that reimbursement will be received if the entity settles the obligation. The reimbursement shall be treated as a separate asset. The amount recognised for the reimbursement shall not exceed the amount of the provision. Provisions are not recognised for future operating losses.

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

A government grant that becomes receivable as compensation for expenses or losses already incurred or for the purpose of giving immediate financial support to the entity with no future related costs is recognised as income of the period in which it becomes receivable. Government grants related to assets, including non–monetary grants at fair value, are presented in the statement of financial position by setting up the grant as deferred income or by deducting the grant in arriving at the carrying amount of the asset. Grants related to income are presented in the profit or loss separately. 2.7 employees benefiTs Short term employee benefits The cost of all short terms employee benefits is recognised during the period in which the employee renders the related service. The accruals for employee entitlements to wage, salaries and small annual leave represent the amount which the Company has a present obligation to pay as a result of employees’ services provided to the reporting date. The accruals have been calculated at undiscounted amounts based on current wage and salary rates. 2.8 Cash anD Cash equivalenTs Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand, deposits held on call with banks, and investments in money market instruments, all of which are available for use by the Company unless otherwise stated. 2.9 inCome reCeiveD in aDvanCe Income received in advance includes the initial amount agreed in the contract to the extent that it is probable that they will result in revenue and can be measured reliably. As soon as the outcome of a contract can be estimated reliably, contract revenue is recognised in profit or loss in proportion to the stage of completion of the contract. Contract expenses are recognised as incurred unless they create an asset related to future contract activity. The stage of completion is assessed by reference to surveys of actual work performed. When the outcome of a contract cannot be estimated reliably, contract revenue is recognised only to the extent of contract costs incurred that are likely to be recoverable. 2.10 provisions Provisions are recognised when: The Company has a present obligation as a result of a past event; It is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation; and A reliable estimate can be made of the obligation. The amount of a provision is the present value of the expenditure expected to be required to settle the obligation.

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

2.11 leases A lease is classified as an operating lease if it does not transfer substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership. Operating leases Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense on a straight–line basis over the lease term. The difference between the amounts recognised as an expense and the contractual payments are recognised as an operating lease asset. This liability is not discounted. 2.12 Change in esTimaTes Changes in estimates are accounted for in the period in which the change occurs, and are accounted for prospectively. A change in estimate occurs as a result of new information or new developments, and takes into account all facts and circumstances, but changes over time as those facts and circumstances change or the entity obtains more experience and/or knowledge.

3. defIcIt from operatIons is arrived at after taking into account: 2012 R

2011 R

Auditor’s remuneration

80 000

84 000

Depreciation

328 219

352 508

1 985 265

1 753 910

725 373

311 334

(1 110 990)

(1 028 694)

526 031

340 534

Director’s emoluments – executive services Operating lease charges – premises Administration fees received – Central City Improvement District

4. fInance Income Interest received on bank balance

5. Income tax expense Provision has not been made for current taxation, or deferred taxation as the Company is an approved Public Benefit Organisation in terms of Section 30 of the Income Tax Act and is exempt from income tax in terms of Section 10 (1) (cN) of the Income Tax Act.

54

55


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

r o w i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

s t e e r i n g

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

financials

financials

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

6. plant and equIpment cost

accuMulated

caRRyING

dePRecIatIoN

aMouNt

caRRyING aMouNt at BeGINNING of yeaR

addItIoNs

dIsPosals

dePRecIatIoN

caRRyING aMouNt at eNd of yeaR

Computer software

63 501

23 611

(67 801)

19 311

2012 owNed assets 2012

R

R

R

Computer software

385 888

(366 577)

19 311

Furniture

141 669

61 000

(54 581)

148 088

Furniture

432 903

(284 815)

148 088

Fittings

56 248

4 903

(26 989)

34 162Office

Fittings

319 812

(285 650)

34 162

Equipment

48 149

175 188

(36 839)

186 498

Office equipment

263 180

(76 682)

186 498

Computer hardware

213 500

196 647

(142 009)

268 138

Computer hardware

988 713

(720 575)

268 138

523 067

461 349

(328 219)

656 197

2 390 496

(1 734 299)

656 197

Computer software

122 010

56 514

(115 023)

63 501

2011

56

2011

Computer software

360 644

(297 143)

63 501

Furniture

188 051

3 733

(50 115)

141 669

Furniture

348 594

(206 925)

141 669

Fittings

58 626

38 020

(40 398)

56 248

Fittings

314 909

(258 661)

56 248

Office equipment

58 156

14 097

(13 738)

(10 366)

48 149

Office equipment

73 285

(25 136)

48 149

Computer hardware

217 050

133 053

(136 603)

213 500

Computer hardware

703 582

(490 082)

213 500

643 893

245 417

(13 738)

(352 505)

523 067

1 801 014

(1 277 947)

523 067

57


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

r o w i n g

s t e e r i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

financials

financials

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

7. trade and other receIvables

10. related partIes

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

2012

2011

R

R

Trade debtors

2 368 843

1 071 008

Allowance for doubtful debts

(58 465)

City of Cape Town

600 000

2 910 378

1 071 008

10.1 iDenTiTy of relaTeD parTies The Company receives substantial funding from the City of Cape Town. The directors are listed in the Directors’ Report. Western Cape Economic Development Partnership NPC Cape Town Central Improvement District NPC 10.2 maTerial relaTeD parTy TransaCTions City of Cape Town funding received – R 7 574 000 (2011: R 7 158 360). 10.3 maTerial relaTeD parTy balanCes Trade and other payable to Cape Town Central City Improvement District NPC – note 8 Trade and other receivable from Western Cape Economics Development Partnership – R351 085 (2011 R Nil).

11. operatIng lease commItments

8. trade and other payables

11.1 fuTure minimum lease paymenTs Commitments for future minimum lease payments under operating leases in respect of office rental and parking are as follows:

Cape Town Central City Improvement District

918 583

Accruals

574 309

49 708

3 086 881

6 152 267

Provisions

853 034

594 647

Straight–lining lease liability

137 647

5 705

VAT payable

14 844

1 097 175

5 585 298

7 899 502

Income received in advance

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

operaTing leases

– due within 1 year – due between 1 and 5 years – due after 5 years

2012 R

2011 R

949 563

679 440

2 952 325

3 223 920

3 901 888

3 903 360

12. fInancIal rIsk management 9. note to the statement of cash flows 9.1 Cash generaTeD by operaTions 286 010

(326 709)

328 219

352 505

13 738

614 229

39 534

(Increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables

(1 839 369)

745 610

(Decrease)/increase in trade and other payables

(2 314 204)

6 759 296

(3 539 344)

7 544 440

Operating surplus/(deficit) Adjustment for: Depreciation of plant and equipment Loss on scrapping of equipment Cash flows from operating activities before working capital changes

58

The Company has exposure to the following risks from its use of financial instruments: credit risk liquidity risk This note presents information about the Company’s exposure to each of the above risks, the Company’s objectives, policies and processes for measuring and managing risk, and the Company’s management of capital. Further quantitative disclosures are included throughout these financial statements. The directors have overall responsibility for the establishment and monitoring of the Company’s risk management policies and procedures which have been established to identify and analyse the risks faced by the Company, to set appropriate risk limits and controls and to monitor risks and adherence to limits. Risk management policies and procedures are reviewed regularly to reflect changes in market conditions and the Company’s activities.

59


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

r o w i n g

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

s t e e r i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

financials

financials

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

notes to the fInancIal statements (ConTinueD)

12. fInancIal rIsk management (contInued)

12. fInancIal rIsk management (contInued)

12.1 CreDiT risk Credit risk is the risk of financial loss to the Company if a counterparty to a financial instrument fails to meet its contractual obligations, and arises principally from the Company’s trade and other receivables and cash and cash equivalents. An allowance for impairment is established based on managements’ estimate of identified incurred losses in respect of specific trade and other receivables. Bad debts identified are written off as they occur.

12.2 liquiDiTy risk (ConTinueD) The following are contractual maturities of financial liabilities, including interest payments and excluding the impact of netting agreements

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

30 JuNe 2012 caRRyING aMouNt

Reputable financial institutions are used for investing and cash handling purposes. 12.2 liquiDiTy risk Liquidity risk is the risk that the Company will not be able to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. The Company’s approach to managing liquidity is to ensure, as far as possible, that it will always have sufficient liquidity to meet its liabilities when due, under normal and stressed conditions, without incurring unacceptable losses or risking damage to the Company’s reputation.

non ‑ DerivaTive finanCial liabiliTies

Fair value of financial instruments The Company’s financial instruments consist mainly of cash at the bank and cash equivalents, trade and other receivables and trade and other payables The estimated net fair value at which financial instruments are carried on the statement of financial position at 30 June 2012 have been determined using available market information and appropriate valuation methodologies, but are not necessarily indicative of the amounts that the Company could realise in the normal course of business. At reporting date there were no significant concentrations of credit risk. The maximum exposure to credit risk is represented by the carrying amount of each financial asset in the statement of financial position.

30 JuNe 2011 non ‑ DerivaTive finanCial liabiliTies

The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date is: 2012 R

2011 R

Trade and other payables

Trade and other payables

(5 585 298)

(7 899 502)

coNtRactual casH flows

6 MoNtHs oR less

6 ‑ 12 MoNtHs

2‑5 yeaRs

MoRe tHaN 5 yeaRs

5 585 298

(5 585 298)

(7 899 502)

(7 899 502)

13 change In estImate An amount previously reflected as a VAT liability relating to revenue received in prior periods was released in the current year as a change in estimate, based on a tax clearance certificate from SARS stating that there are no outstanding amounts due to SARS. The financial statements have been adjusted in the current year to account for this change in estimate. The effect of this change on revenue and trade and other payables in the current year is as follows: 30 JuNe 2012

Trade and other receivables

2 910 377

1 071 008

Cash and cash equivalents

4 325 881

7 800 543

7 236 258

8 871 551

Increase in revenue Decrease in trade and other payables

(1 227 249) 1 227 249

There is no effect in future periods. The maximum exposure to credit risk for trade receivables at the reporting date is: Local debtors

2 910 377

1 071 008

14. standards and InterpretatIons not yet effectIve There are Standards and Interpretations in issue that are not yet effective. The directors have considered all of these Standards and Interpretations and found none to be applicable to the business of the Company and therefore expect none to have a significant impact on future financial statements.

60

61


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

r o w i n g

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

s t e e r i n g

h u b

c r o s s r o a d s

c o a c h i n g

c h e e r i n g

financials

financials

detaIled Income statement

detaIled Income statement (ConTinueD)

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

for The year enDeD 30 June 2012

2012 R

2011 R

(20 948 304)

(12 098 595)

Auditor’s remuneration

80 000

84 000

Bad debts

58 465

Bank charges

26 192

21 353

15 766

2012 R

2011 R

Revenue

21 234 314

11 771 886

expenditure

Administration fees – Cape Town Central City Improvement District

1 110 990

1 028 694

Grant income – City of Cape Town

7 574 000

7 158 360

Change in estimate relating to VAT raised on revenue in prior periods

1 227 249

Parking and film income

1 545 605

1 725 080

Computer expenses

198 813

63 448

Project income

9 776 470

1 859 752

Depreciation

328 219

352 505

495

6 765

Cleaning

Donations and gifts Other income

526 031

340 534

Events

62 752

57 166

Interest received

526 031

340 534

General expenses

204 102

84 994

Insurance

35 554

33 935

Internet connectivity

26 287

23 790

Legal costs

59 265

1 616

13 738

Office expense

22 094

15 601

Postage

8 676

4 126

172 049

98 728

11 919 591

3 383 406

Reimbursements

11 809

19 982

Rental expenses – Operating lease

725 373

311 334

6 247 142

7 047 233

Subscriptions

36 650

28 128

Telephone and fax

97 954

67 761

Training

30 940

Travel

595 882

363 22

Expenditure (refer to page 63) Net surplus

21 760 345

12 112 420

(20 948 304)

(12 098 595)

812 041

13 825

Loss on scrapping of equipment

Printing and stationery Project costs

Salaries and wages

62

f i n a n c i a l s

63


i n t r o d u c t i o n

premier business l o c at i o n

r o w i n g

q u a l i t y u r b a n e n v i r o n m e n t

s t e e r i n g

p o p u l a r d e s t i n at i o n

k n o w l e d g e

h u b

c o a c h i n g

c r o s s r o a d s

f i n a n c i a l s

c h e e r i n g

S TA F F

S TA F F

THE CAPE TOWN PARTNERSHIP TEAM

WDC2014 CCDS CREATIVE CAPE TOWN THE FRINGE THE SAFETY LAB

SUPPORT SERVICES

EDP

CCID

COMMUNICATIONS

64

65


introduction

r ow in g

premier business lo cat io n

quality urban environment

p o p u l ar d e st i n at io n

ste e ri ng

k n o w l e d g e h u b

coachi ng

crossroads

financials

c h e e ri n g

Produced in collaboration with No part of this publication may be reproduced without prior permission of the publishers and the reference ‘Cape Town Partnership’ as the photo and text source. No liability is assumed for unsolicited text and photos. For queries please contact 021 419 1881 or visit www.capetownpartnership.co.za

Cape Town Partnership 2012 Annual Report  

Cape Town Partnership 2012 Annual Report

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