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WATER GUIDELINES FOR CONSTRUCTION & COMMERCIAL PROPERTY BASEMENT WATER

CITY OF CAPE TOWN’S GREEN BOND In 2017, the City of Cape Town launched its first green bond of R1 billion in a closed bidding process. 29 investors made a total offering of R4.3bn in response. With the projects to be a mix of adaptation and mitigation initiatives, among these are water management initiatives as well as the treatment of sewage effluent. For more on the Green Bond, see pg 17.

CENTRAL CITY BUSINESSES ADAPTING TO THE CRISIS Several businesses with operations in the CBD are leading by example in terms of water-saving initiatives. Here are a few examples. Virgin Active Gyms (in the Cape Town CBD and throughout the metropole) have taken the following measures to reduce water usage: reduced backwashing of pools; use pool covers to reduce evaporation; closed steam rooms and saunas; installed dual flush toilets; replaced PVC piping with stainless steel to prevent leaks; have rain water harvesting and water recycling projects in place; conduct regular water audit; train staff on water management; fitted showers with eco-showerheads which use 30% less water and installed two-minute alarm systems indicating when your two minutes of showering time are up. Restaurants throughout the CBD are using grey water to water their

herbs and plants; some are reducing dishwashing by making use of paper and wooden coffee cups and using waterless wine coolers. Hotels are installing water saving measures such as low-flow shower heads; requesting guests to shower instead of taking baths (some hotels have even removed the plugs from baths); implementing tourist awareness campaigns such as “Save like a local”; and replacing fresh water with sea water in swimming pools (a few have even closed their pools). A number of hotels are also informing arrivals that there will be no daily changing of sheets and towels for long-staying guests. Leading by corporate example A number of CBD-based corporates are stepping up to the water-wise challenge, among them the Woolworths head office (located in Precinct 4) and Redefine Properties new The Towers complex (located in Precinct 1). See case studies on each of these on pg 11.

CAPE TOWN’S OVERALL WATER USAGE BY NUMBERS:

64.5%

residents of houses, flats & complexes

10

12.8%

retail & offices

4.2% industry

3.6%

residents in informal settlements

THE STATE O F C A P E TO W N CE NTR A L CI T Y R E P O R T 20 1 7

The water crisis has forced companies to find different sources of water. A prime example of this is ground water which seeps into the basement levels of buildings, and which normally collects in underground sumps. Once the sumps are full, the water is released into the stormwater system and lost out to sea. Within the CBD, there are many buildings which have basement water – with the majority not yet using this resource. It is understandable therefore that this water has now been flagged as an asset. To this end, GreenCape1, together with the City of Cape Town, has researched if and how this water can be used, and have provided the following guidelines for property owners and managing agents. The most efficient way to make use of basement water is to: Use it on site Share it within a property portfolio Share it with a third party if there is surplus available (and it is non-potable). Infrastructure costs incurred to make use of basement water can be claimed back by a business. The following steps can be taken to start the process of using basement water: STEP 1: Install meters and measure basement water discharge. STEP 2: Compare with potable water demand (identify different uses/quality requirements). STEP 3: Test water quality to determine if it is fit for use or needs a filtration system. STEP 4: Install buffer tanks (sized according to basement water discharge and demand). STEP 5: Install treatment system, if required. STEP 6: Connect to points of use [with Reduced Pressure Zone (RPZ) valve]. STEP 7: Apply for a WSI/WSP (see box top right of pg 11) if supplying for human consumption.

The State of Cape Town Central City Report 2017  

Looking back at 2017 in terms of the economic and investment climate of the Cape Town CBD.

The State of Cape Town Central City Report 2017  

Looking back at 2017 in terms of the economic and investment climate of the Cape Town CBD.

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