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cricket •

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SATURDAY MAY 5 10AM - 4 PM Included with Regular Admission Members FREE Demonstrations, live animals, food, live blues music, arts and crafts, information, organizations and more!

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Obtain the Property Report as required by Federal law and read it before signing anything. No Federal Agency has judged the merits or value, if any, of this property. This is not intended to be an offer to sell nor a solicitation of offers to buy real estate in Greenbrier Sporting Club by residents of HI, ID, IL, NY and OR or in any other jurisdiction where prohibited by law. This project is registered with the New Jersey Real Estate Commission, N.J. Reg. No. 11-59-0002. All plans, renderings, designs, and other depictions, as well as the number, type, size, material, availability, location, appearance, dimensions and pricing of lots, homes, facilities and amenities are for the purpose of illustration and are subject to change without notice. Use of recreational facilities and amenities requires separate club membership. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.Š 2012 The Greenbrier Sporting Club / John Klemish, Broker In Charge, 5 Kate’s Mountain Road, White Sulphur Springs, WV 24986.

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Your Premier Fishing Destination Load up the boat, pack your best rod and reel and hit the road– It is time to “Fish Virginia First”– The Mid-Atlantic’s Premier Fishing Trail! Some of the best fishing destinations in the country await you in Virginia! Home of some of the most picturesque and inspiring lakes, ponds, streams, rivers and reservoirs around, Virginia promises to satisfy your desire to fish, as well as your sense of adventure!

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SEE THE WORLD’S GREATEST ARTISTS IN ONE OF THE WORLD’S GREAT FESTIVALS

FESTIVAL DEBUT

American Ballet Theatre Giselle

with Virginia Symphony Orchestra “One of the most beautiful sights in dance is ABT in full flight” wrote the legendary dance critic Clive Barnes in the New York Post. Recognized as one of the great dance companies in the world, ABT is famed for the artistry of its dancers and the scope of its repertoire. April 20–22, Norfolk

PLUS DOZENS MORE PERFORMANCES BY WORLD-RENOWNED ARTISTS Renée Fleming

The Screwtape Letters

Virginia International Tattoo April 27–29, Norfolk

May 1–6, Norfolk

“The people’s diva…a voice as warm and rich as a fine single malt” London Times April 16, Norfolk Chris Botti

Al Pacino: One Night Only May 12, Norfolk

May 20, Virginia Beach

Jane Krakowski May 27, Williamsburg

Plan your 2012 Festival trip to historic, beautiful Coastal Virginia. Travel packages are available! FOR MORE INFORMATION AND A COMPLETE FESTIVAL SCHEDULE, VISIT vafest.org OR CALL 1-877-741-2787

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Editor’s Letter VOluMe 10, NuMbeR 3 April 2012 Published by

Cape Fear Publishing Company 109 east Cary street, Richmond, Virginia 23219 Telephone (804) 343-7539, Facsimile (804) 649-0306 VirginiaLiving.com PUBLISHER

John-lawrence smith EDITORIAL STAFF editor erin Parkhurst Art direCtor sonda Andersson Pappan AssoCiAte editor daryl Grove AssistAnt editor lisa Antonelli bacon CONTRIBUTING EDITORS

bland Crowder, Neely barnwell dykshorn, bill Glose, Caroline Kettlewell, sarah sargent, Julie Vanden-bosch CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Mary burruss, Matthew Gottlieb, Clarke C. Jones, Chiles T.A. larson, Kay Neer, Tim Thornton, deveron Timberlake, holly Timberline, Gary Robertson CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Jeff Greenough, stacey evans, Kip dawkins, Roger Foley, Chiles larson, Chad bonanno, Patricia lyons, sam dean, beth harris CONTRIBUTING ILLUSTRATORS

Craig laRotonda, daniel Chang, Robert Meganck, Rob ullman EDITORIAL INTERNS

Charlotte brackett, shelby Giles, Glennis lofland ART INTERNS

Jillian Gonzalez, sophia li ADVERTISING ExECUTIVES CENTRAL VIRGINIA sAles MAnAGer Torrey Munford (804) 343-0782, TMunford@CapeFear.com

Christiana Roberts

(804) 622-2602, CRoberts@CapeFear.com EASTERN VIRGINIA

Kerry harrington

(757) 450-1335, Kerryharrington@CapeFear.com

Wit Robertson

(804) 622-2614, WitRobertson@CapeFear.com NORTHERN VIRGINIA

blaise yanick

(804) 622-2603, blaiseyanick@CapeFear.com WESTERN VIRGINIA

heather McKinney

(804) 622-2611, heatherMcKinney@CapeFear.com OFFICE STAFF oFFiCe MAnAGer Carolyn birney AssistAnt oFFiCe MAnAGer Chenoa Ford CreAtive serviCes direCtor Jason sullivan CirCulAtion MAnAGer Jamilya brown Web editor daryl Grove CorPorAte sPonsorsHiPs Torrey Munford GroundskeePer Melwood Whitlock ACtivities & MorAle direCtor Cutty AssistAnt ACtivities & MorAle direCtor Rex CALENDAR ADVICE

We welcome calendar items; to ensure consideration, printed copies of information must be sent four months before publication via u.s. Mail to our editor at the above address. POSTMASTER

send address changes to virGiniA livinG 109 east Cary st., Richmond, VA 23219 SUBSCRIPTIONS

One year - $22, two years - $38. send to 109 east Cary st., Richmond, VA 23219 or Virginialiving.com BACK ISSUES

back issues are available for most editions and are $9.95 plus $5 shipping and handling. Please call for availability. REPRINTS & REPRODUCTION PERMISSION

Contact John-lawrence smith, Publisher, at (804) 343-7539 or Jlsmith@CapeFear.com LEGALISMS

Virginia Living is a registered trademark of Cape Fear Publishing Company, inc. Copyright 2008, all rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission of the publisher is strictly prohibited. IDENTIFICATION STATEMENT VIRGINIA LIVING

(usPs) issN 1534-9984 VirginiaLiving is published bimonthly by Cape Fear Publishing Company, 109 east Cary st., Richmond, VA 23219. Periodical postage permit 021-875 at Richmond, VA.

A Literary Duet When Williamsburg-based writer and photographer Chiles Larson, a long-time contributor to Virginia Living, called me a few months ago and said he wanted to “set me up” with a writer, I must confess I was a little wary. It’s been a long time since I had a blind date—editorial or otherwise. But Chiles, ever the professional and gentleman, has never let me down, so I decided to accept the invitation. I am so glad I did. After reading Kay Neer’s essay about the military-style assault that black ants make on her home in Alexandria each spring, I was so taken with her witty musing that I knew we had to close this issue with the piece (see page 112). As the weather warms, and the ant brigade that lives in the dark recesses of my own home begins to emerge, I know I’ll greet that line of marching soldiers with newfound respect. Later, when I called to thank Chiles for his match-making and to discuss the travel story he shot and wrote about visiting France that appears in this issue (see page 76), he said, “I bet you’ve never had a brother-sister act in the magazine before, have you?” I don’t believe we have, I answered. “Well, you do now,” Chiles laughed. Kay, you see, is Chiles’ older sister. The two of them grew up in Norfolk; their father was an editor at the Virginian-Pilot. Chiles, a graduate of the College of William & Mary who spent most of his career in TV news and advertising and who has published books on Virginia history, and Kay, who attended William & Mary and, after raising four children, graduated from George Washington University on a writing scholarship, are pictured here around 1934. I am very glad to have such a talented sibling duo in this issue. I am also glad to present Tim Thornton’s story about the Southwest Virginia Cultural Foundation’s effort to recast that region’s economy around its sustainable resources; namely, its rich culture and history (see page 106). Long home to natural resource-depleting and manufacturing industries, the region has certainly taken its share of blows as those businesses have atrophied and often disappeared over the years. When the cornerstone of a community’s economy pulls up stakes, it can be devastating for those left behind. But the people of Southwest Virginia—though tested—certainly have not been bested as a new economy built on longheld traditions in music, art and recreation is beginning to thrive. We here at Virginia Living applaud this kind of resilience and ingenuity. Thornton knows the region well. The award-winning journalist and teacher of Appalachian literature says his family has lived in the New River Valley since TJ occupied the White House. Today he lives within walking distance of the 1934 building where his parents and he went to high school and his children, now almost-grown, attended middle school. When Thornton, who plays the dulcimer, interviewed the musical Yates family in Konnarock for the story, he enjoyed an impromptu jam session with Debbie playing clawhammer banjo, and Tim picking his guitar. Eleven year-old Molly played her potato bug mandolin, and the youngest of the Yates clan, 9-year-old Sadie joined in too. She is too small to play the family’s stand-up bass when it is standing up, so instead, Thornton says, she sat atop the big fiddle laying on its side and thumped along in time while everybody sang. Sadie, like a lot of folks in this region, sure seems to know how to make things work. There is much more in this issue of Virginia Living, including a feature story about another creative solution to a problem—invasive species. Mary Burruss spent time with locavore hunter Jackson Landers to learn more about his plan to control invaders like Chinese mystery snails and kudzu—eat them. I hope you’ll try one of the recipes we offer for these persistent pests (please do let us know how they taste). We also bring you in this issue a feature story about the sport and art of fly fishing, written by the ever-capable Clarke C. Jones. I am pleased to say that voting in our first ever Best of Virginia Readers’ Survey has closed, and thousands of you let us know about the best our state has to offer in everything from dining to doing. Thank you for taking time to complete our survey and share your “bests”! Look for them in our special issue, Best of Virginia 2012, which will be on newsstands in May. I hope you enjoy this issue of Virginia Living!

—eRiN PARKhuRsT, Editor

Blast From the Past! Our June 2006 story “A Rogue’s Gallery of Clubs,” about Virginia Beach nightlife in the 1960s and ’70s and written by Jake Denton, was republished on our website late last year. The establishments profiled are long gone, but clearly not forgotten. The story stirred up a few fond memories that readers were kind enough to share with us in the comments sections of both VirginiaLiving.com and our Facebook page. Here are a few of the highlights:

This article is great! it brings back many memories. left out was The seaside Park, where 31st street now ends. We danced every Tuesday night, then went to The Top hat. Oh yes, a great place! And The dome? i’m dating myself by saying that i remember seeing James brown, The beach boys and many other groups during that era. Then came the fabulous Rogue’s [Gallery]! every Wednesday was locals Night; Thursday was show Night with Frankie Valli, Fats domino, even The Temptations! That point in time was so great, the music will live forever. Chuck Heeb

i won a Twist contest at The Peppermint! The first-place prize? A case of 3.2 black label! 1961-1967 was my time in this place. Thank you, Virginia Living, for bringing part of it “alive” again. Jerry Reid i frequented Rogue’s Gallery, Peppermint beach Club and Peabody’s in the ’70s. All good times! Shelley Stepp

Letters to the editor

We love receiving letters and emails from Virginia Living readers and hearing your reactions to our stories! Don’t keep your thoughts to yourself, write them down or type them up instead! Please e-mail us at Editor@CapeFear.com or write to us at Letters to the Editor, Cape Fear Publishing, 109 E. Cary St., Richmond, Va. 23219. Please include your name, address and phone number. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. For subscriptions, see our website, VirginiaLiving.com. Kindly address all other editorial queries to Editor@CapeFear.com

V i r g i n i a

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I’m at a place in my life where:

I’d rather play in my ga rden tha n toil in my kitchen.

Equal Housing Opportunity © 2012 RWC

Living at Rappahannock Westminster-Canterbury is about exactly that, “living.” Set on 165 of the most scenic acres of Virginia’s Northern Neck, RWC is an inviting, full-service retirement community. We offer an appealing worry-free lifestyle that affords you more time to enjoy those things you want to do, and the peace of mind of continuing care, if ever needed. For more information, call to request your complimentary copy of our Embrace Life Today DVD today.

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contents april 2012 Virginia LiVing

f e at U r e s

ga r d e n

d e pa r t m e n t s

96

82

Upfront 21 Peripatetic poet Sandra

eat, or Be eaten! Virginia has plenty of alien critters that are multiplying fast and muscling out native species. What to do? locavore hunter Jackson landers says get out the frying pan. Join him as he goes “invasivore.”

By mAry BurruSS

100

to catch a fish We visit rose river Farm in Syria and mossy Creek in Harrisonburg to discover why the sport of fly fishing is as much about respecting nature as it is about landing trout. By ClArke C. JoneS

106

creatiVe economy Big industry may have foundered in Southwest Virginia, but its reputation as a cultural center is spreading due to an effort to build a new economy that is as sustainable as it is inventive. By tim tHornton

the garden path Dick and Judy mazzucchelli’s elegant walled garden was inspired by some of Virginia’s most beautiful 18th-century gardens. But the result of these expertly integrated inspirations is a garden that is all their own.

By DAryl groVe

87

79th annUaL historic garden week A preview of what’s new for the garden Club of Virginia’s marquee event coming to more than 250 gardens near you this April. By erin PArkHurSt

Beasley, mountain radio, leather and liquor, winning wineries, popping pink, Bellwether and more.

cLick 43 Social functions around

the state, supporting art, institutions and charities.

weddings 47 Weddings done in grand

Virginia style from across the Commonwealth.

interView 48 Virginia native and

Hollywood stuntman Paul Darnell jumps, dives and rolls his way onto the big screen. By Holly timBerline

sport 50 Virginians have enjoyed

cricket, that oh-so typically British sport, since the Colonial era. A primer on where cricket is being played today and what you need to know to get to bat. By mAttHeW gottlieB

62 Virginiana

St. Christopher’s School in richmond, now in its 100th year, asks students to explore what it means to be a leader in the 21st century. By erin PArkHurSt

64 food

Since ancient times, caviar has been the apotheosis of entertaining. the perfect complement? icy vodka, of course. Chef J Frank offers recipes that do justice to both. By liSA Antonelli BACon

traVeL 76 A sojourn in France is

decades in the making for one writer, who discovers that Paris, the loire Valley and normandy were worth the wait. By CHileS t.A. lArSon

departUre 112 Ants martial up and move

in. Can we all live together? maybe. like it or not, one writer offers up an ant’s-eye view. By kAy neer

o n t h e coV e r Colby and Brian Trow, owners of Mossy Creek Outfitters in Harrisonburg. Photograph by Jeff Greenough

p h oto g r a p h By k i p daw k i n s

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coming

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may!

in

BEST OF VIRGINIA 2012

Buy your copy in May at Barnes & Noble stores and quality newsstands around the state, or go to VirginiaLiving.com!

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VirginiaLiving.com The Virginia Living experience doesn’t have to end with the last page of the magazine. Visit us at VirginiaLiving.com, where you’ll find extended content from the stories in this issue, plus original web-only content and our fabulous photo contests.

RECIPES

Hungry for more of our invasivore recipes? Our Kudzu Pesto and Cajun Grilled Northern Snakehead recipes will tantalize your tastebuds. Cook, and do your part to help save Virginia from invasive species. EXPLORING

Fly angler Beau Beasley asks the thorny question, who owns the Jackson River? Plus, our guide to cricket terminology like “beamer” and “Nelson” will help you navigate this lyrically ludicrous lexicon. ARtS & EvENtS

Want to see Southwest Virginia’s creative economy in action? See our listing of venues and upcoming events across the region. SLIdEShOwS

Enjoy more of Stacy Evans’ lively images from Southwest Virginia, go deeper into Jeff Greenough’s fly fishing photography and see more of Roger Foley’s gorgeous shots of the Mazzucchelli’s walled garden in Leesburg. PhOtO CONtEStS

Join in the fun and win prizes! We’ll be looking for the Biggest Basketball Fan and the Prettiest Flower in Bloom in our March and April photo contests. Show us your colors!

We’re also proud to announce the launch of the Virginia Living iPad app. Download for free from the Apple store or via VirginiaLiving.com/iPad and see the magazine looking sleeker than ever before!

S: PLu

AdriAn vAn Leen

all that and more at VirginiaLiving.com Find us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

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Kurt Vonnegut

Folk Artist William Clarke

Pretty in Pink

writing on the wall Image matters to poet Sandra Beasley—“I don’t tend to slum it,” she says, dressing up instead of down, no artist’s torment furrowing her photogenic brow. “We do want our poets to have a memorable look,” she admits, “some kind of extremity” that sets them outside convention. But her darkeyed, cerebral glamour isn’t the 32-year-old writer’s main attraction; it is her skill as a storyteller, peddling words to a discerning, and growing, audience. The Vienna-born Beasley, who graduated from the University of Virginia and American University, logs 30,000 miles a year in her car, “giving everything but a pint of blood” for a rigorous mix of readings, residencies and book signings across the region. Her third volume of poetry is finished; her first two, Theories of Falling and I Was the Jukebox, won careerenhancing attention, prestigious fellowships and a number of awards. Boosting Beasley’s ascent was a memoir published last year, Don’t Kill the Birthday Girl, about her allergic reaction to a host of triggers. The resulting media interviews established enough momentum that she could leave a magazine editing job at The American Scholar for life on the road. As a traveling writer, Beasley shifts into performance mode, “going to places where I’m in charge of the evening,” on campuses, in bookstores and at conferences. She may match some of her audience’s preconceived notions of a poet—“I do drink Scotch out of a flask that I carry, I do wear a scarf, I do work until 4:00 in the morning,”—but she disarms with thoughtful repartee honed by love affairs and hours well spent in bars. “I’m grateful to have gotten my start with open mics,” she says of poetry readings in parks and clubs. “You have to know how to deliver a poem that can grab that audience by the throat,” which in her case is a counterpunch of deep ideas and images told with twinkling eyes and soprano pitch. Followers sometimes ask her for autographs and pictures. “I can take a word like ‘accessible’ as a compliment. If a poem makes you feel stupid, the poet has let you down.” Modern poets live in a social media world, and Beasley’s musings on Twitter and in her blog, Chicks Dig Poetry, intend to

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“give more than the postcard view,” she says. “You can be a poet and still get down. God knows we need more poets who are willing to be open to that.” For Beasley, that means using absurdity—speaking as an eggplant, a piano, the testicle of a plant—or high and low diction, and a witty ferocity that often spins from a footnote of science or history. “I think it’s so important for the poet to look beyond her own navel, to use information from the outside world,” she says. Beasley’s Washington D.C.-based parents, an Army general who traveled frequently and a collage artist-painter, now speak to her “artist to artist, road warrior to road warrior,” bolstering her resolve to keep moving despite what she calls a tremendous need to be grounded. “My nesting instinct keeps me from being a true vagabond,” she says. Rituals hold the chaos of constant travel in check: She rises at daylight, exercises to Lauryn Hill and Kanye West, putters online after breakfast, and then gets down to business. She writes late into the night in hotel rooms and artist retreats, returning to her minimalist studio in D.C. to regroup and repeat. “It’s not about being comfortable in the world; it’s about being mildly uneasy, but proceeding nonetheless,” Beasley blogs upon returning to the Virginia Center for Creative Arts in Amherst for a month-long residency early this year. “Always, you arrive. You orient. You risk embarrassment. You plunge.” Self-awareness came while she studied English and edited an underground literary journal at the University of Virginia. Writing became a way of standing apart, observing the scene and learning a craft that she has willed into a career. Poets have served different purposes across time, Beasley observes, and while some want to push the boundaries of the genre, others find power in traditional forms. She favors the sestina, a complex 39-line structure first used by a 12th-century troubadour, because its repetition reminds her of waves on the ocean, a favorite reference. Her subjects range from the platypus and the cherry tomato to a God who wears jeans and is short. If readers don’t appreciate poetry as an art form, Beasley hopes to change their opinion. “I like converting people. … And I’ve never regretted telling a story.” She enjoys the visceral process of thumb-tacking finished pages to the wall, arranged like a band’s set list to make them play whole. Once she’s organized a book, she insists on a final rehearsal: “I read all 60,000 words aloud and then hit send,” releasing the manuscript to her publisher. With that, another road trip unspools over a bluesy Sam Cooke playlist, and the nomad shows her face to the world. SandraBeasley.com i l l u s t r at i o n b y r o b e r t m e g a n c k

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n At i v e s

Invisible by the Thousands Ancient And short-lived, fleeting And enduring, the fAiry shrimp is A miniAture mirAcle. Virginia’s fairy shrimp are creatures of profound contradictions, at once rare and abundant, ephemeral and enduring, widely distributed but difficult to find, fragile and yet astonishingly hardy. You’ve probably never heard of them. You’ve almost certainly never seen them. And yet in late winter through spring, thousands upon thousands of them live out their brief lives in the evanescent ecosystems that are Virginia’s vernal pools. Faithful readers of this column will recall being introduced to vernal pools this time last year, when the subject was that vocal harbinger of the season, the spring peeper. As described on the website of the Virginia Vernal Pools Program (VirginiaVernalPools.org), vernal pools are temporary, freshwater wetlands— typically they fill up with winter and spring rains only to dry out over the course of the summer and fall. As shallow as a few inches and as deep as 15 feet, these fleeting pools support a surprising variety of life for the very

reason that they do dry out—making them inhospitable to fish and, therefore, friendly to the kinds of creatures that a fish might happily eat. Like fairy shrimp. Fairy shrimp and their relatives can be found the world over in a surprising variety of habitats, but the three species known to live in Virginia all make their homes in vernal pools, according to naturalist Mike Hayslett, who is director of the Virginia Vernal Pools Program. In synch with the waxing and waning of the pool, an individual fairy shrimp leads a brief life; it will hatch, grow to maturity, breed and die all in a single season. At the right moment in that season, however, one vernal pool can host thousands of the shrimp. Not that you might notice, even if you happened across a vernal pool, which itself is all-too-rare a thing to find (and, under assault from development and pollution, in danger of growing rarer still). A mature fairy shrimp is insubstantial: Translucent

and roughly an inch long, it flits almost invisibly through the water, earning its whimsical name. Still, in its short life, the fairy shrimp plays an important role. In a season when vegetation is difficult to come by, vernal pools teeming with fairy shrimp serve as a convenient take-out buffet for waterfowl such as mallards, green-winged teals and wood ducks. “Who doesn’t like shrimp?” says Hayslett. And while it’s perhaps not all that pleasant to be eaten by a duck, the duck, in fact, aids in the fairy shrimp’s survival. To understand why, you need to know that a live fairy shrimp is a delicate thing. It needs just the right conditions to thrive and is sensitive to pollution, water chemistry and suspended sediments. “If a bear or a deer—or a human—wallows around in a vernal pool and stirs up the debris from the bottom, they can kill a lot of shrimp,” says Hayslett. A fairy shrimp’s eggs, however, are a different matter altogether. Astonishingly hardy, they can remain viable through inhospitable conditions for years. Decades. Quite possibly even centuries. And when the right conditions finally present themselves, the eggs will hatch. “They can remain in the dry soil of an old pool for decades, and when that pool finally refills with water, they’ll hatch out,” says Hayslett. Such remarkable endurance has allowed fairy shrimp to persist across a very long span of time, at least since the ice ages. Their hardiness also allows eggs to “catch an air flight from pool to pool” in the gut of a duck. When a female fairy shrimp full of eggs is eaten by a duck in one pond, the eggs can survive the journey through the duck’s digestive tract to be, er, deposited in the next pool where the duck lands. Which is how an entirely pond-locked creature can get up and go places. Hayslett’s enthusiasm for fairy shrimp is undeniable. But if fairy shrimp could be said to have a Number One Fan, that honor would certainly go to Brian La Fountain, a naturalist and photographer who is in the final stages of editing a documentary following the life cycle of fairy shrimp. He and Hayslett hope the film will create awareness about fairy shrimp and the fragile vernal pool homes on which they depend. “In Virginia, fairy shrimp are the poster critter for uniqueness,” says Hayslett. “And most people,” adds La Fountain, “don’t even know they exist.” —Caroline Kettlewell V i r g i n i a

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Pump Up the Jam Shhh! Allegheny MountAin RAdio bReAkS the Silence of the nAtionAl RAdio Quiet Zone. By Gary roBertson

Courtesy of allegheny Mountain radio

Radio Quiet Zone—a 13,000-square-mile area established in 1958 to minimize possible harmful interference to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory in Green Bank and the radio receiving facilities for the U.S. Navy in Sugar Grove, both of which are in West Virginia. The Quiet Zone threw up barriers to radio and later cell phone and Wi-Fi transmissions in the counties immediately surrounding the observatory, and the high mountains played havoc with television signals before the days of satellite dishes and cable, isolating local residents. It wasn’t until 1981 that the observatory finally perAllegheny Mountain Radio’s photo illustration of their online store. mitted the establishment of a low-power station— In the shadow of the National Radio Quiet Zone, WMVR-AM—in Frost, West Virginia. The network was established when WVLS-FM in Highland County and operating among some of the highest and most and WCHG-FM in Bath County both began broadcastisolating elevations east of the Mississippi, Allegheny ing in 1995. (According to FCC regulations, WMVR Mountain Radio binds three thinly populated counbroadcasts during the daylight hours only and the two ties in Virginia and West Virginia that are otherwise Virginia stations take over in the evening.) detached from much of the rest of the world. The network has 10 full-time staff members and In this age of über-global connectedness, the threemany volunteer announcers. The on-air personalistation network is hyper-local and proud of it. ties include a retired college professor, a retired Army Perhaps nowhere else will the recipe of the week, ranger, a local schoolteacher, a summer camp operalocal obituaries, high school basketball games, lost tor, a golf course superintendent, a former member of dog announcements, poetry readings and a musithe National Security Agency, a farmer and a preacher. cal collage of country, classical, blue grass, rock ‘n The community is welcome to put together a show or roll, big band, folk and jazz collide in such perfect sing a song or even offer a recipe. harmony. “I’ve never had a job where I’ve laughed Diane Buzzard, the network’s interim general so much,” says Erin Will, station coordinator for manager, hopes to put Allegheny Mountain Radio’s WVLS-FM in Virginia’s tiny Highland County, popuprogramming on the Internet sometime soon, so the lation 2,300. world can listen in. Allegheny Mountain Radio had its start 30 years You never know what you’ll hear. Recently, Crissy ago in Pocahontas County, West Virginia, as local Smith of Mountain Grove contributed her recipe for residents tried to find ways to connect to each other “Pickled Beets and Eggs.” AlleghenyMountainRadio.org and surmount the silence imposed by the National

Where Eros Meets Ethos ViRginiA opeRA to peRfoRM the Mikado. By Glennis lofland Don’t put your opera glasses away just yet; the Virginia Opera still has one more show to stage. Beginning March 10 and ending April 1, the Virginia Opera will perform Gilbert and Sullivan’s most popular work, Mikado in The Mikado, Norfolk, Fairfax and Richmond. Making their Virginia Opera debuts are visiting headliners Matthew Plenk, Kevin Burdette, Katherine Jolly and Aaron St. Clair Nicholson. Sung in English, with English supertitles, Mikado is perfect for the novice as well as for the experienced viewer. It is a world where flirting can get you beheaded and marriages are arranged between characters with names the likes of Nanki-Poo and Yum Yum. You have to wonder where Gil-ivan got that wicked sense of humor. VaOpera.org

Katherine Jolly, pictured above, will perform the role of Yum-Yum.

Raise a Glass to Virginia Wine ViRginiA nAMed one of the woRld’S 10 beSt wine deStinAtionS. By daryl Grove “Virginia wine has been something of an insider secret for the past three or four years,” says Annette Boyd, director of the state-funded Virginia Wine Marketing Board. But the secret is out, after prestigious Wine

contributed photos

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Enthusiast Magazine named the Commonwealth one of the 10 best wine travel destinations in the world for 2012. Boyd says this international recognition is “first and foremost due to the caliber of wines being produced here,”

though Virginia’s rich history, lush landscapes and nearly 200 wineries spread throughout every region of the state give tourists multiple reasons to stop by the Old Dominion for a drink. Cheers! VirginiaWine.org

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2/24/12 1:36 PM


Kicking It! Richmond KicKeRs GeneRal manaGeR shelley soweRs is in a leaGue of heR own. BY darYl grove Though Richmond Kickers General Manager Shelly Sowers shuns the spotlight, fans at City Stadium are used to seeing the 2010 United Soccer Leagues Executive of the Year on the move, walkie-talkie in hand, busy ensuring that everything happens on time in all of the 30 or more games the Kickers play each season. The Kickers are Virginia’s only professional soccer team, and the imperturbable Sowers—now in her 10th year with the organization—oversees operations for both the 20-plus player professional roster as well as the nearly 8,000 players in the Kickers’ youth club. We caught up with Sowers on the eve of the team’s 20th season to find out how this 31-year-old dynamo makes it all happen. How did you get your start with the Kickers? I’d never played soccer. I was just out of college in 2002 and needed some experience, so I joined the organization as a sales and marketing associate. I really didn’t expect to be here longer than a year! What’s the best thing about being GM? Game day. People walk into the stadium in the evening and see all the signage, but they don’t know we’ve been there since 8 a.m. putting it up and will be there until midnight taking it down. I love to see all the planning and hard work pay off on game day. Richmond Kickers General Manager Shelley Sowers at City Stadium.

What’s the toughest thing? It’s just so much work to do in a short amount of

time. Ticket sales, match reports, making sure the game kicks off on time, that the lines aren’t too long out front, that the moon bounce is inflated and then deflated. One game ends, and you’re already planning the next one. Sometimes it’s 16hour days, seven days a week. But it’s exciting to never know what to expect. One time the scoreboard at the stadium stopped working an hour before kickoff, so we had to rig up a clock and speaker system for the game to kick off on time. Are you the only female GM in the league? I am right now, and that can be a challenge in itself. It’s definitely a man’s world. There’ll always be someone who says something like “Oh, your dad must own the team,” but never the people who work with me here at the Kickers. What’s the secret to the Kickers’ longevity? Really hard-working people who are genuinely dedicated. Rob [Ukrop, president of the board] and Leigh [Cowlishaw, head coach and director of soccer] were both players on that original 1993 team. Leigh and I collaborate on everything; basically, he comes up with ideas, and then I find a way of making them happen! It’s a team effort for sure. The Richmond Kickers 2012 season begins April 7 versus Charleston Battery at City Stadium. Kickoff is 5 p.m. The team will celebrate its 20th anniversary by wearing 1993 throwback jerseys. RichmondKickers.com

Leather is better foR almost anythinG, But especially foR when fashion meets utility.

John Buck

Forest-based luxury leather purveyor Moore & Giles has a well-rounded cache of utilitarian fashion items, including two new pieces that inspire spring picnics, road trips or just outdoor entertaining. the Meehan bar rollup ($150)—designed with nYc master mixologist Jim Meehan—features all the compartments and pockets you need to be a bartender on the move. When you’re bringing the party with you, consider the Meehan utility bag ($660) with removable padded sections, laminated pockets, elastic tool holders, cell phone holder and even a business card pocket. salut! MooreandGiles.com The Meehan Bar Rollup and Utility Bag from Moore & Giles.

“The only reason I ever played in the first place was so I could afford to hunt and fish.” —Sam Snead, Ashwood-born golfer who won a record 82 PGA Tour events, and who would have been 100 this year. contrIbuted photos

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2/10/12 9:18 AM

2/24/12 11:02 AM


Flower Power

Art for Art’s Sake

How to care for orcHids witHout out loving tHem to deatH. By ShelBy GileS Orchids are notoriously difficult to care for. It seems like one minute you’re admiring their vibrant colors and the delicately smooth flesh of their tender petals, and the next you’re collecting crunchy leaves from the failing flower’s wilted stem. But fear not the flower! Arthur E. Chadwick of Chadwick and Son Orchids, which operates more than 10 greenhouses in Powhatan County and whose First Lady Presidential Orchid Collection is featured in the United States Botanic Garden, has a few tips for those of us wanting to see our orchids not only bloom, but prosper. Don’t give your orchid too much attention by over-watering. Do water your orchid once a week and then, “just leave it alone,” says Chadwick. Don’t repot too often. Do repot every few years, and group your orchid types. Different species of orchids have different care specifications. Don’t plant in tightly packed soil because, as Chadwick says, “orchid roots grow rigorously.” Do plant in things such as bark, cork and moss, so that the roots can breathe. Don’t place your orchid in direct heat or light. It will wilt. Do remember that orchids are tropical plants, so place your orchid outside from May to September. Don’t fertilize your orchid in the winter. Do fertilize your orchid every other time you water it in the spring.

Arthur E. Chadwick holding a Cattleya orchid.

Armed with this advice, you may eventually emulate Chadwick’s father, Arthur A. Chadwick, who has orchids from the 1940s that are still going strong. Blooming marvelous! ChadwickOrchids.com

tHe virginia arts festival returns for its 16t 16tH season. You don’t have to be an arts maven to dive into the Virginia Arts Festival. You just have to be open to enjoying a plethora of arts-related events, from dance to music to a lecture by—yes, the Godfather himself—Al Pacino. In fact, Pacino isn’t the only internationally recognized name that will connect with audiences in venues across 10 cities in hampton roads this April. how about worldrenowned violinist Itzhak Perlman? or the American ballet Theatre? This year’s festival might be stretching the definition of “arts,” but we’re glad. Sign up for The Art of Chocolate (a fest unto itself), a ukulele concert by Jake Shimabukuro (hey, plucking a uke takes some artistry) or a comedic riff on classical music by violinist Aleksey Igudesman and pianist h hyung-ki joo. The arts explosion begins April 12 and runs through June 30. VaFest.org Jake Shimabukuro playing his ukulele.

Go ahead, box me in! wHere to find virginia’s best boxed luncHes. By liSa antonelli Bacon Did the inventor of the boxed lunch know what a boon it would be to the world of food? That it would be a staple of bridge parties? A tasty respite on garden week tours? Midday relief from boardroom meetings? The classic Southern boxed lunch— like Christmas morning—is always a delightful surprise. Push aside the colorful tissue and the ribbon-trussed utensils and see your requests nestled in with a chocolate-dipped strawberry or a ginormous cookie. It’s like opening a present. We have searched the state and found what we think are some of the best boxed lunches Virginia has to offer. Walk in or order ahead (always a polite choice), but don’t miss out.

ConTrIbuTed PhoToS

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chanticleer catering, Roanoke Chanticleer always includes two sweeties: your choice (does an espresso-frosted chocolate torte bar sound good?) and a chocolate-dipped strawberry. $10. ChanticleerCatering.com

sally bell’s Kitchen, Richmond The richmond classic features the understated but standout cheese wafer topped with a pecan, and you can choose a specialty cupcake (all Sally bell’s cupcakes are special) or a tart. $7.85. SallyBellsKitchen.com

taste unlimited, Norfolk

Sally Bell’s boxed lunch.

magnolia foods, Lynchburg

norfolkians and beach-goers love “Taste,” as it is known. Its generously-sized sandwiches on fresh French bread ensure you won’t go hungry. While locals tend to stick to their favorites, there’s a new one: the Merrimac—baked ham, Swiss cheese, and hot peach chutney with mayo. $10. TasteUnlimited.com

Where else can you get a peanut butter and strawberry jam sandwich these days? The cappuccino brownie has become Magnolia’s signature. All the rest is secondary. $8.45. MagnoliaFoods.com

o’Kelly’s, Danville

best buns breads, Arlington

Sandwiches—especially the secret recipe chicken salad and handmade pimiento cheese—are special on this kitchen’s yeast bread, made every morning. desserts include homemade danishes (butter pecan, anyone?). $5. 434-836-7970

Sandwiches have a gourmet twist (Mango Pecan roasted Chicken Salad), and soups (lobster bisque, rustic mushroom, to name a couple) are made from scratch. $10.75. GreatAmericanRestaurants.com

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Charlottesville & Keswick

Shopping

HISTORIC

!

Saturday, March 3 – 11am

Pre-concert festival starts at 10am! Erin R. Freeman, Conductor

Sara Valentine & Michael Boudewyns, Actors

Dining

Britten’s The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra provides a fun way to learn about the symphony!

The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra

Entertainment

S

E AL

The Emperor’s New Clothes Saturday, April 21 – 11am

Pre-concert festival starts at 10am! Erin R. Freeman, Conductor Grey Seal Puppets The Hans Christian Anderson classic is transformed into a musical fable.

Genworth Financial Symphony Pops

Celebrate the day all night long in the Barn at Castle Hill Cider.

keswick, virginia 203.390.2323 www.castlehillcider.com events@castlehillcidercom

Specializing in period 18th & 19th Century American and English furniture, fine and decorative arts including porcelain, paintings and mirrors. 2125 Ivy Road | ChaRlottesvIlle, va | 22903 www.MageRfIeldantIques.CoM | 434.978.4500

A high end Vintage Clothing boutique featuring the finest in men’s and women’s wear, clothing with a conscience and an attitude.

Rodeo with the Richmond Ballet Friday, April 27 – 8pm Saturday, April 28 – 2 & 8pm Steven Smith, Conductor Richmond Ballet The Richmond Symphony and the Richmond Ballet team up for a night of Western favorites! Giddy up!

Carpenter Theatre at Richmond CenterStage

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by N e e ly b a r N w e l l Dy ks h o r N a N D J u l i e Va N D e N - b o s c h

In The Pink Taking iTs cue from The faded hunTsmen’s jackeT, The spring 2012 landscape is Transformed by shades of carnaTion, rose madder and raspberry. Eighteenth-century London tailor Thomas Pink designed the iconic hunting coat worn by masters of foxhounds, whippers-in and huntsmen. The coat was made of a scarlet cloth, but has always been referred to as PINK. Modern Virginians have appropriated the color for hunt and for play. Even the runway at Valentino this spring made plenty of room for pink alongside its trademark red.

Tom Ford Nail Lacquer in Indian Pink. $30. NeimanMarcus.com

Lacoste Special Edition Women’s Polo. $150. JonathanAdler.com

Courtesy of IMAXtree

the MArquIs of WAterford And MeMbers of the tIpperAry hunt (the noble tIps): tIpperAry ‘KIllIng, no Murder,’ 1842; oIl on CAnvAs. vIrgInIA MuseuM of fIne Arts, rIChMond. the pAul Mellon ColleCtIon.

St y l e |

Valentino’s spring runway set the tone for the season with this blossoming shade of pink. Valentino.com

Thomas Pink Classic Braces in Pink. $100; Thomas Pink Woven Button Cufflinks. $50. Thomas Pink, Tysons Galleria, 703-891-1176 and ThomasPink.com

Original Tall Gloss Hunter Boot in Magenta. $125. Saks Fifth Avenue, Stony Point Fashion Park, Richmond, 804-320-6960 and Hunter-Boot.com Canape Gondole red lacquer frame sofa with fuchsia French linen upholstery, to the trade. James Duncan, 305-731-2272 and James-Duncan.com Junior Dachshund Bookends. $150. JonathanAdler.com

Block-printed Primrose Decorative Pillow. $200. Janet Brown Interior Design, Richmond, 804358-9548 and JohnRobshaw.com V i r g i n i a

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Bellwether a compendium of news and notes from around the state. By Lisa antoneLLi Bacon and GLennis LofLand

Up From the Rubble With a record-setting 5.8 magnitude earthquake followed four days later by a hurricane that caused the second largest power outage in state history, not to mention fallen trees and flooding, Mother Nature showed her force last summer with devastating effect to some of Virginia’s most venerable antiquities. Preservation Virginia wants to restore them, but there’s no budget for hurricane or earthquake repair. Among the worst damaged were Cape Henry Lighthouse in Virginia Beach, the historic Jamestown settlement and the Mary Washington House in Fredericksburg. Want to help? On March 24 and 25 at the Main Street Arena on the Mall, Antiques In Charlottesville will host its annual antique show to benefit Preservation Virginia, an organization devoted to preserving Virginia’s historic properties. Spend some money; save the past. AntiquesInCharlottesville.org

A Blowout for a Shootout It was one of the most dramatic courthouse shootouts in American history. On March 14, 1912, “mountaineer” Floyd Allen was on trial at the Carroll County Courthouse in Hillsville for busting two of his nephews out of custody. At his sentencing, Floyd’s kin turned up with guns blazing. Ninety seconds and 57 bullets later, seven people—including the judge, the Commonwealth’s Attorney and a witness—were dead or dying. The Carroll County Historical Society will recognize the 100th anniversary of the shootout March 1214 with a symposium about the tragedy, a music program including a ballad about the event and laying of wreaths on the graves of those who died that day. “We consider the entire event a tragedy,” says historical society secretary Shelby Inscore-Puckett. “It isn’t our place to lay blame.” CourthouseTragedy1912.com

The Shuttle Has Landed The Space Shuttle Discovery will land at the National Air & Space Museum in Chantilly for a lengthy stay on April 19, weather permitting. “If the weather is bad in Florida, it won’t arrive that day,” says Isabel Lara of the museum. The longest-orbiting shuttle in the NASA fleet flew 39 missions, including a couple of “firsts.” It was flown by the first African-American commander and the first female commander in NASA history. And astronaut/ senator John Glenn took it for a spin in 1998. Don’t get too excited. You won’t be able to go inside or even get close. “It’s an artifact on display!” exclaims Lara. Silly us for asking. NASM.SI.edu

Cooking with Martha . . . Washington, That Is How ever did they do it? Without a food processer, a coffee maker or even (heaven forbid) electricity? The Donald W. Reynolds Museum at Mount Vernon is showing us how with its new exhibit, “Hoecakes & Hospitality.” From now until summer 2013, you can glimpse the behind-the-scenes history of 18th-century food preparation. Original cookbooks, pots and fine tableware that made the dining room at Mount Vernon a presidential place for vittles show just how Martha Washington became an exemplary hostess. It’s a sensuous display, too, with the aromas Martha enjoyed—cinnamon, coffee, herbs and warm bread. Sniff, and be delighted. MountVernon.org

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A Mind-Broadening Experience It could be happening near you. Or around you. Or right under your nose. “Minds Wide Open,” a celebration of children and the arts, is all over Virginia. A statewide collaboration of artists, arts organizations, museums and libraries across the Commonwealth are synched up to provide months of performances, exhibitions, festivals, film screenings and readings around the state—all by, for or about children and the arts. Why? For many reasons. But here’s a statistic that got the right minds pondering Chilways to connect children with the arts: Chil dren who study the arts are four recogtimes more likely to be recog nized for academic achievement. Find out what open minds are doing near you. ArtsVa.org

On the Map The $150 million expansion of the Vir Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in 2010 has not gone unnoticed. Last year, the mumu seum was among 13 buildings selected from around the world to be awarded a Royal Institute of British Architects International Award. And that’s not all. The museum also beat out sites in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, LouisiLouisi ana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia to be named Travel AtAt traction of the Year by the Southeast Tourism Society, marking the first time the award has been given to a museum. Surprised? Did you miss all the hoo-ha over last year’s blockbuster Picasso exhibit? “We had visitors from all corners of the world with record-breaking attendance,” notes VMFA Director Alex NyNy erges. Now that’s a world-class museum. VMFA.museum

Invited to the ‘Dance Last year, Richmonders were so taken with Hollywood-come-to-town during the production of Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln movie that they hardly noticed one of its own making it big in filmland. Rick Alverson, director of “The Comedy,” found himself at the Sundance Film Festival in January, premiering the film to Hollywood’s elite. The film, described as “a scathing look at the white male on the verge of collapse,” was selected from more than 9,000 submissions. Doesn’t look like an au autobiography; “The Comedy” sold out at the festival. Sundance.org

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2/23/12 1:29 PM


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oLden tIMes |

BY B l a n d c r o w d e r

Wise Homecoming! U-2 pilot’s ret retUrn generates excitement, pride.

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In 1960, it was an Eisenhower–Khrushchev world. In civil defense drills, schoolchildren—feeling mystified to terrified—dropped and dove under their desks for cover, years ago while parents stockpiled canned sustenance in basements, ready to take shelter from fallout. The superpowers played Risk, but pretended otherwise. That May, one of the CIA’s U-2 spy planes disappeared. The Eisenhower administration produced layer upon layer of fictional PR: A plane had disappeared north of Turkey. The pilot had died, having radioed about oxygen problems on board. But Khrushchev blew holes in the U.S. party line, announcing that the plane had been found on Soviet soil in decent condition and that surveillance pix had been recovered from it. Then he produced his flying ace in the hole; the pilot, very much alive. Washington turned all shades of red, and we Americans collectively held our breath, especially those of us in Wise County, homeland of Francis Gary Powers, the plane’s pilot. Kentuckian by birth but raised in Pound on the Virginia border, Powers had just joined the U-2 program, four years after leaving the

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A Tazewell County youth “of about 18 summers” years ago named Stevenson is “in bad,” reports the Tazewell Republican, after he tries to take over a Norfolk and Western passenger train as it is taking on water. Stevenson leaps onto the locomotive’s running board and shoves a “blue steel automatic Colts pistol” into the face of the engineer named Coulling. But the hijacker wannabe’s plan flops. The engineer grabs Stevenson, and a fireman knocks him to the ground with a shovel. The fireman jumps on the “young desperado,” and the engineer helps throw him into the baggage car to await the sheriff.

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Air Force as a captain. For spying, he was sentenced to 10 years but was freed two years later, in February 1962, exchanged for a KGB agent held by the United States. Powers’ reception in his own country was at first nippy. Some slammed him for not having destroyed his aircraft—or himself. But on March 6, the Senate Armed Services Select Committee (on which sat Prescott Bush, R-Conn., Poppy to No. 41, Gramps to No. 43), decreed that Powers had acted “as a fine young man under dangerous circumstances.” In less than a week, he was home again in Wise amid much fanfare. “The eyes of the world were on Wise County this week, as Francis Gary Powers came home,” opened one article in Norton’s Coalfield Progress. People flocked to see him, and, “from all indications, they liked what they saw.” Reporter Bill Hendrick visited at home with Francis, as Powers’ family called him, getting to know not the famous U-2 pilot but a fellow who was “one of our own kind, a product of the mountains.” Hendrick wrote of Powers knee-deep in the mud trying to unstick another reporter’s car. Powers with muddy hands, suggesting that his greeters not shake, but they “shook hard anyway.” Powers on horseback visiting neighbors. Nieces and nephews, scrambling around the house; his grandmother, 92, napping in the next room; his mother leaving for church. It sounds as though he could’ve made a go in politics. On the drive home, the reporter wrote, “We thought about this goodlooking man with the big friendly eyes who had been in the world’s headlines so much during the past two years. We liked him.”

No sooner does everybody get one kind of telephone years ago than the phone company comes up with a brand-new kind. Stony Creek in Sussex County and Claremont in Surry are two towns served by Home Telephone and Telegraph Co. in Virginia and, like most similar towns, are switching from operator-made to direct-dial local calls, reports the Southside Virginia Dispatch. Subscribers will have to get new phones, and the Franklin office will become a toll center where operators will route long-distance calls to other exchanges. Despite the rate hike that’s going to result, 74% of customers are all for the change.

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Montpelier, James Madison’s home, opens to the public years ago for the first time in March with a festival timed to coincide with the president’s birthday, reports the Northern Neck News of Warsaw. The home sits on more than 2,600 acres in Orange County. Actors portray Madison, his wife Dolley, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington and George Mason. Others in generic roles as Colonial Virginians mingle with attendees and air their views on the new Constitution. Madison, the fourth president, is known as the Father of the Constitution. The mansion will be restored in the first decade of the 21st century.

Send unique postcards, along with an explanatory note and 8 1/2 -inch SaSE, to Virginia Living, Postcards, 109 E. Cary St., richmond, Va., 23219, and get a free one-year subscription if your entry is selected. (Send at your own risk.)

I l l u S T r AT I O N B y r O B u l l M A N

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p e n n y p o s tc a r d s BY S h e l BY G i l e S

Ship to Shore From the famous “First landing” at Cape Henry in 1607 to the modern Navy and commuter ferries, the Hampton roads area has a long and proud maritime history.

ss pocahontas, norfolk

Sent by Glenda Booth, Alexandria The SS Pocahontas transported up to 1,200 people and 120 cars back and forth across the Chesapeake Bay between Cape Charles and little Creek before being replaced by the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel in 1964.

Wrecks at cape Henry, near norfolk Sent by Alice Waskey, South Boston It can’t all be smooth sailing, as these two unidentified shipwrecks at historic Cape Henry demonstrate. Cape Henry is where the Jamestown settlers made first landfall in 1607 and the site of the first lighthouse sanctioned by the new united States government in 1792.

newport news shipbuilding and dry dock co., newport news Sent by Gayle Floyd, Charlottesville This Newport News shipyard dates back to 1886 and has delivered famous ships such as the British Navy’s revolutionary HMS Dreadnought, the uS Navy’s uSS Enterprise (aka “Big E”) and the famous ocean liner SS united States, which set the transatlantic speed record in 1952.

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2/23/12 1:30 PM


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books |

R e v i e w e d by b i l l G lo s e

Portrait of an Author

A VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHeR TellS HOW A WWII POW BeCAMe A SPOkeSMAN OF THe VIeTNAM eRA, eARNING equAl AMOuNTS OF PRAISe AND CONDeMNATION AlONG THe WAy.

In 1969, Kurt Vonnegut published the novel that would become his opus: Slaughterhouse-Five. This was during the height of the Vietnam War when the paramount concern of America’s youth was the draft. With its anti-war rhetoric wrapped in easyto-understand prose, Slaughterhouse-Five turned Vonnegut into a counterculture icon overnight and eventually earned the #36 spot on TIME magazine’s list of the top 100 English-language novels. Long is Vonnegut’s shadow on America’s literary landscape, yet no one has dared to comprehensively sum up this author’s life. Until now. Weighing in at 700-plus pages and including 1,900 footnotes, And So It Goes finally provides an exhaustive look at Vonnegut’s life, his many triumphs, and, yes, his many failings. “Everybody has a rehearsed version of their lives,” says acclaimed biographer and Barboursville resident Charles J. Shields, who began work on the five-year project in 2006, interviewing Vonnegut at his New York City home, then following up with over 125 of his contemporaries, friends, and family members. “My job was to cut through the rehearsed version and get to the truth. I had to make him human and not just this literary figure. Once I made it clear that I wasn’t his scribe, he really opened up.” What Shields learned was that Vonnegut was an enigma. He wrote books with anti-war themes but invested in Dow Chemical, the company that made napalm. He preached eco-friendly humanism at college campuses but owned shares in companies that performed strip mining. He extolled a virtuous moral code yet cheated on his wife (often), raged at children (his and neighbors’ alike), and stabbed many a friend in the back. Just as “so it goes” is an oftrepeated phrase in many of Vonnegut’s books, “the two were never on friendly terms again” seems to be the catchphrase in Shields’ tome. “From the time he was a teenager until his last days on this earth,” says Shields, “Vonnegut wanted to be a famous author and set his course in that direction, even though at times it caused other people pain and heartbreak.” Vonnegut’s mistrust and sour outlook traces back to childhood when his parents plunged from upper to middle class with the stock market collapse of 1929 and subsequent Depression. Where possible, they kept up appearances. They kept their two oldest children in private schools but sent Kurt to public school. Kurt wanted to study

English in college, but his brother coerced him into a science track. He seldom studied and dropped out before he could be kicked out. World War II had begun, so he joined the Army. But just before shipping overseas, he used a weekend pass to visit home. While there, his mother committed suicide. Soon after, he joined his first unit at the Battle of the Bulge just before it surrendered to the Germans and spent the rest of the war as a POW. He was on a work

detail in Dresden when the city was firebombed. This event fueled his storytelling passion. Perhaps it was guilt, wondering why he was spared while 135,000 other people were suffocated or immolated by fire. By writing about the horrors of war, he could validate his survival. As Shields writes in the book, “Dresden troubled his dreams. It was part of a noisy concatenation of events that banged and jolted like

No Turning Back: One Man’s Inspiring True Story of Courage, Determination, and Hope By Bryan anderson and daVid MaCk, Penguin, $25.95

in conversational prose, anderson describes the day he lost three limbs to a roadside bomb in iraq, his arduous recovery process at Walter reed and new ways he found to make life an adventure, from snowboarding to rock-climbing to acting on tV. he not only transforms perceptions of “handicapped” to “differently abled,” he also challenges readers to overcome the obstacles preventing them from achieving their own goals. after reading anderson’s story, don’t be surprised to find yourself dusting off your own “life’s to-do list.”

The Revisionists By thoMas MuLLen, LittLe, BroWn & Co., $25.99

historical istorical agitators, or hags, from the distant future travel back in time to prevent disasters such as the holocaust, the 9/11 attacks and, in the all-too-near-future, the great Conflagration. time-traveling ime-traveling government agents use extreme force to prevent the hags from upsetting their “perfect present.” But as they battle in 2011 over historical integrity, one agent starts to question the real purpose of his mission. The Revisionists is a literary crossover with writing so beautiful and characters so lovingly detailed that you would follow them wherever the story might go.

A History of the World in 100 Objects By neiL MaCgregor, Viking, $45.00

in this 707-page book, neil Macgregor creates a museum exhibit that depicts the evolution of human society from 2,000,000 B.C. to present day. From ancient hand-axes to stone masks to Victorian tea sets to the credit card, each chapter describes the development of a particular object and the impact it had on its time period. in the chapter on Pieces of eight, we learn how the famous silver coins were mined and minted in Peru and how they became the first global currency as spain used them to finance far-reaching conquests. an interesting and edifying read.

Southern Appalachian Celebration: In Praise of Ancient Mountains, Old-Growth Forests, & Wilderness By JaMes VaLentine With text By Chris BoLgiano, unC Press, $35.00

With this collection of 136 images of the southern appalachians, James Valentine presents an enduring portrait of the region’s unique natural character. his photographs of majestic mountains, fields of wildflowers, cascading waterfalls and soaring trees reveal the appalachians’ rich scenic beauty, while Chris Bolgiano’s interpretive text and captions tell the story of its natural history. a beautiful and captivating addition to any coffee table.

boxcars coupled together. There was his mother’s suicide; then being shipped overseas and landing on a beachhead marred by a titanic struggle; next, the humiliation of being cast into the largest defeat And So It Goes of American Kurt Vonnegut: arms in history; A Life and last, the By CharLes J. shieLds conflagration of henry hoLt, $30.00 Dresden. Through naiveté, stupidity, or perhaps some truth that touched on his worth as a human being, he had arrived at 23 with much to explain.” He sought to explain the human condition through literature. Vonnegut’s first five novels were published sporadically over 17 years and didn’t earn enough to fully support him and his family. He made ends meet by taking jobs. By his mid-forties, Vonnegut’s books were out of print, and he considered himself a failure. He told a friend that he hadn’t earned enough money writing to buy a pack of baseball cards. But then he finally captured the bombing of Dresden in Slaughterhouse-Five, and he was never out of print again. When Shields came calling, Vonnegut the octogenarian was generous with his time. He openly shared painful family history and often called to check how things were progressing or just to chat. On March 14, 2007, he got tangled in his dog’s leash, tripped, and fell down his apartment’s stairs. A month later, he died. His legacy lies in the words he has written, but it also lies in this book as well. A responsibility that weighed heavily on Shields the night before his book launch. “I had gotten a box of books and put them out on my kitchen table,” explains Shields. “I lined them up and was signing them to people I owed favors to. And here I had 25 faces of Vonnegut staring back at me, and I thought, ‘Don’t look at me like that. I did the best that I could.’” The best he could do was more than enough. And So It Goes is a fascinating examination of the life of an imperfect man, one who would appreciate the integrity of the work. Even if he’d rant about it first. V i r g i n i a

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PRESENTS

March 21-25 • Norfolk, Virginia Enjoy ALL THINGS CHOCOLATE March 24 at Scope Exhibition Hall from 10-5. Tickets $20 adult $10 children under 12

Chocolate for sampling and sales, demonstrations, entertainment, and children’s activities.

For additional event information and tickets visit us:

www.vafest.org/chocolate Co-presented with Supported in part by the Norfolk Consortium

The American Theatre NothiNg But the Best! American Jazz Singer

gRetCheN PARLAto tHurSdAy MArcH 1, 7:30pM

American jazz singer Gretchen Parlato is creating waves throughout the international jazz community. Her album, The Lost and Found, was acclaimed by Billboard Magazine as “the most alluring jazz vocal album of 2009.” Q&A following the performance. Walnut Street Theatre in

PRooF

SAt MArcH 3, 8pM

The Acting Company & The Guthrie Theatre in

JuLius CAesAR

Acting Master Class, Sat March 3, 10:30AM. $15 Space is limited

Fri MArcH 30, 8pM SAt MArcH 31, 8pM

BALLet FoLKLoRiCo de ANtioQuiA, CoLoMBiA

MiLos KARADAgLiC

tuE MArcH 6, 7:30pM WEd MArcH 7, 7:30pM

CeLtiC Nights

Journey Of Hope tuE MArcH 13, 7:30pM WEd MArcH 14, 7:30pM

ZAKiR hussAiN & the MAsteRs oF PeRCussioN

Fri MArcH 16, 8pM

Q&A following the shows.

Guitarist tuE April 3, 7:30pM

DAiLeY & ViNCeNt tHu April 12, 7:30pM

steVe WiLsoN

Alto & Soprano Saxophone and flutes Fri April 20, 8pM Springer Theatre in

MAtt hAiMoVitZ

Cellist in Beyond Bach Sun MArcH 25, 2:30pM

the hoNKY toNK ANgeLs

Fri April 27, 8pM SAt April 28, 8pM Sun April 29, 2:30pM

www.HamptonArts.net 757-722-2787 125 E. Mellen St., Hampton, VA

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2/1/12 9:50 AM

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a rt s |

BY S a r a h S a r g e n t

Paying Tribute Folk artist William Clarke mines his memories to Capture sCenes oF a rapidly-Fading World. On this early January day, the houses on artist William Clarke’s street on the outskirts of Blackstone are all decked out for Christmas. Garden lions sport jaunty blue tinsel garlands around their necks in front of his house. A handsome man with a 100-watt smile, Clarke welcomes me into his living room. It’s an exotic space: Blankets cover the windows, sealing out the sun, and a rich pastiche of objects that includes trophies and awards, crosses and Mardi Gras beads glints at me through the dim light, suggesting some kind of nightclub or shrine. Clarke’s parents purchased the shotgun-style house when he was 14, moving their family of eight into its three modest rooms. Originally, it didn’t have an inside toilet, and today it’s still pretty rustic. A wood stove in the studio directly behind the living room heats the place. Though his artwork could have provided a ticket out, Clarke is deeply attached to his family home and to the neighborhood. Determined to set a positive example for young people, he stuck it out there when, for a time, the neighborhood descended into the netherworld of drugs. Clarke says he has been expressing himself “ever since I was a little boy of three or four, drawing in the dirt or on the walls.” He uses acrylic paint and pastel, first sketching the

subject in with pencil. Though borne of necessity—Clarke is a self-taught artist—his approach has an honesty that imbues the work with real power. Devoid of pretense, it’s pared down to essentials: bright color, flat shapes, straight lines. There’s no shading or complicated perspective, although Clarke uses an Exacto knife to great effect, creating grassy fields with finely incised lines. In some pieces, Clarke incorporates old window frames and shutters over top the paintings. Helen G. Levinson, former director of Cudahy’s and White Canvas galleries in Richmond, says of Clarke: “He has a wonderful instinct for expressing his feelings about his rural life and experiences. I’m an urban person myself, but I can relate to his work. On the outside, it’s country; but its humanity appeals to the inside.” Clarke does commissions and commemorates historical occurrences, but he mostly paints his memories. These scenes—farmhouses, churches, vegetable stands, baptisms—provide a window into a world that is ebbing away. It’s a world Clarke not only grew up in but studied closely as a young man of 18 when he started driving a truck for the Barrow Grocery Company, making deliveries throughout Southside Virginia and parts of North Carolina, a job he held for about two years. “This is why I

Above: Clarke sometimes incorporates window frames or shutters into his work. Top right: Clarke recreates scenes from his life in acrylic and pastel. Right: The artist at his home in Blackstone.

paint so many country stories,” he says. “I had over 100 or more stops on my route. I got to meet a lot of people and see a lot of the countryside at a young age. It greatly influenced my art.” Funerals, which Clarke sees as tributes to the deceased, are a favorite subject. It could be said that all of Clarke’s works are, in one way or another, a form of tribute, whether to people, places or events. Tall and lean, Clarke is a youthful 61. He is missing half of his middle finger on his left hand. He explains: “When I grew up, there were basically three things you could do in Blackstone,” he says. “Farming, the sawmill or Fort Pickett.” Though he held a number of other jobs, he eventually ended up at the Nottoway Lumber Company in the late 1990s where he operated the planer, an enormous piece of equipment requiring two men to run. One day while working, Clarke’s hand got caught in the belt. The accident didn’t faze Clarke, a lifelong softball player and athlete. “I was back playing softball within a week!” He grins. “Losing the finger was the best thing that ever happened to me.” He returned to the mill at higher pay as a lumber grader, a position he held for the next 10 years. All along, he kept on with his paintings, developing a reputation as a budding folk artist and attracting the attention of a couple of local antique shops. Seeing Clarke’s work on display at Nottoway Antiques, Charles Cosby, a Richmond lawyer, urged him to show Levinson. When the mill was unexpectedly shut down for three

days in 2000, Clarke stacked some paintings in his car and set off for Richmond. In short order, his work was being shown at Cudahy’s, and eminent Washington, D.C. folk art collector Julia J. Norrell had bought three of his paintings. Clarke juggled his painting career and his millwork for a couple of years until the conflicting demands became too much, and he quit his day job to focus on art full time. These days, Clarke has cut his ties to galleries and is going it alone, using word of mouth, street fairs and even Facebook to sell his work. Clarke is a savvy man. His prices ($1,200-$5,000) reflect this, as does his use of social media to promote his work. It’s been a steep learning curve for someone who had never gotten on a plane until 2002 when he flew to an exhibition of his work in Little Rock, Arkansas. When painting, he sets up tables and works in assembly line fashion on 20 to 30 paintings at a time. Each painting is different, but this system is the most economical: He paints until he has used up the paint. During “crunch time” just prior to a fair, he throws sheets over the living room furniture and expands into that space. Clarke credits his success to his mother, who encouraged him to paint, and also to his faith. “I want my art to show my love for God. It’s a big part of my work,” he says. “I pray before I paint—before any big project. I pray a lot.” V i r g i n i a

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Williamsburg’s

Newest

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Come explore a place where nature lives in harmony with the urban pace. If you’re looking for a warm welcome, a great meal, inspiring shopping, or a rich cultural scene, it’s our nature to please. A healthy economy and affordable cost of living are also part of Roanoke’s charm. In addition to a surprisingly sophisticated city, you’ll find an abundance of natural choices. Roanoke is the largest city on the Blue Ridge Parkway. The legendary Appalachian Trail is minutes away. And our Carvin’s Cove is the second largest municipal park in America. Hike, bike, ride, drive, camp or kick back. With 68 parks, five greenway trails, and our signature Mill Mountain Star, the Roanoke experience isn’t something you find outside. It’s something that touches you inside.

www.roanokeva.gov

2/24/12 11:35 AM


Events april 2012

festivals

Around the State

March 3-4 Chocolate Lovers

March 10 Lex allen Literary

Et tu, Brute? april 1 The acting Company’s “Julius Caesar,” George Mason University’s Center for the arts, Fairfax, 703-993-2787, CFA. GMU.edu

lectures March 7 Powers of Persuasion:

Propaganda and WWii, Bedford Welcome Center, Bedford, 540586-3329, DDay.org

March 18-20 good Spirits:

alcoholic Beverages in the 18th Century Conference, DeWitt Wallace Museum, Colonial Williamsburg, 800-603-0948, History.org

March 15 Myths of the War

of 1812, robin Hixon Theater, Clay and Jay Barr Education Center, Norfolk, 757-441-2345, OpSail2012Virginia.com

april 28 Curator’s Chat:

Siege of Khe San, Scuttlebutt Theater, National Museum of the Marine Corps, 877-635-1775, USMCMuseum.org

Festival, Wetherill Visual arts Center auditorium, Hollins University, roanoke, 540-362-6503, Hollins.edu

March 10, 11, 17, 18 54th annual Highland Maple Festival, sugar camps around Highland County, Monterey, 540-468-2550, HighlandCounty.org March 21-25 Virginia Festival of

the Book, stores, libraries, theaters, schools and other venues around Charlottesville, 434-924-7548, VaBook.org

april 12-June 30 Virginia arts Festival, 10 cities across Hampton roads, 757-282-2800, VaFest.org

Images © FRame 2010. PhotogRaPhy by JaRed bendIs and FRançoIs Jay LeFt: #54, CenteR: #66, RIght: #72

Festival, Old Town Fairfax, 703385-1661, ChocolateFestival.net

Death Be Not Proud Through april 15 The Mourners: Tomb Sculptures from the Court of Burgundy, lecture and Wine Tasting

april 14 Spring Wine

March 23; Virginia Museum of Fine arts, richmond, 804-340-1400, VMFA.museum

april 15 rockfish Valley Kite

dance

music

art

March 15-18 "The Little Prince” by the Latin Ballet of Virginia, Glen allen Cultural arts Center, Glen allen, 804-379-2555, LatinBallet.com

March 10 Emile Pandolfi in

april 6 Horses by Mercedes

Concert, academy of Fine arts, lynchburg, 434-846-8499, AcademyFineArts.com

Helnwein, Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, 434-977-7284, SecondStreetGallery.org

March 11 The Poulenc Trio, CenterStage! Staunton, 540-8853165, CenterStageStaunton.org

March 1-april 1 in the Event of

Celebration, Hartwood Winery, Fredericksburg, 540-752-4893, HartwoodWinery.com Flying Festival, Spruce Creek park, Nellysford, 434-361-1296, RockfishValley.org

april 27-May 6 Shenandoah

apple Blossom Festival, Winchester, 540-662-3863, TheBloom.com april 28 The 4th annual East

Beach art, Jazz and Wine Festival, Norfolk’s East Beach, 757-468-1193

april 5 18th Century Dance

Class, Gadsby’s Tavern Museum, alexandria, 703-746-4242, AlexandriaVa.gov

april 13 Moscow Festival Ballet

Savoir Film Fare March 29-april 1 French Film Festival, Byrd Theatre, richmond,

804-827-3456, FrenchFilmFestival.us

“Sleeping Beauty,” George Mason University’s Center for the arts, Fairfax, 888-945-2468, CFA.GMU.edu

benefits March 24 a Tisket, a Tasket,

a Literary Basket, to benefit Washington County library, Glenrochie Country Club, abingdon, 276-676-6222, WCPL.net

March 24-25 antiques in Charlottesville, to benefit preservation Virginia, Main Street arena, Charlottesville, 434-962-2730, AntiquesInCharlottesville.org March 27 it’s all about the

Kids golf Classic, to benefit The protect Children Foundation, Chesapeake Gold Club, Virginia Beach, 757-663-8720, GolfersTournament.com/JohnnyD/

March 18 Tao—The art of the Drum, George Mason University’s Center for the arts, Fairfax, 888945-2468, CFA.GMU.edu March 31, april 1 Midori

andy Warhol, Olin Hall Galleries, roanoke College, 540-3752332, Roanoke.edu

March 31-June 10 Making History: 20th-Century african american art, Virginia Museum of Fine arts, richmond, 804-3401400, VMFA.museum

returns, alexandria Symphony Orchestra, Schlesinger Center, NVCC campus alexandria, 703548-0885, AlexSym.org

theater

april 3 Steve Katz, Cousins Studio

March 8-25 “Wicked,” Chrysler

april 12 The Fresh Beat Band,

March 30 “Mark Twain at Large,” piedmont arts, Martinsville, 276-632-3221, PiedmontArts.org

Theatre, Modlin Center for the arts, richmond, 804-289-8980, Modlin. Richmond.edu

Chrysler Hall, Norfolk, 888-5468561, Norfolk-Theater.com april 22 Bela Fleck & the Original

Flecktones, University of richmond’s Modlin Center for the arts, 804289-8980, Modlin.Richmond.edu

tours april 28 Hollin Hills House and garden Tour, Hollin Hills, alexandria, 703-765-9134, HollinHills.net

Hall, Norfolk, 888-546-8561, Norfolk-Theater.com

april 12-15 “Dancing at Lughnasa,” University of richmond’s Modlin Center for the arts, 804289-8980, Modlin.Richmond.edu april 13 “The Winter’s Tale,”

The american Shakespeare Center’s Blackfriars playhouse, Staunton, 540-851-1733, AmericanShakespeareCenter.com

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CliCk! Chrysler Museum | norfolk Internationally acclaimed glass maestro Lina Tagliapietra joined more than 150 guests at the opening of the Chrysler Museum’s new 7,000-square-foot Glass Studio in Norfolk on November 1.

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More than 600 guests attended the 5th Annual Stall Ball in Virginia Beach on November 12, raising $110,000 for the Therapeutic Riding Program.

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WVPT | CHarloTTeSville On January 3, public television station WVPT hosted some of its most generous donors at historic Morven Farm for a special screening of the season two premiere of “Downton Abbey.”

CliCk! Hampden-Sydney College | farMville On November 11, more than 350 Hampden-Sydney College alumni and their spouses gathered at the Country Club of Virginia for an auction to benefit the HampdenSydney Fund.

adrienne and keith Woodard

Travis Willburn, Bryant Hipp and Janet Matthews

larry and Donna lambert ,Charles and Pam fitzgerald

Ginny and Greg Sieminski

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Michael Palmore and Chris Howard

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Last November, 165 guests gathered at Great Wolf Lodge for Providence Classical School’s annual Destinations Gala Auction, raising $61,000 for the school’s scholarship fund and campus expansion.

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vance Stalling and laurice lanier Trowell

ralph and laura Urch and Janine Wilcox Hinz

robin Burcham, Chris long, Tim and Melissa Carpenter

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he wedding of Margaret Maureen Hollar and Daniel Joseph McKenna, both of Charlottesville, took place September 24, 2011, at the King Family Vineyard in Crozet. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Hunter Hollar of Singers Glen. The groom is the son of Mary Lou McKenna of Laurel, Maryland, and the late John Joseph McKenna. PhotograPhy by Patricia Lyons

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rianna Lynn Bloom and Alexander David Spotts, both of Richmond, were married October 29, 2011, at Tuckahoe Presbyterian Church in Richmond. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Bloom of Richmond. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Spotts of Lexington, South Carolina. PhotograPhy by beth harris

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ennie Leigh Doss and Frederick Andrew Moreno of Raleigh, North Carolina, were married May 21, 2011, at Southview United Methodist Church in Roanoke. The bride is the daughter of Cecil Wray Jr. and Terri Doss of Ferrum. The groom is the son of Oscar and Eugenia Moreno of Cary, North Carolina. PhotograPhy by sam Dean

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Urban Explorer Hollywood stuntman Paul Darnell made it to the big screen by perfecting the art of freerunning—which means employing a combination of athleticism, technique and intelligence to overcome anything that stands in his way. By Holly TimBerline p h oto g r a p h y by c h a d b o n a n n o

When Gloucester native Paul Darnell was a high school sophomore, he climbed out of his bedroom window and onto the roof of his family’s two-story home and challenged himself to leap. “I bet I can jump off here without breaking anything,” he thought, heart pounding. A minute later he was in the grassy yard below, all bones intact, high-fiving his friend and planning to do it again. That wasn’t the first time Darnell pushed himself physically, and it was far from the last.

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Darnell, 29, is now a successful Hollywood stuntman, his resume growing longer and more impressive each year. He doubled Adam Sandler in “You Don’t Mess With the Zohan” and Robert Pattinson in both “Twilight” and “Water for Elephants.” And next summer, according to IMDB.com, Darnell will be seen flying through the air as Henry Cavill’s double in “Man of Steel.” But the 6-foot 1-inch Darnell— dark-haired and lean—may be best known as a leader in the urban sport of freerunning, which is a way of moving acrobatically through one’s environment by rolling, vaulting or flipping to navigate obstacles. Freerunning and its precursor, parkour, are more recognizable than ever, thanks to their growing use in feature film chase scenes. (Think of Matt Damon sailing over Paris rooftops in “The Bourne Ultimatum” or Jake Gyllenhaal running up walls and scrambling over buildings in “Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time.”) Darnell is a co-founder of one of the few professional teams of freerunners in the world, Tempest Freerunning, which he helped start in 2006 after graduating from Virginia Tech. Team Tempest competes in the growing number of freerunning competitions around the world and is in high demand for stunt work in television and film. Their client list includes such iconic brands as Ford, McDonald’s, BMW, Samsung and K-Swiss. Last year, Darnell and two other members of the 10-person team opened the Tempest Freerunning Academy in Los Angeles, a 7,000-square foot facility designed by X Games ramp builder Nate Wessel, where coaches will train anyone old enough to turn a somersault in freerunning and parkour. But Darnell’s journey began right here in Virginia. Growing up in Gloucester, Darnell played baseball and basketball through middle school, adding track and tennis in high school. His interests expanded to include BMX bicycling, break dancing and extreme sports, and he says he never missed the annual X Games on ESPN. Later, in high school, Darnell became interested in gymnastics, mainly because he wanted to learn how to flip. “Flipping and breakdancing had far less rules than baseball and basketball,” he says. “I started to gravitate toward less structure and more fun. … I also wanted to discover what I could do with my body.” Jumping off the roof successfully prompted Darnell to form a group with some like-minded friends. The group was called XJ, for “Extreme Jumping,” and each new member

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profiLe

“You adapt yourself to the environment. Whatever’s been built out there, you find a way to run through it, get over it, climb it.” who joined (there were ultimately four) had to go through an initiation jump off the Darnell family’s roof. Of XJ, Darnell recalls, “We would meet at my house and wait until it got dark and walk down Indian Road to Ware Academy. We jumped off every balcony and roof at the academy that we could get on,” adding, “No one ever got hurt. It was a rush of being all alone at the school, climbing onto rooftops and flying through the air. We had so much fun!” Though he was never actually injured from a jump, Darnell says he didn’t know how to properly absorb the impact of landing, so his knees took a lot of it, and that was painful. Right around that time, Darnell caught something on TV that would save his knees and change his life: an episode of “Ripley’s Believe It or Not” that featured a group called Yamakasi. They were nine young men living just outside of Paris in the 1980s who had conditioned themselves to sprint through the urban settings around them, leaping over, rolling under or diving through obstacles in their way—techniques that would eventually become known as parkour. When he saw Yamakasi, Darnell was riveted. “It was a perfect mesh with what I was already doing,” he explains. He also learned that his passion for jumping didn’t have to mean the end of his knees. “They had style and technique,” he explains, and were able to absorb the impact of their jumps. Darnell studied the types of moves Yamakasi practiced, joined Internet message boards and meet-up groups, and soon became a devotee of freerunning, which has been described as a more stylized way of doing parkour. Freerunning supported a long-term goal of Darnell’s: to become a movie stuntman. Though he considered stunt training after high school, he wanted a back-up plan and so opted for college. “I started as a computer geek,” he says, but realizing it wasn’t a good fit, changed his major to human nutrition, food and exercise. He also joined the gymnastics club, which he would go on to captain. In spring of 2005, toward the end of his senior year at Tech, Darnell and fellow gymnast Andy Causley started planning Tempest Freerunning. “We were both graduating and figuring out our next steps in life,” says Darnell. “We saw the potential for

the world of freerunning to become like that of skateboarding, with clothing, DVDs, magazines and gyms. We wanted to be innovators in the sport.” Under the Tempest name, the two trekked from Blacksburg to Los Angeles—where skateboarding began—participating in local freerunning “jams” along the way. “We made a plan to move to LA,” explains Darnell. “Since we were basing our model of freerunning on skateboarding, then why not start in the same place?” Darnell’s first freerunning job was in a music video—he climbed ladders and jumped on roofs to get into a nightclub. “I was getting paid to jump off stuff! It was amazing,” he says. His major break in stunt work came when he met Scott Rogers, an awardwinning stuntman, stunt coordinator and second-unit director for numerous films, who hired Darnell to double Adam Sandler in “You Don’t Mess With the Zohan.” Rogers hired Darnell for his next project as well, “Race to Witch Mountain.” Darnell credits Rogers with showing him the ropes of the stunt business. “I was lucky to find such a big name stunt coordinator who was willing to take me under his wing,” he says. Darnell, whose college graduation gift from his parents was three weeks of training at a stunt school in Seattle, says he learned a lot about stunts on the job. “You only have a certain amount of time to make it work. It’s always a little rushed,” he says, crediting his freerunning experience with giving him the necessary strength and agility to overcome any obstacle. At first blush, this all sounds like thrill-seeker’s work, perfectly aimed at those who live for the adrenaline rush of a challenge. In fact, Darnell says, the opposite is true. “I don’t seek the stuff that makes me feel pumped up,” he insists. More than anything, his work is about problem solving. As with freerunning, he says, “You adapt yourself to the environment. Whatever’s been built out there, you find a way to run through it, get over it, climb it.” When it comes to filming stunts, he says, “You want to be prepared and calculated. You don’t want crazy types doing this work.” That’s because it’s dangerous, right? “You do hear about bad outcomes,” Darnell concedes. “It is

a dangerous job. … But sometimes I forget that, because I’ve always worked with professionals and been pretty safe.” “Pretty safe” doesn’t mean injuryfree, however. In a climactic fight scene in the first “Twilight” movie, Robert Pattinson’s character is hurled from the floor into a (breakaway) window high above. Darnell recalls

the scene: “Three, two, one, GO! The wires are supposed to pick me up and toss me through the window, but they didn’t pull me up as far as I needed to go, so I hit a solid wall below the window instead.” Though he separated his shoulder, the filmmakers still needed the shot, so a re-take was necessary. “I felt like I could do it as long as I didn’t hit the wall again,” Darnell says. They recalculated, and Darnell did it again. “I trusted them, and it was fine.” As far as Darnell is concerned, it’s all in the line of duty. “You’re there to get the job done,” he says, matter-offactly. TempestFreerunning.com •

Facing page: Paul Darnell performing a 180-degree cat leap. Above: Darnell sideflipping down a set of stairs. The surreal effect is achieved in post-production. V i r g i n i a

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sport

Batsman Up! Spring’s ‘other’ sport, cricket, has surprisingly deep roots in the Commonwealth. By Matthew GottlieB

Springtime is here, and across Virginia players will take up the old bat and ball for a classic warm-weather sport. Around the state, they’ll gather for informal games and in structured contests on official playing fields, umpire and all. The sport they’ll play? Cricket, the only sport in the world where you can be out for a duck if a bowler you thought was a dibbly dobbly sends you a googly. 50 |

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You may chortle a bit at this stereotypically British athletic contest that comes complete with an official tea break, but more than 1,000 people play the sport in Virginia, according to Shelton Glasgow, the Atlantic region representative to the United States of America Cricket Association. Northern Virginia in particular has seen a surge in the number of active cricket players—Loudoun County conducts a popular cricket league, and some public schools in Fairfax County include cricket in physical education classes. Cricket is even played on the collegiate level: The George Mason University cricket team beat 31 squads to win the 2011 national championship. Cricket began in England, with the earliest known reference to the game dating to 1598. (The game would be codified in 1788.) Long associated with countries that were once part of the British Empire, it’s no surprise the sport was played in Colonial Virginia. The 1709 and 1710 secret diaries of William Byrd of Westover indicate that Byrd played cricket with friends at Westover, Green Spring, Shirley and Berkeley plantations, and played hard enough to injure himself. “We played at cricket and I sprained my backside,” he wrote, but continued to play. During the Revolutionary War, George Washington’s troops are thought to have played a variation of the game at Valley Forge in 1778. Even post-Independence, in 1795, a Richmond cricket club printed a set of team and sport rules, suggesting the organization’s members wanted more people to take up the pastime. Henry Chadwick, now rememberd as “the father of baseball,” was initially a cricket writer and created a short-lived Richmond cricket club in 1857, and there are references to clubs in Roanoke, Gordonsville, Charlottesville and Richmond around the turn of the century. But it was baseball that captured Chadwick’s imagination, along with the rest of the nation’s. Cricket was largely forgotten, but far from gone. The British Commonwealth Cricket Club, established in 1953 and now based in Washington, D.C., played its first four years in Virginia at Bellpais, a Fairfax County estate near Mount Vernon. The organization served as the fountainhead for the multiethnic Washington Cricket League and the melting-pot cricket culture that began to emerge across Northern Virginia. In 1988, the Hampton Cricket Club emerged from the gathering of NATO troops stationed in the area. A few years later, the India Association Cricket Club took up play in

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Let’s Play Cricket! Richmond, taking on Hampton and another team in Lynchburg. In 1995, the four-squad Mid-Atlantic Cricket League formed, and the next year it merged into the North Carolina-based Mid-Atlantic Cricket Conference. Last year, 15 Virginia teams competed in the MACC. Fans see cricket as a highly athletic sport. Top-level bowlers can hurl 100-mile-per-hour balls toward the batsman, who needs protective equipment, including arm, leg and chest guards, gloves, and a protective helmet with a facemask. The players wear collared shirts and brightly colored uniforms that almost resemble training suits for most matches. For test matches—the increasingly rare, five-day matches that “test” qualified national teams— players wear stylish white uniforms. On a basic level, the game should appear familiar to most Americans. Teams of 11 take turns on offense— wielding a bat—during an innings (don’t be fooled; for unknown reasons, ‘innings’ is both a singular and plural term) while the fielding team attempts to get them “out.” The batsman stands by a wicket—three posts known as stumps, with two wooden cross sections atop them called bails—waiting for the ball to be bowled, overarm. The batsman hits the ball with a flat-faced, paddle-

obstructing the ball’s path with his leg? The slightest possibility of the batsman doing so prompts cries of “howzat?” from the fielding team, an appeal to the umpire, who must then decide whether the batsman is “leg before wicket,” and therefore out. A cricketer “should have a clear head, and a quick eye and hand, and above all be cool and collected, all nerve or none at all,” wrote Edgar Allan Poe for Burton’s Gentlemen’s Magazine in 1839. Billed in the title as an “experienced practitioner” of “manly pastimes,” he also advised players to develop pain tolerance. Karan Sohi might not use the evocative words of Poe, but he would share the writer’s sporting spirit. The 23-year-old native of Punjab, India, has lived in Fairfax for nearly six years and plays pick-up cricket in a Manassas parking lot on Friday nights and at a Gainesville track on Saturday mornings. For someone who does not have the time for a structured league, these informal games are an easy way to get to play. The pick-up teams simply limit the number of times the defense bowls to the offense, set up some juryrigged wickets, and they’re off and running. “Honestly, it was one of the things I thought I wouldn’t have a chance of doing in the U.S.,” Sohi says. “I thought when I left India that

your help spreading the word,’” says Dave Carver, 45, Loudoun County Parks and Recreation’s division manager for sports. “Now we’re turning away teams because we don’t have the space.” Youth outreach efforts by the Washington Warriors Cricket Club and the United States Youth Cricket Association have helped bring the sport into some school systems as well. At least 10 middle schools and two high schools in Fairfax County have included, or are planning to include, cricket in their physical education program. The USYCA says that Henrico and Loudoun counties are also preparing plans. “It’s a very good equalizer because a lot of students have not played cricket before, but it’s very easy to understand,” says Fairfax County health and physical education teacher Tony Salgado, 31. “It gives students the chance to succeed where they haven’t before. We’ve gotten a lot of good feedback on it.” George Mason University’s championship cricket team started out playing informal matches in parking lots and leagues scattered around Northern Virginia. There was enough interest to form intramural competitions, and then to create an unofficial school team in 2009. Last March, the GMU Patriots traveled

Think you might enjoy the sound of leather on willow? Here is a list of places to play cricket in Virginia, as well as a guide to some of the more confusing terminology.

Mid-AtlAntic cricket conference Teams from North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia compete against each other in this recreational cricket league, which was established in 1997. MACC-Cricket.org

WAshington cricket leAgue Founded in 1974 and a member of the USA Cricket Association, the WCL is home to 33 metro-D.C. clubs, many in Northern Virginia. WCLinc.com

loudoun county cricket leAgue Plays the faster-paced short version of the game known as Twenty20, using hard tennis-balls instead of leather cricket balls. VLCCL.com

WAshington Metro cricket leAgue Hard tennis-ball league with 32 teams, working in partnership with Fairfax County to stage matches in Northern Virginia. WMCL.net

Cricket Terminology: Beamer: An illegal delivery of the ball, aimed to bounce at the batsman’s head.

Googly: A surprise delivery from a bowler that the batsman expects to spin in one direction, but actually spins in the opposite direction. Known in Australia as a “wrong’un.” Duck: A batsman who is dismissed

“A cricketer should have a clear head and a quick eye and hand, and above all be cool and collected, all nerve or none at all.” —Edgar Allan Poe

without scoring a single run is “out for a duck,” because the number zero resembles a duck egg. If dismissed on the first ball he faces, it’s a “golden duck.”

Duckworth-Lewis Method: Mathematical formula used to recalculate the batting team’s target in games affected by rain.

shaped bat. If the player makes contact with the ball (it can travel in any direction), he or she runs back and forth between two sets of wickets to score runs. A run is scored upon each successful stop at a wicket. Hit the ball out of the playing field on the fly, and it’s a six, which is worth six runs—cricket’s version of a home run. Hit it out of the playing field on the ground, and the batsman acquires four runs. A good batsman aims for 100 runs before the fielding team gets him or her out. For baseball fans, the most familiar way the defense gets a batsman out comes from catching the ball on the fly. Nine other options exist for the defense to execute an out. One includes the bowler sending the ball by the batsman, crashing into the wicket and knocking off the bails, the cricket equivalent of a strike out. But what if the batsman blocks the ball from hitting the wicket by

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would be pretty much it.” Take Sohi’s experience and replicate it across the region, and one can see the sport’s potential for grassroots growth. After repeated requests from local residents, Loudoun County established its first cricket league, which played its inaugural season in 2009. Organizers decided to start the league using a modified tennis ball, much softer than a cricket ball, since the county did not have a proper cricket pitch for competition. In just two seasons, the organization mushroomed from five to 25 teams, split into one upper and two lower divisions, and constructed a cricket pitch near Middleburg that hosted three games a day during weekends last season. Contruction of a second venue is being considered by the Parks and Recreation department. “I think we had a number of people who kept asking us to do it, and we finally said ‘OK, but we need

to Lauderhill, Florida’s Central Broward Regional Park and Stadium and the only American venue with International Cricket Council certification, to win collegiate cricket’s national championship. Winning meant that Mason’s players got to take home the Chanderpaul Trophy, donated by former International Cricket Council Player of the Year Shivnarine Chanderpaul of Guyana, who captained the West Indies’ national team in 2005 and 2006. The club now has official backing from the university. Sohaib Khan, 24, president of the club who came to the U.S. in 2001 from Karachi, Pakistan, says, “The one thing that is always interesting, when there are tournaments at George Mason, we have a huge crowd.” So, with such growing interest in the sport, could the U.S. become a respectable cricket nation? Stickier wickets have been solved. •

Dibbly Dobbly: A bowler of limited skills.

Dolly: An easy catch. Grubber: A ball that bounces very low after striking the surface of the pitch. Leather on Willow: When the ball (made of leather) is struck by the bat (made of willow).

Maiden: An over (set of six deliveries by the bowler) in which no runs are scored by the batting team. Nightwatchman: A less talented batsman sent in to play when light is fading, so that the more talented batsman is not risked in poor light.

Sledging: Verbal abuse, often humorous, directed at a batsman in an attempt to unsettle him before he faces a ball.

>> More terms at VirginiaLiving.com

2/23/12 1:46 PM


Meetings in Virginia 2012

Get it Together Meeting places can help your company reconnect and move forward. Email, cell phones, Skype, conference calls, Facebook, Twitter—the means of social connection available to us today seem endless. But when you really want to connect with someone nothing beats actual face time, and I’m not talking about the app for your Apple device. Meeting face-to-face inspires creativity that just cannot be achieved via the Internet. Mom always told us never to put all our eggs in one basket, but when it comes to brainstorming and creative thinking, bringing all those ideas to one place might be exactly what your organization needs to harness your collective creativity. When it comes to meeting places, Virginia boasts not just a prime central, Mid-Atlantic location, but also a vast variety of scenery and experiences. From Newport News to Alexandria to Roanoke, Virginia offers first-class meeting spaces, excellent accommodations and exciting leisure activities from golfing to whitewater rafting. These new experiences, new settings and a break from the ordinary office day can provide valuable teamwork and employee bonding opportunities, which can foster new ideas and clearer communication. A single stroke of genius can transform an organization, and a change of scenery is sometimes all it takes. With mountains, meadows, cities and shoreline, Virginia certainly has a variety of scenes to choose from, and a variety of options for your organization to enjoy...and then get down to business.

Boar’s Head A New Chapter Begins! At The Boar’s Head every meeting is a breakout session with acres of endless views, trees and lakes for team building complemented by high-tech facilities, 22,000 square feet of classic meeting space and four dining facilities, including AAA Four-Diamond Old Mill Room. Our 175 rooms include nine suites, some with fireplaces. Restyled guest rooms, debuting Spring 2012, offer rich furniture and fabrics, textures and finishes adding a warm, residential feeling. An ideal destination at an incomparable value. (800) 476-1988 or BoarsHeadInn.com County of Orange Intimate, Romantic, Unforgettable. Orange County is the perfect destination for your perfect wedding. Our luxurious B&Bs, unique venues, exceptional catering, award-winning wineries and stunning scenery will exceed your dreams and create memories that will last a lifetime. (877) 222-8072 or VisitOrangeVirginia.com Founder’s Inn Located in the heart of southeastern Virginia, nine minutes from the airport, The Founders Inn and Spa, managed by Capella Hotel Group, provides a tranquil urban oasis. Traditional in its origins, design and architecture, the hotel features captivating Grand Georgian and period antique furnishings. An English garden centered among 26 landscaped acres creates a retreat and quietude of the mind. The spacious interior imbues a sense of space and efficiency. Highest standards of cleanliness and warm-hearted service delight guests with an exquisite hospitality experience. (800) 926-4466 or FoundersInn.com

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Half Moone Cruise and Celebration Center Located on the downtown Norfolk waterfront, the Half Moone is Hampton Roads’ most impressive event space. With panoramic views of the Elizabeth River and Norfolk’s beautiful skyline, this extraordinary facility is unequaled. Make your corporate meeting, wedding or special event extraordinary. (757) 664-1074 or HalfMoone.org Hampton CVB Delegates convening in Hampton are greeted by scenic waterfront vistas, exceptional facilities, worldclass attractions and an array of shopping and dining, all within close proximity of the Hampton Roads Convention Center. In Coastal Virginia, where the Chesapeake Bay meets one of the nation’s busiest harbors, Hampton presents meeting planners with exceptional value. The 400 year-old-city features dynamic attractions including the Virginia Air & Space Center, Fort Monroe, Hampton Roads harbor tours, and more. (800) 487-8778 or VisitHampton.com The Hermitage Museum & Gardens, located on the shore of the Lafayette River in Norfolk, is the ideal location for your next meeting or event. The beauty of the grounds combined with an exceptional view and the breeze off the water will make any event memorable. Plan your cocktail party at sunset or your special dinner under the stars. The Hermitage’s warm and inviting atmosphere makes it the perfect location for corporate events of all kinds. (757) 423-2052 (x0) or TheHermitageMuseum.org

The Hilton Virginia Beach Oceanfront is Hampton Roads’ first flagship-quality oceanfront resort with meeting space designed to work for you. The hotel and surrounding area offer everything you could imagine for corporate meetings, including a 7,100-square-foot oceanfront ballroom and luxurious, state-ofthe-art guest rooms and suites with an impressive collection of amenities. Our meeting planners will see to it that everything you wish for happens successfully and smoothly. (757) 213-3000 or HiltonVB.com The Jefferson Hotel Those who meet at The Jefferson enjoy the timeless elegance of more than 26,000 square feet of unique meeting space combined with modern communications technology, complemented by unsurpassed conference services. The Jefferson offers an experience that cannot be duplicated. Each detail of a meeting or special event is executed with a warm and genuine regard for the ultimate pleasure of the guest and the planner. (804) 788-8000 or JeffersonHotel.com The Sanderling Resort & Spa is an award-winning resort located on the shores of the Atlantic on North Carolina’s Outer Banks. With 88 guest rooms and five villa homes, The Sanderling can accommodate groups from 10-100 people in IACC-certified conference facilities. When your meeting adjourns, there is much to do here, on one of the most pristine beaches in the country. Massages await at The Sanderling Spa, as well as indoor and outdoor pools, tennis courts and nearby golf. (252) 261-411 or TheSanderling.com

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Located in the heart of historic Southeastern Virginia, nine minutes from Norfolk International Airport, The Founders Inn and Spa embraces both traditional and cosmopolitan luxury thereby providing a tranquil urban oasis within the Virginia Beach resort destination for group business.

Heaven on Earth. And a World Away from the Ordinary.

Traditional Hospitality Meets Cosmopolitan Luxury Under new management – Capella Hotel Group • 25,000 square ft. of meeting space • 240 guest rooms renovated in 2010 • New Executive Chef Scott Simpson

• Centrally located near the oceanfront, Norfolk and Virginia Beach nightlife and historical triangle of Williamsburg

• Groups from 10 to 1,400 are easily accommodated

• Perfect location for corporate meetings and executive getaways, conferences, unforgettable events, weddings and parties

• Select guest rooms with fireplaces; views of the lake and lovely Colonial gardens

• Flowering Almond Spa; health & fitness center, indoor and outdoor pools

• 20 separate meeting rooms

FoundersInn.com 800.926.4466 5641 Indian River Road, Virginia Beach, VA 23464 Call (757) 366-5716 and ask about the Virginia Living special!

The Hilton Empyrean Club says you have arrived. Hampton Roads Convention Center

800.487.8778 visithampton.com

A very special hotel within a hotel with privately accessed club floors atop the Hilton Virginia Beach Oceanfront. The Empyrean Club offers our guests VIP accommodations, private lounge with complimentary breakfast, daily hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, preferential reservations and tickets to popular events and venues plus extra in-room amenities that signal you are someplace extraordinary. Come enjoy our exceptional resort — and the extra measure of comfort and welcome that cannot be found anywhere else along the oceanfront. Come see for yourself. Luxury, like life, is in the details.

And while visiting, enjoy Salacia; featuring the best steak in Tidewater, along with fabulously fresh seafood and an awardwinning wine list. It’s another little way to celebrate all that is good at the beach.

3001 Atlantic Avenue, Virginia Beach, VA 23451 757.213.3000 | hiltonvb.com | salaciavb.com

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Meetings in Virginia 2012

Approach your event from a spectacular new viewpoint.

W atch Histor

fold... y Un ovation

dRen The B o arsHea

.com

Retreat to Charlottesville

Located on the beautiful Downtown Norfolk waterfront, with sweeping

views of both the Elizabeth River and the metro skyline, the Half Moone Cruise and Celebration Center offers some of the most Contact Dana Mayo spectacular and unique event and at 757.664.1074 or meeting spaces in Hampton Roads. Dana.Mayo@Norfolk.gov

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The Boar's Head offers 22,000 square feet of meeting space and 573 acres of creative space for meetings, retreats, team building programs and much more. Enjoy our 175 newly renovated guest rooms. Let a Boar’s Head meeting professional customize a package for your next event. 434.972.2224 | meet@boarsheadinn.com

800.476.1988

www.boarsheadinn.com

dining | lodging | golf | tennis | spa | meetings | weddings

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Ash Lawn-Highland The Home of President

James Monroe Guided House Tours Daily November through March 11–5 April through October, 9–6 Adults $12 • Children $6

Private Event Rentals

Celebrate your family’s wedding where Eliza Monroe was married. Pavilions and boxwood gardens are available for corporate events.

Make a name for yourself with The Jefferson’s superior level of service and planning expertise. Dedicated banquet managers, superb food, the latest technology and attention to detail can ensure a productive and memorable meeting in Richmond’s most unique meeting environment. For more information, call 804.649.4612 101 West Franklin Street | Richmond, Virginia 23220 | jeffersonhotel.com JEF7884_MudAd5_75x5_625.indd 1

2050 James Monroe Parkway Charlottesville, VA 22902 434.293.8000 • info@al-h.us www.al-h.us

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Planned Communities

Make Yourself at Home B Planned communities give you all the comforts of home without the hassle of maintaining a house.

uying a house. It’s one of the most important, and most expensive, decisions we can make. We weigh all kinds of factors like neighborhood, price range, style and age of the house, but all with the question, where do I want to make my home? In the dictionary, house and home have the same definition, simply a dwelling place, but for most of us a house and a home don’t mean quite the same thing. A home evokes warmth, happiness, respite from the world, while a house is merely a structure, a building that requires upkeep, repairs at times, and of course, stress. Making a house into a home doesn’t relieve the headaches of house ownership, another big consideration when searching for your new home. Unless you live in a planned community. Virginia boasts a number of planned communities that allow their residents to enjoy home ownership without the hassles. While architecturally diverse, these new homes do not require any upkeep from you, because every kind of support service is a simple phone call away, freeing up your schedule for activities more life-fulfilling than fixing the leaky faucet or mowing the lawn. Consider connecting with a neighbor between dips in the community pool, working on your game at the golf course or even enjoying a hike on the nature trail. Amenities such as these, and more, create opportunities for residents to build friendships, rather than just acquaintances, with their neighbors, which is really what a community is all about.

EAST BEACH

LENNAR HOMES

VIRGINIA BAPTIST HOMES

Named one of the top five sustainable land developments in the United States, East Beach is situated on 100 acres along the Chesapeake Bay in Norfolk. Site of the 2011 Coastal Living Ultimate Beach House, the neighborhood is surrounded by water and fashioned after classic southeastern seaboard coastal villages. It also won one of the highly prestigious 2011 CNU Charter Awards from the Congress for New Urbanism. The master plan for this $500 million development includes 700 residences alongside neighborhood restaurants, boutique shops, a Bay Front Club and offices. Public parks, walking paths and bay front greens are part of the generous open spaces for this community along the shore.

Lennar’s Heritage trio of planned communities for active adults—Colonial Heritage, Virginia Heritage and Heritage Highlands—offers something for everyone. Colonial Heritage is a resort-style community with an Arthur Hills designed Championship golf course and a 25,000 square foot community center. Virginia Heritage, offers great walking and biking trails, as well as swimming, tennis and other events. And folks who want more wide open spaces and peaceful living will fit right in at Heritage Highlands.

Considering downsizing or making a move to a retirement community? If so, consider a move to one of the Virginia Baptist Homes retirement communities. VBH communities are located throughout the state of Virginia in Newport News, Richmond, Culpeper and Roanoke. VBH communities provide cottages or spacious apartments as well as assisted living or nursing care if needed. Residents of our communities rest easy knowing they have a plan in place for their future care.

• 866-713-0403 or EastBeachNorfolk.com

Sunnyside Communities is the only not-for-profit Continuing Care Retirement Community in Virginia that can claim a Century of Caring: From 1912 until today, Sunnyside Communities has gone from one home serving six residents to three communities across Virginia serving 900 residents, with King’s Grant in Martinsville, Summit Square in Waynesboro and Sunnyside in Harrisonburg. Sample accomplishments include the Pinnacle Award for Wellness, 5-Star Excellence Rating, Shenandoah Valley’s “Most Respected” and among the “Best” in the State; its strong 100-year legacy has made it a premier choice. Visit SunnySideCommunities.com to learn about the customizable lifestyle options - cottages, homes, villas, or apartments.

KENDAL AT LEXINGTON Kendal at Lexington is a not-for-profit, Quaker-related lifecare community located in historic Lexington. The community is surrounded by natural beauty and is a short walk to downtown Lexington, Washington & Lee University and Virginia Military Institute. Residents have access to creative opportunities, a fitness center, flexible dining, enriching cultural events, plus interesting neighbors and residential services second to none. All this with the security of access to quality continuing care for life. • (800) 976-8303 or Kalex.Kendal.org

• LennarHomesVA.com/VL

SUNNYSIDE COMMUNITIES

• (540) 825-1569 or VBH.org

WALKER SQUARE The Condominiums at Walker Square, offering condos in Charlottesville, is the area’s #1 Top Selling community due to its unbeatable combination of value and proximity to University of Virginia and downtown Charlottesville. With monthly payments as low as $864, students and young professionals are discovering the benefits of owning their own home in the middle of everything. The Condominiums at Walker Square are located near the UVA medical center, midtown shops, and The Corner. • (434) 977-8273 or WalkerSquare.com

• SunnysideCommunities.com

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Relax on North Carolina’s famed Wrightsville Beach! There is no substitute.

This classic 1940 Wrightsville Beach cottage, is one of the oldest homes on the island, and has just enjoyed a total restoration, landscaping, and refurnishing. North Carolina pine panelling, wrap-around porches, garden shower, and fantastic views all serve to make HendersonHouse a unique and relaxing home away from home. HendersonHouse is conveniently located on East Henderson Street seven houses from the beach, and within pleasant walking distance to a variety of local favourites including Johnny Mercer’s Pier, Robert’s Grocery, and the King Neptune restaurant. Wrightsville Beach’s incomparable

Call today to book your holiday! wide white sand beaches, and clear

blue Atlantic waters offer guests a host of recreational possibilities from parasailing to relaxing moon-lit walks. All for only $1,200 per week.

Erskine Smith 910-520-7130

More at www.HendersonHouse.cc

10596 KALEX VA Living Ad_0212.indd 1

1/31/12 11:48 AM

You’re an adult now.

So live like one.

Charlottesville’s #1 Selling Community in 2011

Buy NOW & Pay No HOA Fees for One Year PLUS Receive up to $2,500 Towards Your Move-In!* 1 & 2 bedroom condos just steps from the Grounds, Downtown and the Medical Center.

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434.977.8273 | WalkerSquare.com

*Offer and/or incentive through preferred lender and the use of Charlottesville Settlement Company. Payment reflects 10% down and a 5.375% 5/1 Adjustable Rate Mortgage Product based on the purchase price of $143,900. Payment includes P & I and Taxes. Offer and/or incentive subject to change without notice. Models do not reflect racial preference. See agent for additional information. Walker Square and its affiliates reserve the right to modify features, plans and pricing without notice and/or obligation. ©Walker Square 2012. 12-WSC-095 VA Liv 3.1_8.75X5.625-V3.indd 1

Sales & Marketing By

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Planned Communities

Daleville, near Roanoke

Culpeper

Richmond

Newport News

COMFORT. SECURITY. PEACE OF MIND. QUADRUPLED. Whether you enjoy being near the water or the mountains, the city or a charming small town, Virginia Baptist Homes has a retirement community that’s right for you. Each of our four communities offers apartments and cottages, as well as the peace of mind of continuing care if ever needed. Take advantage of a great location, and the security of knowing your future is well-planned in a place you’ll always enjoy calling home. Virginia Baptist Homes’ mission is dignity in living, wherever you live. To learn more, call (540) 825-1569 or visit www.vbh.org.

The National Museum of the United States Army, scheduled to open at Fort Belvoir, Virginia in 2015 will be the nation’s one and only Museum to present the complete Army’s history since 1775. It’s immersive exhibits, soldier artifacts, and dynamic venues will tell the stories of selfless service and personal sacrifices of the 30 million American men and women who have worn the Army uniform.

A Great

Army Deserves a Great Museum For more information on how to support the National Army Museum, visit us online today!

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UL C T HO TI OA HE ME M AT STA 20 OF 1 E BE L LI 1 AC VIN H G HO US E

FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS

Beauty and the Best! The award-winning East Beach community in Norfolk is perfectly situated on the Chesapeake Bay. This $500 million development on 100 acres will feature 700 residences, neighborhood restaurants, boutique shops, the Bay Front Club and more. The park-like setting includes gracefully landscaped open spaces & paths with stunning bay front vistas. Boating, fishing and sailing are just steps away. For exquisite homes by the Chesapeake Bay, or water view villas overlooking an active marina, East Beach has both the beauty and the best! Prime bay front lots just released for sale! Discover more! Visit us today at EastBeachNorfolk.com

ORIGINAL HOME

100 years ago, Sunnyside Communities has built a legacy of stability and trust, pioneering modern retirement living with a vibrant lifestyle. Enjoy our video online to preview our three full-service, continuing care locations, King’s Grant in Martinsville, Sunnyside in Harrisonburg and Summit Square in Waynesboro, where our residents take charge of their own lifestyle surrounded by beautiful friendships and stunning scenery. Don’t wait to make this important decision. Contact us to see what a Century of Caring can mean to you.

SUNNYSIDE

540.568.8411 | 800.237.2257 3935 Sunnyside Drive | Harrisonburg, VA

KING’S GRANT

276.634.1000 | 800.462.4649 350 King’s Way Road | Martinsville, VA

SUMMIT SQUARE

540.941.3100 | 800.586.5499 501 Oak Avenue | Waynesboro, VA

www.SunnysideCommunities.com

dine with the best SUBSCRIBE ONLINE OR CALL (804) 343-7539 ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION ONLY $22! TWO-YEARS $38!

EastBeachNorfolk.com

Telephone 757.333.6650

East Beach. A simple life on the Chesapeake Bay.

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Summer Camps & Programs

CA M P I N F O CAMP OFFICE 1-800-873-3223

CAMPER:STAFF RATIO 4:1 Junior Camp; 6:1 Senior Camp, Riding Camp and VIVA!

AGES 7-16

REGISTRATION OPENS Immediate

COST $1000–$1800 / week; multple week discounts available

Camp Friendship Camp Friendship is a residential summer camp in Virginia, nestled in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains on 520 acres of rolling hills and scenic woods. Since 1966 Camp Friendship has offered boys and girls, ages 7-16, an opportunity to experience the best summer possible. Summer Activities and Year Round Programs ranging from equestrian camp, sports clinics, field trips, and teen camp offer our camp families a well-rounded summer experience.

573 Friendship Rd., Palmyra, VA 22963 www.CampFriendship.com info@campfriendship.com 2.75" x 5.625" Ad_Layout 1 2/23/12 10:07 AM Page 1

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Make This Summer Count! Make this summer count! If your son is struggling academically, or wants to improve his GPA, give him the opportunity to raise his GPA, and get on track and experience our acclaimed JROTC training program in a warm, caring environment, combining academics, athletic training and additional activities such as golf, scuba, flight instruction, etc. At Fishburne Military School, cadets (students) are provided a unique learning environment that includes small class sizes, rigorous academics, summer athletics, a caring teaching staff and the opportunity to immerse themselves within the school’s acclaimed military structure and Army Junior Reserve Officer Training Corps (JROTC) program. Fishburne’s family-oriented culture provides a warm environ-

SCHOOL IN F O

ment for students to thrive academADMISSIONS ically. Functioning in tandem with (800) 946-7773 the school’s military-oriented style GRADES of teaching and traditional academ7–12 ics, one of Fishburne’s curriculum clASS SIzE 6:1 highlights is its Leadership Education Training (Levels 1-4) coursework, REGISTRATION which provides a differentiating expeDEADlINE June 23, 2012 rience for students preparing for civil(Registration Day) ian college or for admission to one of cOST the country’s four service academies. $3,890 for New Fishburne’s Summer School program Boarding Students helps new cadets to acclimate to the general structure and rigors of military school life. The full curriculum offered during Summer School, including SAT preparation, helps cadets catch up on their studies and encourages them to accept new challenges.

225 South Wayne Avenue, Waynesboro, VA 22980 www.fishburne.org admissions@fishburne.org

Co-Ed Camp for science students 11-15

near Chincoteague Island, Virginia

Students interested in aerodynamics, robotics, rocket launching, flight simulation, and more...

For a brochure contact: ed@vaspaceflightacademy.org July & August Day camp, specialized academic programs, athletic programs, and unique enrichment opportunities, all on the beautiful campus of St. Christopher’s School. For more information call 804-282-3185 or email SummerVentures@stcva.org www.stchristophers.com

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Call today! 757-824-3800 for Camp Program & Group Info S p e c Si pae lc i aa l d av dev re r t ti iSS ii n n gg S Se ce tc i to in o n

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CA M P I N F O CAMP OFFICE (347) RIM-ROCK AGES 6–16 COST $2300 for 2-week General Camp Session CAMPER:STAFF 3:1

Camp Rim Rock Girls ages 6-16 overnight. Our 61st season! Multiple week sessions. Horseback Riding (80 horses, 6 rings), Performing Arts, Arts & Crafts, Sports (tennis, basketball, volleyball, and more), Aquatics (kayaking, tubing). Horseback Riding Specialty Camp. Mini Camp for 2nd-4th graders. ACA accredited. Less than 2 hours from D.C. on 600 acres.

343 Camp Rim Rock Road, Yellow Spring, WV 26865 CampRimRock.com info@camprimrock.com

Celebrating Our 91st summer! CA M P I N F O CAMP OFFICE 804.758.2306 ext. 129 AGES 8–17 years old CAMPER:STAFF RATIO 5:1 REGISTRATION

Ongoing COST

$800 – $1000 per week

Christchurch Summer Camps on the River atSchool

Sailing, Marine Science, Fishing and Teen Adventure Camps! Summer Camps on the River offers campers the opportunity to explore the Chesapeake Bay region of Virginia. Campers spend time in small focus groups, giving each camper the opportunity to receive one on one attention while learning new skills. In the evening, campers will enjoy traditional camp activities like camp fires, field games, talent show, or end of the week dance. Your camper will live in an air conditioned dormitory room supervised by our highly trained staff. Every day campers will grow in independence and better understanding of the role they play in the camp and greater community. Discovery of the world around them and the impact they have on it, will give a greater understanding of environmental impacts and improve character development.

49 Seahorse Lane, Christchurch, VA 23031 www.christchurchschool.org aporter@christchurchschool.org

-The Oldest Girls’ Camp in the VirginiasEsTabLishEd in 1922

Archery ~ Rifle ~ Swimming ~ Singing Tennis ~ Canoeing ~ Dance ~ Drama ~ Wild World Sports & Fitness ~ Low Ropes ~ Arts & Crafts

A mAgicAl plAce where girls leArn, Achieve, improve And mAke friends for life. Lewisburg, WV

1-877-446-9475

campghany@gmail.com

www.campalleghany.com

CA M P I N F O ADMISSIONS (804) 493-8038 ext. 1026 AGES 6–12 ENROLLMENT 20 children and their grandparents COST: $330 per person (includes lodging and all meals) SESSION AVAILABILITY: June 26-28, July 10-12 and August 7-9

Grand Camp @ Stratford Hall Finally, a summer camp for grandparents and grandchildren. Join us for three days of fun-filled, educational activities that are sure to provide a memorable family bonding experience. Together with your grandchildren, relive 18th-century life on a Virginia plantation. Try your hand at fishing, bricklaying, working the tobacco field and marching as the colonial Virginia militia. 483 Great House Road, Stratford, VA 22558 Stratfordhall.org/learn/camps/grandcamp.php bdoerken@stratfordhall.org

e Subscrib CA M P I N F O CAMP OFFICE 800.272.1172 AGES Grades 6–12

SESSION AVAILABILITY July 1–27 ArEAS Front Royal, VA rEGISTrATION dATES Now

Randolph-Macon Academy In Randolph-Macon Academy’s Middle School Academic Camp, students entering grades 6-8 spend mornings in interactive academic classes, while afternoons, evenings, and weekends are reserved for activities and trips. R-MA Upper School Summer Courses are for students entering grades 9-12. Students may take new core or elective courses for credit, or repeat a core course. New courses available this year! English as a Second Language is an immersion course intended for international students who have previous exposure to English. The Flight Camp encompasses flight time in a Cessna 172 as well as ground school.

200 Academy Drive, Front Royal, VA 22630 www.rMA.edu/summer-programs admission@rma.edu

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Today!

GET A ONE-YEAR SUBSCRIPTION (SIX ISSUES) FOR ONLY $22 $20 OR OR TWO TWO YEARS YEARS FOR FOR ONLY$38! ONLY$34! CALL (804) 343-7539 OR SUBCRIBE ONLINE AT VIRGINIALIVING.COM

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Virginiana

Clockwise from top: Students at St. Christopher’s during the 1916-1917 school year; Dr. Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne; from left, Jack Nester, Brit Hume and Mac Robertson at the Fox News studio.

Profiles in Leadership As it celebrates its centennial, St. Christopher’s School in Richmond asks the question, ‘What is a leader?’ By ERin PARkhuRSt photogr aphy courtesy of saint christopher’s school

Not all school assignments are onerous. At least according to Mac Robertson, 17, and Jack Nester, 18, seniors at Richmond’s St. Christopher’s School, which is celebrating its centennial this year. Last year, in preparation for the school’s third community symposium, “Building Leaders from the Inside Out,” held in November, they were invited to conduct a research project: investigate the core principles of leadership. But instead of churning out a five-paragraph essay, Nester and Robertson picked up Nester’s video camera and, over a nine-month period, met and interviewed some of the people who may know the topic best: leaders, including Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, VCU Men’s Head Basketball Coach Shaka Smart, Hampden-Sydney College President Chris Howard, and Fox News journalist Brit Hume. The product of their efforts is a collection of short films titled “Connector Moments,” shown throughout the two-day symposium. 62 |

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“My favorite was Brit Hume,” says Nester, a competitive swimmer and aspiring filmmaker who will attend Tulane University next year. The day he and Robertson met Hume at the new Fox News studio in Washington, D.C., now former Congressman Anthony Wiener from New York resigned, and the newsroom was buzzing. “There were all kinds of people there. It was exciting,” says Nester, who concedes that it wasn’t until that day that the significance of the opportunity really sank in. “It hit me when we were interviewing Shaka Smart,” says Robertson, a basketball fan who is on the track team and student council and a member of the school’s Missionary Society. “I thought, ‘I’m interviewing the coach who went to the Final Four last year.’ I had to set aside all of that, or I would be too nervous. I’m glad I didn’t freak out.” The project was conceived two years ago when the symposium planning committee began reaching

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out to invite speakers, explains Ashley Farley, parent of a sophomore and co-chair of the committee: “We wanted to have Mike London of UVA as a speaker but he was unavailable, so we thought, ‘Why don’t we just talk to him ahead of time?’” At that point, Farley says the committee identified the leaders they wanted to participate, and invited Robertson and Nester to conduct the video interviews. “It was meant to be a student project from the beginning,” says Farley, “but it was huge for all of us.” Farley, along with Lisa Burlee and Pierce Walmsley, co-chairs of the Connector Moments subcommittee, traveled with the boys to their interviews. Says Farley: “The boys were nervous, but each person we interviewed was so genuine and kind, and that made us feel at ease. The boys commented more than once that they thought this human side of these big personalities was part of what made them successful leaders.” When the committee began to put the video together, Farley says that many of the leaders said the same things about leadership: Honor, integrity and honesty matter. “That really stayed with me,” says Farley. “I hope that will stay with the boys, too.” Collins Burlee, 17 and a junior at St. Christopher’s this year, along with several other students, joined Nester and Robertson during the project. Burlee and Robertson travelled to the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. to interview Justice O’Connor. Burlee says, “She was very straightforward with her answers. A few times she just said, ‘I don’t know the answer to that.’ It was a little intimidating.” Burlee says the Justice talked about the importance of hard work in leadership, referring to her own upbringing on a ranch. Says Burlee: “She told us, ‘Cattle don’t take breaks.’” But it wasn’t all serious. The boys laugh recalling the interview with Smart. Says Nester, “Coach Smart seemed more nervous for that interview than you were Mac!” Robertson explains: “He seemed like he wanted to be back on the court. Near the end of the interview he said, ‘Are we done yet?’ When I said yes, he said, ‘Oh, thank God!’ That really made me feel more comfortable.” Did the boys worry about making any gaffes during the interviews? “No,” says Nester, “our biggest worry was dropping the camera!” The students did finally interview Mike London, head coach of the UVA

football team, as well as Governor Bob McDonnell and NASCAR champion Richard Petty. “Some of the people we interviewed were kind of laid back, some were more serious, but they all emphasized that if you work for what you want, you can get it,” explains Robertson. So what conclusions did they come to about leadership? “In order to be a good leader, you have to have great relationships,” says Nester. For Burlee, “I think Richard Petty said it best: You can’t succeed at anything by yourself.” “In our research, we have found

kindergarten through high school. “Building character and ethical leadership are at the heart of our mission,” says Stillwell. The Connector Moments project, he says, was a “great example of having young people explore and articulate what matters greatly to them” using a medium that resonates with their peers. Plus, he says, “They learned how down to earth genuine leaders can be.” Looking ahead to St. Christopher’s second century, Stillwell says, “We want to help the guys become creative problem-solvers because the

says he and his wife Lisa got behind the project because they saw an opportunity to create a place that would help boys develop the kinds of skills and competencies they will need in the next century. The 32,000-square-foot facility houses a digital arts classroom and a ‘loud’ library equipped with technology like LCD TVs and electronic bulletin boards so that students can work together. “My favorite aspect of the leadership center,” says Luck, whose son graduated from the school four years ago and who is himself a 1979 graduate of St. Christopher’s, “is the magic that happens between the students and the faculty there. What is going to be unique and special about this building is that it will put students and faculty together to interact in natural ways.” “We hadn’t had a space like this,” says Susan Lawrence Mistr, director of communications for St. Christopher’s and parent of a seventh-grader. The center, she explains, is meant to become the

“Some of the people we interviewed were kind of laid back, some were more serious, but they all emphasized that if you work for what you want, you can get it.” very few people are comfortable defining leadership,” says Charley Stillwell, headmaster at St. Christopher’s since 1999. “For us, we take an inclusive approach. It’s not just about being the team captain or the Student Council President. We believe that all our boys can be leaders when they use the right mix of character and personal skills to make a positive difference in the lives of others, whether in quiet ways or public moments.” St. Christopher’s was founded in 1911 by Dr. Churchill Gibson Chamberlayne as The Chamberlayne School. (It was renamed St. Christopher’s School in 1920 when it joined a system of church schools established by the Episcopal Diocese of Virginia.) An Episcopal priest and scholar, Chamberlayne emphasized the idea that leadership means putting oneself in a position to help others, according to St. Christopher’s School: 100 Years, a retrospective on the school’s history published in 2011. The school began with 16 students; today, St. Christopher’s enrolls 950 students from junior

issues they face today are so complex. We also want to help them become effective in collaborative situations and be savvy and flexible with technology and working across cultures.” In January, St. Christopher’s opened the Luck Leadership Center—a $13 million facility that houses a dining hall and cafe, student and faculty lounges, college counseling offices and theater, music and arts studios. Charlie Luck IV, president and CEO of Luck Stone Corporation and member of the St. Christopher’s board of governors,

locus of social life on campus, a place where students and faculty can meet for unscripted learning moments. “Boys aren’t good at making appointments,” laughs Stillwell. “The secret to making this all go is the relationships boys build with their teachers. “So many of the qualities we are trying to develop in the guys now, including character, wisdom and judgment, are the same as when the school started,” explains Stillwell, who adds, “The second century isn’t always new.” •

Above: Mac Robertson interviews Justice Sandra Day O’Connor at the Supreme Court. Right: Artist’s rendering of the newly-opened 32,000-square-foot Luck Leadership Center. V i r g i n i a

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A Royal Combination CAVIAR & VODKA indulgences worth savoring ∑

By Lisa Antonelli Bacon

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Aristotle wrote of heaping platters of caviar served to the blare of trumpets. Russian soldiers in the Napoleonic Wars spread the virtues of vodka. Together they are the perfect marriage of two of life’s great luxuries.

p h o t o g r a p h y b y k i p d aw k i n s

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FOOD

If

I had one day left to live, I’d buy a dozen tins of high-grade caviar, ice down some vodka, and have a few friends over for the most indulgent hours of our collective lives. Such a splash would cost a few thousand dollars, but with only hours left to spend whatever is left in the bank account, how better to cash out? Vodka and caviar go together like love and the first few years of marriage. The vodka preps the palate but doesn’t interfere with the flavor of the caviar. And the caviar delights it with beads that pop to reveal a nutty, slightly salty flavor. “Vodka and caviar, it’s a party in your mouth,” says Michel Emery, director of sales for Paris-based Petrossian, the world’s largest and, at 90-plus years, the most longstanding distributor of caviar. “You taste the caviar, then a sip of vodka cleanses the palate for the next taste of caviar.” Jennifer Knowles, wine director at The Inn at Little Washington, a Forbes five star and AAA five diamond-ranked hotel and restaurant, which sells more than a kilogram of caviar a week both as stand-alone service and in various dishes in the restaurant, says vodka pairs well with caviar because its clean and pure

flavors “pierce the salinity of the caviar but also allow the natural flavor to shine through.” Surprisingly, with caviar, the best isn’t necessarily the costliest. Ask 10 different chefs what their favorite caviar is, and you’ll get almost as many answers. “It’s a very personal thing,” says Emery. “The best thing to do is to find a species [of fish] you like. It’s not a question of how much to spend but how much your palate likes it.” Vodka, too, is a subjective pursuit. But good vodka Facing page: A purist’s should meet a few standard criteria. “It should delight, caviar on blini have unique and interesting characteristics,” says and crème fraîche. Jonathan Pogash of TheCocktailGuru.com and in-house Above: Caviar served mixologist for NBC’s “Weekend Today in New York.” atop a floral ice ring. Once you’ve done some tasting, Pogash says, you’ll be able to discern the right properties, including “some spice notes, like cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves, and savory spices like peppers, which you get after tasting a bit and getting your palate used to everything that goes on.” Follow a straight shot with some caviar, and you’ll taste why this combination is an enduring worldwide pleaser.

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FOOD Left: Fettuccine with smoked salmon and salmon caviar. Below: Poor man’s asparagus.

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Below: Caviar canapes. Right: Oyster and caviar canapes.

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-]uop -iy0[ptu9 Quest for the Best When it comes to caviar, forget everything you thought you knew. Beluga caviar might still be thought of as the best, but short of traveling to Russia and mugging a poacher, we’ll never know. Russia has banned trade of caviar from wild sturgeon. And importation of Beluga caviar—whether by hand or by mail—into America was declared illegal by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in 2005. (The Beluga sturgeon is protected as an endangered species.) And don’t think highly prized Iranian caviar, once fished from the Caspian Sea, will provide any comfort. The Obama administration embargoed all imports from Iran in September 2010. Of course, you can always turn to the black market, easiest to find online, but Emery sniffs at the thought: “Either it’s not Beluga and they’re selling it as Beluga, or it’s Beluga that’s fished illegally from the Caspian Sea,” he says. Either way, we shouldn’t be ordering Beluga. Petrossian buys its Ossetra, the next rung down on the caviar hierarchy (from the Ossetra sturgeon), from farms around the world. But best not cultivate a taste for Sevruga (from the Sevruga sturgeon), the less expensive high-grade caviar. “There has been no Sevruga for a long time,” says Emery. “It hasn’t been farm-raised yet.” If you want to replicate the Beluga experience, Emery recommends Khaluga caviar, which originates in China. So what can you expect at $194 for 1.06 ounces? “A light flavor, large beads, and a buttery taste, almost like an egg yolk,” explains Emery. Great vodka is easier to separate from the chaff. “Look for the initial mouth feel, which will be either sweet or bitter,” says Pogash. If it’s sweet, pass. It means other flavors have been added to the spirits. “I want the chill to hit my tongue and savory notes to come forward,” he says, “with maybe a little sweetness when it hits the back of the tongue and the throat.” He cites either Belvedere or Dutch import Van Gogh as a purist’s choice. And to beat the inevitable alcohol burn? “Take a second sip,” says Pogash, who adds that when tasting spirits and wine, “you have to take more than one sip to experience it.” setting the stage Caviar presentation isn’t the production you might think. People who know caviar prefer the classic service on bland toast points with a little butter, blini, or even potato slices, perhaps with a light topper of crème fraîche. This allows the flavor of the roe to take center stage. If you are serving caviar by the spoon, Emery recommends three to five grams “for a nice dollop.” As an appetizer with blini or toast points, expect to serve 30 grams per person or, as a main course, up to 100 grams per person. A main course offering, he says, should have different types of caviar “to compare flavors and textures.” And the spoon? This is very important: only wood, mother of pearl, horn or other non-metallic substances. Ironically, even though caviar comes in tins, a metal spoon turns the flavor of the delicate roe into something unworthy. Lastly, make tasting the caviar and vodka the main event. You could dress up the presentation with a hand-painted bottle of Jewel of Russia Ultra vodka, but don’t let the caviar sit indefinitely on a cocktail buffet. “Putting it on ice can work if you’re going to leave it on the table for an hour or a half hour,” says Emery. “If it isn’t chilled, you should eat it within a half-hour.” That shouldn’t be a problem. •

Left: Experts recommend pairing caviar with high-end vodkas such as Van Gogh or Belvedere for optimum effect.

}

oyStER AND CAViAR CANApES 6 oysters 1 cucumber caviar for garnish Wash and scrub oyster shells. Shuck oysters and retain oyster liquor in shell. Peel cucumber and slice into paper-thin strips. Place oysters on half shells, garnish with cucumber strips and top with caviar (about 1/2 teaspoon per oyster).

SHoRtCut BLiNi 3 eggs 1¼ cups milk 2 tablespoons olive oil ¼ teaspoon salt ¾ cup all-purpose flour 1 cup buckwheat flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder Combine dry ingredients. in a blender, mix eggs, milk and olive oil. Slowly add dry ingredients. in a non-stick skillet over medium heat, pour batter into half-dollar size circles. Cook until bubbles form around edges, then flip. Cook for another minute to minute-and-a-half. remove from pan. Cool before serving. Makes 2-3 dozen blini.

pooR MAN’S ASpARAGuS 1 leek 1 hard-boiled egg 1 generous spoonful caviar 1 tablespoon vinaigrette Trim leek’s root end and all but an inch of dark leaves. Split leek lengthwise almost all the way through and wash thoroughly. Blanch in boiling salted water until tender. Then refresh in ice water. Dry with paper towels. Separate egg yolk and white and sieve both. Place split leek in a V-shape on plate. Drop caviar into the space of the V and flank with yolk on one side and egg white on the other. Dress with vinaigrette. Serves one.

FEttuCCiNE WitH SMoKED SALMoN AND SALMoN CAViAR 1/2 pound fettuccine 1 avocado, diced 1 large tomato, diced 3 ounces of smoked salmon 1 ounce salmon caviar 2 tablespoons chives, chopped 2 tablespoons cilantro, minced 4 generous tablespoons olive oil olive oil Salt and pepper to taste Cook fettuccine according to directions. rinse in cold water and drain thoroughly. Toss with avocado, tomato, chives, cilantro and salmon in olive oil. garnish with caviar. Makes four appetizer servings.

CAViAR CANApES Top these with caviar for a spectacular canape tray: fingerling potato, cooked and split hard-boiled egg sliced lengthwise hard-boiled egg with top cut off crouton topped with smoked salmon

Champagne Cup, melons moCha sugar Bowl, rundes modell moCha spoon and serving fork, liqueur TumBler, giTTerwerk Bowl and oval nesTing Trays all designed By Josef hoffmann. franCes palmer ColleCTion Bowl designed By franCes palmer. hand-emBroidered linens inspired By wiener werksTäTTe and designed By mela koehler. sherry TumBler designed By adolf loos. all from The design shop aT neue galerie, new york CiTy, neuegalerie.org moTher of pearl and horn Caviar spoons from sur la TaBle, riChmond. surlatable.com Jewel of russia ulTra BoTTles provided By paTTy mCCormaCk and ClayTon vail.

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E D U C A T I O N I N V I R G I N I A 2012

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Delivered right to your inbox Introducing our e-newsletters Subscribe Today! VirginiaLiving.com/signup

Admission visitation day & spring fling | april 20, 2012

Together we are more. Sain t M a r y ’ s S c ho o l

S aint mary’s school is an interconnected community where girls are empowered

to serve and shape the world. Teachers challenge students and students challenge each other to examine ideas in new ways. Please contact the Admission Office at 800-948-2557 or visit us online at www.sms.edu to

register for a visit or to learn more about our community and programs.

apply today ! for the 2012-2013 academic school year 900 hillsborough street | raleigh, nc 27603-1689 | www.sms.edu saint mary’s school is an independent, episcopal, college-preparatory, boarding and day school dedicated to academic excellence and personal achievement for girls in grades 9-12. we admit girls of any race, color, religion, or national or ethnic origin.

The Celebration Continues... Come celebrate with us as we showcase special events and programs statewide between March and June by, for, or about children and the arts. Visit ArtsVa.org to learn more.

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2/27/12 9:13 AM


GREG GARRETT presents EASTERN VIRGINIA’S finest $1,800,000

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JAMES RIVER ESTATE WITH 3 ACRES Magnificent 4,300 square foot Cape Cod with slate roof sitting high above one of the Chesapeake Bay’s most majestic rivers. Matching carriage house.

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WILLIAMSBURG - 13 ACRES Elegant Colonial home with all the upgrades you’d expect with pasture, complete treed privacy and horse stables. 5,500 square foot masterpiece.

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Located in the Clifton area of Fairfax Station, the Craftown’s 5-acre sprawling estate is a wooded oasis just off Fairfax County Parkway & Route 123. Minutes from shopping & dining at Burke Centre & Burke Town Center, recreation destinations such as the Country Club of Fairfax & Four Seasons Golf Center, and regional parks close by. With top schools nearby & all the space your lifestyle needs, this home is sure to please.

The Craftown Estate

7540 Clifton Road, Fairfax Station, VA 22039 • Approx. 15,000 sq. ft. Of Finished Living Space On 4 levels! • Stone Front & Sides • 7BR • 9.5 BA • 4-Car Sideload Garage • Marble Foyer w/Spiral Oak Staircase • Wrought Iron Pickets • Rear Staircases • Upgrade Hardwood on 1st floor • Gourmet Kitchen w/Tumbled Italian Tile, Granite, Wine Rack & Cooler • 2-story Family Room w/Coffered Ceiling & Wood Burning Fireplace • Many More Luxurious Upgrades & Special Features Throughout.

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LAKEFRONT - 4.5 ACRES Beautiful custom brick Cape Cod on scenic lake with privacy and wildlife. 4,600 square feet with first floor master bedroom, sunroom, and dock.

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CEDAR POINT BIG NANSEMOND RIVER views!!! 3 fireplaces! Classic, stately BRICK Georgian with bulkhead and dock. 1st floor master bedroom suite.

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HISTORICAL GEM 3198 Cappahosic Road Gloucester, Virginia Own your own history. Completely restored, most with original materials. Complete history from Land Grant in 1865 to current owner. Listed on the National and Virginia registers and Colonial Dames 17th-century historical homes. New addition built 1984. Includes guest cottage, 3-car garage, workshop, and greenhouse with lap pool. Ready to move into, no work needed; $675,000. Steve Burch, (757) 220-9500 or cell (757) 880-0081. Virtual tour: http://rtvpix.com/RE-5585-D51RNN-01.

This 8,300 square foot, three-story home was built in Hot Springs’ Homestead Preserve community. The home combines southern historical charm with modern convenience and luxury, sitting atop a limestone cliff that offers spectacular views of Hot Springs Gap and ridges rolling west. The home features four bedroom suites; formal living and dining rooms; gourmet kitchen; casual living and media rooms; sauna; wine cellar - all providing comfortable places to gather and entertain while the fabulous stone terraces, porches and fire pit are the perfect extension for outdoor living. $2,900,000

AMAZING CONTEMPORARY 1744 Tyndall Point Lane Gloucester, Virginia

Colonial charm from the street and ultra modern thereafter. This amazing contemporary home was transformed in 2007 by a team of architects, designers and a premier builder, from a 2200 SF Colonial to a spectacular 6900 SF home perched above the York River. Elevated with stabilized shore, pier/boat lift, outdoor kitchen and vanishing edge pool. Spectacular Kitchen with StudioBecker cabinets, commercial grade stainless appliances, Calacutta marble. Crestron System and other state of the art electronics. There are panoramic river views from the fi rst floor Master Bedroom with its unique bath and heated blue stone floors. There are mesmerizing views also from the Kitchen, Dining Room, Sunroom and the second floor Recreation Room/Gym and Balcony. Teak flooring throughout. Cantilevered stairway from the Foyer and a second stairway from the Recreation Room. This magnificent home has its own Electronic Equipment Room, Media Room and Gym. Sylvia Payne, (757) 220-9500 or cell (757) 880-7590. Virtual tour: rtvpix.com/RE-2637-ZVQ53H-01.

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CLARKSON & WALLACE

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SHENANDOAH

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Historic home of Gen. John Bowyer, Revolutionary War hero and Colonial statesman, Thorn Hill enjoys unobstructed Blue Ridge and Allegheny views. High ceilings, original woodwork, glass and floors combine with advanced systems to provide comfort and security in a grand Georgian style. 17 acres include paddocks, stabling, the original granary, and a magnificent studio.

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Hawkhead Albemarle County A 5-6 bedroom residence with full, finished terrace level for a total of over 5300 SF. There are large master bedrooms up & down. Spacious FRs on both levels, one of which is finished in mahogany the owners brought from Argentina. Lots of built-ins, attic & storage spaces. Lovely deck runs full back of house and accessed from master bedroom, kitchen and formal dining room. Great flow for living and entertaining inside & out. The 16 acre parcel overlooks the river. Also included are a barn, guest cottage w/deck, run-in shed & a 3-bay garage. $1,500,000

Heartsworth Charlottesville, Va A magnificent, 11,260 SF, 7 bedroom brick Colonial enjoying panoramic, pastoral and mountain views. Beautifully sculpted gardens and a heated vanishing edge pool with gazebo enhance the gorgeous views, while miles of hiking trails weave around the perimeter of the beatiful 88 acre property with river. Now $4,400,000

ND LA

This 126+/- acre property is also located near historic Lexington, the Maury River, and Goshen Pass. The larger brick house is located on a beautiful knoll overlooking the land, creek, and surrounding mountains. In addition to the comfortable living spaces, it has a custom kitchen, an attached 3-car garage, and pool. Above one of two spring-fed ponds is a private guest house with stone work and deck overlooking the water. Included are a stable, bank barn, and numerous shop/outbuildings. $1,499,000

ESTATE BRO AND KE RS

STEVENS & COMPANY One Boar’s Head Place | Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 434-296-6104 | www.StevensandCompany.net

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WALKERS CREEK

279 acres atop a meadow sits a property with awe-inspiring views equaled only by the lookouts from the Blue Ridge Parkway. The main house, bounded by wings of cut limestone and vintage logs, offers a most wonderful living space with every comfort for large or small gatherings. A log guest cabin, custom playhouse, and outbuildings compliment this very private and unique setting. Farm structures, hunting cabin, and spring creek are also included. $2,250,000

Visit our website for other fine properties www.jfbrownrealestate.com • (540) 464-1776 6 E Washington Street • Lexington, VA 24450

2/24/12 3:52 PM


V

irginia

“Neala” 1840 Stone Manor 209 Acres - Madison County $3,750,000

“Shack Mountain” National Historic Landmark 102 Acres - Albemarle County $3,250,000

“Cobb Island Station” With 32 Waterfront Acres Virginia’s Eastern Shore $4,850,000

“Bachelor’s Quarters” Dating to 1800 5 Acres - Minutes from UVA $750,000

“Western View Farm” 700 Acres - Rapidan River Culpeper County $3,600,000

“Meadow Wood” c. 1885 with 56 Acres Just West of Richmond $542,500

“Cowherd Mtn. Farm” 232 Acres Orange County Historic District $1,975,000

“Rilleside” 16 Acres On the Lynch River Blue Ridge Views - Albemarle $335,000

“Sunnyside “ 59 Acres- May be Divided Near Madison’s Montpelier $795,500

Please visit our website for further information on these and others.

SAMUELS Jos. T.

Three Generations Of Virginia Real Estate Service

Charlottesville, VA u www.jtsamuels.com u (434) 295-8540

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2/22/12 2/24/12 12:18 2:20 PM


SOLD

Frank Hardy, Inc. is pleased to announce the sale of the following properties:

OAK GROVE, c. 1854, is a historic brick manor, with full english basement, was fully restored and features 10' ceilings, original woodwork and windows as well as gorgeous heart pine floors. Situated on 143 park like acres, the property includes an inground pool, a large equipment shed/shop, and a large barn. Approximately 45 acres are fenced and in open pasture, making it ideal for horses or cattle.

FLOWERDEW HUNDRED, is one of Virginia’s finest estates with over 1051 historic acres along the James River. Main residence of approximately 14,000 sq. ft. offers a dramatic setting, which overlooks the entire estate as well as the extensive water frontage on the James River. Additional structures include a Museum with a welcome center and pavilion, and numerous outbuildings and farm structures.

UPPER BUNDORAN, a 54 acre estate near UVA with a 7 bedroom manor house is 15 minutes south of Charlottesville. The house sits on an elevated parcel among large shade trees and mature English boxwood. The private setting offers long panoramic views of the surrounding valley. Miles of deeded riding and hiking trails on adjacent properties.

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TraVeL

A visit to Paris, the Loire Valley and Normandy was decades in the making for Chiles T. A. lArson. But France’s fabled cathedrals, châteaux and charming city streets were worth waiting for. Reflections on a long awaited sojourn to the land of liberté, égalité, fraternité.

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View from inside one of four giant clocks on the façade of the Musée d’Orsay.

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In my early twenties, an opportunity presented itself to visit Paris. However, because I would only be able to set aside a few days there, I felt the enchantment from the “City of Light” might fade from just a short stay, particularly when I was traveling by myself. So instead, I opted for a two-week stay in Denmark that offered the possibility of locating Larson family roots in the upper reaches of Jutland. My youthful intuition certainly felt vindicated when, decades later, I finally found myself in Paris—with the prospect of soaking up the sights, sounds, smells and tastes of this intriguingly beautiful city—after my wife, Bernice, and I decided it was time we visited France together. This would be the trip I had always hoped to make. My wife is not only fluent in French—after years of teaching the language—but also enjoys a number of old friendships in Paris from a period prior to our marriage. With our arrival at Charles de Gaulle airport and the usual bustle of clearing customs and collecting baggage in a large international hub, we were, unlike most passengers arriving, fortunate to be able to avoid dealing with transportation into the city. We were met by Maurice and Renee Pélisser, old friends of Bernice’s from when their son Pas-

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cal stayed with Bernice’s family in Greensboro, North Carolina, as an exchange student. Later, she and Maurice enjoyed a professional association when she owned a wine and cheese shop in Charleston, South Carolina, and he was a wine distributor in Paris. Not only did Maurice intimately know all the fine restaurants in the city, he also knew how to navigate the traffic, and he whisked us quickly away to the city in his compact little Audi. Before taking us to our hotel, the Edward VII, located in central Paris, he pointed out a building on the Champs-Elysées near the Arc de Triomphe where Thomas Jefferson resided between 1785 and 1789 while serving as minister to France. A small memorial plaque has been placed by the entry. On arrival at the hotel, we learned our room was not ready. The register had a line asking guests their occu-

pation. I simply put “travel writer,” and upon our return later that day, voilà! Our modest single room had become a suite with a private balcony overlooking the Avenue l’Opéra de Paris. The next morning, we hiked up to the Basilica of the Sacré Coeur, the highest point in the city, and then explored the special charm that radiates throughout Montmartre. It is a local saying that Monmartre is to Parisians what Greenwich Village is to New Yorkers. Paris is best enjoyed on foot, because the slow pace allows one to better appreciate and enjoy the enchantment coming from all quarters. A late afternoon shower briefly interrupted our stroll from Notre Dame Cathedral along the Right Bank towards the Eiffel Tower. The combination of beautiful late afternoon light and damp reflections from the rain made for a series of pleas-

ing photos. I was able to capture a Bateaux Mouche with the Ile de la Cité and the Pont Neuf in the background; the Pont de la Concorde arch, with a single stroller walking under it; the Pont Alexandre III, with its row of beautiful golden street lamps, and a final twilight photo of the Arc de Triomphe, taken from the safety of a pedestrian stand in the middle of this famous avenue. We spent the next day strolling through the numerous galleries of the Musée d’Orsay, prominently situated on the Left Bank of the Seine. The building was converted from a 1900 Beaux Arts railway station and, in 1986, after extensive remodeling, opened as a museum. The massive structure features four giant clocks on the main façade located at each corner of the building. It is best known for its extensive collection of Impressionist and Post-Impressionist masterpieces by artists such as Monet, Manet, Degas, Renoir, Cezanne, Gauguin and Van Gogh, whose use of light made Bernice’s heart sing, she said. It is easy to understand the romantic spell Paris holds on people. Although we spent just a few days experiencing the enriching sights

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TraVeL

Facing page: Street scene in Montmartre. This page, from above left: Arc de Triomphe; Eiffel Tower at night; Bateau Mouche with Ile de la Cité and Pont Neuf in the background.

and sounds, we felt we had made a modest connection to the magnificent metropolis. We would like to have stayed longer, but there’s more to France than just one city. The Pélissers had worked out a plan for us to next visit the winegrowing region of the Loire Valley. We spent our first night in the medieval town of Chartres in a forgettable little motel inn that was too close to the highway for restful sleep. However, seeing Chartres Cathedral, constructed between 1193 and 1250 and considered one of the finest examples of the French High Gothic style, made up for the restless night. Listed with UNESCO as a World Heritage Site, it is equally notable because of the hundreds of sculpted illustrations of key theological themes and religious figures adorning the building’s three great façades. The Pelissers’ choice to tour the Loire Valley, with its storied history, gave us the opportunity to spend a little time looking over several imposing châteaux. For this, they selected Chenonceau, which features a romantic, arching gallery that spans the River Cher like a bridge, and the impressive formal gardens of Villandry. We were told there were

more than 300 of these distinctive structures, ranging from the Medieval to the Renaissance periods, studded along the banks of the Loire River out to the Atlantic. This venue was also planned in order to visit the vineyard and winery of Maurice’s boyhood friend Roger Aygalenq, who produces the highly regarded Chinon wines made from Cabernet Franc grapes. Since Chinon is considered a Frenchman’s wine, it is rarely exported, and my wife had not carried it in her shop. As a Medievalist, she was thrilled to be in the shadow of the famous Château de Chinon, where Joan of Arc came in 1429 to try to persuade Charles VII to fight for his kingdom. Bernice had been asked to bring a dressier outfit for a banquet during our stay, but we were not told that this formal ceremonial dinner would be under the auspices of the Entonneurs Rabelaisiennes de Chinon, an ancient wine society. The event was to be held in a massive cave in the cliffside under the castle. That evening, while Bernice was on the dance floor, a guest whispered in my ear that Bernice had been tapped to become a member, and was presented with a large medallion and

certificate of membership. She was also required to consume a goblet of wine before the applauding assembly. The following day, the Pélissers drove us to Normandy where, after a warm goodbye, we joined a group tour of the little village of Lisieux, sponsored by the College of William & Mary Alumni Association. This location is in the center of Normandy, which meant easier access for day trips throughout the province. Normandy is an extraordinary region of France. With its close proximity to Great Britain across the English Channel, one would think successful invasions might have been commonplace, yet there were only two. The first was led by William the Conqueror who, with some 8,000 to 10,000 men on board 400 boats, set sail for England on September 17, 1066, arriving unopposed at a small port in Sussex eleven days later to defeat his cousin at the Battle of Hastings and become King of England. This action is vividly illustrated in an enormous piece of embroidery known as the “Bayeux Tapestry,” which stretches 230 feet and is divided into a large number of scenes, featuring hundreds of partici-

pants. It dates from the 11th century, but the colors are astonishingly fresh. Tradition has it Matilda, William’s wife, and her ladies in waiting wove it, taking pleasure in depicting William’s outstanding achievement. The tapestry is exhibited at Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux. The second successful invasion was June 6, 1944, D-Day, a day that is ingrained in the modern psyche as the beginning of the end for Nazi Germany. We visited the five codenamed landing sectors that stretched along 50 miles of Normandy’s shoreline where 160,000 allied troops landed. The American 4th Infantry division hit Utah beach, with the 1st and 29th divisions assaulting Omaha beach. The British attacked both Gold and Sword beaches with Canadians landing at Juno. The success of these landings was based on many things, but surprise, extraordinary planning and top-down secrecy were the major components. The 29th Division had been a Virginia National Guard unit prior to the war. Among the 180 men in Company A of the 116th Regimental Combat Team, 34 were from Bedford County. This was the first wave to go into action at Omaha. At the end of V i r g i n i a

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the day, 19 had been killed in action. In proportion to its size, no other community in America would suffer such a staggering loss in the invasion. Bedford was selected by Congress to be the site of the National D-Day Memorial. Eleven of the 21 total casualties from Company A are buried in the Normandy American Cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer. Having read about and seen photographs of the massive and pitiful litter of equipment of every description scattered all over Omaha Beach—the wrecked tanks, half-sunk landing craft, the dead and wounded either

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lying in the sand or floating among the debris—we were overwhelmed and deeply moved at seeing, through misty eyes, the perfect order in which the graves were placed and maintained. We learned there were three Medal of Honor recipients buried in the cemetery. Tech. Sgt. Frank D. Peregory of Charlottesville is among the three. One grave I was interested in locating was that of Maj. Thomas D. Howie, a former football coach at Staunton Military Academy, who was killed in action on July 17, 1944, just prior to the assault on St. Lo. I had

known something about this American hero as a young boy, and it was touching to locate his grave. Howie had been encouraging his troops before the battle, saying, “I want to be the first man into St. Lo.” This was carried out. His body, with an American flag draped over it, was placed on a pile of rubble in front of the St. Lo cathedral. A full page photograph in LIFE magazine appeared later with a simple caption, “The Major of St. Lo.” Next, we took a quick day trip to Honfleur, a charming harbor town, which is a popular vacation spot. A

number of artists—including Claude Monet, considered the father of the Impressionist movement—found the town and nearby seascapes compelling subjects for their creative efforts. Monet paid tribute to Eugene Boudin, a native of Honfleur, for the early influence he had on his painting, and the pair were joined by several friends in the first Impressionist exhibition in 1874. The following day we traveled to Giverny, located a little more than halfway between the coast and Paris. It is noteworthy as the place chosen by Monet for his residence.

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TraVeL

Facing page, clockwise from left: Pont Alexandre III in Paris; formal gardens of the Château de Villandry; religious figures on façade of Chartres Cathedral.

This page, clockwise from top left: Storm clouds over Mont Saint-Michel; ancient stonework passageway at Mont SaintMichel; American military cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer; harbor at Honfleur.

Unfortunately, on our visit, his garden, which was the subject of many of his paintings created late in his life, was packed with tourists, making it challenging to compose pictures, particularly of his famous water gardens. The final day of our Normandy stay was a visit to Mont Saint-Michel, the legendary granite island off the Normandy coast. Seeing it in a misty light recalls the drip castles we used to make out of sand at the beach. It truly has a fairy tale look about it. Talk about castles with moats surrounding them! The half-mile cause-

way connecting the island with the coastline has a tidal swing of some 46 feet and, when the high tide begins returning, it comes in with the speed of a galloping horse. Mont Saint-Michel is both a monastery and a fortress. The first humble church was consecrated in 706. Soon another church was added, and it became a place of pilgrimage; then a handful of monks moved on to the windswept rock. In 960, an important Benedictine abbey was founded by Richard I, Duke of Normandy. Subsequent buildings, rising in tiers, were added over the centu-

ries. Watching high from the slender steeple over all below is a statue of the Archangel Michael. We made our way up to the cloister via a series of twisting stairways, up stone steps, through ancient portals and a veritable labyrinth of passageways that have been established at different levels from one century to another, marking the diverse periods of architecture. Looking out over the vast stretches of exposed sand surrounding this hauntingly spiritual island, revealed for us during the low tide, made the spiraling climb to the summit a fit-

ting conclusion for us to reflect on this foray into France. Paris, the Loire Valley and Normandy provided us with a touch of the cultural fabric of this special country. I was delighted to have experienced it now, with someone who knows and appreciates France, rather than by myself earlier. Good things really are worth waiting for. À la prochaine fois! Or, until the next time! •

>> For more information about visiting France, go to VirginiaLiving.com V i r g i n i a

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Garden

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Facing page: Looking into the “sunken panel” vegetable garden. This page, clockwise from top left: Steps leading from main house to walled garden; Painted Lady butterfly resting on a purple coneflower; inside front gate; Dick Mazzucchelli.

What Lies Over the Garden Wall? A couple in Leesburg drew inspiration from some of Virginia’s finest 18th-century gardens to create a hidden paradise and win a longstanding battle with some very determined deer. By DAryL GroVe p h oto g r a p h y by ro g e r f o l e y

The centerpiece of Samarate, Dick and Judy Mazzucchelli’s 15.3 acre property in Mount Gilead, near Leesburg, is not the house itself. Though their story-and-a-half, double-pile, Williamsburg-style home is both impressive and welcoming, the focal point of the estate—named after the owner’s ancestral home in Northern Italy—lies 200 feet east of their backdoor at the end of a brick walkway, which descends through three landscaped terraces. It is the Mazzucchellis’ magnificent walled garden.

Inside the 100 by 120-foot walls is an upper-tier pleasure garden of parterres separated by boxwoods and a central gravel walkway, and a lower tier utilitarian garden where Dick, 74, grows fruits and vegetables. The two tiers and various “rooms” work as individual panels, but also come together to form one united space that pays homage to landmark 18th-century Virginia gardens like Eyre Hall on the Eastern Shore, George Washington’s Mount Vernon in Northern Virginia, and the Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg. The Mazzucchellis’ walled garden is a marvel of expertly integrated inspirations; and it’s all thanks to some very determined deer. Dick Mazzucchelli and the deer have a longstanding disagreement over who gets to eat his vegetables. When he and Judy, 73, retired in 2000—Dick from Gates, Hudson & Associates Inc., the Fairfax-headquartered commercial real estate firm he co-founded with two partners in 1980, and Judy after 24 years as a hospital volunteer— they were looking forward to long, happy days tending to—and eating from—a plentiful vegetable garden. However, the local V i r g i n i a

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Clockwise from top left: Solid panels of the garden gates prevent deer from seeing in; Pioneer Macintosh apples; Japanese Snowbell tree in upper tier.

deer population staged regular raids, trampling the garden and eating the foliage on the Mazzucchellis’ potato plants, tomato vines, pepper plants and more. Initial efforts to defend the patch included an 8-foot high fence made from the kind of wire used in vineyards, but even that proved no match for persistent antlers. “We knew we needed to do something a little more permanent,” says Dick. And so the Mazzucchellis began to plan a deer-proof garden in the Colonial style that would complement their home. Such an undertaking required expert help. Dick knew of Lisbeth Prins, 52, owner of the now 30-yearold Plant-A-Plant Landscaping Company through her sponsorship of Keep Loudoun Beautiful—the volunteer group of which Dick is both

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board member and treasurer. Prins and her company received a Keep Virginia Beautiful Award for her work in 1999, and she was familiar with the early to mid-18th century style the Mazzucchellis were looking for. On their first meeting, the Mazzucchellis knew it was meant to be when Prins pulled up in her car and out jumped Golden Retriever Amos, the mirror image of the Mazzucchellis’ own Retriever, Cody. A quick comparison of canine family trees revealed that Cody and Amos were in fact brothers. Amos has since passed away, but Cody is now a stately 14 years old and happy to get up and wag his tail at visitors to Samarate. After some preliminary planning work, Prins believed that the smaller-scale walled garden the Mazzucchellis were planning to build close to their backdoor would

not make the grade. Literally. “The walls would have had to step too rapidly because of the grade of the garden,” Prins explains. “And there was also a hedgerow that Dick wanted to keep. So we looked at different sites.” The Mazzucchellis mulled over Prins’ advice and then decided to go for it. “We thought, ‘If we’re going to do this thing, we’re going to do it on a grander scale,’” says Dick. “And then it evolved into something bigger and better.” And so by mid-2008, plans were drawn up for a Colonial erainspired garden, with an upper tier pleasure garden and a lower tier vegetable garden, surrounded by a wall modeled after the one at Mount Vernon. The plans required altering the grade of the garden using industrial-sized construction equipment, relocating the drain

field to make room and bringing in 100 yards of soil that Prins calls “the Mazzuchelli blend.” Planting began in earnest in spring 2009. The first thing you notice about the Mazzucchellis’ garden is, of course, the wall, which stands 7-anda-half-feet tall with three 30-inch drops to accommodate the grade of the land. The large mahogany gates at either end—the only way in or out of the garden—feature a solid panel designed so that a mature deer can not see through, or over, and be enticed by what’s on the other side. The wall was built using a brick called “Jefferson Oversize,” which is about a half-inch taller than a standard wall brick and manufactured by the Salem-based company, Old Virginia Brick. These are arranged in the Flemish bond pattern (alternating headers and stretchers) that was common in the 18th century. The wall is topped by a coping—a nod to the wall surrounding the Governor’s Palace in Williamsburg—which features an overhang which is not only aesthetically pleasing, but also redirects rainwater to prevent it from soaking into the brick. It was important to both the Mazzucchellis and to Prins that the garden be more than a facsimile of its 18th-century inspirations. The goal, says Prins, was “incorporating the key elements of the things that [the Mazzucchellis] liked from each garden.” For example, they decided against using ivy, which has grown to cover the walls at Mount Vernon. “We wanted to break the walls up, but not cover them up,” she explains, and her solution was

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to plant boxwoods right next to the foundation, which leaves just enough brick visible from the outside while providing a preview of what can be found inside. The Mazzucchellis gave Prins a book, Washington’s Historic Garden at Mount Vernon by Mac Griswold, to use certain photographs as a reference, but Prins deliberately didn’t open its pages until after the garden was complete. “I didn’t want to keep opening books and get off-track,” she confides, “because it’s more about the feeling of space. A photo is just one aspect, one shot. When you’re in a garden it’s the whole space that has to work, not just a vignette.” Prins’ sense of space is apparent throughout. Crepe myrtles create what she calls “the umbrella effect,” hanging just over your head, while short Sylvester tulips—as found at Monticello—are planted in front of the beds to create a stepping effect. The upper tier pleasure garden is divided into two “rooms” by a central brick-lined walkway. The room to the left, inspired by the famous gardens at Eyre Hall in Northampton County, is a grass panel with a Brandywine maple tree at its center, with boxwood hedges and multiple varieties of crepe myrtle. The red of the dynamite and the blue hues of the raspberry sundae, for example, represent Dick and Judy’s respective favorite colors, both of which pop because of the whites, pinks and yellows Prins has added to the color wheel. The result is an aesthetically pleasing collaborative compromise, perhaps illustrating why the Mazzucchellis have been married an

impressive 51 years. “And we’re still talking,” says Judy with a smile. To the right is a series of parterres lined with holly, with a Japanese Snowbell tree at the center of each section. Around the walls are subtle, playful touches like ivy grown in the shape of window frames and a boxwood cut into the shape of a flower basket—inside which Judy plans to place “something showy” this spring—adding just the right amount of frivolity to the elegance and order. The lower tier of the garden is separated from the upper tier by a 30 inch-high dry stack wall made using stone unearthed on the property, as is the large stone seat that serves as a resting spot while gardening. This helps to create a microclimate in the lower tier, perfect for growing. The lower tier is smaller—measuring 40

feet by 100 feet—but contains seven rectangular beds where Dick grows a variety of vegetables, including tomatoes, eggplant, squash, peppers, Swiss chard and pole beans, which the Mazzucchellis regularly transport directly to the kitchen. “I roast the vegetables together a lot,” says Judy. “It’s easy to do, and it brings the flavor out of every vegetable.” Perhaps the most recognizably Colonial aspect of the garden may be the octagonal building in the southeast corner. Measuring 10 feet in diameter and rising above the garden with a bell-shaped tower, this wasn’t just inspired by the four similar buildings at Mount Vernon; it was actually constructed using a 1956 plan that the Mount Vernon Ladies Association generously shared with the Mazzucchellis. “It was just

Clockwise from top left: View from the upper tier, through garden gates and up to house; Dick Mazzucchelli harvesting summer squash; view from the octagon building, showing dry-stack retaining wall.

one sheet,” recalls Dick, “but it was enough for us to scale it.” The Mazzucchellis hired Rob Whitaker of Fine House LTD in Strasburg to recreate the profile of the bell-shaped roof and elaborate cornice features, with the iconic “fish scale” shingles being soaked overnight (so they would bend to the roof’s shape) and then installed by Cedar Shakes & Shingles Inc. of Manassas. At the top of the garden is a wooden bench, which was intended as a place for the Mazzucchellis to sit in the evenings and admire their garden. “We were going to come out every day and enjoy a glass of wine on that bench,” remembers Judy. “And that has happened maybe once!” Dick concurs: “Well, you go down there, and you see things that need to be done. You get caught up in it, so you want to go and get your hands dirty.” That’s the thing with gardens; they just keep growing and changing. “It’s also a learning process,” Dick says. “We’re learning more and more about the plants and how to cultivate them, and it’s the same in the vegetable garden. As Jefferson said, ‘Though an old man, I am but a young gardener.’” So no time for wine, but the couple are able to sit on the bench with a cup of coffee most mornings and watch the spectacular sunrise over Hogback Mountain, and both Dick and Judy agree that the work in the garden isn’t really work, but pleasure. “The garden has been a very special thing in our lives,” says Judy. “We really are excited about it.” Fortunately, those deer don’t know what they’re missing. • V i r g i n i a

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garden week

What’s Blooming? A sneak peek at Historic Garden Week. By erin pArkHurst wat e r c o lo r s by b e t h M a r c h a n t

It is almost time for that delightful rite of spring in Virginia… Historic Garden Week. For seven days in April, more than 250 private homes and gardens will welcome admiring visitors—dare we say, floramaniacs?—eager to get a glimpse of striking flower arrangements and stately furnishings, and some of the state’s most beautiful gardens just reaching their peak. Now in its 79th year, Historic Garden Week once again will not disappoint. A number of grand additions to its programme include five log homes in Rockbridge County open for the first time, and the Martinsville home of the late Stewart Miller, the creator of one of our favorite things, Carriage House Cheese Straws. Yummy. But that’s not all that is new for the venerable event, which is produced by more than 3,400 Garden Club of Virginia members across the Commonwealth. The event’s guidebook, long a monochromatic, utilitarian sort of tome characterized by tiny printing, has been revamped. “We worked together as a team to make the guidebook more readable and geared more toward non-Garden Club members,” explains Karen Cauthen Miller, Historic Garden Week’s new director. The new guidebook, like the homes and gardens it represents, is bursting with color. Art director Dale Edmondson has designed an inviting new cover, and Richmond artist Beth Marchant—who for the last 15 years has produced the guidebook’s familiar pen and ink drawings—has re-imagined the diminutive depictions in watercolor. “I think the guidebook is easier to make sense of,” says Marchant. “Adding color throughout enabled the guidebook to reflect the beauty of the tours themselves,” says Miller, who adds that a new color map pinpointing the sites of the Garden Club’s restoration projects will bring attention to the mission of the event: Tour proceeds fund the restoration and preservation of Virginia’s historic gardens. As a bonus, adding to the guidebook’s new user-friendliness is larger print, which is good news for the, er, more visually challenged among us. This editor included. • Historic Garden Week takes place April 21-28 throughout the state. For a complete listing of tours, and ticket information, go to VaGardenWeek.org Following is a preview of a few of our favorite homes on the tour this year:

eyre hall 3215 eyre hall Dr., cheriton This 18th-century property on Cherrystone Creek, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, has been in the Eyre family for 250 years. The house was completed in 1758, and the garden in 1800 making it the oldest garden in Virginia to have been continuously maintained. Mr. H. Furlong Baldwin, owner.

the carriage house 21 scuffle hill, Martinsville Built in 1905 by Benjamin Stevens as “a damn good garage” for the three-story mansion he built on the property, the two-story carriage house survived a 1917 fire that destroyed the mansion. Home to numerous residents, including Stewart Miller, an avid cook whose Carriage House Cheese Straws were named for the house. Open for Historic Garden Week for the first time. Mrs. Benjamin R. Gardner, owner.

wilson springs 5751 Maury river rd., rockbridge baths Nestled between Hogback Mountain and the Maury River, Wilson Springs, built in 1775 and remodeled in the 19th century as the Wilson Springs Hotel, is one of the most historic properties in Rockbridge County. The hotel drew visitors to its sulphur springs but was purchased and remodeled in 1985 to become a private home. Cochran and Clover Lyle, owners.

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BEST LAW YERS in virginia 2012

Legal Eagles When you need legal advice, make sure you get it from the most respected attorneys in the Commonwealth. BY glennis loFland

S p e c i a l

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a d v e r t i S i n g

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urn on the TV after work and you will be greeted by countless crime and legal dramas starring actors who can convincingly regurgitate all the legal jargon they’ve learned. We watch them enough to think we know how the legal system works, until we remember those shows are scripted entertainment. Life, on the other hand, is unscripted. And when you find yourself in need of some real life legal guidance, you don’t want a TV actor. You want someone who knows the ins and outs of our complicated legal system, someone with the experience to navigate that world. But where can you find the right attorney? Sure, you can them on highway billboards and in TV commercials. You can whistle some of their advertising jingles that you probably know most of the words too. Catchy yes, but that doesn’t necessarily make them a good lawyer. What makes someone a serious legal professional is the respect of their peers, which leads to a listing in Virginia’s Best Lawyers. The oldest and most respected peer-review publication in the legal profession, Best Lawyers is selected by the only people who really know, as it’s compiled by extensive and confidential peer-review surveys of thousands of other lawyers. If an attorney has high enough scores to make the list, he or she must maintain those scores to remain on the list for subsequent editions. Being named one of the Best Lawyers is a testimony to that attorney’s credibility as one of the best. For the first time, Virginia Living brings this prestigious list to you because, while all those TV shows are entertaining, we should leave real law to the professionals.

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3/5/12 12:53 PM


c e ntr a l v i rgi n i a

aDMiniSTraTiVe / reGULaTory LaW Christian & Barton, LLP richmond | 804-697-4100 Michael J. Quinan

aPPeLLaTe PraCTiCe Hirschler Fleischer, PC richmond | 804-771-9500 John R. Walk

Hunton & Williams LLP eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC richmond | 804-788-8200 richmond | 804-788-7740 John Charles Thomas David W. Clarke Jackson Lewis LLP Thomas A. Lisk richmond | 804-649-0404 Hancock, Daniel, Johnson & nagle PC David E. Nagle richmond | 804-967-9604 Law office of Gail S. Marshall Thomas Francis Hancock III rapidan | 540-672-3506 Hunton & Williams LLP Gail S. Marshall richmond | 804-788-8200 McGuireWoods LLP Brooks M. Smith richmond | 804-775-1000 Jackson Lewis LLP William G. Broaddus richmond | 804-649-0404 Sands anderson PC John M. Barr richmond | 804-648-1636 LeClairryan Robert B. Delano, Jr. charlottesville | 540-245-3444 Troutman Sanders LLP Steven W. Blaine richmond | 804-697-1200 LeClairryan William H. Hurd glen allen | 804-270-0070 George A. Somerville James Patrick Guy II Two rivers Law Group, PC John A. Pirko richmond | 804-477-8666 LeClairryan S. Vernon Priddy III richmond | 804-783-2003 Eric M. Page Murphy & McGonigle, P.C. glen allen | 804-762-5320 James A. Murphy SeltzerGreene, PLC richmond | 804-864-1100 Brian R. Greene Troutman Sanders LLP richmond | 804-697-1200 Carter Glass IV Donald G. Owens Anthony F. Troy Woods rogers PLC richmond | 804-343-5020 Anthony J. Gambardella, Jr.

anTiTrUST LaW Christian & Barton, LLP richmond | 804-697-4100 J. Edward Betts McGuireWoods LLP richmond | 804-775-1000 Howard Feller James H. Walsh

arBiTraTion

Hirschler Fleischer, PC richmond | 804-771-9500 Charles F. Witthoefft Hunton & Williams LLP richmond | 804-788-8200 D. Alan Rudlin Law office of roderick B. Mathews richmond | 804-359-6743 Roderick B. Mathews McGuireWoods LLP richmond | 804-775-1000 John S. Barr Midkiff, Muncie & ross, P.C. richmond | 804-560-9600 James C. Shannon Troutman Sanders LLP richmond | 804-697-1200 Bradfute W. Davenport, Jr.

BanKinG anD FinanCe LaW Hunton & Williams LLP richmond | 804-788-8200 J. Waverly Pulley III

LeClairryan richmond | 804-783-2003 George P. Whitley

Scott Kroner PLC charlottesville | 540-296-2161 W. Stephen Scott

ThompsonMcMullan richmond | 804-649-7545 Dewey B. Morris

Spinella owings & Shaia PC richmond | 804-747-0920 Harry Shaia, Jr.

Troutman Sanders LLP richmond | 804-697-1200 Thomas E. duB. Fauls Jeffrey M. Gill Jacob A. Lutz III Fred W. Palmore III C. Cotesworth Pinckney

Spotts Fain PC richmond | 804-697-2000 Robert H. Chappell III

Williams Mullen richmond | 804-420-6000 Howard W. Dobbins William H. Schwarzschild III Wayne A. Whitham, Jr.

BanKrUPTCy anD CreDiTor DeBTor riGHTS / inSoLVenCy anD reorGaniZaTion LaW Canfield, Baer & Heller LLP richmond | 804-673-6600 Robert A. Canfield Cox Law Group PLLC lynchburg | 540-845-2600 H. David Cox

Tavenner & Beran, PLC richmond | 804-783-8300 Paula Steinhilber Beran Lynn Lewis Tavenner Troutman Sanders LLP richmond | 804-697-1200 Fred W. Palmore III Williams Mullen richmond | 804-420-6000 Paul Bliley William H. Schwarzschild III

BeT-THe-CoMPany LiTiGaTion Cantor, Stoneburner, Ford, Grana & Buckner, P.C. richmond | 804-644-1400 H. Aubrey Ford III

Douglas e. Little Law office charlottesville | 540-977-4500 Douglas E. Little

Christian & Barton, LLP richmond | 804-697-4100 R. Harvey Chappell, Jr. Warren David Harless Craig Thomas Merritt

DurretteCrump PLC richmond | 804-775-6900 Roy M. Terry, Jr.

Craig S. Cooley richmond | 804-358-2328 Craig S. Cooley

Hirschler Fleischer, PC richmond | 804-771-9500 Michael P. Falzone Robert Westermann

edmunds & Williams, P.C. lynchburg | 540-846-9000 Robert C. Wood III

Hunton & Williams LLP richmond | 804-788-8200 Benjamin C. Ackerly Tyler P. Brown Kutak rock LLP richmond | 804-644-1700 Michael A. Condyles LeClairryan richmond | 804-783-2003 Bruce H. Matson McGuireWoods LLP richmond | 804-775-1000 Dion W. Hayes o’Keeffe & Spies lynchburg | 540-845-6555 Richard E. Spies

Hirschler Fleischer, PC richmond | 804-771-9500 John R. Walk Charles F. Witthoefft Hunton & Williams LLP richmond | 804-788-8200 John D. Epps James E. Farnham Thomas G. Slater, Jr. Law office of edward Scher richmond | 804-421-6000 Edward E. Scher LeClairryan richmond | 804-545-1500 Everette G. Allen, Jr.

McGuireWoods LLP richmond | 804-775-1000 William G. Broaddus Richard Cullen William H. King, Jr. Scott C. Oostdyk Rosewell Page III Gilbert E. Schill, Jr. Anne Marie Whittemore Morris & Morris PC richmond | 804-344-8300 Philip B. Morris Spotts Fain PC richmond | 804-697-2000 Hugh M. Fain III Troutman Sanders LLP richmond | 804-697-1200 Bradfute W. Davenport, Jr. Stephen A. Northup Robert D. Seabolt

BioTeCHnoLoGy LaW Hirschler Fleischer, PC richmond | 804-771-9500 J. Benjamin English LeClairryan richmond | 804-783-2003 Gary D. LeClair

CoLLaBoraTiVe LaW: FaMiLy LaW Parker, Mcelwain & Jacobs, P.C. charlottesville | 540-973-3331 Annie Lee Jacobs Phillips, Morrison, Johnson & Ferrell lynchburg | 540-384-0946 Frank West Morrison Susan Davis White charlottesville | 540-977-0563 Susan Davis White Tremblay & Smith, PLLC charlottesville | 540-977-4455 John K. Taggart III

CoMMerCiaL LiTiGaTion

Sands anderson PC richmond | 804-648-1636 C. Thomas Ebel

McCandlish Holton PC richmond | 804-775-3100 Michael H. Gladstone McGuireWoods LLP charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Jonathan T. Blank Leigh B. Middleditch, Jr.

Butler armstrong richmond | 804-353-4931 Susan C. Armstrong Cantor, Stoneburner, Ford, Grana & Buckner, P.C. richmond | 804-644-1400 H. Aubrey Ford III Christian & Barton, LLP richmond | 804-697-4100 R. Harvey Chappell, Jr. Warren David Harless Paul W. Jacobs II Craig Thomas Merritt Michael W. Smith

McGuireWoods LLP richmond | 804-775-1000 J. William Boland William G. Broaddus Richard Cullen eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC William H. King, Jr. richmond | 804-788-7740 Scott C. Oostdyk Matthew B. Kirsner Rosewell Page III edmunds & Williams, P.C. Gilbert E. Schill, Jr. lynchburg | 540-846-9000 Howard C. Vick, Jr. Robert C. Wood III J. Tracy Walker IV Anne Marie Whittemore Feil, Pettit and Williams, PLC charlottesville | 540-979-1400 MichieHamlett, PLLC Michael E. Derdeyn charlottesville | 540-951-7200 John V. Little Goodman, allen & Filetti, PLLC Edward B. Lowry glen allen | 804-346-0600 Charles M. Allen, Jr. Morris & Morris PC richmond | 804-344-8300 Hirschler Fleischer, PC James W. Morris III richmond | 804-771-9500 Philip B. Morris John R. Walk Charles F. Witthoefft Sands anderson PC richmond | 804-648-1636 Hunton & Williams LLP Stephen E. Baril richmond | 804-788-8200 M. Pierce Rucker John D. Epps William N. Watkins James E. Farnham Joseph C. Kearfott Setliff & Holland, P.C. Lonnie D. Nunley III glen allen | 804-377-1260 Robert M. Rolfe John K. Burke, Jr. Thomas G. Slater, Jr. Spotts Fain PC Law office of edward Scher richmond | 804-697-2000 richmond | 804-421-6000 Hugh M. Fain III Edward E. Scher Troutman Sanders LLP LeClairryan richmond | 804-697-1200 charlottesville | 540-245-3444 Dabney J. Carr IV H. Robert Yates III Bradfute W. Davenport, Jr. Stephen A. Northup LeClairryan James C. Roberts richmond | 804-545-1500 Robert D. Seabolt Everette G. Allen, Jr. Anthony F. Troy Vernon E. Inge, Jr. Williams Mullen LeClairryan richmond | 804-420-6000 richmond | 804-783-2003 William D. Bayliss Charles G. Meyer III Calvin W. Fowler, Jr. Charles M. Sims John L. Walker III Thomas M. Wolf DurretteCrump PLC richmond | 804-775-6900 Wyatt B. Durrette, Jr. Barrett E. Pope

CoMMUniCaTionS LaW Christian & Barton, LLP richmond | 804-697-4100 Louis R. Monacell

Tremblay & Smith, PLLC charlottesville | 540-977-4455 M. E. Gibson, Jr.

ConSTrUCTion LaW Hirschler Fleischer, PC richmond | 804-771-9500 Barry A. Hackney R. Webb Moore LeClairryan richmond | 804-783-2003 L. B. Cann III McGuireWoods LLP richmond | 804-775-1000 George Keith Martin Vandeventer Black LLP richmond | 804-237-8800 Stephan F. Andrews Williams Mullen richmond | 804-420-6000 William R. Mauck, Jr.

CoPyriGHT LaW Gavin Law offices, PLC richmond | 804-784-4422 Ian D. Titley Goodman, allen & Filetti, PLLC glen allen | 804-346-0600 Charles M. Allen, Jr. Hunton & Williams LLP richmond | 804-788-8200 Stephen P. Demm J. Michael Martinez de Andino Leading-edge Law Group, PLC richmond | 804-343-3220 John B. Farmer Troutman Sanders LLP richmond | 804-697-1200 Robert L. Brooke

CorPoraTe CoMPLianCe LaW McGuireWoods LLP richmond | 804-775-1000 Donald E. King

Hirschler Fleischer, PC eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC richmond | 804-771-9500 richmond | 804-788-7740 J. Benjamin English David W. Clarke W. Michael Walker LeClairryan glen allen | 804-270-0070 James Patrick Guy II

Hunton & Williams LLP richmond | 804-788-8200 Allen C. Goolsby III

LeClairryan richmond | 804-783-2003 Eric M. Page

LeClairryan richmond | 804-783-2003 Scott H. Richter George P. Whitley

The nolte Law Firm, P.C. richmond | 804-658-4518 JoAnne Lewis Nolte

V I RGI N I A • M A RY L A N D

SETLIFF & HOLLAND, P.C.

A Powerful Partner Two Virginia lawyers from Setliff & Holland, P.C., were recently selected by their peers for inclusion in The Best Lawyers in America® 2012 (Copyright 2011 by Woodward/White, Inc., of Aiken, S.C.). C. Stephen Setliff was recognized in the category of Transportation Law, and John K. Burke, Jr., was recognized in Commercial Litigation, Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law and Litigation - Real Estate.

VIRGINIA •

(804) 377-1260

MARYLAND •

(443) 837-6800

www.setliffholland.com

Mr. Setliff has been repeatedly recognized in Best Lawyers in America for his expertise in transportation law (2008 – 2012). He is also listed in the 2009, 2010 and 2011 Virginia Super Lawyers publication in the field of transportation law. Mr. Burke has been repeatedly recognized in Best Lawyers in America for Commercial Litigation (1999 – 2012) and Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law. He has also been repeatedly recognized as one of America’s Leading Lawyers for Litigation by Chambers USA (2004-2011), and as a Virginia Super Lawyer in Business Litigation.

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c e ntr a l v i rgi n i a McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Robert L. Burrus, Jr. Clifford A. Cutchins IV Donald E. King

McSweeney, Crump, Childress & Temple, PC Richmond | 804-775-6900 Beverley L. Crump MichieHamlett, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 John V. Little

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 F. Claiborne Johnston, Jr.

Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Douglas P. Rucker, Jr.

Corporate Law

Tremblay & Smith, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 M. E. Gibson, Jr.

Caskie & Frost, P.C. Lynchburg | 540-846-2731 John R. Alford, Jr. Theodore J. Craddock

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Jeffrey M. Gill Thomas A. Grant F. Claiborne Johnston, Jr. Richard A. Minardi, Jr. C. Cotesworth Pinckney James C. Roberts Ashley L. Taylor, Jr.

Edmunds & Williams, P.C. Lynchburg | 540-846-9000 Bernard C. Baldwin III Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 J. Terry Parsley W. Michael Walker Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 John J. Beardsworth, Jr. Cyane B. Crump Allen C. Goolsby III T. Justin Moore III Thurston R. Moore Randall S. Parks J. Waverly Pulley III Gordon F. Rainey, Jr. Thomas G. Slater, Jr. Gary E. Thompson Randolph F. Totten C. Porter Vaughan III

Williams Mullen Charlottesville | 540-951-5700 David L. Dallas, Jr. Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 R. Brian Ball Wyatt S. Beazley IV Howard W. Dobbins Randolph H. Lickey Julious P. Smith, Jr.

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Richmond | 804-771-5700 Elizabeth G. Hester Kepley Broscious & Biggs, PLC Richmond | 804-741-0400 William A. Broscious LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Grant A. Grayson David I. Greenberg Gary D. LeClair Douglas L. Sbertoli George P. Whitley McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Kurt J. Krueger Robert L. Burrus, Jr. Joseph C. Carter III Clifford A. Cutchins IV R. Gordon Smith

Craig S. Cooley Richmond | 804-358-2328 Craig S. Cooley

Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Richard Cullen Howard C. Vick, Jr. Anne Marie Whittemore

Beale, Davidson, Etherington & Morris, P.C. Richmond | 804-788-1500 John S. Morris III

St. John, Bowling and Lawrence Charlottesville | 540-326-1666 Francis M. Lawrence Trial Advocacy College at the University of Virginia Charlottesville | 540-924-7354 Judah Best Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 James C. Roberts Anthony F. Troy John S. West

Randolph, Boyd, Cherry and Vaughan Richmond | 804-643-6611 Francis A. Cherry, Jr. Setliff & Holland, P.C. Glen Allen | 804-377-1260 John K. Burke, Jr.

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law

Employment Law - Management

Economic Development Law

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Mark S. Dray J. G. Ritter II

Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Warren David Harless

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Michael J. Schewel

Education Law McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 R. Craig Wood

Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar Bremner, Janus & Stone Richmond | 804-643-1400 Murray J. Janus

Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Bradford A. King

Craig S. Cooley Richmond | 804-358-2328 Craig S. Cooley

Schroder Fidlow, PLC Richmond | 804-225-0505 Kirk T. Schroder

St. John, Bowling, Lawrence & Quagliana, LLP Charlottesville | 540-296-7138 Francis McQ. Lawrence

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Siran S. Faulders William H. Hurd

Criminal Defense: White-Collar

Elder Law

Bremner, Janus & Stone Richmond | 804-643-1400 Murray J. Janus

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 William G. Broaddus

The Nolte Law Firm, P.C. Richmond | 804-658-4518 JoAnne Lewis Nolte

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 William D. Bayliss

Reed Smith LLP Richmond | 804-344-3400 D. Patrick Lacy, Jr. Kathleen S. Mehfoud

Barnes & Diehl, P.C. Richmond | 804-762-9500 Michael HuYoung

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 John R. Walk

Hancock, Daniel, Johnson & Nagle PC McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-967-9604 Richmond | 804-775-1000 Kimberly W. Daniel Gary S. Marshall James P. McElligott, Jr. Jay J. Levit Law Office Dana Rust Glen Allen | 804-270-4600 Rodney A. Satterwhite Jay J. Levit W. Carter Younger Jones & Green, LLP McSweeney, Crump, Childress & Charlottesville | 540-296-4138 Temple, PC D. Brock Green Richmond | 804-775-6900 Macaulay & Burtch PC Thamer E. Temple III Richmond | 804-649-4009 Roth Doner Jackson Gibbons PLC Jack W. Burtch, Jr. Glen Allen | 804-441-8440 Marchant, Thorsen, Honey, Baldwin Sean M. Gibbons & Myers, LLP Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-285-3888 Richmond | 804-648-1636 James B. Thorsen C. Michael DeCamps McGuireWoods LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Richmond | 804-697-1200 Jonathan P. Harmon David E. Constine III D. Eugene Webb, Jr.

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Anita G. Vaughn ThompsonMcMullan Richmond | 804-649-7545 Paul G. Izzo R. Shawn Majette

McCandlish Holton PC Richmond | 804-775-3100 Thomas C. Foster McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Robert M. Cipolla James P. McElligott, Jr. Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Phyllis C. Katz Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Wallace M. Starke Evelyn Small Traub Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Catherine M. Marriott

David R. Simonsen, Jr. Richmond | 804-285-1337 David R. Simonsen, Jr.

Energy Law

Christian & Barton, LLP Hancock, Daniel, Johnson & Nagle PC Richmond | 804-697-4100 Louis R. Monacell Richmond | 804-967-9604 Edward L. Petrini Kimberly W. Daniel Michael J. Quinan Hunton & Williams LLP Cliona M. Robb Richmond | 804-788-8200 Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Patricia K. Epps Richmond | 804-788-7740 Gregory B. Robertson David W. Clarke Hill B. Wellford, Jr. Jackson Lewis LLP Richmond | 804-649-0404 John M. Barr Kevin D. Holden David E. Nagle

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 John J. Beardsworth, Jr. Richard D. Gary Guy T. Tripp III

LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Steven D. Brown

LeClairRyan Glen Allen | 804-270-0070 James Patrick Guy II Michael L. Hern John A. Pirko

Employment Law - Individuals

Macaulay & Burtch PC Richmond | 804-649-4009 Jack W. Burtch, Jr.

Butler Williams & Skilling Richmond | 804-648-4848 Harris D. Butler III

McCandlish Holton PC Richmond | 804-775-3100 Samantha Otero

Cantor, Stoneburner, Ford, Grana & Buckner, P.C. Richmond | 804-644-1400 H. Aubrey Ford III

McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 David Z. Izakowitz R. Craig Wood

David R. Simonsen, Jr. Richmond | 804-285-1337 David R. Simonsen, Jr.

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Lynn F. Jacob James V. Meath Douglas Nabhan

LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Eric M. Page McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Edward L. Flippen Mark J. La Fratta Vishwa B. Link Bernard L. McNamee Stephen H. Watts II

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Donald G. Owens Woods Rogers PLC Richmond | 804-343-5020 Anthony J. Gambardella, Jr.

Family Law Barnes & Diehl, P.C. Chesterfield | 804-796-1000 Edward D. Barnes Ann Brakke Campfield Lawrence D. Diehl Brian H. Jones

Entertainment Law - Motion Pictures & Television

Batzli Wood & Stiles, PC Richmond | 804-545-9800 Terrence R. Batzli Charles E. Powers Andrea R. Stiles William C. Wood

Schroder Fidlow, PLC Richmond | 804-225-0505 Kirk T. Schroder

Bremner, Janus & Stone Richmond | 804-643-1400 Murray J. Janus

Entertainment Law - Music

Brenner, Evans & Millman, P.C. Richmond | 804-644-1300 Ronald S. Evans

Schroder Fidlow, PLC Richmond | 804-225-0505 Kirk T. Schroder

Butler Armstrong Richmond | 804-353-4931 Donald K. Butler

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Philip H. Goodpasture

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Mahlon G. Funk, Jr.

Environmental Law

Joseph and Mische, P.C. Charlottesville | 540-984-1118 Ann W. Mische

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Kevin J. Finto Timothy G. Hayes

Law Offices of Deanna D. Cook, PC Richmond | 804-273-6415 Deanna D. Cook

Richmond | 804-775-1000 David E. Evans Daniel K. Slone James A. Thornhill

New Growth Ventures, LLC Richmond | 804-897-5443 Kimberly Fauss

MichieHamlett, PLLC Law Office of Thomas E. Knauer, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 Richmond | 804-783-7787 Elizabeth P. Coughter Thomas E. Knauer William C. Scott IV Ronald R. Tweel McGuireWoods LLP

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 James E. Ryan, Jr. Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Channing J. Martin

Ethics and Professional Responsibility Law Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Gary J. Spahn

Parker, McElwain & Jacobs, P.C. Charlottesville | 540-973-3331 Annie Lee Jacobs Poole and Poole Richmond | 804-358-6669 Rodney M. Poole Susan Davis White Charlottesville | 540-977-0563 Susan Davis White The Elliott Law Firm Colonial Heights | 804-520-1240 Robert C. Elliott II Tremblay & Smith, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 John K. Taggart III

SeltzerGreene, PLC Richmond | 804-864-1100 Brian R. Greene

AT T O R N E Y S

AT

L A W

w w w. h f - l a w. c o m

Richmond Office The Edgeworth Building 2100 East Cary Street Richmond, VA 23223 Phone: 804.771.9500 Fax: 804.644.0957

Fredericksburg Office Mill Race North 725 Jackson Street, Ste. 200 Fredericksburg, VA 22401

2011 Virginia Best Lawyers. Back Row Left to Right: Mike Walker, Barry Hackney, Bud Funk, Ben English, Chuck Rothenberg, Paul Davenport, Rick Witthoefft, John Ivins, Webb Moore, Dave Belkowitz and Mike Terry. Front Row Left to Right: Jay Steele, Anita Vaughn, Thom Dillon, Jim Theobald, Mike Falzone, Jim Weinberg, John Walk and Robbie Westermann. Not pictured: Terry Parsley.

Phone: 540.604.2100 Fax: 540.604.2101

HIRSCHLER FLEISCHER, founded in 1946, is a full-service firm engaged in a diverse and sophisticated legal practice. We approach our work with the entrepreneurial spirit established by our founders and embrace a passion for the practice of law that engenders a commitment from our attorneys and staff to provide creative and practical solutions. Clients large and small, new and established, domestic and international, are attracted to the firm by its ability to tailor affordable legal services to meet their needs and to consult with them on business and final decisions.

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Family Law Mediation Phillips, Morrison, Johnson & Ferrell Lynchburg | 540-384-0946 Frank West Morrison

Financial Services Regulation Law LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 George P. Whitley

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Steven D. Gravely Stephen D. Rosenthal Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Wyatt S. Beazley IV Malcolm E. Ritsch, Jr. McCandlish Holton PC Richmond | 804-775-3100 Helen L. Konrad Mark B. Rhoads

ThompsonMcMullan Richmond | 804-649-7545 Dewey B. Morris

McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 David Z. Izakowitz

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Thomas E. duB. Fauls Jeffrey M. Gill F. Claiborne Johnston, Jr. Jacob A. Lutz III Fred W. Palmore III C. Cotesworth Pinckney

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Eliot Norman

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Howard W. Dobbins Robert D. Perrow

First Amendment Law Marchant, Thorsen, Honey, Baldwin & Myers, LLP Richmond | 804-285-3888 James B. Thorsen

Franchise Law Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Thomas J. Dillon III Perkins Law Glen Allen | 804-205-5162 Eric C. Perkins Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Sandy T. Tucker

Information Technology Law Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 S. Brian Farmer Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Randall S. Parks LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Eric M. Page McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Rodney A. Satterwhite

Insurance Law Brenner, Evans & Millman, P.C. Richmond | 804-644-1300 Theodore I. Brenner Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Richmond | 804-788-7740 Douglas M. Palais

Labor Law - Union Jay J. Levit Law Office Glen Allen | 804-270-4600 Jay J. Levit McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 W. Carter Younger Vergara & Associates Hopewell | 804-458-6394 James J. Vergara, Jr.

Land Use & Zoning Law Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Charles H. Rothenberg James W. Theobald McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 John V. Cogbill III Gloria L. Freye Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Edward B. Kidd Williams Mullen Charlottesville | 540-951-5700 Valerie Wagner Long Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Ralph L. Axselle, Jr. Andrew M. Condlin

Legal Malpractice Law - Defendants Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Gary J. Spahn

Legal Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs

Cantor, Stoneburner, Ford, Grana & Harman, Claytor, Corrigan & Wellman, Buckner, P.C. P.C. Richmond | 804-644-1400 Richmond | 804-747-5200 H. Aubrey Ford III John M. Claytor Gaming Law Tremblay & Smith, PLLC McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Richmond | 804-775-1000 Thomas E. Albro Richmond | 804-788-7740 Alexander H. Slaughter Thomas A. Lisk Morin & Barkley LLP Leveraged Buyouts and Hirschler Fleischer, PC Charlottesville | 540-293-1200 Richmond | 804-771-9500 Private Equity Law James W. Barkley James L. Weinberg Hirschler Fleischer, PC Morris & Morris PC Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-771-9500 Richmond | 804-344-8300 Richmond | 804-788-8200 S. Brian Farmer James W. Morris III Patricia M. Schwarzschild Hunton & Williams LLP Sands Anderson PC McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Richmond | 804-648-1636 Richmond | 804-775-1000 T. Justin Moore III Robert B. Delano, Jr. Mary Dalton Baril Thurston R. Moore Albert M. Orgain IV James S. Seevers, Jr. Troutman Sanders LLP LeClairRyan Government Richmond | 804-697-1200 Richmond | 804-783-2003 Edward H. Starr, Jr. Relations Practice Gary D. LeClair Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Richmond | 804-788-7740 International Trade Litigation - Antitrust David W. Clarke and Finance Law Thomas A. Lisk Hunton & Williams LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Hancock, Daniel, Johnson & Nagle PC Richmond | 804-788-8200 Richmond | 804-788-8200 Richmond | 804-967-9604 Thomas G. Slater, Jr. John J. Beardsworth, Jr. W. Scott Johnson Randolph F. Totten McGuireWoods LLP Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Howard Feller Richmond | 804-775-1000 Robert J. Grey, Jr. James H. Walsh Donald E. King LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Thomas A. Coulter Macaulay & Burtch PC Richmond | 804-649-4009 Alexander M. Macaulay McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Jerry Kilgore Christopher Nolen Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Ben R. Lacy IV Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Ralph L. Axselle, Jr. Reginald N. Jones

Health Care Law Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Jonathan M. Joseph Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Mark S. Hedberg Matthew D. Jenkins M. Bruce Stokes, P.C. Richmond | 804-303-0820 M. Bruce Stokes McCandlish Holton PC Richmond | 804-775-3100 Jamie Baskerville Martin Thomas W. McCandlish McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Leigh B. Middleditch, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 R. Gordon Smith Thomas J. Stallings

Labor Law - Management Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Patricia K. Epps Gregory B. Robertson Hill B. Wellford, Jr. Jackson Lewis LLP Richmond | 804-649-0404 Kevin D. Holden David E. Nagle LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Steven D. Brown Macaulay & Burtch PC Richmond | 804-649-4009 Jack W. Burtch, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 R. Craig Wood McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Gary S. Marshall James P. McElligott, Jr. Dana Rust Rodney A. Satterwhite W. Carter Younger McSweeney, Crump, Childress & Temple, PC Richmond | 804-775-6900 Thamer E. Temple III Roth Doner Jackson Gibbons PLC Glen Allen | 804-441-8440 Sean M. Gibbons

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Robert D. Seabolt Anthony F. Troy

Litigation - Banking & Finance Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Michael W. Smith Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Edward J. Fuhr LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-545-1500 Vernon E. Inge, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 J. William Boland Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Stephen E. Baril Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Fred W. Palmore III Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Paul Bliley Calvin W. Fowler, Jr. Robert D. Perrow John L. Walker III

Litigation - Bankruptcy

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 D. Eugene Webb, Jr.

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Michael P. Falzone

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Lynn F. Jacob James V. Meath

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Benjamin C. Ackerly Tyler P. Brown

Kutak Rock LLP Richmond | 804-644-1700 Michael A. Condyles LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-545-1500 Vernon E. Inge, Jr. Bruce H. Matson McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Dion W. Hayes Spotts Fain PC Richmond | 804-697-2000 Robert H. Chappell III Tavenner & Beran, PLC Richmond | 804-783-8300 Lynn Lewis Tavenner Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Paul Bliley William H. Schwarzschild III

Litigation - Construction

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Stephen P. Demm Maya M. Eckstein J. Michael Martinez de Andino Thomas G. Slater, Jr. Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Richmond | 804-771-5700 Christopher J. Mugel Leading-Edge Law Group, PLC Richmond | 804-343-3220 John B. Farmer LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Charles M. Sims McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Brian C. Riopelle Spotts Fain PC Richmond | 804-697-2000 Hugh M. Fain III Dana D. McDaniel

Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Michael W. Smith

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Robert A. Angle Dabney J. Carr IV

Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Charles M. Allen, Jr.

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Patrick R. Hanes

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Barry A. Hackney R. Webb Moore

Litigation - Labor & Employment

LeClairRyan Charlottesville | 540-245-3444 H. Robert Yates III LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 L. B. Cann III LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-545-1500 Vernon E. Inge, Jr. LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Thomas M. Wolf McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 William G. Broaddus Steven C. McCallum Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 William N. Watkins Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Bradfute W. Davenport, Jr. Vandeventer Black LLP Richmond | 804-237-8800 Stephan F. Andrews Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 William D. Bayliss William R. Mauck, Jr.

Litigation Environmental Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Kevin J. Finto Timothy G. Hayes Robert M. Rolfe LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-545-1500 Everette G. Allen, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 David E. Evans Scott C. Oostdyk Anne Marie Whittemore Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 James E. Ryan, Jr. Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Channing J. Martin

Litigation - ERISA McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 James P. McElligott, Jr.

Litigation - First Amendment Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Craig Thomas Merritt Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Edward J. Fuhr Morris & Morris PC Richmond | 804-344-8300 James W. Morris III

Litigation - Intellectual Property Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Michael W. Smith DurretteCrump PLC Richmond | 804-775-6900 Wyatt B. Durrette, Jr. Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Charles M. Allen, Jr.

Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Warren David Harless David R. Simonsen, Jr. Richmond | 804-285-1337 David R. Simonsen, Jr.

Litigation - Municipal LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-545-1500 Vernon E. Inge, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 William G. Broaddus Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Daniel M. Siegel Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Bradfute W. Davenport, Jr. Carter Glass IV

Litigation - Patent Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Craig Thomas Merritt Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Charles M. Allen, Jr. Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Maya M. Eckstein J. Michael Martinez de Andino McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Brian C. Riopelle Spotts Fain PC Richmond | 804-697-2000 Dana D. McDaniel Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Robert A. Angle Dabney J. Carr IV

Hancock, Daniel, Johnson & Nagle PC Litigation - Real Estate Richmond | 804-967-9604 Kimberly W. Daniel Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Hirschler Fleischer, PC Charles M. Allen, Jr. Richmond | 804-771-9500 Thomas J. Dillon III Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Patricia K. Epps Gregory B. Robertson Hill B. Wellford, Jr. Jackson Lewis LLP Richmond | 804-649-0404 John M. Barr Kevin D. Holden David E. Nagle Jay J. Levit Law Office Glen Allen | 804-270-4600 Jay J. Levit Jones & Green, LLP Charlottesville | 540-296-4138 D. Brock Green LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Steven D. Brown Charles G. Meyer III Macaulay & Burtch PC Richmond | 804-649-4009 Jack W. Burtch, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Gary S. Marshall James P. McElligott, Jr. Dana Rust W. Carter Younger Morris & Morris PC Richmond | 804-344-8300 James W. Morris III Roth Doner Jackson Gibbons PLC Glen Allen | 804-441-8440 Sean M. Gibbons Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 C. Michael DeCamps Spotts Fain PC Richmond | 804-697-2000 Hugh M. Fain III Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 D. Eugene Webb, Jr. Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Lynn F. Jacob Douglas Nabhan

Litigation - Land Use & Zoning McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 William G. Broaddus John V. Cogbill III Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Andrew M. Condlin John L. Walker III

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 John C. Ivins, Jr. John R. Walk LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 L. B. Cann III Setliff & Holland, P.C. Glen Allen | 804-377-1260 John K. Burke, Jr. Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 William D. Bayliss Charles L. Cabell Steven D. Delaney John L. Walker III

Litigation - Regulatory Enforcement (SEC, Telecom, Energy) Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Edward J. Fuhr Thomas G. Slater, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 William G. Broaddus William H. King, Jr. Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Robert D. Perrow

Litigation - Securities

MichieHamlett, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 James P. Cox III

Morin & Barkley LLP Charlottesville | 540-293-1200 Donald Morin

Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Stephen E. Baril

Tremblay & Smith, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 R. Lee Livingston

ThompsonMcMullan Richmond | 804-649-7545 Hugh Antrim

Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants

Litigation & Controversy - Tax LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 N. Pendleton Rogers McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Craig D. Bell Morris & Morris PC Richmond | 804-344-8300 James W. Morris III Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Harold E. Starke, Jr.

Mass Tort Litigation Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 John D. Epps David Craig Landin

The Miller Firm LLC Orange 540-672-4224 Michael J. Miller

Mass Tort Litigation / Class Actions Defendants Kutak Rock LLP Richmond | 804-644-1700 Brickford Y. Brown LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Charles G. Meyer III McCandlish Holton PC Richmond | 804-775-3100 Michael H. Gladstone McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Joseph K. Reid III Alexander H. Slaughter Samuel L. Tarry, Jr. J. Tracy Walker IV Steven R. Williams Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Edward H. Starr, Jr. Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Robert F. Redmond, Jr.

Media Law Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Craig Thomas Merritt

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 James E. Farnham Edward J. Fuhr

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Philip H. Goodpasture

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Anne Marie Whittemore

Mediation

Armstrong, Bristow, Farley & Schwarzschild PLC Richmond | 804-282-6170 Matthew M. Farley Edmunds & Williams, P.C. Lynchburg | 540-846-9000 Bernard C. Baldwin III Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 John R. Walk Julie A. King PLC Charlottesville | 540-825-4172 Julie A. King

Litigation - Mergers & Acquisitions

LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Charles M. Sims

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Edward J. Fuhr

McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Charles D. Fox IV

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Calvin W. Fowler, Jr.

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Dennis I. Belcher John B. O’Grady

Hancock, Daniel, Johnson & Nagle PC Richmond | 804-967-9604 Sean P. Byrne LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Rodney K. Adams Ronald P. Herbert Rawls, McNelis & Mitchell, PC Richmond | 804-344-0038 Byron J. Mitchell Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 M. Pierce Rucker Carlyle R. Wimbish III

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs

Law Offices of Michael G. Phelan, P.C. Allen, Allen, Allen & Allen, P.C. Richmond | 804-767-4815 Richmond | 804-257-7512 Michael G. Phelan Jason W. Konvicka McGuireWoods LLP Malcolm P. McConnell Richmond | 804-775-1000 Cantor, Stoneburner, Ford, Grana & Joseph P. McMenamin Buckner, P.C. Deborah M. Russell Richmond | 804-644-1400 Sands Anderson PC Irvin V. Cantor Richmond | 804-648-1636 Stephanie E. Grana Cullen D. Seltzer Lewis T. Stoneburner

Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Tremblay & Smith, PLLC Richmond | 804-788-7740 Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 Douglas M. Palais Thomas E. Albro

Litigation - Trusts & Estates

Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Robert F. Donnelly Michael L. Goodman Mary M. H. Priddy

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Charles F. Witthoefft Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Robert J. Grey, Jr. D. Alan Rudlin McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 John S. Barr

MichieHamlett, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 Christine Thomson Tremblay & Smith, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 Thomas E. Albro Williamson & Lavecchia, L.C. Richmond | 804-288-1661 Jonathan Petty Thomas W. Williamson, Jr.

Mergers & Acquisitions Law Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 J. Benjamin English W. Michael Walker Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Matthew D. Jenkins T. Justin Moore III Randall S. Parks Gary E. Thompson LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Gary D. LeClair McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Clifford A. Cutchins IV Donald E. King Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 R. Brian Ball Robert C. Dewar

Municipal Law Hefty & Wiley, P.C. Richmond | 804-780-3143 William H. Hefty Roger C. Wiley LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Eric M. Page McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 George Keith Martin Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Benjamin W. Emerson Daniel M. Siegel Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Carter Glass IV

Phillips, Morrison, Johnson & Ferrell Rustburg | 540-821-5022 Thomas L. Phillips, Jr.

Non-Profit / Charities Law

The McCammon Group Richmond | 804-343-0922 John B. McCammon

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 J. William Gray, Jr.

Medical Malpractice Law Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Mahlon G. Funk, Jr.

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Michele A. W. McKinnon

Patent Law

LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Kimberly A. Satterwhite

Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Charles M. Allen, Jr.

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Joseph P. McMenamin

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 J. Michael Martinez de Andino

Best l aw yer s in virginia 2012

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OR ANGE, VIRGINIA

THE MILLER FIRM, LLC

•

WA S H I N G TO N , D.C .

A national presence with a broad range of expertise At The Miller Firm we represent catastrophically injured people through the tough times each client faces after an injury. We do this in only one way....... on a very personal basis. We realize that this is probably the most significant injury you have ever faced in your life and that you need an advocate on your side to represent your interest in order to receive fair compensation. This requires special attention to the details to help you get your life back on track. We represent our clients against the giant manufacturing, pharmaceutical and insurance companies. We are very skilled at representing clients with great compassion and follow up. The Miller Firm is a national practice representing individuals who have been seriously injured by pharmaceuticals, medical devices and defective products along with catastrophic injuries from accidents of all types. Even though we represent clients throughout the country our home is in VIRGINIA. Our firm is located in the city of Orange and services clients throughout the regional area of Virginia, Maryland and DC. The Miller Firm has a full staff of lawyers who are well seasoned in serious automobile accident and trucking injuries as well as many different areas of personal injury law. The firm has been deputized by a large state to represent its interest against a drug company for commercial fraud and personal injury. And we have had success in large-scale commercial fraud cases.

Dangerous Drugs

Aviation Law

Defective Medical Devices

Medical Malpractice

Product Liability

Personal Injury

The Miller Firm: Uniquely qualified to serve you. The attorneys and medical professionals at The Miller Firm have a broad range of experience and expertise, making us uniquely qualified to help you with an extensive variety of personal injury and accident cases.

ORANGE, VIRGINIA OFFICE

WASHINGTON, D.C. OFFICE

The Sherman Building, 108 Railroad Avenue Orange, VA 22960 Toll Free: (800) 882-2525

1101 Pennsylvania Ave N.W. Washington, DC 20004 Phone: (540) 672-4224 Fax: (540) 672-3055

www.millerfirmllc.com S p e c i a l

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A d v e r t i s i n g

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c e ntr a l v i rgi n i a Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Richmond | 804-771-5700 Christopher J. Mugel

Personal Injury Litigation

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Stephen D. Busch William H. King, Jr. Rosewell Page III Deborah M. Russell Samuel L. Tarry, Jr.

Bowman and Brooke LLP Richmond | 804-649-8200 Michael A. Montgomery

MichieHamlett, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 Christine Thomson

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Mahlon G. Funk, Jr.

Midkiff, Muncie & Ross, P.C. Richmond | 804-560-9600 James C. Shannon

Marks & Harrison Richmond | 804-282-0999 Gregory S. Hooe

Morris & Morris PC Richmond | 804-344-8300 Lauren Ebersole Hutcheson Philip B. Morris James W. Morris III

McCandlish Holton PC Richmond | 804-775-3100 Michael H. Gladstone MichieHamlett, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 Gary W. Kendall Kevin Ryan Morin & Barkley LLP Charlottesville | 540-293-1200 Donald Morin Morris & Morris PC Richmond | 804-344-8300 Michael R. Ward Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Terrance L. Graves Tremblay & Smith, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 R. Lee Livingston Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 W. F. Drewry Gallalee

Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants

Rawls, McNelis & Mitchell, PC Richmond | 804-344-0038 Byron J. Mitchell Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 William N. Watkins Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 James C. Roberts Zunka, Milnor & Carter, Ltd. Charlottesville | 540-977-0191 John W. Zunka

Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs Allen, Allen, Allen & Allen, P.C. Richmond | 804-257-7512 George Edward Allen III W. Coleman Allen, Jr. Douglas A. Barry P. Christopher Guedri Jason W. Konvicka

Caskie & Frost, P.C. Lynchburg | 540-846-2731 John R. Alford, Jr.

Cantor, Stoneburner, Ford, Grana & Buckner, P.C. Richmond | 804-644-1400 Elliott Buckner Irvin V. Cantor

Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Warren David Harless

CowanGates PC Richmond | 804-320-9100 Frank N. Cowan

CowanGates PC Richmond | 804-320-9100 Frank N. Cowan

Emroch & Kilduff, LLP Richmond | 804-358-1568 William B. Kilduff

Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Michael L. Goodman Mary M. H. Priddy

Hundley & Johnson, P.C. Richmond | 804-262-9000 Edward F. Johnson, Jr.

Law Office of Edward Scher Harman, Claytor, Corrigan & Wellman, Richmond | 804-421-6000 P.C. Edward E. Scher Richmond | 804-747-5200 Marks & Harrison Michael E. Harman Richmond | 804-282-0999 Hunton & Williams LLP John C. Shea Richmond | 804-788-8200 MichieHamlett, PLLC John D. Epps Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 David Craig Landin M. Bryan Slaughter Thomas G. Slater, Jr. Christine Thomson Hill B. Wellford, Jr. J. Gregory Webb LeClairRyan Phillips, Morrison, Johnson & Ferrell Charlottesville | 540-245-3444 Rustburg | 540-821-5022 H. Robert Yates III Thomas L. Phillips, Jr. LeClairRyan Purcell & Purcell Richmond | 804-783-2003 Louisa Ronald P. Herbert 540-967-2225 Charles G. Meyer III Charles F. Purcell McGuireWoods LLP The Chandler Law Group Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Charlottesville | 540-971-7273 J. Brian Jackson Brad Chandler, Jr. R. Craig Wood Tremblay & Smith, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-977-4455 Thomas E. Albro

e a ste r n v i rgi n i a

ADMIRALTY & MARITIME LAW

Ventker & Warman, PLLC Norfolk | 757-625-1192 Daniel R. Warman

Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 James L. Chapman IV Guilford D. Ware

ANTITRUST LAW

Davey & Brogan, PC Norfolk | 757-622-0100 Patrick M. Brogan Philip N. Davey R. Arthur Jett, Jr. Troutman Sanders LLP Norfolk | 757-640-0004 Christopher Abel Michael J. Gardner John E. Holloway David H. Sump Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Mark T. Coberly Walter B. Martin, Jr. Edward J. Powers John M. Ryan

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Conrad M. Shumadine

APPELLATE PRACTICE Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman Sykes, Bourdon, Ahern & Levy, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-499-8971 L. Steven Emmert Weinberg & Stein Norfolk | 757-627-1066 Jerrold G. Weinberg Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Conrad M. Shumadine

Williamson & Lavecchia, L.C. Richmond | 804-288-1661 Jonathan Petty Thomas W. Williamson, Jr.

Private Funds / Hedge Funds Law LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 David I. Greenberg Gary D. LeClair

Product Liability Litigation

Rawls, McNelis & Mitchell, PC Richmond | 804-344-0038 Byron J. Mitchell Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Douglas P. Rucker, Jr.

Project Finance Law Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 J. Benjamin English Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 John J. Beardsworth, Jr.

Harman, Claytor, Corrigan & Wellman, P.C. Public Finance Law Richmond | 804-747-5200 Caskie & Frost, P.C. Stanley Wellman Lynchburg | 540-846-2731 The Miller Firm LLC Theodore J. Craddock Orange | 540-672-4224 Christian & Barton, LLP Michael J. Miller Richmond | 804-697-4100 Troutman Sanders LLP Eric E. Ballou Richmond | 804-697-1200 Hunton & Williams LLP Gary J. Spahn Richmond | 804-788-8200 Christopher G. Kulp Product Liability Bryar C. Nettles Litigation - Defendants John D. O’Neill, Jr. Robert Dean Pope Gregory Kaplan Kutak Rock LLP Richmond | 804-423-7921 Richmond | 804-644-1700 Thomas C. Junker Charles P. Shimer Hunton & Williams LLP LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-788-8200 Richmond | 804-783-2003 John D. Epps Douglas L. Sbertoli David Craig Landin Lonnie D. Nunley III McGuireWoods LLP McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 J. Brian Jackson James F. Neale McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Terrence M. Bagley William H. King, Jr. Rosewell Page III Samuel L. Tarry, Jr. J. Tracy Walker IV Steven R. Williams Morris & Morris PC Richmond | 804-344-8300 James W. Morris III Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Dabney J. Carr IV

Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs

Richmond | 804-775-1000 Arthur E. Anderson II Renee B. Fain Bonnie M. France David L. Richardson William J. Strickland Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 William R. Derry, Jr. Stephen L. Johnson Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 R. Hart Lee

Railroad Law Butler Armstrong Richmond | 804-353-4931 Susan C. Armstrong

Real Estate Law

Law Offices of Michael G. Phelan, P.C. Feil, Pettit and Williams, PLC Charlottesville | 540-979-1400 Richmond | 804-767-4815 Ralph L. Feil Michael G. Phelan Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC The Chandler Law Group Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Charlottesville | 540-971-7273 Phyllis M. Rubinstein Brad Chandler, Jr. Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 David F. Belkowitz Paul H. Davenport Harman, Claytor, Corrigan & Wellman, John W. Steele Michael H. Terry P.C. James W. Theobald Richmond | 804-747-5200

Professional Malpractice Law

Michael E. Harman Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Stephen E. Baril

Professional Malpractice Law - Defendants McSweeney, Crump, Childress & Temple, PC Richmond | 804-775-6900 R. Paul Childress, Jr.

ARBITRATION Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 William E. Franczek

BANKING AND FINANCE LAW Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Alfred M. Randolph, Jr. Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Richard C. Beale Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Bryant C. McGann Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Thomas G. Johnson, Jr. Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Monroe Kelly III C. Grigsby Scifres

Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Daniel M. Campbell Andrew J. Tapscott William A. Walsh, Jr. LeClairRyan Charlottesville | 540-245-3444 Steven W. Blaine McCallum & Kudravetz, P.C. Charlottesville | 540-293-8191 George B. McCallum III Roger D. Williams

BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS / INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 Donald C. Schultz Crowley, Liberatore & Ryan, P.C. Chesapeake | 757-333-4500 Karen M. Crowley Glasser and Glasser P.L.C. Norfolk | 757-625-6787 Michael A. Glasser Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Paul K. Campsen Dennis T. Lewandowski Law Offices of David A. Greer PLC Norfolk | 757-227-5155 David A. Greer Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Jonathan L. Hauser Weinberg & Stein Norfolk | 757-627-1066 Jerrold G. Weinberg

McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 John V. Cogbill III Gloria L. Freye T. Craig Harmon Nancy R. Little George Keith Martin Charles L. Menges Charles R. Swartz MichieHamlett, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 James P. Cox III John V. Little Richmond & Fishburne Charlottesville | 540-977-8590 Joseph W. Richmond, Jr. Scott Kroner PLC Charlottesville | 540-296-2161 Robert J. Kroner Spotts Fain PC Richmond | 804-697-2000 Meade A. Spotts ThompsonMcMullan Richmond | 804-649-7545 C. Grice McMullan Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Bernice H. Cilley David S. Cohn Neil S. Kessler Edward B. Kidd Mark S. Shiembob Williams Mullen Charlottesville | 540-951-5700 Valerie Wagner Long John Russell Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 Charles L. Cabell Matthew Cheek Andrew M. Condlin Steven D. Delaney David DuVal A. Brooks Hock John M. Mercer Zunka, Milnor & Carter, Ltd. Charlottesville | 540-977-0191 Richard E. Carter

Securities / Capital Markets Law

Murphy & McGonigle, P.C. Glen Allen | 804-762-5320 James A. Murphy Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 F. Claiborne Johnston, Jr.

Securitization and Structured Finance Law Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Kevin J. Buckley Randolph F. Totten Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 David S. Cohn Thomas E. duB. Fauls

Tax Law Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Anita G. Vaughn Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Cameron N. Cosby J. William Gray, Jr. George C. Howell III Thomas McNally Millhiser William L. S. Rowe LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 N. Pendleton Rogers McCallum & Kudravetz, P.C. Charlottesville | 540-293-8191 David W. Kudravetz McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Charles D. Fox IV Leigh B. Middleditch, Jr. McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 W. Birch Douglass III William G. Fendley IV Robert G. McElroy John B. O’Grady Thomas P. Rohman Tax Counsel Glen Allen | 804-915-7030 Richard Davis

Troutman Sanders LLP Eckert Seamans Cherin & Mellott, LLC Richmond | 804-697-1200 Richmond | 804-788-7740 Harold E. Starke, Jr. Douglas M. Palais Williams Mullen Feil, Pettit and Williams, PLC Richmond | 804-420-6000 Charlottesville | 540-979-1400 Farhad Aghdami Donald Long J. Conrad Garcia Craig L. Rascoe Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Edward J. Fuhr C. Porter Vaughan III LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Scott H. Richter Douglas L. Sbertoli George P. Whitley McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 William J. Strickland Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Thomas A. Grant F. Claiborne Johnston, Jr.

Securities Regulation Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Edward J. Fuhr C. Porter Vaughan III LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Scott H. Richter George P. Whitley

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Ross C. Reeves Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Monroe Kelly III C. Grigsby Scifres

Trademark Law Gavin Law Offices, PLC Richmond | 804-784-4422 Ian D. Titley Goodman, Allen & Filetti, PLLC Glen Allen | 804-346-0600 Charles M. Allen, Jr. Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Stephen P. Demm Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Richmond | 804-771-5700 Christopher J. Mugel Leading-Edge Law Group, PLC Richmond | 804-343-3220 John B. Farmer McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Janet P. Peyton

Transportation Law Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Terrance L. Graves Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Albert M. Orgain IV Setliff & Holland, P.C. Glen Allen | 804-377-1260 C. Stephen Setliff

Trusts and Estates Armstrong, Bristow, Farley & Schwarzschild PLC Richmond | 804-282-6170 Maureen C. Ackerly Michael Armstrong John D. Bristow Matthew M. Farley J. Garrett Horsley Jane L. Schwarzschild Christian & Barton, LLP Richmond | 804-697-4100 Waller R. Staples III Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 Anita G. Vaughn Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 J. William Gray, Jr. Thomas McNally Millhiser Katherine E. Ramsey William L. S. Rowe Julie A. King PLC Charlottesville | 540-825-4172 Julie A. King Kimberly A. Pinchbeck, P.C. Richmond | 804-320-2439 Kimberly A. Pinchbeck McCallum & Kudravetz, P.C. Charlottesville | 540-293-8191 Jane Champion Clarke David W. Kudravetz McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Lucius H. Bracey, Jr. Charles D. Fox IV McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 Dennis I. Belcher W. Birch Douglass III Michele A. W. McKinnon John B. O’Grady Thomas S. Word, Jr. MichieHamlett, PLLC Charlottesville | 540-951-7200 James P. Cox III Morin & Barkley LLP Charlottesville | 540-293-1200 Kristen Smith Bain

Hirschler Fleischer, PC Richmond | 804-771-9500 J. Benjamin English S. Brian Farmer Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 T. Justin Moore III Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Richmond | 804-771-5700 Bradley A. Haneberg LeClairRyan Richmond | 804-783-2003 Gary D. LeClair McGuireWoods LLP Charlottesville | 540-977-2500 Steven J. Keeler Williams Mullen Charlottesville | 540-951-5700 David L. Dallas, Jr.

Water Law Hunton & Williams LLP Richmond | 804-788-8200 Kevin J. Finto Timothy G. Hayes Brooks M. Smith McGuireWoods LLP Richmond | 804-775-1000 David E. Evans John M. Lain Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 James E. Ryan, Jr.

Workers’ Compensation Law - Claimants Maloney, Parks & Clarke, P.C. Richmond | 804-212-1883 Malcolm Parks III Marks & Associates Hopewell | 804-458-1800 B. Mayes Marks, Jr.

Sands Anderson PC Richmond | 804-648-1636 Bruce L. Mertens

Two Rivers Law Group, PC Richmond | 804-477-8666 Mary Louise Kramer

Shackelford, Thomas & Gregg Orange 540-672-2711 Frank A. Thomas III

Whitt & Del Bueno, P.C. Glen Allen | 804-864-9660 Ralph L. Whitt, Jr.

Susan K. Stoneman Richmond | 804-643-7062 Susan K. Stoneman Timothy H. Guare, PLC Richmond | 804-288-8480 Timothy H. Guare

Troutman Sanders LLP Richmond | 804-697-1200 Robert L. Brooke

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman

Weinberg & Stein Norfolk | 757-627-1066 Jerrold G. Weinberg Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Gary A. Bryant Conrad M. Shumadine

Zemanian Law Group Norfolk | 757-622-0090 Peter G. Zemanian

LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Alan D. Albert

Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 William F. Devine

BET-THE-COMPANY LITIGATION

McGuireWoods LLP Norfolk | 757-640-3700 Robert W. McFarland

Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 George H. Bowles Donald H. Clark Stephen G. Test

Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Stephen G. Test

Venture Capital Law

Midkiff, Muncie & Ross, P.C. Richmond | 804-560-9600 Arthur T. Aylward Charles F. Midkiff James G. Muncie, Jr.

Wilson & McIntyre, P.L.C. Norfolk | 757-961-3900 John D. McIntyre

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stanley G. Barr, Jr. Hunter W. Sims, Jr.

Williams Mullen Richmond | 804-420-6000 David D. Addison Farhad Aghdami Julious P. Smith, Jr. John H. Turner III Fielding L. Williams, Jr.

Richmond & Fishburne Charlottesville | 540-977-8590 Wendall L. Winn, Jr.

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stanley G. Barr, Jr. Hunter W. Sims, Jr. W. Edgar Spivey

Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman

Virginia Estate Plans, PLC Richmond | 804-565-2300 Malcolm P. Friddell Helen Lewis Kemp Nancy Newton Rogers Derek L. Smith David W. Whitehead

Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Gregory A. Giordano Jeffrey H. Gray Scott Hart John C. Lynch Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Robert L. O’Donnell John M. Ryan

Williams Mullen Newport News | 757-249-5100 William L. Stauffer, Jr.

Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 William E. Franczek Patrick A. Genzler Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Stephen G. Test

COPYRIGHT LAW Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Craig L. Mytelka

CORPORATE COMPLIANCE LAW Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Robert C. Nusbaum

CONSTRUCTION LAW Norris & St. Clair, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-498-7700 John S. Norris, Jr. Outland, Gray, O’Keefe & Hubbard Chesapeake | 757-547-0171 David A. Hearne Benjamin A. Hubbard III

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE LAW Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 William R. Van Buren III

Best l aw yer s in virginia 2012

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3/5/12 12:53 PM


SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Duncan Garnett

Duncan Garnett is a former President of the Virginia Trial

All of us are exposed. None of us are immune. A reckless manufacturer, a greedy drug company, a dangerous tractor trailer, a drunk driver or just a careless person can cause brain damage, paralysis, fractures, burns, disfigurement and death. It happens suddenly and unexpectedly. I represent injured people. They are police officers, factory workers, doctors and nurses, insurance agents, housewives, executives, secretaries, school teachers, children, grandparents, lawyers and store clerks. They are catastrophically injured. “They” are us.

Lawyers Association and a partner at Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C. He has handled hundreds of injury and wrongful death cases across Virginia and in other states. Garnett has been listed in Best Lawyers for sixteen consecutive years, received Martindale-Hubbell®’s highest rating of AV® Preeminent™ for twenty consecutive years and has been selected for inclusion in Virginia Super Lawyers continuously since 2006. His work is devoted to those who suffer life altering injury. He is aggressive, professional and compassionate.

Duncan Garnett

When the jury holds the person or company accountable we help our client get the best medical care possible. We restore them to a living wage. We see that injured children are provided for into the future and we make certain that the elderly are protected.

Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C.

The suffering my clients endure and the courage and hope they demonstrate inspires and drives me. I am a Virginia Trial Lawyer.

12350 Jefferson Avenue, Suite 300 Newport News, VA 23602 Office (757) 223-4550 • Toll Free (866) 442-4583 dgarnett@pwhd.com

Tractor Trailer and Truck Accidents Auto and Motorcycle Accidents S p e c i a l

duncangarnettAPR12.indd 94 best-lawyers_APR12.indd 1

Defective Medical Devices Mass Torts/Class Actions

Nursing Home Negligence Trauma / Wrongful Death

a variety of factors unique to each case Past successful results do not guarantee nor predict future results. A Reported d v e r case t i sresults i n gdepend S U upon PPLE M ENT

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2 11:59 AM

e a ste r n v i rgi n i a Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Robert C. Nusbaum

CORPORATE LAW Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 George L. Consolvo David M. Delpierre Robert C. Goodman, Jr. Gus J. James II Vincent J. Mastracco, Jr. Charles V. McPhillips Alfred M. Randolph, Jr. Robert Smartschan William R. Van Buren III Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-491-4000 Michael E. Barney LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Ray W. King Stephen R. Romine McGuireWoods LLP Norfolk | 757-640-3700 John D. Padgett William R. Waddell Poole Mahoney PC Virginia Beach | 757-499-1841 Albert H. Poole

DERIVATIVES AND FUTURES LAW Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Robert C. Goodman, Jr.

ELDER LAW Oast & Hook, PC Suffolk | 757-399-7506 Andrew H. Hook

Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Anita O. Poston Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Thomas C. Inglima Thomas G. Johnson, Jr. Hugh L. Patterson Toy D. Savage, Jr. Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Brian C. Purcell Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Patrick C. Devine, Jr. Robert C. Nusbaum William A. Old, Jr. Williams Mullen Portsmouth | 757-391-3366 Albert J. Taylor, Jr. Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Stephen W. Burke Thomas R. Frantz Frederick T. Stant III

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: NON-WHITE-COLLAR

LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Alan D. Albert

Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Robert G. Morecock Thomas B. Shuttleworth II Stephen C. Swain Lawrence H. Woodward, Jr.

Poole Mahoney PC Virginia Beach | 757-499-1841 Reeves W. Mahoney Weinberg & Stein Norfolk | 757-627-1066 Jerrold G. Weinberg

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stephen E. Noona Hunter W. Sims, Jr. Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Michael R. Katchmark Conrad M. Shumadine

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Alfred M. Randolph, Jr.

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Hunter W. Sims, Jr.

Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Norman W. Shearin

Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Bryant C. McGann

Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Bryant C. McGann

FRANCHISE LAW

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Conrad M. Shumadine

Waldo & Lyle P.C. Norfolk | 757-622-5812 Charles M. Lollar Joseph T. Waldo Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Robert C. Nusbaum

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (ERISA) LAW

EMPLOYMENT LAW - INDIVIDUALS Bertini O’Donnell & Hammer P.C. Norfolk | 757-670-3868 Lisa A. Bertini Christopher Colt North Newport News | 757-873-1010 Christopher Colt North Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 Ann K. Sullivan Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C. Newport News | 757-223-4500 James H. Shoemaker, Jr. Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Gregory A. Giordano

EMPLOYMENT LAW - MANAGEMENT Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 Ann K. Sullivan Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Sharon S. Goodwyn James P. Naughton Jackson Lewis LLP Norfolk | 757-648-1445 Thomas M. Lucas

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 William M. Furr William E. Rachels, Jr. Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Susan R. Blackman

Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Rabinowitz, Swartz, Taliaferro, Swartz David C. Burton & Goodove, P.C. Sara Rafal Norfolk | 757-622-3931 Franklin A. Swartz Sacks & Sacks, P.C. Norfolk | 757-623-2753 Stanley E. Sacks Andrew M. Sacks

Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman

EMINENT DOMAIN AND CONDEMNATION LAW

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stanley G. Barr, Jr. Robert J. Barry Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & John M. Bredehoft Scott W. Kezman Morecock PC Burt H. Whitt Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Robert G. Morecock LeClairRyan Thomas B. Shuttleworth II Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Stephen C. Swain Kelvin L. Newsome Lawrence H. Woodward, Jr. Troutman Sanders LLP Stallings & Bischoff, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Virginia Beach | 757-422-4700 Gregory A. Giordano Moody E. Stallings Vandeventer Black LLP Zoby & Broccoletti, P.C. Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Norfolk | 757-466-0750 Dean T. Buckius James O. Broccoletti Arlene F. Klinedinst John M. Ryan

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Hunter W. Sims, Jr.

Christie, Kantor, Griffin, Smith, Shepherd & Chiusano, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-499-9222 George A. Christie Barry Kantor

LITIGATION - BANKING & FINANCE

Sacks & Sacks, P.C. Norfolk | 757-623-2753 Andrew M. Sacks Stanley E. Sacks

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE-COLLAR

LITIGATION - ANTITRUST

FINANCIAL SERVICES REGULATION LAW

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Richard C. Mapp III Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Willcox & Savage, P.C. Jeffrey T. Talbert Norfolk | 757-628-5500 James R. Warner, Jr. Tavss Fletcher Cher E. Wynkoop Norfolk | 757-625-1214 Alexander T. Mayo, Jr. Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Scott Hart John C. Lynch

FAMILY LAW

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stephen E. Story

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS PRACTICE Kemper Consulting Norfolk | 757-627-1988 John-Garrett Kemper LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Alan D. Albert Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Glenn R. Croshaw

HEALTH CARE LAW Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 T. Braxton McKee William R. Van Buren III Poole Mahoney PC Virginia Beach | 757-499-1841 M. Todd Gerber Tavss Fletcher Norfolk | 757-625-1214 Alexander T. Mayo, Jr. Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Anita O. Poston Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Patrick C. Devine, Jr. Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Arthur Serratelli Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Susan R. Blackman

INSURANCE LAW TaylorWalker, PC Norfolk | 757-625-7300 John Franklin III

LABOR LAW - MANAGEMENT Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 Ann K. Sullivan Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Sharon S. Goodwyn James P. Naughton Jackson Lewis LLP Norfolk | 757-648-1445 Thomas M. Lucas Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stanley G. Barr, Jr. Burt H. Whitt Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Dean T. Buckius Arlene F. Klinedinst John M. Ryan Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 David C. Burton

LAND USE & ZONING LAW LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Stephen R. Romine

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

Sykes, Bourdon, Ahern & Levy, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-499-8971 R. Edward Bourdon, Jr.

Cooper, Spong & Davis, P.C. Portsmouth | 757-397-3481 Susan Taylor Hansen

Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 R. J. Nutter II

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Marina Liacouras Phillips

Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Howard E. Gordon

Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Patrick A. Genzler

Williams Mullen Newport News | 757-249-5100 William L. Stauffer, Jr. Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 George H. Bowles Monroe Kelly III

LITIGATION - BANKRUPTCY Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 Donald C. Schultz Crowley, Liberatore & Ryan, P.C. Chesapeake | 757-333-4500 Karen M. Crowley Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Paul K. Campsen Dennis T. Lewandowski McGuireWoods LLP Norfolk | 757-640-3700 Douglas M. Foley Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Jonathan L. Hauser Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Ross C. Reeves Wilson & McIntyre, P.L.C. Norfolk | 757-961-3900 John D. McIntyre

LITIGATION - CONSTRUCTION Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Terence Murphy Outland, Gray, O’Keefe & Hubbard Chesapeake | 757-547-0171 David A. Hearne Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 John C. Lynch Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 William E. Franczek Patrick A. Genzler James W. Walker Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Michael R. Katchmark Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Donald H. Clark Stephen G. Test

LITIGATION ENVIRONMENTAL Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Marina Liacouras Phillips Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Scott Hart Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Patrick A. Genzler Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Gary A. Bryant

LITIGATION - FIRST AMENDMENT Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Hunter W. Sims, Jr. Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Conrad M. Shumadine

LITIGATION - INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman Robert M. Tata Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stephen E. Noona Stephen E. Story LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Alan D. Albert Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 John C. Lynch Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Craig L. Mytelka

LITIGATION - LABOR & EMPLOYMENT Bertini O’Donnell & Hammer P.C. Norfolk | 757-670-3868 Lisa A. Bertini Christopher Colt North Newport News | 757-873-1010 Christopher Colt North Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Sharon S. Goodwyn James P. Naughton Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stanley G. Barr, Jr. Robert J. Barry John M. Bredehoft Scott W. Kezman Burt H. Whitt LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Kelvin L. Newsome Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C. Newport News | 757-223-4500 James H. Shoemaker, Jr. Stallings & Bischoff, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-422-4700 Kevin E. Martingayle Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Gregory A. Giordano Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 William M. Furr William E. Rachels, Jr. Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Susan R. Blackman Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 David C. Burton Sara Rafal

LITIGATION - LAND USE & ZONING Sykes, Bourdon, Ahern & Levy, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-499-8971 R. Edward Bourdon, Jr. Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 R. J. Nutter II

LITIGATION - MUNICIPAL Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stanley G. Barr, Jr.

LITIGATION - PATENT Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stephen E. Noona Stephen E. Story Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Craig L. Mytelka

LITIGATION - REAL ESTATE Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-491-4000 Ann K. Crenshaw LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Ray W. King Stallings & Bischoff, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-422-4700 William C. Bischoff Williams Mullen Newport News | 757-249-5100 William L. Stauffer, Jr. George H. Bowles Donald H. Clark Stephen G. Test

LITIGATION - REGULATORY ENFORCEMENT (SEC, TELECOM, ENERGY) Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 John C. Lynch

LITIGATION - SECURITIES Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Jeffrey H. Gray Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 George H. Bowles

LITIGATION - TRUSTS & ESTATES Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-491-4000 R. Braxton Hill III Midgett & Preti PC Virginia Beach | 757-687-8888 John T. Midgett Rack & Olansen, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-605-5000 Kevin B. Rack Wilks, Alper & Harwood Norfolk | 757-623-6500 Susan C. Alper Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 George H. Bowles Joseph A. Di Julio

LITIGATION & CONTROVERSY - TAX James S. McNider, III P.L.C. Hampton | 757-722-8000 James S. McNider III Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-491-4000 R. Braxton Hill III LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Elizabeth J. Atkinson

MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS DEFENDANTS Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Bruce T. Bishop

MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS - PLAINTIFFS Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C. Newport News | 757-223-4500 Robert R. Hatten

MEDIATION Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 William E. Franczek

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW Bennett and Zydron, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-486-5454 Carlton F. Bennett

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 R. Barrow Blackwell

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW - PLAINTIFFS Bertini O’Donnell & Hammer P.C. Norfolk | 757-670-3868 Amberley G. Hammer Lisa P. O’Donnell Brain Injury Law Center Hampton | 757-244-7000 Stephen M. Smith Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C. Newport News | 757-223-4500 Avery T. Waterman, Jr.

Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 John M. Ramirez Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Thomas C. Inglima Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Mark E. Slaughter Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Thomas R. Frantz

Breit Drescher Imprevento & Walker, P.C. Norfolk | 757-622-6000 Jeffrey A. Breit John W. Drescher Gilbert, Albiston & Keller, P.L.C. Norfolk | 757-625-1188 George Albiston Oscar L. Gilbert Glasser and Glasser P.L.C. Norfolk | 757-625-6787 Richard S. Glasser

MORTGAGE BANKING FORECLOSURE LAW

Joseph Smith, Ltd. Hampton | 757-244-7000 Stephen H. Pitler Howard P. Smith

Glasser and Glasser P.L.C. Norfolk | 757-625-6787 Michael A. Glasser

Law Offices of Richard J. Serpe, P.C. Norfolk | 757-233-0009 Richard J. Serpe

Samuel I. White Virginia Beach | 757-490-9284 William Adam White

Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C. Newport News | 757-223-4500 H. Duncan Garnett, Jr. Donald N. Patten Avery T. Waterman, Jr.

MUNICIPAL LAW Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 Timothy A. Coyle

Sacks & Sacks, P.C. Norfolk | 757-623-2753 Stanley E. Sacks Andrew M. Sacks

MUTUAL FUNDS LAW

Shapiro, Cooper, Lewis & Appleton, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-460-7776 James C. Lewis

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Robert C. Goodman, Jr.

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION Patten, Wornom, Hatten & Diamonstein, L.C. Newport News | 757-223-4500 Robert R. Hatten Pender & Coward, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-490-3000 Daniel M. Schieble Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Joseph J. Perez

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION - DEFENDANTS Breeden, Salb, Beasley & DuVall, P.L.C. Norfolk | 757-622-1111 Allen W. Beasley T. Jeffrey Salb Furniss, Davis, Rashkind and Saunders, P.C. Norfolk | 757-461-7100 Alan B. Rashkind Richard A. Saunders Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman Joseph Smith, Ltd. Hampton | 757-244-7000 Stephen H. Pitler Howard P. Smith Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Stanley G. Barr, Jr. R. Barrow Blackwell McGuireWoods LLP Norfolk | 757-640-3700 Richard J. Cromwell Poole Mahoney PC Virginia Beach | 757-499-1841 Jeffrey Brooke

Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Robert J. Haddad Edwin Jay Rafal Thomas B. Shuttleworth II Stephen C. Swain Lawrence H. Woodward, Jr. The Moody Law Firm, Inc. Portsmouth | 757-393-4093 Willard J. Moody, Sr.

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Robert J. Haddad Stephen C. Swain

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION - DEFENDANTS Hunton & Williams LLP Norfolk | 757-640-5300 Gregory N. Stillman Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Thomas B. Shuttleworth II

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION - PLAINTIFFS Bertini O’Donnell & Hammer P.C. Norfolk | 757-670-3868 Amberley G. Hammer Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Thomas B. Shuttleworth II

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS

Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Morecock PC Jeffrey H. Gray Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Edwin Jay Rafal Stephen C. Swain TaylorWalker, PC Norfolk | 757-625-7300 James E. Brydges, Jr. John Franklin III The Heilig Firm, PC Norfolk | 757-461-1300 John A. Heilig Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Anita O. Poston Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Bruce T. Bishop

PUBLIC FINANCE LAW Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 George L. Consolvo Barry W. Hunter Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 William L. Nusbaum

Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 William W. Harrison, Jr.

RAILROAD LAW

Shapiro, Cooper, Lewis & Appleton, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-460-7776 James C. Lewis

Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Robert L. Samuel, Jr.

Bondurant Law, P.C. Smithfield 843-327-4069 Walton G. Bondurant

Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Morecock PC Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Robert J. Haddad Edwin Jay Rafal Thomas B. Shuttleworth II Stephen C. Swain Lawrence H. Woodward, Jr.

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION - PLAINTIFFS

Shapiro, Cooper, Lewis & Appleton, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-460-7776 Richard N. Shapiro

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS LAW

Bertini O’Donnell & Hammer P.C. Norfolk | 757-670-3868 Amberley G. Hammer Lisa P. O’Donnell

McGuireWoods LLP Norfolk | 757-640-3700 John D. Padgett

Bangel, Bangel & Bangel, L.L.P. Portsmouth | 757-397-3471 Keith H. Bangel Bennett and Zydron, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-486-5454 Carlton F. Bennett

Brain Injury Law Center Hampton | 757-244-7000 Stephen M. Smith

The Moody Law Firm, Inc. Portsmouth | 757-393-4093 Willard J. Moody, Sr. Ventker & Warman, PLLC Norfolk | 757-625-1192 Daniel R. Warman Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Wiley F. Mitchell, Jr. Samuel J. Webster

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e a ste r n v i rgi n i a Wilson & Hajek Virginia Beach | 757-962-9722 Francis P. Hajek

REAL ESTATE LAW Crenshaw, Ware & Martin PLC Norfolk | 757-623-3000 Howard W. Martin, Jr.

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Robert L. Dewey Thomas G. Johnson, Jr. Anthony M. Thiel

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Williamsburg | 757-259-3800 Paul W. Gerhardt

Faggert & Frieden, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-424-3232 David Y. Faggert Jeffrey B. Hammaker, P.C, P.C. Norfolk | 757-962-3365 Jeffrey B. Hammaker

McGuireWoods LLP Norfolk | 757-640-3700 Mark D. Williamson

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Barry W. Hunter Jeffrey Stedfast

Wilks, Alper & Harwood Norfolk | 757-623-6500 Jay F. Wilks

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-491-4000 Michael E. Barney Ann K. Crenshaw Robert E. Farmer III

LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Ray W. King Stephen R. Romine

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Hampton | 757-224-2900 Lawrence G. Cumming

Troutman Sanders LLP Virginia Beach | 757-687-7500 Thomas F. Betz, Jr. R. J. Nutter II

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Stephen R. Davis Williams Mullen Newport News | 757-249-5100 Joseph H. Latchum, Jr.

Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & H. David Embree Howard E. Gordon Morecock PC William L. Nusbaum Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Robert C. Nusbaum Robert E. Ruloff Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Eric A. Hauser Monroe Kelly III

Moore & Lee, LLP McLean | 703-506-2050 Charlie C. H. Lee Robert M. Moore

n o rth e r n v i rgi n i a

Randall C. Allen, P.C. Leesburg | 703-737-6710 Randall C. Allen

Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Robert E. Scully, Jr.

ARBITRATION Akerman Senterfitt LLP Vienna | 703-790-8750 Donald G. Gavin

Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC Vienna | 703-847-6300 Mark E. Hanson Val S. McWhorter Richard F. Smith Brian J. Vella

Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 William D. Dolan III

Lane Law Services McLean | 703-749-1296 David G. Lane

BIOTECHNOLOGY LAW

Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC Vienna | 703-847-6300 Val S. McWhorter Richard F. Smith Brian J. Vella Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, LLP McLean | 703-749-1000 Lewis J. Baker Williams Mullen McLean | 703-760-5200 Thomas O. Mason

BANKING AND FINANCE LAW Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 C. Christopher Giragosian

Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, LLP McLean | 703-749-1000 Lewis J. Baker Kathleen O. Barnes Christopher J. Brasco Robert K. Cox Shelly L. Ewald Robert M. Fitzgerald Vivian Katsantonis Carter B. Reid Mark A. Sgarlata John B. Tieder Paul A. Varela

Nixon & Vanderhye P.C. Arlington | 703-816-4000 B. J. Sadoff

COLLABORATIVE LAW: FAMILY LAW Fite, O’Brien & Anderson, Ltd. Vienna | 703-821-8575 Frances Fite Law Office of Karen L. Keyes Arlington | 703-528-1991 Karen L. Keyes

COPYRIGHT LAW Birch, Stewart, Kolasch & Birch, LLP Falls Church | 703-205-8000 James M. Slattery

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION

BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITOR DEBTOR RIGHTS / INSOLVENCY AND REORGANIZATION LAW

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John A. C. Keith

Greenspun Shapiro Davis & Leary PC Fairfax | 703-352-0100 James F. Davis

Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Robert Vieth

Nixon & Vanderhye P.C. Arlington | 703-816-4000 Robert W. Faris Mark E. Nusbaum

DiMuro, Ginsberg & Mook, PC Alexandria | 703-684-4333 Bernard J. DiMuro

Bean, Kinney & Korman, PC Arlington | 703-525-4000 Jennifer A. Brust James R. Schroll

Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Michael Lincoln

Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 Richard O. Duvall

Greenberg Traurig LLP McLean | 703-749-1300 Lawrence E. Rifken Henry & O’Donnell, P.C. Fairfax | 703-548-2100 Bruce W. Henry

Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 Thomas J. Cawley Stephen M. Sayers

Leach Travell Britt PC McLean | 703-584-8900 Lawrence A. Katz Stephen E. Leach

McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Thomas E. Spahn Warren E. Zirkle

LeClairRyan Alexandria | 703-684-8007 C. Erik Gustafson

Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Robert E. Scully, Jr.

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Donald F. King James W. Reynolds

Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 William D. Dolan III

Rogan Law Firm PLLC Leesburg | 703-771-9191 Christopher L. Rogan Tyler, Bartl, Ramsdell & Counts, P.L.C. Alexandria | 703-549-5000 Richard A. Bartl Robert O. Tyler Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 Stephen K. Gallagher

Greenberg Traurig LLP McLean | 703-749-1300 Lee R. Marks Mark J. Wishner Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 Jocelyn West Brittin William J. Mutryn McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Thomas C. Brown, Jr. Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Gregory M. Giammittorio Lawrence T. Yanowitch Rees Broome, PC Vienna | 703-790-1911 Joel M. Birken

Webster Book LLP Alexandria 888-987-9991 Aaron S. Book Steven T. Webster David N. Webster

Squire, Sanders & Dempsey, L.L.P. Tysons Corner | 703-720-7800 Robert E. Gregg Robert B. Webb III

Williams Mullen McLean | 703-760-5200 Thomas O. Mason

ThinkLaw, PLLC Vienna | 703-942-6154 W. Thomas Parrott III

COMMUNICATIONS LAW

Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Falls Church | 703-280-9260 Bradford Englander Christopher A. Jones

Lukas, Nace, Gutierrez & Sachs, LLP McLean | 703-584-8678 Brooks E. Harlow

Wiley Rein LLP McLean | 703-905-2800 H. Jason Gold Valerie P. Morrison Dylan Trache

CONSTRUCTION LAW

BET-THE-COMPANY LITIGATION Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 Richard O. Duvall Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 Thomas J. Cawley Stephen M. Sayers

S p e c i a l

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Akerman Senterfitt LLP Vienna | 703-790-8750 Donald G. Gavin Jeffrey G. Gilmore Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 John G. Lavoie Kraftson Caudle McLean | 703-873-5500 Larry W. Caudle, Jr. Daniel J. Kraftson A. Wayne Lalle, Jr. Lane Law Services McLean | 703-749-1296 David G. Lane

A d v e r t i s i n g

Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 Elizabeth R. Hughes

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: NON-WHITE-COLLAR Greenspun Shapiro Davis & Leary PC Fairfax | 703-352-0100 Peter D. Greenspun Jonathan Shapiro Howard, Morrison, Ross & Whelan, PLLC Warrenton 540-347-1000 Blair D. Howard Land, Clark, Carroll, Mendelson & Blair, P.C. Alexandria | 703-836-1000 James C. Clark Law Offices of Marvin D. Miller Alexandria | 703-548-5000 Marvin D. Miller

SPORTS LAW Bertini O’Donnell & Hammer P.C. Norfolk | 757-670-3868 Lisa P. O’Donnell

Wilks, Alper & Harwood Norfolk | 757-623-6500 Steven Harwood

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Allan G. Donn Shuttleworth, Ruloff, Swain, Haddad & Toy D. Savage, Jr. Morecock PC Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-671-6000 Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Thomas B. Shuttleworth II Robert C. Nusbaum Lawrence H. Woodward, Jr. William A. Old, Jr. Maria S. Stefanis

TAX LAW

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 J. Douglas Sorensen

Williams Mullen Portsmouth | 757-391-3366 Albert J. Taylor, Jr.

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-491-4000 R. Braxton Hill III

Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Thomas R. Frantz John M. Paris, Jr.

LeClairRyan Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Elizabeth J. Atkinson

TRADEMARK LAW

Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Patrick W. Herman

Williams Mullen Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 Craig L. Mytelka

TRANSPORTATION LAW McGuireWoods LLP Norfolk | 757-640-3700 John D. Padgett Vandeventer Black LLP Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Mark T. Coberly

Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Norfolk | 757-624-3000 Kirkland M. Kelley Lewis W. Webb III Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-491-4000 R. Braxton Hill III

Law Office of Stanley L. Samuels, PLC Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-627-0133 Norfolk | 757-622-3366 Stanley L. Samuels Robert C. Nusbaum LeClairRyan Williams Mullen Norfolk | 757-624-1454 Neal P. Brodsky Virginia Beach | 757-499-8800 TRUSTS AND ESTATES Joseph A. Di Julio Midgett & Preti PC Thomas R. Frantz Amy G. Pesesky PLC Virginia Beach | 757-687-8888 Robert C. Miller Norfolk | 757-333-4779 John T. Midgett Amy G. Pesesky Wolcott Rivers Gates Pender & Coward, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-497-6633 Clarke, Dolph, Rapaport, Hull, Brunick Virginia Beach | 757-490-3000 M. Powell Peters & Garriott, P.L.C. Jo Ann Blair-Davis Norfolk | 757-466-0464 E. Diane Thompson Cyrus Dolph IV WORKERS’ COMPENSATION Rack & Olansen, P.C. LAW - EMPLOYERS Kaufman & Canoles, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-605-5000 Newport News | 757-873-6300 Kevin B. Rack Vandeventer Black LLP Philip L. Hatchett Norfolk | 757-446-8600 Wilks, Alper & Harwood F. Nash Bilisoly Norfolk | 757-623-6500 Susan C. Alper

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Dexter S. Odin

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 David Rust Clarke

Leffler & Mosley, P.C. Fairfax | 703-293-9300 Rodney G. Leffler

Reed Smith LLP Falls Church | 703-641-4200 Grayson P. Hanes

Zwerling, Leibig & Moseley, P.C. Alexandria | 703-684-8000 John Kenneth Zwerling

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS (ERISA) LAW

CRIMINAL DEFENSE: WHITE-COLLAR

Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 David Albert Mustone

Briglia Hundley Nuttall & Kay, P.C. Vienna | 703-883-0880 James W. Hundley

Kruchko & Fries McLean | 703-734-0554 Martha L. Hutzelman

Greenberg Traurig LLP McLean | 703-749-1300 David G. Barger

Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP McLean | 703-770-7900 Howard L. Clemons

Greenspun Shapiro Davis & Leary PC Fairfax | 703-352-0100 Peter D. Greenspun Jonathan Shapiro

EMPLOYMENT LAW - INDIVIDUALS

Colten Cummins Watson & Vincent P.C. Fairfax | 703-277-9700 The Maddox Law Firm, P.C. Richard J. Colten Vienna | 703-883-8035 Marcia M. Maddox Cooper Ginsberg Gray, PLLC Fairfax | 703-934-1480 The Roop Law Firm PLLC Heather A. Cooper Vienna | 703-442-0040 David E. Roop, Jr. Cooper Ginsberg Gray, PLLC The Susan Hicks Group PC Fairfax | 703-934-1480 Fairfax | 703-691-4848 Daniel L. Gray Susan M. Hicks Cottrell Fletcher Schinstock Bartol & Cottrell, P.C. Alexandria | 703-836-2770 FAMILY LAW MEDIATION James Ray Cottrell Bean, Kinney & Korman, PC David H. Fletcher Arlington | 703-525-4000 Christopher W. Schinstock Carol Schrier-Polak Crouch & Crouch Fite, O’Brien & Anderson, Ltd. Arlington | 703-528-6700 Vienna | 703-821-8575 Richard E. Crouch Frances Fite Grenadier, Anderson, Starace & Law Office of Karen L. Keyes Duffett, P.C. Arlington | 703-528-1991 Alexandria | 703-683-9000 Karen L. Keyes Ilona Ely Grenadier

J. Frederick Sinclair Alexandria | 703-299-0600 J. Frederick Sinclair Land, Clark, Carroll, Mendelson & Blair, P.C. Alexandria | 703-836-1000 James C. Clark Law Offices of Marvin D. Miller Alexandria | 703-548-5000 Marvin D. Miller Law Offices of William B. Cummings Alexandria | 703-836-7997 William B. Cummings Leffler & Mosley, P.C. Fairfax | 703-293-9300 Rodney G. Leffler Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 William D. Dolan III Webster Book LLP Alexandria 888-987-9991 David N. Webster Zwerling, Leibig & Moseley, P.C. Alexandria | 703-684-8000 John Kenneth Zwerling

EDUCATION LAW Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John F. Cafferky

Charlson Bredehoft Cohen & Brown, P.C. Reston | 703-318-6800 Elaine Charlson Bredehoft

Arlene T. Starace

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Daniel P. Westman

Hale Carlson Baumgartner PLC Fairfax | 703-763-0374 Dana Carlson

Sparks & Craig LLP McLean | 703-848-4700 Robert R. Sparks, Jr.

Hirsch & Ehlenberger, P.C. Reston | 703-481-6063 Brian M. Hirsch

Victor M. Glasberg & Associates Alexandria | 703-684-1100 Victor M. Glasberg

Joseph and Mische, P.C. Leesburg | 703-777-7740 Nan Joseph

EMPLOYMENT LAW - MANAGEMENT

Kelly Byrnes & Danker, PLLC Fairfax | 703-224-0888 John E. Byrnes Sean Kelly

Constangy, Brooks & Smith, LLP Fairfax 571-522-6100 James M. Coleman Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Elizabeth Lewis Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 Thomas J. Cawley Thomas P. Murphy Isler Dare Ray Radcliffe & Connolly, P.C. Vienna | 703-748-2690 Edward L. Isler Steven W. Ray Littler Mendelson P.C. Tysons Corner | 703-442-8425 Thomas J. Flaherty Elizabeth A. Lalik

Law Offices of Beth Bittel Fairfax | 703-591-1320 Beth A. Bittel Law Offices of Karen C. Davis Alexandria | 703-879-4295 Karen C. Davis Lieblich & Grimes, P.C. Alexandria | 703-683-6300 Sharon K. Lieblich Marc A. Astore, PC Fairfax | 703-273-5100 Marc A. Astore

The Law Offices of Cheryl K. Graham, Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. P.L.L.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Leesburg | 703-443-9360 Nancy M. Lawrence Cheryl K. Graham

FRANCHISE LAW Akerman Senterfitt LLP Vienna | 703-790-8750 Warren L. Lewis Michaele S. Weatherbie DLA Piper LLP Reston | 703-773-4000 Barry M. Heller H. Bret Lowell Plave Koch PLC Reston | 703-774-1200 Leslie D. Curran Mark A. Kirsch Lee J. Plave James Rubinger John M. Tifford

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Timothy M. McConville Sparks & Craig LLP McLean | 703-848-4700 Robert R. Sparks, Jr.

LAND USE & ZONING LAW

Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Antonio J. Calabrese Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 Francis A. McDermott

Reese Law Office Fairfax | 703-279-5140 Catherine M. Reese

Law Offices of John L. Laster Falls Church | 703-538-3600 John L. Laster

Sparks & Craig LLP McLean | 703-848-4700 Robert R. Sparks, Jr.

Schwartz & Associates, LLC Fairfax | 703-341-4758 Philip Schwartz

Betty A. Thompson Arlington | 703-522-8100 Betty A. Thompson

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Daniel P. Westman

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS PRACTICE

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Timothy M. McConville

Institute for Justice Arlington | 703-682-9320 Dana Berliner

Isler Dare Ray Radcliffe & Connolly, P.C. Vienna | 703-748-2690 Edward L. Isler Steven W. Ray

McQuade Byrum PLLC Alexandria | 703-548-4200 Martha Jane Peeler McQuade

Kelly A. Thompson, PLC Arlington | 703-237-0027 Kelly A. Thompson

Bean, Kinney & Korman, PC Arlington | 703-525-4000 James W. Korman Tracy A. Meyer Carol Schrier-Polak

Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 Thomas J. Cawley Thomas P. Murphy

Spirit Rock Consulting, LLC Alexandria 202-250-0477 Aurene Michele Martin

ELDER LAW

FAMILY LAW

LABOR LAW - MANAGEMENT

Masterman, Krogmann & Diño PC Vienna | 703-827-5500 David D. Masterman

HEALTH CARE LAW

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 A. Hugo Blankingship, Jr. Paul B. Terpak

Law Offices of Amelia Porges PLLC Arlington 202-495-1740 Amelia Porges

GAMING LAW

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 J. Patrick McConnell

EMINENT DOMAIN AND CONDEMNATION LAW

INTERNATIONAL TRADE AND FINANCE LAW

Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Elizabeth Lewis

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Daniel P. Westman

Mowrey Meezan Coddington Cloud LLP McLean | 703-760-0750 Kipp A. Coddington

Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 Jocelyn West Brittin

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Leslye S. Fenton

LeClairRyan Alexandria | 703-684-8007 Thomas A. Coulter

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Reston 571-203-2700 Jay T. Westermeier, Jr.

Constangy, Brooks & Smith, LLP Fairfax 571-522-6100 James M. Coleman

Nichols, Zauzig & Sandler P.C. Woodbridge | 703-492-4200 Paul F. Nichols Betty Moore Sandler

The Estate Planning & Elder Law Firm P.C. Arlington | 703-243-3200 William S. Fralin

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY LAW

Law Offices of Beth Bittel Fairfax | 703-591-1320 Beth A. Bittel

McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Stephen W. Robinson

Blankingship & Keith, PC Manassas | 703-365-9945 Mary E. McGowan

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Virginia Beach | 757-628-5600 Neil L. Rose

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Samuel J. Webster

Law Offices of William B. Cummings Alexandria | 703-836-7997 William B. Cummings

Howard, Morrison, Ross & Whelan, PLLC Warrenton 540-347-1000 Blair D. Howard

Willcox & Savage, P.C. Norfolk | 757-628-5500 Allan G. Donn Peter M. Huber Toy D. Savage, Jr.

Shoun, Bach, Walinsky & Curran, P.C. Fairfax | 703-222-3333 Albert M. Bonin Susan M. Butler Gerald R. Curran Keenan R. Goldsby Robert E. Shoun Surovell Isaacs Petersen & Levy, PLC Fairfax | 703-648-8279 Dorothy M. Isaacs David Levy Scott Surovell Robert J. Surovell The Condo Law Group, P.C. McLean | 703-442-0888 Joseph A. Condo

Barent L. Fake Fairfax Station | 703-926-5457 Barent L. Fake McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Thomas C. Brown, Jr. Reed Smith LLP Falls Church | 703-641-4200 Julia Krebs-Markrich

IMMIGRATION LAW Fettmann, Tolchin & Majors PC Fairfax | 703-385-9500 Jonathan Ginsburg Goel & Anderson LLC Reston | 703-796-9898 Vic Goel Greenberg Traurig LLP McLean | 703-749-1300 Dawn M. Lurie Laura F. Reiff Martha J. Schoonover

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 Sarah E. Hall

McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Carson Lee Fifer, Jr. Jonathan P. Rak Gregory A. Riegle Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Walsh PC Arlington | 703-528-4700 Nan E. Walsh Martin D. Walsh Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Walsh PC Prince William | 703-680-4664 John H. Foote Michael D. Lubeley

LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John A. C. Keith Hudgins Law Firm Alexandria | 703-739-3300 Robert E. Draim Jordan Coyne & Savits L.L.P. Fairfax | 703-246-0900 Carol T. Stone

S U PPLE M ENT

3/5/12 12:53 PM


LITIGATION - PATENT

GRENADIER, ANDERSON, STARACE , DUFFE T & K EISLER, P.C.

DLA Piper LLP Reston | 703-773-4000 Dale S. Lazar Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Reston 571-203-2700 Charles E. Lipsey Greenspun Shapiro Davis & Leary PC Fairfax | 703-352-0100 James F. Davis

Lane Law Services McLean | 703-749-1296 David G. Lane Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC Vienna | 703-847-6300 Mark E. Hanson Val S. McWhorter Richard F. Smith Brian J. Vella Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, LLP McLean | 703-749-1000 Lewis J. Baker

Williams Mullen McLean | 703-760-5200 Millen, White, Zelano & Branigan, P.C. Thomas O. Mason Arlington | 703-243-6333 Alan E. J. Branigan Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Barry E. Bretschneider Nixon & Vanderhye P.C. Arlington | 703-816-4000 Robert W. Faris Larry S. Nixon Mark E. Nusbaum Oblon, Spivak, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt, L.L.P. Alexandria | 703-413-3000 Greg H. Gardella Charles L. Gholz Arthur I. Neustadt

With almost seventy years of combined experience, Ilona Grenadier and Arlene Starace have been selected for “ Best Lawyers in America”, Washingtonian Magazine’s “Best Lawyers”, and “Superlawyers” in Virginia and D.C. Both have Martindale-Hubbell’s highest AV® Preeminent™ rating. Their reputation for competency and professionalism is cemented by their indisputable record in negotiation, mediation and the courtroom. The firm handles all aspects of domestic relations cases, including divorce, support, equitable distribution, custody, and pre and post marital agreements.

649 South Washington Street, Alexandria, VA 22314 12359 Sunrise Valley Drive, Suite 230, Reston, VA 20191 19301 Winmeade Drive, Suite 216A, Leesburg, VA 20176

(703) 683-9000 • www.vafamilylaw.com Sands Anderson PC McLean | 703-893-3600 J. Jonathan Schraub

Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 Stephen K. Gallagher

Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP McLean | 703-245-9300 Thomas L. Appler John J. Brandt

Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Falls Church | 703-280-9260 Bradford Englander Christopher A. Jones

LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW - PLAINTIFFS Benjamin W. Glass, III & Associates PC Fairfax | 703-591-9829 Benjamin W. Glass III The Duff Law Firm, P.C. Fairfax | 703-591-7475 David L. Duff

LEVERAGED BUYOUTS AND PRIVATE EQUITY LAW Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Michael Lincoln Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 William J. Mutryn

LITIGATION - BANKING & FINANCE Webster Book LLP Alexandria 888-987-9991 Steven T. Webster

LITIGATION - BANKRUPTCY Bean, Kinney & Korman, PC Arlington | 703-525-4000 Jennifer A. Brust Henry & O’Donnell, P.C. Fairfax | 703-548-2100 Bruce W. Henry Leach Travell Britt PC McLean | 703-584-8900 Lawrence A. Katz Stephen E. Leach LeClairRyan Alexandria | 703-684-8007 C. Erik Gustafson Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 James W. Reynolds Rogan Law Firm PLLC Leesburg | 703-771-9191 Christopher L. Rogan

Wiley Rein LLP McLean | 703-905-2800 H. Jason Gold Valerie P. Morrison

LITIGATION - CONSTRUCTION Akerman Senterfitt LLP Vienna | 703-790-8750 Donald G. Gavin Jeffrey G. Gilmore Owen J. Shean Bean, Kinney & Korman, PC Arlington | 703-525-4000 Timothy Hughes Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John A. C. Keith Cameron/McEvoy PLLC Fairfax | 703-273-8898 Edward W. Cameron Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 Thomas M. Brownell Kasimer & Annino, P.C. Falls Church | 703-893-3914 Joseph H. Kasimer Kraftson Caudle McLean | 703-873-5500 Larry W. Caudle, Jr. Daniel J. Kraftson A. Wayne Lalle, Jr. Moore & Lee, LLP McLean | 703-506-2050 Charlie C. H. Lee Robert M. Moore Randall C. Allen, P.C. Leesburg | 703-737-6710 Randall C. Allen Smith Pachter McWhorter PLC Vienna | 703-847-6300 Mark E. Hanson Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Robert E. Scully, Jr.

Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, LLP McLean | 703-749-1000 Lewis J. Baker Kathleen O. Barnes Christopher J. Brasco Robert K. Cox Shelly L. Ewald Robert M. Fitzgerald Vivian Katsantonis Carter B. Reid Mark A. Sgarlata John B. Tieder Paul A. Varela Robert G. Watt

LITIGATION ENVIRONMENTAL Mowrey Meezan Coddington Cloud LLP McLean | 703-760-0750 Kipp A. Coddington

LITIGATION - ERISA Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John A. C. Keith

LITIGATION - INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP Reston 571-203-2700 Charles E. Lipsey Greenspun Shapiro Davis & Leary PC Fairfax | 703-352-0100 James F. Davis McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Warren E. Zirkle

Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Marvin Petry Robert E. Scully, Jr. Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 William D. Dolan III

LITIGATION - LABOR & EMPLOYMENT Constangy, Brooks & Smith, LLP Fairfax 571-522-6100 James M. Coleman Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 Thomas P. Murphy Isler Dare Ray Radcliffe & Connolly, P.C. Vienna | 703-748-2690 Mark Dare Littler Mendelson P.C. Tysons Corner | 703-442-8425 Thomas J. Flaherty Elizabeth A. Lalik

Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP McLean | 703-770-7900 William P. Atkins George M. Sirilla Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Marvin Petry

LITIGATION - REAL ESTATE Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 A. Hugo Blankingship, Jr. Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Robert Vieth Reed Smith LLP Falls Church | 703-641-4200 Grayson P. Hanes Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Robert E. Scully, Jr. Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Walsh PC Prince William | 703-680-4664 Michael D. Lubeley Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, LLP McLean | 703-749-1000 Colin J. Smith Webster Book LLP Alexandria 888-987-9991 Steven T. Webster Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Falls Church | 703-280-9260 Raymond J. Diaz Andrew J. Terrell

LITIGATION - REGULATORY ENFORCEMENT (SEC, TELECOM, ENERGY) Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 William D. Dolan III

LITIGATION - SECURITIES McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Warren E. Zirkle

LITIGATION - TRUSTS & ESTATES

McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Stephen W. Robinson

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John A. C. Keith

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Daniel P. Westman

Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Robert E. Scully, Jr.

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Timothy M. McConville

Yates Campbell & Hoeg LLP Fairfax | 703-273-4230 Munford R. Yates, Jr.

LITIGATION - LAND USE & ZONING

LITIGATION & CONTROVERSY - TAX

Reed Smith LLP Falls Church | 703-641-4200 Grayson P. Hanes

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John A. C. Keith

Millen, White, Zelano & Branigan, P.C. Arlington | 703-243-6333 Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Alan E. J. Branigan Walsh PC Prince William | 703-680-4664 Nixon & Vanderhye P.C. John H. Foote Arlington | 703-816-4000 Michael D. Lubeley Robert W. Faris Larry S. Nixon Mark E. Nusbaum LITIGATION - MUNICIPAL Frank P. Presta Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Joseph A. Rhoa Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Oblon, Spivak, McClelland, Maier & Dexter S. Odin Neustadt, L.L.P. Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Alexandria | 703-413-3000 Walsh PC Barry J. Herman Prince William | 703-680-4664 Arthur I. Neustadt John H. Foote Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP McLean | 703-770-7900 William P. Atkins George M. Sirilla

McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Ronald D. Aucutt

MASS TORT LITIGATION / CLASS ACTIONS - PLAINTIFFS Ashcraft & Gerel LLP Alexandria | 703-931-5500 James F. Green Michelle A. Parfitt Michael W. Heaviside

MEDIATION Akerman Senterfitt LLP Vienna | 703-790-8750 Donald G. Gavin

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW Bartoli Cain Law Alexandria | 703-548-3577 Michele Bartoli Cain Hall, Sickels, Frei & Mims, P.C. Reston | 703-925-0500 Gary Brooks Mims Nichols, Zauzig & Sandler P.C. Woodbridge | 703-492-4200 Charles J. Zauzig III

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 William L. Carey Hamilton Altman Canale & Dillon, LLC Fairfax | 703-591-9700 Stephen L. Altman Susan L. Mitchell

PATENT LAW Birch, Stewart, Kolasch & Birch, LLP Falls Church | 703-205-8000 James M. Slattery DLA Piper LLP Reston | 703-773-4000 Dale S. Lazar Greenspun Shapiro Davis & Leary PC Fairfax | 703-352-0100 James F. Davis Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Barry E. Bretschneider Nixon & Vanderhye P.C. Arlington | 703-816-4000 Robert W. Faris Larry S. Nixon Mark E. Nusbaum Frank P. Presta Oblon, Spivak, McClelland, Maier & Neustadt, L.L.P. Alexandria | 703-413-3000 Stephen G. Kunin Gregory J. Maier Gerald J. Mossinghoff Arthur I. Neustadt Norman F. Oblon Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP McLean | 703-770-7900 William P. Atkins Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Marvin Petry

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION

Hancock, Daniel, Johnson & Nagle PC Benjamin W. Glass, III & Associates PC Fairfax | 703-591-3440 Fairfax | 703-591-9829 Anisa P. Kelley Benjamin W. Glass III Richard L. Nagle Blankingship & Keith, PC McCandlish & Lillard, P.C. Fairfax | 703-691-1235 Fairfax | 703-273-2288 Chidi I. James Gary W. Brown Garnier & Garnier, P.C. Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Herndon | 703-237-2010 Dicker LLP Robert L. Garnier McLean | 703-245-9300 Robert H. Hovis, III, P.C. Thomas L. Appler Annandale | 703-642-5800 Mark M. Jones Robert H. Hovis III Cynthia L. Santoni

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW - PLAINTIFFS

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION - DEFENDANTS

Benjamin W. Glass, III & Associates PC Ashcraft & Gerel LLP Alexandria | 703-931-5500 Fairfax | 703-591-9829 James F. Green Benjamin W. Glass III Brault Palmer Grove Steinhilber & Hall, Sickels, Frei & Mims, P.C. Robbins, LLP Reston | 703-925-0500 Fairfax | 703-273-6400 Robert T. Hall Thomas C. Palmer, Jr. Charles W. Sickels Jones & Rostant, PC Fairfax | 703-352-0522 Annette LaCroix Jones Donna Miller Rostant Karp, Frosh, Lapidus, Wigodsky & Norwind, P.A. Alexandria | 703-535-8777 Gary A. Godard Nichols, Zauzig & Sandler P.C. Woodbridge | 703-492-4200 Charles J. Zauzig III Robert H. Hovis, III, P.C. Annandale | 703-642-5800 Robert H. Hovis III Shevlin Smith Fairfax | 703-591-0067 Michael J. Shevlin Thomas G. Smith William E. Artz, P.C. Arlington | 703-243-3500 William E. Artz

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS LAW Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Michael Lincoln Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 William J. Mutryn Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Lawrence T. Yanowitch Venable LLP Vienna | 703-760-1600 Thomas W. France

Hall, Sickels, Frei & Mims, P.C. Reston | 703-925-0500 Robert T. Hall Gary Brooks Mims

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 Peter S. Everett Robert J. Stoney Mark A. Towery Blankingship & Keith, PC Manassas | 703-365-9945 Mary E. McGowan Curcio Law, P.C. Alexandria | 703-836-3366 Thomas J. Curcio Hall, Sickels, Frei & Mims, P.C. Reston | 703-925-0500 Steven M. Frei Robert T. Hall Gary Brooks Mims Charles W. Sickels Howard, Morrison, Ross & Whelan, PLLC Warrenton 540-347-1000 Blair D. Howard Jennings & Porter, PLLC Fairfax | 703-359-8620 R. Craig Jennings Jones & Rostant, PC Fairfax | 703-352-0522 Annette LaCroix Jones Karp, Frosh, Lapidus, Wigodsky & Norwind, P.A. Alexandria | 703-535-8777 Gary A. Godard McCandlish & Lillard, P.C. Fairfax | 703-273-2288 Gary W. Brown R. Peyton Mahaffey Miles & Stockbridge P.C. Tysons Corner | 703-903-9000 Harvey B. Cohen Nichols, Zauzig & Sandler P.C. Woodbridge | 703-492-4200 Charles J. Zauzig III Robert H. Hovis, III, P.C. Annandale | 703-642-5800 Robert H. Hovis III Shevlin Smith Fairfax | 703-591-0067 Michael J. Shevlin Thomas G. Smith Surovell Isaacs Petersen & Levy, PLC Fairfax | 703-648-8279 Robert J. Surovell Scott Surovell The Harris Law Firm Fredericksburg 540-371-4941 John P. Harris III The Law Offices of Jeremy Flachs Annandale | 703-354-7700 Jeremy Flachs Tina L. Snee & Associates Fairfax | 703-352-8833 Tina L. Snee

Webster Book LLP Hamilton Altman Canale & Dillon, LLC Alexandria 888-987-9991 Fairfax | 703-591-9700 David N. Webster Stephen L. Altman William E. Artz, P.C. Jennings & Porter, PLLC Arlington | 703-243-3500 Fairfax | 703-359-8620 William E. Artz R. Craig Jennings Jordan Coyne & Savits L.L.P. Fairfax | 703-246-0900 John O. Easton Carol T. Stone Leffler & Mosley, P.C. Fairfax | 703-293-9300 Rodney G. Leffler McCandlish & Lillard, P.C. Fairfax | 703-273-2288 Gary W. Brown Miles & Stockbridge P.C. Tysons Corner | 703-903-9000 Harvey B. Cohen Tina L. Snee & Associates Fairfax | 703-352-8833 Tina L. Snee William E. Artz, P.C. Arlington | 703-243-3500 William E. Artz Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP McLean | 703-245-9300 John J. Brandt Mark M. Jones

PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION - PLAINTIFFS

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION Brault Palmer Grove Steinhilber & Robbins, LLP Fairfax | 703-273-6400 Thomas C. Palmer, Jr.

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION - DEFENDANTS Webster Book LLP Alexandria 888-987-9991 David N. Webster

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION - PLAINTIFFS Webster Book LLP Alexandria 888-987-9991 David N. Webster

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW Brault Palmer Grove Steinhilber & Robbins, LLP Fairfax | 703-273-6400 Thomas C. Palmer, Jr.

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 Dexter S. Odin

Allen, Allen, Allen & Allen, P.C. Fredericksburg 540-786-4100 Edward L. Allen Douglas A. Barry

Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Walsh PC Prince William | 703-680-4664 John H. Foote

Ashcraft & Gerel LLP Alexandria | 703-931-5500 James F. Green Michelle A. Parfitt

Sands Anderson PC McLean | 703-893-3600 J. Jonathan Schraub

NATIVE AMERICAN LAW

Bartoli Cain Law Alexandria | 703-548-3577 Michele Bartoli Cain

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW - DEFENDANTS

MUNICIPAL LAW

Appleby Law PLLC Alexandria | 703-837-0001 Nancy J. Appleby Spirit Rock Consulting, LLC Alexandria 202-250-0477 Aurene Michele Martin

Jordan Coyne & Savits L.L.P. Fairfax | 703-246-0900 John O. Easton

Benjamin W. Glass, III & Associates PC Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-591-9829 Fairfax | 703-691-1235 Benjamin W. Glass III David J. Gogal Rees Broome, PC Vienna | 703-790-1911 Bruce E. Titus

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n o rth e r n v i rgi n i a

Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Walsh PC Prince William | 703-680-4664 John H. Foote Michael D. Lubeley

Sands Anderson PC McLean | 703-893-3600 J. Jonathan Schraub

Watt, Tieder, Hoffar & Fitzgerald, LLP McLean | 703-749-1000 Colin J. Smith

Wilson Elser Moskowitz Edelman & Dicker LLP McLean | 703-245-9300 Thomas L. Appler

REAL ESTATE LAW

Hunton & Williams LLP McLean | 703-714-7400 E. Peter Kane Francis A. McDermott

Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP Falls Church | 703-280-9260 Raymond J. Diaz

McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Carson Lee Fifer, Jr. Jonathan P. Rak

SECURITIES / CAPITAL MARKETS LAW

MercerTrigiani LLP Alexandria | 703-837-5000 David S. Mercer Lucia Anna Trigiani

Bean, Kinney & Korman, PC Arlington | 703-525-4000 Jonathan C. Kinney

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Jacob L. Lewis

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 David E. Feldman

Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 A. Hugo Blankingship, Jr.

Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP McLean | 703-770-7900 Steven L. Meltzer

Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP McLean | 703-770-7900 David L. Miller

Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Antonio J. Calabrese John G. Lavoie John H. Toole Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 Stuart Mendelsohn

SECURITIES REGULATION

Spartin Planning Alexandria | 703-740-4572 Anne K. Planning Debbie B. Spartin

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Jacob L. Lewis

Walsh Colucci Lubeley Emrich & Walsh PC Arlington | 703-528-4700 Martin D. Walsh

TAX LAW McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Ronald D. Aucutt

south/south w e ste r n v i rgi n i a

Administrative / Regulatory Law Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Gary C. Hancock

Magee Goldstein Lasky & Sayers, PC Roanoke | 540-343-9800 Andrew S. Goldstein A. Carter Magee, Jr. Roy V. Creasy Roanoke | 540-342-0729 Roy V. Creasy

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 D. Stan Barnhill

Steven L. Higgs Roanoke | 540-400-7990 Steven Higgs

Antitrust Law Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 William R. Rakes

The Law Office of Richard D. Scott Roanoke | 540-400-7997 Richard Scott Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Richard C. Maxwell

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Heman A. Marshall III

Appellate Practice

Bet-the-Company Litigation

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Monica T. Monday William R. Rakes

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 William R. Rakes

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 John D. Eure

LichtensteinFishwick PLC Roanoke | 540-343-9711 John P. Fishwick, Jr.

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Frank K. Friedman

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 William B. Poff

Banking and Finance Law

Biotechnology Law

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 G. Franklin Flippin G. Michael Pace, Jr. William R. Rakes

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Hugh B. Wellons

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Douglas W. Densmore James Chapman Hale Hugh B. Wellons

Corporate Law Daniel, Medley & Kirby, P.C. Danville | 434-792-3911 Robert Lee Yancey Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 G. Franklin Flippin G. Michael Pace, Jr. William R. Rakes Glenn, Feldmann, Darby & Goodlatte Roanoke | 540-224-8000 Harwell M. Darby, Jr.

LeClairRyan Blacksburg | 540-961-2600 Michael P. Drzal

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Douglas W. Densmore

Commercial Litigation

LeClairRyan Blacksburg | 540-961-2600 Michael P. Drzal

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law

Glenn, Feldmann, Darby & Goodlatte Roanoke | 540-224-8000 Paul G. Beers

H. Buswell Robert Jr. PLLC Blacksburg | 540-951-8320 Henry Buswell Roberts, Jr. Howard Beck, Jr. Roanoke | 540-777-2663 Howard J. Beck, Jr. John R. Patterson Roanoke | 540-342-5157 John R. Patterson LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 William E. Callahan, Jr. Michael E. Hastings Lori D. Thompson

S p e c i a l

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Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 David N. Cohan

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Lewis A. Conner Lewis A. Conner

Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 Paul M. Black

Giles & Lambert, P.C. Roanoke | 540-981-9000 Tracy Allen Giles Malissa Lambert-Giles

Copyright Law

Corporate Compliance Law

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Gregory J. Haley Kevin W. Holt William R. Rakes J. Scott Sexton

Daniel F. Layman, Jr. Roanoke | 540-491-9317 Daniel F. Layman, Jr.

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 K. Brett Marston Osterhoudt, Prillman, Natt, Helscher, Yost, Maxwell & Ferguson, PLC Roanoke | 540-989-0000 Charles H. Osterhoudt

Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 Paul M. Black

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 George J. A. Clemo H. Allen Glover, Jr.

Construction Law

Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 F. B. Webster Day

Guynn, Memmer & Dillon, P.C. Salem | 540-387-2320 Victor S. Skaff

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 George J. A. Clemo Nicholas C. Conte R. Neal Keesee, Jr. Talfourd H. Kemper, Sr. Alexander I. Saunders

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Bryan Grimes Creasy

Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Kevin P. Oddo

Barbour & Simpkins, LLP Dublin | 540-674-8556 Michael J. Barbour

LichtensteinFishwick PLC Roanoke | 540-343-9711 John P. Fishwick, Jr.

David J. Damico Roanoke | 540-343-0888 David J. Damico

Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 Douglas T. Stark

Ferris, Eakin & Thomas, P.C. Roanoke | 540-344-3233 Raphael E. Ferris

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 D. Stan Barnhill Francis H. Casola Nicholas C. Conte James W. Jennings, Jr. Mark D. Loftis William B. Poff

A d v e r t i s i n g

Robert F. Rider PLC Roanoke | 540-283-9895 Robert F. Rider William H. Cleaveland Roanoke | 540-591-5959 William H. Cleaveland

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 John S. Harper

Stites & Harbison, PLLC Alexandria | 703-739-4900 Marvin Petry

Holland & Knight, LLP McLean | 703-720-8600 Leigh-Alexandra Basha

Ritzert & Leyton, P.C. Fairfax | 703-934-2660 J. Carlton Howard, Jr.

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 David A. Lawrence James B. Pittleman

TRUSTS AND ESTATES

Kelly A. Thompson, PLC Arlington | 703-237-0027 Kelly A. Thompson

Vaughan, Fincher & Sotelo, PC Vienna | 703-506-1810 Patrick J. Vaughan

Law Offices of John L. Laster Falls Church | 703-538-3600 John L. Laster

William L. Babcock, Jr. PC Alexandria | 703-518-8400 William L. Babcock, Jr.

Manning & Murray, P.C. Arlington | 703-532-5400 A. Paul Lanzillotta Donald O. Manning William G. Murray

Yates Campbell & Hoeg LLP Fairfax | 703-273-4230 Thomas Campbell A. Everett Hoeg III Munford R. Yates, Jr. Thomas D. Yates

Ritzert & Leyton, P.C. Fairfax | 703-934-2660 J. Carlton Howard, Jr.

TECHNOLOGY LAW Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Adam Ruttenberg Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Thomas J. Knox

TRADEMARK LAW Birch, Stewart, Kolasch & Birch, LLP Falls Church | 703-205-8000 James M. Slattery Greenspun Shapiro Davis & Leary PC Fairfax | 703-352-0100 James F. Davis Nixon & Vanderhye P.C. Arlington | 703-816-4000 Robert W. Faris Mark E. Nusbaum Frank P. Presta

Baskin, Jackson & Duffett, P.C. Falls Church | 703-534-3610 John G. Jackson Blankingship & Keith, PC Fairfax | 703-691-1235 John A. C. Keith Boring & Pilger, P.C. Vienna | 703-281-2161 James L. Boring Charles E. Taylor, P.C. McLean | 703-506-1405 Charles E. Taylor Cochran & Owen, LLC Vienna | 703-847-4480 Deborah D. Cochran

McGuireWoods LLP McLean | 703-712-5000 Ronald D. Aucutt Gino Zaccardelli

Constantine L. Dimos Middleburg 540-687-3392 Constantine L. Dimos

Odin, Feldman & Pittleman P.C. Fairfax | 703-218-2100 David J. Brewer

Frederick J. Tansill & Associates, LLC McLean | 703-847-1359 Frederick J. Tansill Hale Carlson Baumgartner PLC Fairfax | 703-763-0374 John C. Hale

Criminal Defense: White-Collar

Employment Law - Management

Anderson & Friedman Roanoke | 540-982-1525 Anthony F. Anderson

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Paul G. Klockenbrink Todd Leeson W. David Paxton

Barbour & Simpkins, LLP Dublin | 540-674-8556 Michael J. Barbour David J. Damico Roanoke | 540-343-0888 David J. Damico Ferris, Eakin & Thomas, P.C. Roanoke | 540-344-3233 Raphael E. Ferris Gary L. Lumsden PLC Roanoke | 540-982-0566 Gary L. Lumsden Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Thomas J. Bondurant, Jr. LichtensteinFishwick PLC Roanoke | 540-343-9711 John P. Fishwick, Jr. John E. Lichtenstein Robert F. Rider PLC Roanoke | 540-283-9895 Robert F. Rider William H. Cleaveland Roanoke | 540-591-5959 William H. Cleaveland Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Paul R. Thomson, Jr.

Education Law Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Jonnie L. Speight

Elder Law Anderson, Desimone & Green, P.C. Roanoke | 540-776-6434 Ann McGee Green

Eminent Domain and Condemnation Law

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Clinton S. Morse LeClairRyan Blacksburg | 540-961-2600 James K. Cowan, Jr. Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 King F. Tower Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Thomas R. Bagby Victor O. Cardwell Agnis C. Chakravorty Bayard E. Harris Thomas M. Winn III

Family Law Gary L. Lumsden PLC Roanoke | 540-982-0566 Gary L. Lumsden Gravitt & Gravitt, P.C. Halifax | 434-476-6518 Carol B. Gravitt Mundy, Rogers & Associates, L.L.P. Roanoke | 540-982-2900 G. Marshall Mundy Frank W. Rogers III

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Ronald M. Ayers

Weaver Law Firm, P.C. Roanoke | 540-767-7611 David G. Weaver

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law

Family Law Mediation

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 David E. Perry Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 N. A. Ammar, Jr. Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Alton L. Knighton, Jr.

Employment Law - Individuals Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 W. David Paxton

Abrams Landau, Ltd. Herndon | 703-796-9555 Douglas K. W. Landau

Health Care Law

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 G. Michael Pace, Jr.

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Heman A. Marshall III Thomas T. Palmer

Immigration Law Magee Goldstein Lasky & Sayers, PC Roanoke | 540-343-9800 Kenneth J. Lasky Poarch Van Doren Salem | 540-387-1005 Jeffrey A. Van Doren

Cheryl Watson Smith, P.C. Roanoke | 540-265-9022 Cheryl Watson Smith

Financial Services Regulation Law Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 G. Franklin Flippin William R. Rakes LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Douglas W. Densmore Hugh B. Wellons Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 Paul M. Black

Government Relations Practice Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Gregory J. Haley

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 James F. Douthat

Leveraged Buyouts and Private Equity Law Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Bruce C. Stockburger

Litigation - Antitrust

Information Technology Law

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Francis H. Casola

LeClairRyan Blacksburg | 540-961-2600 Michael P. Drzal

Litigation - Banking & Finance

Insurance Law

Environmental Law

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Paul R. Thomson, Jr.

Morrison & Foerster LLP McLean | 703-760-7700 Thomas J. Knox

Rhonda J. MacDonald Vienna | 703-917-8777 Rhonda J. Macdonald

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Guy M. Harbert III

PennStuart Abingdon 276-628-5151 Timothy W. Gresham

Cooley LLP Reston | 703-456-8000 Michael Lincoln

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAW - CLAIMANTS

Frith, Anderson & Peake, PC Roanoke | 540-772-4600 Phillip V. Anderson

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Charles L. Williams, Jr.

VENTURE CAPITAL LAW

Reed Smith LLP Falls Church | 703-641-4200 James E. McNair

Energy Law H. Allen Glover, Jr.

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Gregory J. Haley

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 W. William Gust

McCandlish & Lillard, P.C. Fairfax | 703-273-2288 Peter A. Arntson

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 John D. Eure Kenneth J. Ries

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 William R. Rakes LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Kevin P. Oddo

Litigation - Bankruptcy H. Buswell Robert Jr. PLLC Blacksburg | 540-951-8320 Henry Buswell Roberts, Jr.

LeClairRyan McElroy, Hodges, Caldwell & Thiessen Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Abingdon William E. Callahan, Jr. 276-628-9515 Michael E. Hastings Howard C. McElroy Kevin P. Oddo Lori D. Thompson Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Roy V. Creasy Mark D. Loftis Roanoke | 540-342-0729 Roy V. Creasy Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 The Law Office of Richard D. Scott Christopher W. Stevens Roanoke | 540-400-7997 Richard Scott Woods Rogers PLC Danville | 434-797-8200 Woods Rogers PLC Anthony H. Monioudis Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Richard C. Maxwell

Ashcraft & Gerel LLP Alexandria | 703-931-5500 Craig A. Brown Lawrence J. Pascal Duncan & Hopkins Fairfax | 703-359-6555 John C. Duncan William S. Sands, Jr. The Law Office of James E. Swiger PLLC Centreville | 703-222-3800 James Swiger

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAW - EMPLOYERS Duncan & Hopkins Fairfax | 703-359-6555 John C. Duncan William S. Sands, Jr. McCandlish & Lillard, P.C. Fairfax | 703-273-2288 Benjamin J. Trichilo Siciliano, Ellis, Dyer & Boccarosse PLC Fairfax | 703-385-6692 Susan A. Evans

Litigation - Labor & Employment Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Paul G. Klockenbrink Todd Leeson W. David Paxton Glenn, Feldmann, Darby & Goodlatte Roanoke | 540-224-8000 Paul G. Beers Grimes & Williams, P.C. Roanoke | 540-982-3711 Terry N. Grimes Poarch Van Doren Salem | 540-387-1005 Jeffrey A. Van Doren Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Thomas R. Bagby Agnis C. Chakravorty Bayard E. Harris William B. Poff Thomas M. Winn III

Litigation - Land Use & Zoning Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Gregory J. Haley G. Michael Pace, Jr.

Litigation - Mergers & Acquisitions Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 William R. Rakes

Litigation - Municipal Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Wilburn C. Dibling, Jr. Gregory J. Haley Kathleen L. Wright

Litigation - Real Estate

International Trade and Finance Law

Litigation - Construction

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 G. Michael Pace, Jr.

LeClairRyan Blacksburg | 540-961-2600 Michael P. Drzal

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 K. Brett Marston

Glenn, Feldmann, Darby & Goodlatte Roanoke | 540-224-8000 Maryellen F. Goodlatte

Labor Law - Management

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Robert S. Ballou

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Bryan Grimes Creasy

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 D. Stan Barnhill

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Francis H. Casola

Litigation Environmental

Mediation

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 W. David Paxton LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Clinton S. Morse Poarch Van Doren Salem | 540-387-1005 Jeffrey A. Van Doren Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 King F. Tower Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Thomas R. Bagby Victor O. Cardwell Agnis C. Chakravorty Bayard E. Harris Daniel C. Summerlin III Thomas M. Winn III

Land Use & Zoning Law Daniel F. Layman, Jr. Roanoke | 540-491-9317 Daniel F. Layman, Jr.

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Charles L. Williams, Jr. Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Paul R. Thomson, Jr.

Litigation - First Amendment Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 D. Stan Barnhill

Litigation - Intellectual Property

Leisa K. Ciaffone Salem | 540-444-0001 Leisa Kube Ciaffone

Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants Frith, Anderson & Peake, PC Roanoke | 540-772-4600 Walter H. Peake III Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Robert J. Ingram, Sr. LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 John T. Jessee Powell M. Leitch III

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Francis H. Casola

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Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Elizabeth Perrow

Medical Malpractice Law - Plaintiffs Frith & Ellerman, PC Roanoke | 540-985-0098 T. Daniel Frith III Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Robert J. Ingram, Sr.

Natural Resources Law PennStuart Abingdon 276-628-5151 Stephen Hodges

Oil & Gas Law Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 J. Scott Sexton

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 John T. Jessee Mundy, Rogers & Associates, L.L.P. Roanoke | 540-982-2900 Frank W. Rogers III Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 James W. Jennings, Jr. William B. Poff

Patent Law

WootenHart PLC Roanoke | 540-343-2451 John L. Cooley David B. Hart

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 David N. Cohan

Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs

Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants

Brown & Jennings, PLC Roanoke | 540-444-4010 P. Brent Brown

Clement & Wheatley, P.C. Danville | 434-793-8200 Glenn W. Pulley

Cranwell, Moore & Emick, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-904-1621 C. Richard Cranwell

Mergers & Acquisitions Law

Daniel, Medley & Kirby, P.C. Danville | 434-792-3911 James A. L. Daniel

Frith & Ellerman, PC Roanoke | 540-985-0098 T. Daniel Frith III

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 G. Franklin Flippin

Frith & Ellerman, PC Roanoke | 540-985-0098 T. Daniel Frith III

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 S. D. Roberts Moore

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Douglas W. Densmore James Chapman Hale

Frith, Anderson & Peake, PC Roanoke | 540-772-4600 Phillip V. Anderson Walter H. Peake III

Mining Law

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 J. Rudy Austin S. D. Roberts Moore

Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Gary C. Hancock Robert J. Ingram, Sr.

LichtensteinFishwick PLC Roanoke | 540-343-9711 John E. Lichtenstein The Krasnow Law Firm Roanoke | 540-982-7654 Jeffrey H. Krasnow The Tate Law Firm Abingdon 276-628-5185 Mary Lynn Tate

PennStuart Abingdon 276-628-5151 Timothy W. Gresham Stephen Hodges Wade W. Massie

Municipal Law Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Wilburn C. Dibling, Jr.

Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Gary C. Hancock Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Robert J. Ingram, Sr. Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Ronald M. Ayers David B. Carson Joseph A. Matthews, Jr. William P. Wallace, Jr.

sh e n a n doa h va lle y

Antitrust Law Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Gregory T. St. Ours

Arbitration Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 M. Bruce Wallinger

Bankruptcy and Creditor Debtor Rights / Insolvency and Reorganization Law Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 Dale A. Davenport Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 William E. Shmidheiser III

Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 Colin J. S. Thomas, Jr. Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Thomas E. Ullrich

Commercial Transactions / UCC Law Litten & Sipe, LLP Harrisonburg 540-434-5353 Donald Litten

Corporate Governance Law Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Lynn Suter

Corporate Law

Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Staunton 540-885-0199 Stephan W. Milo

Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Jeffrey G. Lenhart

Collaborative Law: Family Law

Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Donald E. Showalter

Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 Lawrence H. Hoover, Jr.

Commercial Litigation Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 M. Bruce Wallinger Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Mark D. Obenshain Litten & Sipe, LLP Harrisonburg 540-434-5353 J. Jay Litten

Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Lexington 540-463-3691 George H. Roberts, Jr.

Criminal Defense: Non-White-Collar A. Gene Hart, Jr., P.C. Harrisonburg 540-434-9595 A. Gene Hart, Jr.

Education Law BotkinRose PLC Harrisonburg 540-437-0019 Douglas L. Guynn

LichtensteinFishwick PLC Roanoke | 540-343-9711 John E. Lichtenstein Mundy, Rogers & Associates, L.L.P. Roanoke | 540-982-2900 G. Marshall Mundy Robert F. Rider PLC Roanoke | 540-283-9895 Robert F. Rider Stone & Kellerman Christiansburg | 540-381-9082 Edwin C. Stone The Tate Law Firm Abingdon 276-628-5185 Mary Lynn Tate

Young, Haskins, Mann, Gregory, McGarry & Wall, P.C. Martinsville 276-638-2367 Robert W. Mann

Product Liability Litigation Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Matthew W. Broughton

Project Finance Law Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 George J. A. Clemo Alton L. Knighton, Jr.

Public Finance Law Glenn, Feldmann, Darby & Goodlatte Roanoke | 540-224-8000 Harwell M. Darby, Jr.

Product Liability Litigation - Defendants

Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 F. B. Webster Day

Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Robert J. Ingram, Sr.

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 George J. A. Clemo Alton L. Knighton, Jr.

PennStuart Abingdon 276-628-5151 Wade W. Massie

Railroad Law

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 James W. Jennings, Jr. Mark D. Loftis William B. Poff

Product Liability Litigation - Plaintiffs Brown & Jennings, PLC Roanoke | 540-444-4010 P. Brent Brown Gilmer, Sadler, Ingram, Sutherland & Hutton Pulaski | 540-980-1360 Robert J. Ingram, Sr.

Professional Malpractice Law - Defendants Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 D. Stan Barnhill WootenHart PLC Roanoke | 540-343-2451 David B. Hart

Daniel F. Layman, Jr. Roanoke | 540-491-9317 Daniel F. Layman, Jr. Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 G. Michael Pace, Jr. Clark H. Worthy

Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 M. Bruce Wallinger Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Thomas E. Ullrich

Employment Law - Management Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 M. Bruce Wallinger Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Cathleen P. Welsh Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Thomas E. Ullrich

Family Law Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 David A. Penrod Law Offices of Franklin R. Blatt Harrisonburg 540-433-0202 Franklin R. Blatt Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 P. Donald Moses

Labor Law - Management Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Thomas E. Ullrich

Labor Law - Union Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Thomas E. Ullrich

Litigation - Bankruptcy Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 Dale A. Davenport Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 William E. Shmidheiser III

Litigation - Labor & Employment Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Cathleen P. Welsh Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Thomas E. Ullrich

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 George J. A. Clemo

Coleman & Massey, P.C. Roanoke | 540-343-5100 Nan Lou Coleman James B. Massey III

Tax Law

Deneka Law Firm P.C. Roanoke | 540-725-5800 H. Michael Deneka

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Jonnie L. Speight

Ferris, Eakin & Thomas, P.C. Roanoke | 540-344-3233 Lenden A. Eakin

The Law Office of Linda D. Slough Roanoke | 540-344-3233 Linda D. Slough

Technology Law LeClairRyan Blacksburg | 540-961-2600 Michael P. Drzal

Hart & Hart Attorneys, LTD Salem | 540-375-3281 Ross C. Hart

Timber Law

Osterhoudt, Prillman, Natt, Helscher, Yost, Maxwell & Ferguson, PLC Roanoke | 540-989-0000 David C. Helscher

Litigation - Real Estate Paul J. Neal, Jr., Attorney at Law Woodstock 540-459-4041 Paul J. Neal, Jr.

Mediation Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 M. Bruce Wallinger

Medical Malpractice Law - Defendants Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 C. J. Steuart Thomas III Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Charles F. Hilton Marshall H. Ross

Personal Injury Litigation - Defendants Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 Thomas G. Bell, Jr. P. Donald Moses J. Ross Newell III C. J. Steuart Thomas III Colin J. S. Thomas, Jr. Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Daniel L. Fitch Charles F. Hilton

Personal Injury Litigation - Plaintiffs Hoover Penrod PLC Harrisonburg 540-433-2444 David A. Penrod

Workers’ Compensation Law - Claimants

Bersch Law Firm, P.C. Roanoke | 540-774-0044 Robert S. Bersch

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Mark D. Loftis

Martin, Hopkins & Lemon Roanoke | 540-982-1000 Stephen W. Lemon

Trusts and Estates

Frankl Miller & Webb, L.L.P. Roanoke | 540-527-3500 Thomas Harlan Miller

Securitization and Structured Finance Law

Glenn, Feldmann, Darby & Goodlatte Roanoke | 540-224-8000 Maryellen F. Goodlatte

Litten & Sipe, LLP Harrisonburg 540-434-5353 J. Jay Litten

Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 Thomas G. Bell, Jr. Colin J. S. Thomas, Jr.

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Hugh B. Wellons

Real Estate Law

Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Jeffrey G. Lenhart

Employment Law - Individuals

Workers’ Compensation Law

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Neil V. Birkhoff Alexander I. Saunders

Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 G. Rodney Young II

Litten & Sipe, LLP Harrisonburg 540-434-5353 J. Jay Litten

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Bradley W. Fitzgerald Matthew P. Pritts

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 David E. Perry

Litigation - Municipal

Insurance Law

Transportation Law

Securities / Capital Markets Law

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 James W. Jennings, Jr.

Health Care Law

Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Jennifer E. Shirkey

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Paul R. Thomson, Jr.

Johnson, Ayers & Matthews, P.L.C. Roanoke | 540-767-2000 Bryan Grimes Creasy

Education Law

Employee Benefits (ERISA) Law

LeClairRyan Roanoke | 540-510-3000 Tara A. Branscom

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 W. William Gust Bruce C. Stockburger

Whitlow & Youell PLC Roanoke | 540-904-7830 C. Cooper Youell IV

Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Glenn M. Hodge

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Claude D. Carter Talfourd H. Kemper, Sr. Michael K. Smeltzer

Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Paul R. Thomson, Jr.

Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 Bruce C. Stockburger Plunkett & Oehlschlaeger PLC Roanoke | 540-345-8837 Deborah A. Oehlschlaeger Spilman Thomas & Battle, PLLC Roanoke | 540-512-1800 N. A. Ammar, Jr. Olin R. Melchionna, Jr. Woods Rogers PLC Roanoke | 540-983-7600 Neil V. Birkhoff Talfourd H. Kemper, Sr. J. Lee E. Osborne Alexander I. Saunders

Venture Capital Law

Ferris, Eakin & Thomas, P.C. Roanoke | 540-344-3233 Richard M. Thomas Gary L. Lumsden PLC Roanoke | 540-982-0566 Gary L. Lumsden

Workers’ Compensation Law - Employers Daniel, Medley & Kirby, P.C. Danville | 434-792-3911 James A. L. Daniel Frith, Anderson & Peake, PC Roanoke | 540-772-4600 Linda D. Frith Lucas & Kite PLC Roanoke | 540-767-2468 Christopher M. Kite Richard D. Lucas PennStuart Abingdon 276-628-5151 Ramesh Murthy

LeClairRyan Blacksburg | 540-961-2600 Michael P. Drzal

Trademark Law Gentry Locke Rakes & Moore, LLP Roanoke | 540-983-9300 David N. Cohan

Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 Colin J. S. Thomas, Jr. William H. Helsley, P.C. Harrisonburg 540-434-3163 William H. Helsley

Product Liability Litigation - Defendants Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 Colin J. S. Thomas, Jr.

Professional Malpractice Law - Defendants

Water Law PennStuart Abingdon 276-628-5151 Wade W. Massie

Trusts and Estates Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 John Flora Litten & Sipe, LLP Harrisonburg 540-434-5353 Stephen T. Heitz Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Donald E. Showalter

Workers’ Compensation Law - Claimants

Parthemos & Bryant, P.C. Winchester 540-931-0034 Nikolas E. Parthemos

Workers’ Compensation Law - Employers Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Cathleen P. Welsh Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 Thomas G. Bell, Jr.

A. Thomas Lane, Jr. PC Harrisonburg 540-434-7666 A. Thomas Lane, Jr.

Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Charles F. Hilton Marshall H. Ross

Public Finance Law

These lists are excerpted from The Best Lawyers in America® 2012,

BotkinRose PLC Harrisonburg 540-437-0019 Carolyn Madden Perry

ties, in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Best Lawyers

which includes listings for more than 43,000 lawyers in 124 specialin America® is published by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, South Carolina and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call 803-648-0300; write 237 Park Ave, SW, First Floor, Aiken,

Real Estate Law Paul J. Neal, Jr., Attorney at Law Woodstock 540-459-4041 Paul J. Neal, Jr. Timberlake, Smith, Thomas & Moses, P.C. Staunton 540-885-1517 John W. Sills III Wharton, Aldhizer & Weaver, PLC Harrisonburg 540-434-0316 Glenn M. Hodge

SC 29801; email info@bestlawyers.com; or visit www.bestlawyers. com. Online subscriptions to Best Lawyers® databases are available at www.bestlawyers.com Woodward/White Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of August 1, 2011, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney.

Tax Law Lenhart Obenshain PC Harrisonburg 540-437-3100 Jeffrey G. Lenhart

Copyright 2011 by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, SC. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of Woodward/White, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “The Best Lawyers in America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.

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By

y Mar uss Burr

Let them eat… A locavore hunter serves up a solution to the growing problem of eradicating invasive species.

I

am grateful to be wearing tall rubber boots as I step into the chilly water of the stream just below Totier Creek Reservoir near Scottsville on a cool but sunny late October afternoon. I am “fishing” with Jackson Landers, a leader in the national locavore movement and author of The Beginner’s Guide to Hunting Deer for Food. We are looking for something that should be safely contained in an aquarium rather than in this creek—Chinese mystery snails. “Usually, there are just dozens of them lying on the creek bottom,” says Landers. Today the water is cool, and the snails have retreated under rocks. But, in less than 10 minutes of sliding our hands beneath slabs of shale, we have harvested roughly three dozen of this alien breed but none of the native snail species that were plentiful in this creek just a year ago. Dumped into rivers and streams by unsuspecting citizens who are tired of keeping the creatures in their home aquariums, Chinese mystery snails quickly multiply and dominate local snail populations. “I can mark off an area of one square foot in the creeks where I’ve found them, and I can pull up maybe half a pound of snails,” says Landers. “They have the potential to completely displace native snail populations.” Landers explains that this alien is bigger and hardier than native snails. Unlike native species, the Chinese mystery snail can enclose itself completely in its shell, thereby protecting it from predators and making it highly tolerant to drought and toxins; when the going gets tough, it simply closes the door and waits it out. Additionally, they give birth to live snails; native snails lay eggs, which are more susceptible to consumption by predators. It is no mystery that non-native species (like Chinese mystery snails) that out-compete or displace native species can wreak havoc on Virginia’s ecosystems, but in the bigger picture, alien flora and fauna invaders also have the potential to cause serious problems for the economy. Invasives cost taxpayers over $1 billion annually in Virginia alone, says David Pimantel, an ecological econo-

snails?

mist at Cornell University, and in excess of $120 billion nationally. According to the Virginia Invasive Species Working Group, an organization created by the Virginia General Assembly to coordinate state agency action regarding invasives, invasive species are defined as non-native plants, animals and pathogens that cause or are likely to cause ecological disruption, economic losses or harm to humans. Some of these invasive species are media superstars—what experts call “charismatic megafauna [or flora].” Says Kevin Heffernan, a natural heritage stewardship biologist at the Virginia Department of Conservation and Rec-

reation: “They are usually ugly, have big teeth or can hurt people in some way.” Examples of these charismatic species include the Northern snakehead fish, a rather long-faced, sharp-toothed fish from China that can grow up to four feet long, and imported fire ants—aggressive ants that arrived from South America in ship ballasts in the 1930s— that deliver a wicked sting. Other species are lesser known to the general public, like the emerald ash borer—a small, bright green, wood-boring beetle from Asia—or Japanese stilt grass, which was used for shipping breakables from Asia and grows well in moist, low-light conditions. Many of these non-native “exotics”—like forest-eating

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kudzu and charming, but pesky, pigeons—were brought here for decorative purposes. Several began as pets like the mute swan, a beautiful white native of Eurasia, which is highly destructive to native aquatic plants and animals. Others, like the Sirex woodwasp, the African tiger mosquito and the zebra mussel, sneak in via ship ballasts or in imported products like wood or foodstuffs. However they arrive, and regardless of their level of fame, they tend to thrive in their new environment (because they have few preda-

animals such as native birds, fish and crabs can no longer survive in the area.” With such a serious toll on Virginia’s economic and ecological health, eradicating nuisance invasives of all kinds should be an easy sell. But experts like Heffernan say it can be difficult to get organizations and individuals on board with eradication. He explains that until an invasive takes over an ecosystem and has a serious negative impact on native plants and animals, many groups balk. “Many invasives were brought here

formed. Its first task: to generate awareness. The VIS promotes prevention as the most effective strategy against the spread of invasives followed by early detection and quick action. “This is the most cost effective process one can have; move fast and treat it while it is in small numbers, as opposed to waiting until it is widespread. Eradication is then very hard or impossible and very expensive,” says Douglas W. Domenech, chairman of the VIS and Virginia Secretary of Natural Resources. Citizens should report sightings of dangerous and potentially dangerous species (go to VaInvasiveSpecies.org to find out how). From there, VIS can coordinate efforts of federal, state and private organizations “to attack from land, air and sea,” and minimize damage and spreading, according to Heffernan. Working together, he says, concerned groups can be very effective in eliminating invasive populations before they become a huge problem. One such problem—zebra mussels—may sound harmless, but these prolific, striped shellfish will form colonies as dense as 1 million per square yard and cover boats, docks, pipes, grasses and stationary-shelled water creatures such as clams and other mussels. These pesky mollusks clog intake pipes and litter beaches along the Great Lakes with discarded shells. In 2003, zebra mussels were discovered in a quarry pond in northern Virginia, having arrived on the hull of a pleasure fishing boat. Though they were ultimately contained, it took four years of collaborative work headed by the VDGIF to eradicate them—a success due to early warning and quick action. Sadly, this case appears to be the exception. As I look at the multitudes of Chinese mystery snail shells washed up on the shore of hydrillapacked (another invasive) Belmont Bay in Lorton— while on a fishing expedition for Northern snakehead with Landers—I recall Heffernan’s warning; “Funding is inadequate for the size of the problem.” Indeed, the Chinese mystery snail is not yet recognized by officials as a danger, but it clearly is one already. In an effort to face the magnitude of the problem and the limits of public programs, some citizens like Landers have suggested an environmentally safe and economically sound way of dealing with the issue of invasives: Eat them. And a new classification is born: the invasivore.

“Basically, it’s food in your backyard and as cruelty free as it gets without massaging the animal to death.” tors or are just well suited to the habitat) and threaten native ecosystems, thereby requiring public-private initiatives to manage them. A good example is phragmites, a picturesque wetland grass (also known as the common reed) that can reach 15 feet in height and features a feathery plume. According to Heffernan, in the 40 years since being introduced to the Back Bay area of Sandbridge, phragmites have taken over as much as 60 percent of the marsh habitat. In terms of natural plant migration, 40 years equals less than a nanosecond in a process which usually takes hundreds of years. Because of the thickness of their root base, phragmites block light from sprouting plants and emit a type of herbicide to ensure its domination. “It totally transforms the habitat,” warns Heffernan. “Without the natural plants,

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because they are beautiful, like honeysuckle; it’s so fragrant, such a beautiful flower. It’s vibrant and easy to grow,” he says. “It’s hard to show a picture of them and say, ‘This is an invasive alien species we must destroy!’ when our natural biophilia is to think, ‘It’s pretty.’” Despite this, several government organizations like the Department of Forestry, the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, and the Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VDGIF) have taken up arms against alien invasives along with private organizations like the Nature Conservancy and neighborhood groups. To ensure success in the battle, the General Assembly passed legislation in 2003 directing a coordination of efforts. As a result, the Virginia Invasive Species Working Group (VIS) was

Neologism aside, invasivores are “those who eat non-native (invasive) species,” according to a January 1, 2011 post of Schott’s Vocab on NYTimes. com. The invasivore movement is alive and well in Virginia and spearheaded (no pun intended) by Landers and Jace Goodling, owner of Afton-based Goat Busters, a service that hires out goats to clear weed or invasive-infested land. Landers and Goodling believe that invasives make good eatin’ for both people and goats. “Basically, it’s food in your backyard and as cruelty free as it gets without massaging the animal to death,” says Landers. In terms of eating invasives, goats are great at gobbling up a variety of bothersome plants, including some on the Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation’s (DCR) list of

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highly invasive alien plants. “Multiflora rose, ligustrum [privet], all honeysuckle varieties, kudzu, and autumn olive are goat candy,” says Goodling. Goats are perfect for clearing brush and weeds because they defoliate leaves, which inhibits the process of photosynthesis necessary for the plants’ survival. And they are fast! “Generally speaking, my 40-60 goat mob can clear an acre in two to four days, depending on the type and thickness of flora present,” says Goodling. In regards to efficiency, Goodling muses, “A swarm of locusts or a mob of goats, it’s all the same to a patch of brush after 24 to 48 hours...both provide the same scalding effect.” Although Virginia has yet to instigate a state-sponsored goat brigade to help control pest plants, programs in other states like California have been quite successful. (The natural organic fertilizer they provide is a bonus.) But goats aren’t the only invasivores. In his second book, Eating Aliens, which will publish later this spring, Landers describes his adventures traveling around the country hunting and eating various alien invasive species. “It’s another way that hunting can be ecologically and socially good in a way that people wouldn’t expect,” Landers explains. On his quest to educate the public on the benefits of eating invasives, Landers has chowed down on such critters as iguana, lionfish, feral pigs and nutria. But research does have its interesting moments. Last summer while Landers was on the Gulf coast of Florida casting for invasive freshwater fish, he caught a nice plecostomus (an aquarium favorite that has become established in parts of Florida due to aquarium dumping). After gutting the fish, Landers rinsed them in the bathroom sink. A moment later, one of the gutted fish miraculously came back to life, slipping out of his hands and flopping all over the floor. “Bright crimson splatters of blood sprayed the walls, floor and shower curtain in perfect horror movie style. Taken by surprise, I tried to pounce on the flopping fish. I found myself yelling angrily at it, ‘You’re dead! You’re dead! Give up already!’” says Landers. Back in the stream beneath the Totier Reservoir, Landers expresses his concern for the balance of our state’s ecosystems. Landers fears that without some sort of official control policy in place, Chinese mystery snails will get into the James River causing an environmental catastrophe. They are not yet in the James River (although Totier Creek is only a quarter mile away), but they are in the Potomac and have been since 1960 according to Paul Fofonoff, research biologist at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater, Maryland. Oddly enough, this snail has not been formally studied. Fofonoff says, “Catfish and other fish like to eat them and it is hard to know what their effect is on native snails. The danger is unknown at this point.” Landers suggests that people catch the Chinese mystery snails and eat them until the state can formulate education and/or eradication programs. “There are so many of them and they are so easy to catch. You can scoop them up and in ten minutes have enough for dinner for three,” he tells me as we navigate our way back across the creek. With enough garlic, olive oil, salt and fresh pepper, he might be right. •

Invasivore Jackson Landers enjoying Chinese mystery snails prepared by Chef Brian Helleberg of Fleurie Restaurant in Charlottesville.

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was so intrigued by the thought of tasting Chinese mystery snails that I contacted restaurateur Brian Helleberg, owner of Fleurie and Petit Pois in Charlottesville, to host a tasting of the pesky mollusk. Helleberg, who is an outstanding chef (and really good sport), loves the idea of eating these snails to eradicate them from local waters, so he collaborated with his staff to create what turned out to be two delectable snail dishes. After collecting the snails, Helleberg kept them in a bucket of clean water for 10 days with a few leaves of lettuce for them to eat to purge them of dirt and impurities. Once purged, Helleberg removed the trap door (operculum) from the shell, and the snail, shell and all, were flash-boiled in a court bouillon—a stock broth of white wine, celery, carrots, onion, garlic, thyme and bay leaf. They were then removed from the shell and trimmed to the foot (the part used for eating). “These snails look very different from the escargots we normally have imported from France,” notes Helleberg. Indeed. Cooked and trimmed, they resembled rather pasty-looking blobs of old chewing gum, but I had faith in Helleberg’s ability to make them taste fabulous. Helleberg created a special dish for the occasion: Escargots Fleurie, which is snails en crut with Armanac, tomato, Jerusalem artichoke puree, almonds and celery leaf. Helleberg also brought in Chef Brian Jones of Petit Pois to prepare a tradtional French-style Escargot with garlic and parsley butter. Both dishes were beautiful and delicious. The Chinese mystery snails have a mild flavor and an inherent rubbery quality. (They are snails, after all.) But, as Landers points out, “They don’t have to have a good texture; they are pure protein.” The best part? Says Landers, “They taste pretty good.”

Escargot confit with armanac, tomato and almond, with a sunchokE PurEE and Puff Pastry Chef Brian helleBerg fleurie restaurant, Charlottesville FleurieRestaurant.com ServeS 8

nails: S 4 dozen Chinese mystery snails 2 cloves garlic, chopped fine 1 shallot, diced 2 tablespoons tomato paste 1 cup armanac 2 tablespoons butter 1/2 cup sliced almonds 1/2 cup vegetable oil about 1 cup vegetable stock rinse snails under cold running water. in a medium pan, melt the butter and sauté the shallot for one minute, stirring so that it doesn’t color. add the garlic and continue stirring until tender. add the tomato paste and lightly “toast” in pan to develop flavor. add the armanac, almonds, oil and snails, and cover loosely with lid or parchment paper. Bake for 4 hours at 300 degrees. remove lid periodically and baste with vegetable stock to insure there are no burnt edges. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Jerusalem Artichoke Puree: 1 pound Jerusalem artichokes 1 shallot 1/2 cup dry white wine 2 cups cream 1 sprig thyme Peel and thinly slice the Jerusalem artichokes. Set aside. Dice the shallots and place them in a 2-quart saucepan. add the white wine and thyme. Drain the artichokes and transfer to the pan with the shallots, thyme, wine and cream. Cover the pan with a parchment paper lid and simmer until tender (about 1 hour). remove the thyme and strain the mixture when cool, reserving the liquid. Puree the solids in a blender until very smooth. Season with salt to taste. Puff Pastry: Cut 1-inch diameter rounds of the puff pastry and set in refrigerator to rest for at least one hour. Brush with egg wash and bake at 400 degrees for 12 minutes or until golden brown. Top with escargots. garnish with confit tomato and celery leaves.

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Reading the Water Clarke C. Jones travels to the picturesque Rose River

and meets some long-time anglers who show him why fly fishing isn’t just about catching fish.

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On a warm, late September morning, I headed up the scenic Old Blue Ridge Turnpike, passing through the little hamlets of Banco and Criglersville on my way to Rose River Farm, a private fly fishing destination near Syria in Madison County. Rose River Farm is owned by Douglas Dear, 46, a retired commercial mortgage banker through whose property runs a portion of the Rose River, one of the prettiest trout streams in Virginia. I was meeting Dear and three other fishing partners from Richmond who have among them over 100 years of fly-fishing experience. I knew that for the fly fisherman, especially my companions who fish for trout, fishing is not just about catching fish. I had come to find out why. After I turned left off Route 670 to cross a single-lane bridge over the river which leads to the farm, I stopped on the bridge and looked down at the rushing waters and had to grin. The Rose looked and sounded just as I imagined the perfect trout stream should. With its small, cascading waterfalls and its quiet pools—holding what I hoped would be an abundance of large rainbow trout—I could see why people who had been here before me smiled wistfully when I told them where I was headed. Waiting for me on the banks of the Rose were Dear and the farm’s fishing guide, Gary Burwell, along with my fishing partners—Ken Eastwood, Andy Cox and Billy Pearsall. They had been lured by the prospect of catching some of the stream’s beautiful large rainbows, though Dear’s portion of the Rose is a “catch and release” stream, so any fish we caught would be going back into the water. Having assembled rods and reels and put on fishing boots, chest waders and fly-fishing vests, we were eager to start fishing. Rather than using live bait to attract the trout, fly fishermen use artificial flies that have been painstakingly hand-crafted to resemble insects and other natural food sources. The challenge is not just to read the water for clues to the trout’s whereabouts, but also to carefully select the fly that most resembles what the fish are eating that day.

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Billy Pearsall fishing on the Rose River. above: Limited entry and exit points to and from the river protect the steep banks from erosion.

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“When I got to the Rose this morning, I observed mayfly nymphs under the rocks in the river,” said Eastwood, who is currently president of the Fly Fishers of Virginia, a 30 year-old Richmond-based nonprofit organization that promotes fly fishing. Eastwood had decided to fish with a fly that replicates the nymphal stage of the mayfly—a #18 Hare’s Ear Nymph, a relatively small fly made of chopped fur or synthetic material wrapped around the shank of the hook. “It’s the ‘buggy’ looking phase of the mayfly,” Eastwood explained. Mayflies or caddisflies rising from the water may have only 24 hours of life. In that time they mate, lay their eggs and die. “Not only is a hatch coming off the water a beautiful thing to see,” observed Pearsall, a past president of the Fly Fishers of Virginia, “watching it causes you to reflect a little on what is really important in your life.” While many fly fishermen enjoy the camaraderie of fellow fishermen, one of the great contradictions of trout fishing is that when everyone takes to the water, quite often they seek their own space—out of sight of their fishing buddies. Eastwood moved to a spot the farthest upstream, where the water narrows a bit and the growth along the bank makes casting a little more challenging. While I would have snagged a branch or limb on every back cast, I watched as he expertly put the fly just about anywhere he wanted it to go. Cox ventured downstream to where the river became wider and deeper to fish two shaded pools. Even further downstream, Pearsall was stripping his line—retrieving the line by pulling it in through his fingers as opposed to winding it in on the reel—and sending it upstream, making sure to keep the line tight in case a fish should strike. Fly fishermen, he told me, normally try to fish upstream because the silt they disturb under their feet will float downstream. Instinctively, the fish can tell when something other than clear water is coming towards them, and even the slightest change in their environment might make them move elsewhere. Plus, as Burwell told me, trout, like any natural predator, are

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clockwise from right:

Douglas Dear; Rose River Farm in Syria; Andy Cox prepares his fly rod; trout feed on bugs that float downstream; Ken Eastwood, Dear, Gary Burwell and Cox.

opportunists and “typically sit on the current seams where the faster water joins the slower moving water. This allows the fish to feed on bugs floating downstream without exerting too much energy to stay in place.” It wasn’t long before Pearsall had a strike. He missed it, and then the fish struck again. Pearsall’s rod hand snapped skyward keeping tension on the line as the fish shot to the far bank trying to find a way to dislodge the hook—which it did—and then headed downstream. Pearsall, with a somewhat resigned look on his face, merely examined the fly, saw that it was still in good shape and sent it out again. Moments later he had another strike from a fish that looked bigger than the one that got away. As Pearsall brought the fish to him, he switched the rod into his other hand and reached back to unclip the landing net attached to the back of his fishing vest. Seeing the net coming towards him, the fish seemed to find some extra energy and tried to make an escape. But Pearsall had done this many times before and neatly slid the net under the fish. Then, tucking the rod under his arm to hold it, and keeping the fish in the water and the net at the same time, he reached in his vest, pulled out a pair of forceps and gently removed the hook. One of the things that impresses me most about fly fishermen who have a catch and release mindset is how much concern they have over the creature they have just caught. As Pearsall released the hook from the fish, he tilted the net forward and watched the fish swim away. If the fish could not have swum off on its own power, Pearsall would have gently moved the fish back and forth, making sure water was flowing through its gills until it could. That is one of the paradoxes of fly fishing. A fly fisherman or woman will spend hours perfecting different types of casts, then attach a fly that they spent many more hours learning to make while hunched over a small vise, trying to replicate a small insect often no bigger than an ant, using feathers, glue, string, glitter and/or animal fur. He hopes he has imitated the insect well enough so when he presents it to the fish, that particular fish is eating

that particular bug on that particular day and will accept the hand-crafted bug over the real thing. If that is not enough, the trout fisher ties a tiny fly to a hair-thin line, which might break if too much pressure is exerted on it. The fisherman may drive hours to a trout stream he has waited weeks to visit and then hope against hope that some other fly fisher is not standing right where he wants to fish. If there is any wind, it could be blowing in the wrong direction, making casting a fly, which weighs no more than a turkey feather, extremely difficult. Ever try to throw a turkey feather 60 feet? He will do this all day, only stopping to change to a different fly pattern, thinking that the new pattern is the right one. Just as he is ready to give it all up, he catches a 9-inch trout. He brings the trout to the net, admires it for a few moments and then releases it. On his trip home, he will think it has been a fine day. “Trout fishing, to me, is not about the number of fish caught. It is about being on the water, hearing it, seeing it and seeing all the things that come with it,” said Pearsall. “With everything there is to enjoy about the day, catching a fish is just icing on the cake.” Later that night, we built a fire in the fire pit on the terrace of one of the two modern cabins at Rose River Farm (which is conveniently equipped with a fly-tying table and vise). As we sat watching the fire warm the darkness, we talked about what all fly fishermen talk about: fly fishing. “I think,” Cox remarked as we all took in the relaxing night, “that people make the mistake of making fly fishing too precious. They go out and buy the most expensive rod-and-reel set and think that will make them a better fly fisher. A fish doesn’t know if you are using a $100 rod-and-reel set or a $1,000 set.” Sounded like smart thinking to me. I mentioned to the group that, for my next fly fishing trip, I wanted to find a place where I could catch brook trout, Virginia’s only true native trout. Technically, brook trout are not really trout but char; but if Virginians want to pronounce Staunton as Stand-ton, we can darn well call a char a trout. Virginia’s brook trout are normally found in V i r g i n i a

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clockwise from top left: Cox’s handmade flies; Eastwood; bird’s-eye view of the Rose River; Burwell watches as Cox casts his line.

Learning to Fly Ready to be reeled in by fly fishing? The following list of resources should help you cast off and find everything you need to get started: Fly Fishers of Virginia Organization established in 1982 to promote the art of fly fishing, foster good sportsmanship and promote conservation of the nation’s natural resources. The group also organizes trips, dinners and lessons. FlyFishersOfVirginia.org Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries The state agency’s Trout Fishing Guide includes information about permit and license requirements, as well as seasons and fishing limits. DGIF.Virginia.gov/ Fishing/Trout Virginia on the Fly This website provides a directory of Virginia’s best read and most useful fly fishing blogs and other online resources. VirginiaOnTheFly.com/Virginia_sites.htm Fly Fisher’s Guide to Virginia: Including West Virginia’s Best Fly Fishing Waters By David Hart, Wilderness Adventure Press, $28.95 Trout Streams of Virginia: An Angler’s Guide to the Blue Ridge Watershed By Harry Slone, Countryman Press, $18.95 Fly Fishing Virginia: A No Nonsense Guide to Top Waters By Beau Beasley, David Communications, $28.95 12th Annual Virginia Fly Fishing Festival, April 21-22 South River, Waynesboro Aimed at both beginners and experts, the festival offers lectures on when, where and how to fly fish, as well as an expo for gear and lessons. $35 weekend pass, classes cost $50-$75 VAFlyFishingFestival.org V i r g i n i a L i V i n g

mountain streams and western spring creeks where waters remain cooler. There are more than 2,800 miles of fishable trout streams in Virginia; of those streams, over 2,300 miles are wild, and 600 miles are stocked like Rose River Farm. Pearsall, who likes to fish the mountain streams, recommended I visit Harrisonburg and meet the Trows, twin brothers who own Mossy Creek Outfitters, a fly-fishing shop and guide service. “There are probably no two individuals who know more about trout fishing in Virginia than the Trows,” explained Pearsall. “They know their streams and the flies that work in them; they know where the conditions are best and will tell you when they are not; and, most importantly, they know where the fish should be.” Two weeks later, I was in Harrisonburg, introducing myself to the 32-yearold brothers, Brian and Colby Trow. Growing up in Richmond, they were bitten by the fishing bug around age eight, after Colby took a fly-fishing lesson at Wintergreen. “Our neighbor at the time, Carl Fischer, who was president of Trout Unlimited and a past president of Fly Fishers of Virginia, took us under his wing and taught us how to tie flies,” Colby told me. Another gentleman, Nat Burgwyn, became their mentor and he, along with other members of the FFV, would take them on fly-fishing trips. By the time they were in the 8th grade, they were selling their flies to fly fishing shops in Virginia. “Thanks to Nat, we were allowed to go to the FFV meeting and, at age 14, were the first junior members allowed in the club,” said Brian. The brothers even attended James Madison University, in part, because of the quantity of good trout streams in the area. After graduation, Brian, having earned a Bachelor of Science in geology, and Colby, a degree in biology, accepted jobs in Northern Virginia, but they were soon offered an opportunity to move back to the Harrisonburg area. The result? At age 23, they opened their own fly and tackle shop in Harrisonburg. “It was slow at first because here we were, a couple of very young guys, running a fly shop and guiding fishing trips. Customers or vendors would come in and want to speak to the owner, and we said, ‘You are.’ It was kind of hard for people who had been fly fishing longer than we had been alive to trust us,” Brian told me with an understanding smile. “But they soon realized that one or the other of us was on trout streams every day, whereas the client may see a stream three times a year. Soon, they began to see that it paid to listen to this

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clockwise from above left:

Cox and Pearsall; a trout that will be released; Burwell; Colby and Brian Trow; Eastwood fishing near a small dam. below: Under the stars at Rose River Farm.

young kid, because we knew every inch of the stream we were fishing.” Mossy Creek Outfitters is located in the heart of Harrisonburg near the intersection of Route 33 and University Boulevard. A small shop, it carries most of the major brands of fly gear and fly tying supplies. But the most popular item in the store is not the fly fishing gear—it is the brothers’ flyfishing knowledge. The other asset the Trow brothers have is something they worked very hard for, and that is private access to a number of the spring creeks in the area. There are many spring creeks with fish within an hour’s drive of Harrisonburg, but a great many of them run through private property. The Trow brothers have formed an alliance, so to speak, with many of the farmers and other property owners. By educating local landowners about the benefits from government programs like the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP), which assists with fencing for grazing animals and watershed protection measures, they are working to ensure the quality of fishing waters in the area. They are members of the Shenandoah Riverkeeper Association and board members of the local Trout Unlimited chapter. A business is built on its reputation, and the Trows have worked diligently to enhance theirs by doing the extra things. Seth Coffman, Project Coordinator for the Shenandoah Headwaters Home Rivers Initiative for Trout Unlimited, explained, “We are in the initial stages of a dam removal and a 2,000foot stream restoration project on Mossy Creek that got started due, in large part, to Brian and Colby’s outreach efforts with landowners on Mossy Creek. They understand the responsibility that comes with the privilege of having access to these waters.” Although fly fishing is their business, both brothers understand there is a line they must walk as businessmen and environmentalists. “We offer a product that fly fishermen want, but we refuse to put too much pressure on a stream,” Colby told me, noting that one of the distinct advantages of fly fishing in Virginia is the climate: You can fish Virginia streams all year long. For trout to succeed, they need a sustained flow of water at a sustained temperature range between 33 and 70 degrees. “Sixty-two degrees is when trout are most active,” explained Brian. “All the ground water around the Harrisonburg and Luray areas is 55 degrees, so trout in these streams are grow-

ing mostly year round,” unlike fishing out west, say, on the Madison River in Montana, where trout normally only grow four to five months of the year. “Fly fishing is a sport; fly tying is an art,” Colby emphasized. “It is one of the few sports that combine both. You don’t have to be a fisherman to enjoy the art, although many do.” Yes, fly fishing is a lot of things, but I think that Pearsall said it best when we were relaxing around the fire that night on the Rose River: “Fly fishing can be as simple or as complex as you want it to be. You will always find something new to learn or see. It is probably the only sport where you can find yourself or lose yourself at the same time.” • >> For more on fly fishing, go to VirginiaLiving.com

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This page: Heartwood, a 28,000-square-foot artisan’s gateway in Abingdon. Facing page: The Crooked Road Music Trail.

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BY Tim ThornTon

The Business of CreaTiviTy

phoTographY BY sTaceY evans SWEconomy_APR12.indd 107

million board feet of lumber from the surrounding mountains in the first part of the 20th century. That could make enough two-by-fours to stretch from New York to Los Angeles 25 times. And there would be a lot of boards left over. But Hassinger Lumber shut down in 1928. Konnarock, which used to have a hotel, a school and a rail line, doesn’t even have its own post office now. Many Southwest Virginia communities have similar histories. When the trees were all cut, or the coal seam ran out, or the labor got cheaper somewhere else, the jobs were gone, and the community withered. The region still has loggers, coal miners and furniture factory workers, but today, it also has a lot of people building a very different kind of economy. This new economy is creative, entrepreneurial, sustainable—and it’s being constructed largely from the culture, traditions and talents that people in these mountains have always had. Instead of hauling resources out, this new economy draws people, dollars and ideas in. Todd Christensen, executive director of the Southwest Virginia Cultural Heritage Foundation, is the effort’s point man. Funded in part by the Tobacco Indemnification and Community Revitalization Commission and the Appalachian Regional Commission, the foundation’s mission is to connect the other organizations, local governments, small town boosters, artists, farmers, starry-eyed dreamers and utterly practical business people who have joined state officials and agencies to

transform the region’s vision of itself. “Downtowns are evolving from centers for goods and services to cultural centers,” Christensen says. “Communities have to ask, ‘Who are we? Why is there a town here?’ If you notice, all the nice buildings in town were built around 1910. What was going on then that isn’t going on now?” Christensen is on extended—perhaps permanent—loan from the Virginia Department of Housing and Community Development. Soft-spoken but strong-willed, Christensen grew up in Elgin, Illinois. When he was a boy, the town lost the watch factory that shared its name for 100 years. That loss inspired

Scott K. Brown. courteSy Virginia touriSm corporation.

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he gravel road forked and, for a second or two, it was hard to know which way to turn. But the plates and the bowls and the platters scattered along the edge of Acorn Lane like fairy tale breadcrumbs marked the path to Grim Pottery in Konnarock. Owner Debbie Grim Yates’ pottery studio fills the basement of her family’s log home. It also fills a niche in an effort underway here to transform an economy long dependent on extractive industries and low wages. “The land we’re on was my great-greatgreat grandparents’,” says Yates, a lithe, blonde mother of two girls. “My dad and mom decided to move down here and live off the land.” It’s hard to imagine anyone who isn’t a hunter-gatherer living off the land around Konnarock. Much of it is rugged, steep and rocky. White Top, Virginia’s second tallest mountain, dominates the skyline. Gainful employment is generally a long way off. Yates’ mother used to drive an hour each way to work. For a while, Yates, who is also an oldtime musician, drove two hours so she could teach people to play banjo. When she began selling her pottery more than 20 years ago, she hauled it from her basement studio to a shop in North Carolina, 45 minutes away on mountain roads. A long time ago, work was much closer. Konnarock was built by the Hassinger Lumber Company, which cut about 18

The industries that fled southwest virginia over the last century left towns across the region languishing, struggling to redefine themselves and rebuild their economies. Today, an effort is underway to create a new and, more importantly, sustainable, economy in this culturally-rich part of the state.

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Christensen to spend more than 25 years following his graduation from the College of William & Mary working on community development before becoming the foundation’s director. The symbolic center of this new world is a $16.5 million, 28,000-square-foot building in Abingdon that looks like an exploded barn. Heartwood, “Southwest Virginia’s Artisan Gateway,” displays the work of more than 260 regional artists and artisans, and is Southwest Virginia through and through. The wood in the floors and the rocks in the countertops came from the region. Even the coffee is roasted locally. Heartwood is called a gateway, not a center, because it isn’t meant to be a destination. It’s designed to show people what waits outside Heartwood’s doors. At Heartwood, visitors can buy pottery or sculpture or wine or a dulcimer made in a 19-county area. Or they can use touch screens near the entrance to plan a trip through that area that might include a historic reenactment, a music festival, a winery tour and a trip down the New River. “I like to think of it as Southwest Virginia’s porch,” says Jack Hinshelwood. “It’s almost like a port of entry to Southwest Virginia.” Hinshelwood, a fiddler and guitar player with a receding hairline and an outgoing personality, is executive director of the Crooked Road, Virginia’s Heritage Music Trail. Southwest Virginia has a unique and significant musical heritage that stretches back to fiddle tunes and ballads carried by the area’s first settlers from England, Scotland and Ireland. Those songs mixed with instruments and influences brought by Africans, Germans and others to create a new kind of music. What

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Clockwise from top left: Todd Christensen; Abingdon; Draper Mercantile owner Debbie Gardner; Michael Dees canes a chair at CSCA in Galax; Crooked Road Executive Director Hinshelwood.

Johnny Cash called “the single most important event in the history of country music” happened in 1927 when Ralph Peer, a Victor Talking Machine Company producer, set up a temporary recording studio in an old hat factory in Bristol. The Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers were among those who came for a chance at $50 and a percentage of record sales. It’s commonly called the big bang of country music. But it wasn’t easy to convince people to travel the winding roads to Clintwood to visit the Ralph Stanley Museum and Traditional Music Center, even after the film “O Brother Where Art Thou?” made Stanley famous again. So Christensen, who had helped get the Stanley museum started, and Joe Wilson, who manages the Blue Ridge Music Center and is chairman of the National Council for the Traditional Arts, came up with a better idea: a trail of venues that would entice visitors to the area. “You don’t get people to come to one place,” Hinshelwood says. “You get them to come to eight places, eight major music venues.” That’s why the Crooked Road stretches more than 300 miles west from Franklin County along the bottom of the Commonwealth, curling through the coalfields to Breaks Interstate Park on the Virginia-Kentucky Border. In addition to the eight major venues are a number of smaller ones and more than 20 roadside kiosks with information, photographs and recorded presentations that broadcast to anyone who parks close enough and tunes to the right FM frequency. “It’s these down home, authentic venues that have these wonderful histories behind them that people can come and be immersed in, be a part

of,” explains Hinshelwood. “They can pull a chair right up around the Fries jam session and hear some of the best old time musicians in the world. They can chat with people about music or whatever at those gatherings. There’s a real intimacy. I think people who enjoy that sort of thing really dig the Crooked Road and go home with a ‘wow’ experience, I guess you’d say.” The Floyd Country Store is one of those authentic venues. Within sight of Floyd County’s only traffic light, the store has been in and out of business for more than 100 years. For about 40 years— even some years when it wasn’t really a store— people have gathered there on Friday nights to hear and to dance to bluegrass and old time music. A few years ago, Woody Crenshaw and his wife Jackie bought the place and renovated it. Now there are three bands on the stage every Friday night, jams on Sunday afternoons, monthly performances styled after old-time radio shows and all sorts of special events, musical and otherwise. The store has benches out front and an alley on its south side that fills with musicians on Friday nights when the weather is nice. Inside is a mix of ice cream, bibbed overalls, a lunch counter, arts, crafts, preserves, kitchen gadgets, books, CDs, a stage and room to dance. Crenshaw came to Floyd after his father died. He wanted to keep his father’s custom lighting business going, but he didn’t want to live in Raleigh where it was located. So he brought Cren-

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Clockwise from above: Bakers Donna Capozzi Speaks and daughter Lauren at the Merc; local foods for sale in the Merc’s Marketplace; Debbie Grim Yates’ pottery; Yates; New River Retreat cabin; Mark Nichols performing at the Merc.

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shaw Lighting and its 45 jobs to Floyd County. “You come here because you appreciate living here,” Crenshaw says. “You integrate the business into the lifestyle and the community.” Crenshaw has the look of an outdoorsy English professor and the mind and the drive of a community-developing entrepreneur. He has been instrumental in establishing a farmers market in Floyd and transforming two old buildings into retail centers that offer everything from artwork to Beowulf’s favorite beverage, mead. Crenshaw helped create ’Round the Mountain, an organization that means to do for artists what the Crooked Road has done for musicians. Floyd has become a music, arts and cultural center that’s drawn the attention of The New York Times, The Washington Post, Smithsonian Magazine, National Public Radio and Mother Earth News. In Draper, a Pulaski County town near Claytor Lake State Park and even nearer to New River Trail State Park, the new economy means a new life for the Draper Mercantile. It’s difficult to tell when its old life began. Newspaper stories say the Mercantile was built in 1885. And 1865. And 1812. The “Merc” was Draper’s post office and library and soda fountain, but mostly it was the kind of general store that sold everything from coal to coffee to coffins. A white clapboard building with a wide front porch, the Mercantile has had additions and expansions over the years, so now it rambles over more than 8,000 square feet. The store was closed for a year before Debbie and Bill

Gardner bought it in 2008. The plan was to use the old store as an office for New River Retreat, the Gardner’s cabin rental business, but the plan changed. It was soon clear the Merc could be much more than that. And it became apparent that the community wanted the Merc to be more than that. Today it is a gathering place for people and organizations, as well as a venue where area farmers, artists, musicians and writers can offer their work. Guided excursions and mountain bike rentals are scheduled to start this summer. The Gardners’ daughter, Ashlee VanMeter, handles marketing for New River Retreat and the Merc. She lived inside the Merc for a few months during its renovation. “I cannot tell you how many times people walked in those double doors the same way they probably have for 70 years and then were very embarrassed to see that someone had a little house set up in there,” VanMeter says. “I got to meet a lot of people that way.” She learned some things, too. “I realized this was almost like a grandmother to people. ... It’s where they’d gather. They’d get their needs here. I had one woman come up here and say, ‘If it was not for the Draper Mercantile, my family would have frozen or been hungry in the winter.’” They’d get coal and food on credit in the winter and bring lambs and produce to pay off the debt the following spring and summer. “That was true for so many people here,” VanMeter says. “And you realize that you have something in your hand that is considered a family member to this community.” In Galax, once a center for furniture manufacturing, the city runs the renovated Rex Theater where shows include Friday night concerts broadcast by WBRF. The Rex’s neon-lit marquee looks like a lot of old theaters’, but the rows of seats inside stop well before the stage. There’s more room for dancing that way. Just

up Grayson Street, a 1920 bank building houses the Chestnut Creek School of the Arts, which promotes traditional arts and local artists and offers classes that range from photography to flat footin’. Across the region, leftover pieces of the old economy have been repurposed for the new. In Wise County, Mountain Rose Vineyard grows grapes on an old strip mine. The Virginia Creeper Trail and New River Trail State Park have turned railroad beds into recreational trails. The whole region is reconsidering assets it may not have appreciated before. “I think it’s just the beginning,” Crenshaw says. “I think over the next decade and over the next generation Southwest Virginia will be a national destination.” Christensen is aiming even higher, comparing Southwest Virginia to Tuscany and to England’s Lake District. Outsiders find the regional culture exotic, he says: “You’re so used to it that you don’t know it’s there.” Some people know. Back at Grim Pottery, banjo player and fiddler Debbie Grim Yates says ’Round the Mountain and Heartwood have increased the demand for her pottery so dramatically she’s had to turn down some orders. “I’m very blessed to be able to have this whole thing going on right now,” she says. “I love where I live. … I like to hear the birds and crickets and the frogs and be back up in the woods and see a bear every now and then.” • >> For a listing of venues and upcoming events in Southwest Virginia, go to VirginiaLiving.com V i r g i n i a

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The Delaney Family at Jupiter Beach

42” x 54”

The Perfect

Anniversary Gift Jane

Jilli

Jena

Jessica

Jane’s Parents

Jake

Maddi

Jupiter Beach

Kevin’s Parents

Kevin

With his 25th Anniversary fast approaching, Kevin was on the lookout for a special gift for his wife, Jane. He had seen ads for David Cochran's "Casual Family Portraits" and admired how he depicted his clients in a causal yet realistic manner. He knew this could work with his own family. He wondered about the price, process and timeline, and if living in Alabama would doom his idea, so he called David for information. Kevin was intrigued to find that David creates an acrylic painting of a family, working from the client's photographs and depicts them with a personalized background. The entire process can be completed using photos sent via Email from anywhere in the country. A painting can be any size and can include as many or as few portraits as desired, even incorporating family members of former generations. The artist assured Kevin that the painting could be a surprise for his busy wife, who is a devoted mom of four children. She is also the founder and CEO of E-mealz ( www.e-mealz.com ) David depicted the family at Jupiter Beach FL, a sentimental location for the couple. He also included both sets of parents and the family dogs. Dave handled all logistics and a mysterious box arrived at the anniversary party. Jane was required to open this curious box and was rendered speechless (which is uncharacteristic for her) by this very special gift. She marveled at the way each of her loved ones was brought to life. This 42" x 54" painting now hangs in their family room. With such a perfect gift, Kevin now wonders what he will do for next year's anniversary. Giclée prints were made of this painting and given to various family members.

Call or Email David with your questions or ideas.

COCHRAN STUDIOS Studio: 703.684.7855 | Web: www.davidcochran.com | Email: cochranstudios@aol.com

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departure Springtime OffenSive Ants report for duty and mount their annual assault on domestic battlefields. BY KAY NEER | Illustration BY DANIEL CHANG

S

ince rousing from their winter torpor in the crawlspace under my house, colonies of little black ants have been working around the clock to set up their seasonal field headquarters. They will invade my stores, my living quarters, as well as choice areas of my quarter-acre plot. Waiting in the backyard for the repairman to fix my sump pump, I can imagine the activity beneath my house as the soldier ants are called up for service. There are bugle calls, the staccato barking of orders and sounds of a Marine Corps band playing Schubert’s “Marche Militaire” as the ant sergeants drill new recruits, striving to instill uniform order and cadence. Some of the worker ants are learning reconnaissance skills or attending classes on blueprint reading. Some are studying the floor plan of my house, a mid-century rambler with many historic insect trails and undiscovered wall voids. Meanwhile, other worker ants are learning predatory techniques, exit strategies, Meals Ready to Eat preparation, nursery management and even the sad business of being an undertaker. I have determined, through limited observation and the most basic research, that all ants but the queen make their own cots, report for KP duty and take out the trash. Daily, they practice wall scaling and crawling on their thoraxes under fire. Known to scientists as well as exterminators as the little black ants, these insects are about 1/16 th of an inch at maturity and are capable of lifting 50 times their body weight; a good thing if they’re ever called on to carry the queen, who’s a bruiser. She, herself, is waited on hand and foot. Her offspring are nurtured and cosseted by colony workers who may shift the brood from place to place as moisture and temperature fluctuate. Ant daycare. When they’re not eating MREs or sucking on greasy substances, the ants favor a sweet, sticky dropping from the aphids abiding under the leaves of my six-foot ficus tree. The clever black ants herd the aphids to their nests like cows and milk them for their honeydew. In return, the aphids, and their eggs, have access to protection services and other benefits within the ant colony. In addition to crawl spaces, as the pest control commercials will tell you, the little black ants nest around building foundations, in structural wood, masonry cracks, abandoned termite mines as well as stored boxes of leftover ceramic tile, the entrances marked with craters of fine soil. In the garden, they may locate under the concrete base of a birdbath or an ornamental mirrored ball, even under a statue of Saint Francis, which is a good place to leave a saucer of sugar water, both as an oblation and to draw the ants away from the premises.

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Encouraged, perhaps, by the verdant spirit and energy of the goddess Demeter, my crawl space ants emerged from their winter haven and paraded around the rim of my ball-and-claw bathtub. It was a triumphant, if modest, procession to the music of Mendelssohn’s “War March of the Priests,” if I heard correctly. In my mind’s eye, the new recruits appeared a bit ragged and veered out of line occasionally, following a newly laid but erratic chemical trail. But they seemed motivated, persevering around the bathtub’s perimeter before disbanding to take up their various duties. Several worker ants took in water from the washbasin, while others stood watch from the crest of a tall chrome container of toilet paper rolls. On my bedside table that evening, I noticed a coterie of ants checking out a foot-high stack of old copies of The New Yorker, prying between the pages in an effort to salvage bits of aged almond macaroon or desiccated butter creams. Maybe they just wanted to catch up on the cartoons after being holed up all winter. By morning, five or six worker ants, having memorized my kitchen layout, discovered drippings from a Crescent City gumbo on the stovetop and sucked away, ecstatic, I imagine, over bits of Andouille sausage. I have to assume that this isn’t gluttony; that the ants process juices from their food finds, store them and then share with the colony. The bathroom ants moved on, having lost countless numbers of workers who, falling into the empty tub and unable to ascend its slippery slope, disappeared down the drain hole. The kitchen ants, perhaps discouraged by the discovery of a South Beach diet book on the counter and anticipating the deprivation of fats and carbs, have probably gone next door to check out the professional-style gas grill newly installed in my neighbor’s yard. Other ants have been encouraged to move on by a gentle spray of vinegar and a little cinnamon sprinkled on their backsides. Sometime in late summer the ants will be back, mounting the 7-foot pole supporting the hummingbird feeder, traffic backed up for yards. A few might pick fights and die of injuries; some will get drunk and wander off to find an empty cot under a slab of slate; others will plunge through the feeder’s ant guard and drown in the nectar. Standing by solemnly with his notebook and No. 2 pencil, the undertaker ant will take down the names. In late fall, I imagine a few old retired field marshal ants, sporting faded campaign ribbons with battle stars, will assemble in the makeshift Bachelor Officer Quarters. They will regale each other into the night with truths and lies about their combat adventures while drinking the last of the fermented honeydew wine. •

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Virginia Living - April 2012  

Spring has sprung in the April 2012 issue of Virginia Living. Our cover story showcases the simple joys of fly fishing—which, we learned, is...

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