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N EWS + NOTES

STEA M

T A S EAhead! M

Full BY LAUREN FENECH

One of the most charming elements of our Hough Campus is the look of awe among our youngest Crusaders as they go about their day. It’s inspiring. They see the world in a way that adults have long since forgotten; they dream about the future in ways in which we all once did--innocently, with the inherent belief that dreams really do come true. When I was their age, I used to imagine a world in which instruction was catered to the needs I had (but weren’t quite understood at the time). I dreamed of a place in which I could learn with my hands, think with tools, and--like most children--potentially be messy about it. That is why I find Canterbury’s new lower school STEAM garden so exciting; it is the merging of decades of dreams that are coming to fruition. The result? Children who get the opportunity to learn in the most innovative way. The natural questions follow: What is STEAM? What is this garden? And how is it going to enhance the already-excellent curriculum that my child is receiving? Arts integration specialist Susan Riley astutely captures the magic of STEAM education as “an educational approach to learning that uses Science, Technology, Engineering, the Arts, and Mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking.” At Canterbury, we wholeheartedly believe in and align our instruction to this very concept. Our STEAM garden--essentially an outdoor classroom--is the latest STEAM integration into our community. It is place to study science, technology, engineering,

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art, and math. A garden is also a place to explore colors, textures, sounds, shapes, tastes, and smells. It is a practical place to make art and music, and to build large scale projects. It's also a place for our students to study history and the environment. Students of every different pedagogical learning style, and those with different interests will benefit from having the garden on campus.

We would like to create an ecosystem that mimics a micro-food forest. We hope to build an aquaponic tank using tilapia to grow vegetables. We will also use locally sourced materials to build homes for native pollinators. The combination of putting science, engineering and art outdoors builds curiosity and makes learning fun.

-- Art teacher Breck Moorefield The lower school STEAM garden is going to be a unique addition to our Hough Campus with its own one-of-akind specifications: recycled tree stumps will comprise the seats and tables; materials utilized will minimize environmental impacts whilst promoting alternative forms of energy; grade 4 students will lead the school in its first STEAM garden project (focused on solving real-world

Students from all grades are working together to build the STEAM garden.

CSFeatures 2017 Fall  

CSFeatures is a publication of Canterbury School of Florida, a PK3 - Grade 12 independent school in St. Petersburg, FL. CSFeatures covers th...

CSFeatures 2017 Fall  

CSFeatures is a publication of Canterbury School of Florida, a PK3 - Grade 12 independent school in St. Petersburg, FL. CSFeatures covers th...