Page 63

English

Course outline Teaching is provided through lectures, seminars, and small-group supervisions and classes. You typically attend at least six hours of lectures or seminars, and two to three hours of individual, paired or small-group supervision each week. You normally write one or two short essays per week which you then discuss with your supervisor. As well as unseen exams, there’s a compulsory dissertation and over the three years you can replace three more of the written exams with coursework. Prizes are awarded for the best work. Years 1 and 2 (Part I) A broad range, a solid grounding

Year 3 (Part II) Deeper questions, new areas

You’re introduced to the full range of English literature from the Middle Ages to the present day. There are few set texts, so that while you must study widely, you can also focus on topics of interest to you. Over the first two years, you take two compulsory papers:

You take two compulsory papers:

• English Literature and its Contexts 1300-1550 • Shakespeare

You also write a compulsory dissertation (of 6,000-7,500 words) and either submit a second dissertation (of 6,000-7,500 words) and take one optional paper, or choose two optional papers. The optional papers change regularly – the following papers are available in 2014-15:

And you choose four from the following: • • • • •

• Practical Criticism • Tragedy, which ranges from ancient Greek drama to contemporary writing

Practical Criticism and Critical Practice Early Medieval Literature and its Contexts 1066-1350 English Literature and its Contexts 1500-1700 English Literature and its Contexts 1660-1870 English Literature and its Contexts 1830-1945, or English Literature and its Contexts 1870-Present

One or two of the last three optional papers can be replaced with coursework (one dissertation and one portfolio of essays). Subject to certain restrictions, you are also able to ‘borrow’ papers from the Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic; Classics; or Modern and Medieval Languages courses. Further details of these papers are available on the Faculty website.

Different lecturers cater for a wide range of interests and subjects. There’s something for everyone, and a healthy emphasis on pursuing your own interests that’s intellectually liberating.

• • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Chaucer The Medieval Supernatural 1066-1500 Shakespeare in Performance Material Renaissance Lyric Modernism and the Short Story English Moralists American Literature Postcolonial and Related Literatures History and Theory of Literary Criticism Literature and Visual Culture Contemporary Writing in English Early Modern Drama 1588-1642 Special Period of English Literature 1847-72

Subject to certain restrictions, it’s possible to ‘borrow’ papers from the Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic; Classics; or Modern and Medieval Languages courses. Further details of these papers are available on the Faculty website.

Camilla

Related courses Anglo-Saxon, Norse, and Celtic

38

Classics

48

Education

54

Linguistics

76

Modern and Medieval Languages

85

Theology and Religious Studies

www.english.cam.ac.uk

01223 335070 english-faculty@lists.cam.ac.uk www.english.cam.ac.uk

Open days 2015 College open days (arts) Cambridge Open Days – 2 July, 3 July (see p147)

102

61

University of Cambridge Undergraduate Prospectus 2016 Entry  

University of Cambridge Undergraduate Prospectus 2016 Entry