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APPENDIX 3 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT


State of the Environment Report 2011-12

Table of Contents Table of Contents .............................................................................................................................. 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................................... 2 1.1 Attractive Streetscapes ............................................................................................................... 4 3.1 Transport Alternatives That Work ............................................................................................... 6 3.2 Responsible Use of Resources ................................................................................................. 10 3.3 Healthy Natural Environment .................................................................................................... 15 Case study: Sustainability Action Values Everyone Project ........................................................... 23 References...................................................................................................................................... 26 Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. 27 Appendix 1 - Relationship between Council Documents ................................................................ 28


Introduction What is a State of the Environment Report? A State of the Environment (SoE) report summarises the current environmental and heritage conditions for a specific area (eg local government area, region, state, country). The report is used to:  track changes over time through the use of indicators,  identify activities or processes that are affecting the environment or heritage,  outline key works and programs undertaken to address these stressors,  provide a public record of government, industry and community activities for protecting the environment and heritage and  guide policy, future planning and works.

Each level of government in Australia is required to prepare a State of the Environment report. Local government SoE reports are required by section 428A of the Local Government Act 1993 (see Box 1 below). Local governments are required to produce a SoE report during the year of an ordinary Council election (once every four years) and a supplementary report annually as part of Council’s annual reporting requirements, on issues that are relevant to their community as reported in their Community Strategic Plan.

Box 1 - Section 428A of the Local Government Act 1993 (new requirements) “428A State of the environment reports (1) The annual report of a council in the year in which an ordinary election of councillors is to be held must include a report (a state of the environment report) as to the state of the environment in the local government area in relation to such environmental issues as may be relevant to the objectives for the environment established by the community strategic plan (the environmental objectives). (2) A state of the environment report must be prepared in accordance with the guidelines under section 406. (3) The state of the environment report is to: (a) establish relevant environmental indicators for each environmental objective, and (b) report on, and update trends in, each such environmental indicator, and (c) identify all major environmental impacts (being events and activities that have a major impact on environmental objectives). (4) A state of the environment report for a council’s area may be prepared as part of and for the purposes of a state of the environment report for a larger area (such as a region or a catchment management area) and a report for the larger area that includes the required information in respect of the council’s area may be included in the council’s annual report as the council’s state of the environment report

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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The City of Canterbury State of the Environment Report 2011-12 The City of Canterbury SoE report traditionally presented our progress on themes outlined in SoE reporting requirements, as well as other themes identified in Council’s Environmental Management Plan and City Plan that are considered important by our community. For the City of Canterbury 2011-12 SoE report, we have reviewed the format to match exactly the long term goals, outcomes, and indicators outlined in our Community Strategic Plan (CSP). As such, this report is structured around the four long term goals and corresponding outcomes listed in the CSP which related to environmental outcomes. These include: 

  

Outcome 1.1.2 “Our City is green, with street gardens and trees planted and maintained” Outcome 3.1.2 “Our City is pedestrian- and bike-friendly, with well maintained footpaths and bike paths connected across the City through town centres, streets and parks” Outcome 3.2.1 “Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from our activities are reduced” Outcome 3.2.2 “Water consumption from our activities is reduced” Outcome 3.2.3 “Waste from our homes and businesses is minimised through resource recovery” Outcome 3.3.1 “Water quality and aquatic habitat in our City is improved – we have a clean Cooks River system” Outcome 3.3.2 “Biodiversity is enhanced and protected” Outcome 3.3.3 “Air quality is improved” Outcome 3.3.5 “People in our community are aware and actively support protection of our natural environment”

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

Discussion on each topic in the SoE report generally covers two areas: (i) Trend Indicators - identifies trends in indicators over the last few years, to give an overall idea of whether the City is improving, deteriorating or not changing with respect to these indicators. (ii) Actions - what actions Council has taken in the last financial year to attempt to improve the state of the City of Canterbury, with respect to the theme. The City of Canterbury uses the SoE report to guide development of subsequent Environmental Management Plans and City Plans, identify and prioritise opportunities for grant funding and inform Councilors and the community on the condition of our local environment and heritage.

Indicator Key Improving Only just improving No change Deteriorating a little Deteriorating

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1.1 Attractive Streetscapes Outcome 1.1.2

Our City is green, with street gardens and trees planted and maintained

Trend Indicator: Indicator

Number of street plantings completed over time

2008-09

Street trees planted

935

2009-10 331

2010-11 365

2011-12 357

Street trees are significant community assets that play an important role in contributing to the character of local neighborhoods and provide community and environmental benefits. Street trees are planted to replenish and enhance the local streetscapes:  In response to resident requests  To replace trees removed  As part of the street tree planting program The street tree planting program includes a variety of native and culturally-significant species. The breakdown of the species planted from 2008-09 to now is shown in Figure 1. The number of street trees planted annually is shown in the table above and Figure 2 below. Figure 1. Species breakdown of street trees

European Olive 2% Crepe Myrtle 5%

Other 5%

Tibouchina 7%

Watergum 26%

Turpentine 9%

Brushbox 10% Blueberry Ash 13%

Bottlebrush 23%

Source: Parks and Property Team

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 1.1.2

(Continued) Figure 2. Street Trees Planted

1,000

935

900 800 700 600 500 400

331

365

357

2010-11

2011-12

300 200 100 0 2008-09

2009-10

Source: Parks and Property Team

Status In 2008-09 there was an extensive street tree planting program. In 2009-10, 2010-11 and 2011-12 the street tree planting program consisted of one street tree neighbourhood unit in each Council ward. It is considered that this indicator is now remaining stable. Highlights for 2011-12 ďƒź

Adoption of strategic and long-term planning, growing approach so that new street trees are suitably matured before planting, to allow them to establish quickly and grow to maturity.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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3.1 Transport Alternatives That Work Outcome 3.1.2

Our City is pedestrian- and bike-friendly, with well maintained footpaths and bike paths connected across the City through town centres, streets and parks

Trend Indicator:

Kilometres of dedicated walking and cycling trails

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Total distance of footpath (m)

538,592

539,843

546,562

547,733

Excellent

176,217

176,217

174,899

172,296

Good

163,622

163,622

163,886

166,672

Fair

135,480

135,480

136,747

136,606

Satisfactory

45,068

45,068

45,176

52,993

Poor

18,205

18,205

19,135

17,995

Condition

Indicator

There is an extensive network of footpaths and shared cycle paths across the City connecting our town centres, streets and parks. We survey 25% of the footpath network per year or 100% of the footpath network over a four year period. The condition of the footpath and total distance are shown below. Figure 3. Condition of Footpath

35% 30% Excellent

25%

Good

20%

Fair

15%

Satisfactory

10%

Poor

5% 0% 2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Source: Assets & Engineering Team

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.1.2

(Continued) Figure 4. Total distance of footpath (m)

550,000 548,000 546,000 544,000 542,000 540,000 538,000 536,000 534,000 2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Source: Assets & Engineering Team

Status The majority (60%) of the footpath is in an excellent to good condition, as shown in Figure 3. The length of network has also increased gradually over the last four years, up over 9km since 2008, as shown in Figure 3. The development of a condition-based footpath development program has contributed to the improvements in overall footpath condition. A variety of programs and education are utilised to encourage increased use of footpaths and cycleways by our community. Highlights for 2011-12 

 

Distribution of cycling safety information and cycleway maps at community events, such as Australia Day and CARES Open Day (October 2011), and through visits to 15 primary schools. Held Community Transport workshops for Seniors (April 2012), attended by 40 people, to assist in planning mobility ‘post-driving’ and provide information about benefits of walking and public transport use Sustainable Schools Grants Scheme supported two local primary schools to run a ‘build a bicycle’ project with their students Seniors’ Week Community Bike Ride attracted nearly 20 participants who enjoyed a cycle along the Cooks River in March 2012. Installation of signage along the Cooks River shared footpath, supported by the Cooks River Alliance, to provide point-ofinterest and location information to users.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

Above: Seniors Week Community Bike Ride along the Cooks River Cycleway

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Outcome 3.1.2

(Continued)

Trend Indicator:

Number of commuters by mode of transport

Indicator

Mode of travel to work on weekdays

Change

2001

2006

Train

10,348

9,591

-757

Bus

1,642

1,639

-3

Tram or Ferry

24

37

13

205

225

20

24,658

26,525

1,868

Car - as passenger

3,243

3,114

-129

Truck

825

692

-133

Motorbike

122

146

24

Bicycle

116

152

36

Walked only

1,470

1,376

-94

Other

418

338

-80

Worked at home

1,220

1,082

-139

Did not go to work

3,749

3,967

218

Taxi Car - as driver

Not stated

1,271

1,479

207

Total

49,311

50,362

1,052

This indicator, derived from the Census, reveals the main Modes of Transport used by residents to get to work. This data is very useful in transport planning as it informs decision-makers on the effectiveness and availability of local public transport. There are a number of reasons why people use different Modes of Transport to get to work including:   

the availability of affordable and effective public transport options; the number of motor vehicles available within a household; and The travel distance to work, which for example, can allow people to walk or bicycle to their place of employment.

Source: ABS 2006 (2011 data not available yet)

Figure 5. Change in mode of travel to work, City of Canterbury, 2001 to 2006 (Enumerated data)

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.1.2

(Continued)

Status As shown in the indicator table above and Figure 5, in 2006, there were 11,267 people who caught public transport to work (train, bus, tram or ferry) in the City of Canterbury. Nearly three times as many people drove in private vehicles (car –as driver, car – as passenger, motorbike, or truck). The increase in use of cars and decreasing use of public transport as a mode of transport to work has contributed to increasing congestion, and indicates that community outcomes are not being achieved. There was a 30% increase in the number of people traveling by bicycle to get to work (from 116 in 2001, to 152 in 2006). Similarly, there has been a marked increase in the number of cyclists using the Cooks River Cycleway in the past 12 months, as shown in Figure 6 below. Figure 6. Cooks River Cycleway Marrickville South

Average daily count

450 400 Cooks River Cycleway Marrickville South

350 300 250 2006

2008

2010

2012

Years Source: NSW Roads & Maritime Services 2011

There is a total 12 km of shared pedestrian-cycle path throughout the City. This is mainly along the Cooks River Cycleway and M5 Linear Cycle Path. We provide cycling education through practical workshops to encourage more people to use bicycles. The increase in cyclists is positive. Highlights of Actions for 2011-12   

National Ride to work day held in October 2011, with 22 participants Eight ‘Cycling on the road’ and ‘Bicycle maintenance’ courses held to encourage more people to use bicycles as a transport option Review and implementation of the new State Transit bus routes and time tables including the introduction of the metro buses that operate frequently to link key transport and social hubs Kingsgrove to Revesby Quadruplication Project expansion of the East Hills train line for increased capacity and number of express trains to the line.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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3.2 Responsible Use of Resources Outcome 3.2.1

Energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions from our activities are reduced

Trend Indicator: Indicator

Community energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions 2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

43,459

45,997

45,519

39,410

5,610,000

5,610,000

5,115,170

Residential Electricity Use (KWh)

322,701,000

309,808,000

305,640,000

286,890,000

Business Electricity Use (KWh)

215,986,000

217,596,000

214,866,000

206,756,000

2,002,928

1,964,847

1,941,867

1,837,251

Council energy consumption (electricity, gas and fleet) (GJ) Council streetlight energy consumption (KWh)

TOTAL City of Canterbury energy consumption (GJ)

5,754,290.00

*Incomplete data available at time of reporting Figure 7. Breakdown of Council Energy Use (GJ)

80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000

20,196

20,196

22,619

25,788

20,840

20,209

2008-09

2009-10

40,000 30,000

18,415 20,715 23,383

15,663

20,000 10,000

26,248

23,747

2010-11

2011-12

-

Electricity and gas

Fleet fuel

Streetlight electricity

Source: City of Canterbury's Carbon Management System data; AusGrid Community Electricity Report 2010/11

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.2.1

(Continued)

Figure 8. Residential & business electricity use (GWh) 350,000 300,000 250,000

322,701

200,000 150,000

309,808

217,596 215,986

305,640

286,890

214,866

206,756

100,000 50,000 0 2008-09

2009-10 Residential

2010-11

2011-12

Business

Source: AusGrid Community Electricity Report 2010/11

Status Council’s total energy consumption has fluctuated marginally over the past four years. Gas and fleet energy consumption have decreased marginally. The decrease in energy use between 201011 and 2011-12 is due to an incomplete data set for electricity consumption at the time of reporting. A sustained trend has not been confirmed, and further monitoring is required. The City’s streetlight energy consumption has been fairly even over the four year period. Over four years, residential and business electricity consumption have reduced by about 11% and 4% respectively. Overall, the City of Canterbury appears to have reduced its energy consumption by 8%. This is an encouraging trend. Highlights for 2011-12      

Promotion of the NSW Government’s Home Power Savings and the OEH Home Saver Rebates Programs, with an uptake of over 2400 households since June 2010. Delivered over 10 workshops and information on energy efficiency to the general public, including the SAVE Program specifically targeting low income households, provided OEH Save Power Kits, via the libraries, to community. Promoted Fridge Buyback, with 154 residents in 2011-12 getting rid of their second fridge. Over 670 fridges have been collected from Canterbury residents since the program began, helping residents reduce their energy bill and save money. Promoted NSW Government’s Energy Efficiency for Small Business program, through Council’s Smart Biz sustainable business program to support local businesses improve energy efficiency, with 35 businesses participating in 2011-12. Implemented a carbon management system to accurately monitor Council’s energy, water, and paper consumption. Conducted energy audits at Council’s top energy consuming facilities.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.2.2

Water consumption from our activities is reduced

Trend Indicator:

Community water consumption

Indicator

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

164

141

140

118

10,635

10,738

10,731

10,480

Water use by commercial dwellings in the City (ML) Other (ML)

1,334 211

1,350 219

1,208 311

1,334 163

TOTAL City of Canterbury water consumption (ML)

11,969

12,088

11,939

11,977

Water use by Council (kL) Water use by residential dwellings (houses and units) in the City (ML*)

Source: Sydney Water, City of Canterbury’s Carbon Management System Figure 9. Water consumption (kL) 13,000 12,500

164

12,000

211

11,500 11,000

141

140

219 1,350

1,208

10,635

10,738

10,731

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

1,334

118 163

311

1,334

10,500 10,000

10,480

9,500 9,000 Residents

Business

Other

2011-12 Council

Source: Sydney Water

Status There has been a slight decrease in water use across all sectors of the community (residential, business and Council) from 2010-11 to 2011-12, as shown in Figure 9. Water use by Council has decreased by 14% in the past 12 months. This is mostly due to reduced use of potable water in the irrigation of parks and reserves. Residential water use increased marginally, following the lifting of water restrictions in 2007. In 2011-12, residential water use has decreased marginally by about 3%. Highlights of Actions for 2011-12  Completed the installation of rainwater tanks to reduce dependence upon potable water, and plumbed them into the amenities, at a number of community buildings including Ashbury, Belmore, and Earlwood Senior Citizens’ Centres, and Riverwood Community Centre and Lakemba Library.  Rainwater tanks installed at the Depot have harvested 809 000 kL of water and used it for truck washing and irrigation of sports fields, saving potable water.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.2.3

Waste from our homes and businesses is minimised through resource recovery

Trend Indicator:

Diversion rate of community and business waste from landfill

Indicator

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Domestic Waste (tonnes) Domestic Recycling (tonnes) Green waste (tonnes) % diverted from landfill Trade Waste*, dumped rubbish and pre-booked clean up (tonnes)

32,737 13,618 10,321 42% 5966

33,035 13,439 10,153 42% 4851

33,028 13,283 10,497 42% 4942

34,075 12,609 11,625 42% 5,585

Figure 10. Waste collected by type (tonnes) and % diverted from landfill 70,000

60%

60,000

50%

50,000 Tonnes

Figure 11. Domestic waste composition

40%

40,000 30% 30,000 20%

20,000

10%

10,000 0

0% 2008-09 Rubbish

2009-10 Recycling

2010-11 Garden Vegetation

2011-12 % diverted

Source: City of Canterbury Waste and Cleaning Services

Status Responsible management of the waste generated in our community is essential to ensure a healthy environment and reduce the cost of disposal. Council promotes the recycling of materials such as plastic, aluminium, steel, paper and glass, by providing all properties with access to our recycling service. Figure 10 shows the quantities of waste, by type, collected and the diversion rate. Figure 9 beside shows the breakdown of waste produced by the average household. The volume of material diverted from landfill continues to increase, with a peak in total quantity diverted from landfill of 24,234 tonnes in 2011-2012. The NSW Government has set a target for 66% of waste to be diverted from landfill by 2014. This includes all material diverted from landfill through the use of our recycling and garden vegetation bins. Currently, we are diverting approximately 42% of our waste from landfill, but we still have a long way to go in order to meet the NSW Government’s target of 66% by 2014.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.2.3

(Continued)

Highlights of Actions for 2011-12        

Approximately 19 tonnes of eWaste was recycled through Council’s annual collection, with 250 households utilising the service. Collection and treatment of 20 tonnes of harmful chemicals through the Chemical Cleanout, with 567 households participating. Garden vegetation collected has peaked at 11,625 tonnes in 2011-2012. The Schools Education Program provided 35 education sessions at seven local primary schools, with over 2,000 students learning about waste, recycling and sustainability. National Recycling Week was supported through a public information stall at the Campsie Centre. This included the use of bilingual educators to highlight the benefits of recycling and promote upcoming events. Clean Up Australia Day was a great success with 26 sites registered, collecting litter from local parks the and along the Cooks River. Residents discovered what happens to their recycling as part of three tours of a Materials Recycling Facility during the 2011-2012 period. We continue to reduce the amount of litter that enters local waterways through our street cleaning program. This includes a seven day a week program in town centres and a weekly schedule for residential streets.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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3.3 Healthy Natural Environment Outcome 3.3.1

Water quality and aquatic habitat in our City is improved – we have a clean Cooks River system

Trend Indicator: Stream water quality/Number of water quality complaints Indicator

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Number of water pollution complaints to Council Rubbish collected by CREW (tonnes)

59 36

77 24.6

50 16.15

50 3.5

Number of stormwater management structures Material removed by stormwater management structures (tonnes)

5

7

10

10

45.6

39.16

45.9

47.7

Figure 12. Material removed from river and streams

60

12

50 40 30 20

45.6

7

36

10

45.9

47.7

10 8 6

39.16

5

4

24.6 16.15

10 0

10

2008-09

2009-10

2

3.5

2010-11

0

2011-12

Rubbish collected by CREW (tonnes) Material removed by stormwater management structures (tonnes) Number of stormwater management structures Source: Parks and Property Team; Cooks River Alliance

There are two main water courses in Canterbury – the Cooks River and its tributaries (Cups and Saucer Creek and Wolli Creek), and Salt Pan Creek which flows into the Georges River. The Cooks River catchment area is highly urbanised, with one of the highest population densities in NSW, encompassing 100 km2 and 13 local government areas. The City of Canterbury makes up about 24% of the Cooks River catchment. Council works in partnership with other councils to improve the health of the river across the catchment. Key activities to remove pollution from the River include the installation of stormwater management structures (or gross pollutant traps) and the physical removal of rubbish and sediment in these structures, and in parks and reserves in the catchment area.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.3.1

(Continued)

Status Our community is proactive in notifying Council of water pollution incidents and this assists Council to respond accordingly. Stormwater management structures are located across the local government area. As shown in Figure 12, the tonnes of material collected has increased between 2009-10 and 2010-11, as three new structures were installed. The CREW program has undergone a restructure during 2011 and this has affected the total amount of rubbish collected. Highlights of Actions for 2011-12         

Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland was handed over to Council from a partnership with Sydney Water and SMCMA, to manage. The local community takes an active role in assisting Council to maintain the site. Installed interpretation signage at Campsie Remnant Bushland and Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland Carried out RiverHealth monitoring at Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland with community volunteers Carried out RiverScience Ecological monitoring of Cook River estuary. Research project on Bioretention basin at Johnston St, Earlwood data collection and analysis with Macquarie University and SMCMA. Ran tours and workshops on Wetland and Stormwater, Biodiversity for CALD groups, water wise gardening and weed control, with over 180 residents participating, in partnership with NSW Ethnic Communities Council. Monitoring of Fish Ladder at Wolli Creek, Turrella Reserve Maintenance of 10 stormwater management structures We continued our rolling program of Environmental Audits of industrial and commercial premises. 114 businesses were audited by our Environmental Health Unit to ensure compliance with regulations and legislation to prevent environmental incidents, especially stormwater pollution.

Above: Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland, Canterbury

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.3.2

Biodiversity is enhanced and protected Native vegetation cover area (ha) subject to tree planting and bush

Trend Indicator: regeneration

Indicator Number of Council-organised community tree planting events Number of trees/shrubs/grasses planted during community tree planting events and bush regeneration days Area subject to community tree planting and bush regeneration (m2)

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

11

9

9

9

4,715

4,378

4,429

2,145

10*

12*

15.7*

16.9

13,080

13,080

2

Area of constructed aquatic habitat (m ) 8,000 10,500 Source: NSW Office of Environment & Heritage; City of Canterbury Quarterly Reports

The enhancement of biodiversity is measured by environmental rehabilitation and restoration projects, biodiversity and weed education, and new revegetated areas in the LGA. Native revegetation includes new riparian, woodland, and wetland plantings; and constructed environments include wetland and saltmarsh areas. These areas provide essential habitat that support the Cooks River.

Figure 13. Enhancing biodiversity measures

14000

18 16

12000

14

10000

12

8000

10

6000

8 6

4000

4

2000 0

2 2008-09

2009-10

Constructed aquatic habitat

2010-11

No. seedlings planted

2011-12

0

Area planted by community

Source: Parks & Property and Environmental Strategy Teams.

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.3.2

(Continued)

Status Figure 13 shows the gradual increase in two important indicators: the total area of constructed aquatic habitat and annual area subject to community tree planting and bush regeneration. The revegetated sites are in parks, riparian lands and adjacent to bushland sites, providing important habitat. Despite a decrease in the total number of seedlings (trees, shrubs and grasses) planted, we are increasing the total area across the City that is dedicated to protecting and enhancing our local environment. Highlights of Actions for 2011-12 

   

Fauna study and community consultation undertaken to prepare a Biodiversity Strategy for the City of Canterbury. Consultation included discussion with a community reference group and the wider community through visiting bushcare groups, meetings, presence at community events, and the online survey. Increased area of revegetation at Campsie Remnant Bushland site, increasing its the biodiversity and ecological value. Biodiversity tour ‘Train the Trainer’ program delivered to Ethnic Communities Council bilingual educators for delivery to CALD communities in the LGA. Biodiversity training video in production as part of the SAVE (Sustainability Action Values Everyone) program. Increased number of weed and biodiversity education events offered to the community. Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland, a joint project between Sydney Water, the Sydney Metropolitan CMA and the City of Canterbury was handed over to Council. Council supports the Friends of Cup & Saucer Creek Wetland to monitor and manage this natural asset. The GRCCC monitors water quality as part of its volunteer RiverHealth program at the site. Box 1. Biodiversity and weed education Indicator

.

Number of weed workshops held Number of biodiversity events held

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2

2

8

12

New indicator

1

2

11

To complement the environmental restoration on-grounds works program, Council supports a community education program. This program includes workshops, tours and training sessions to assist the community to identify and eradicate noxious weeds and to take steps to enhance our local biodiversity in their own backyards. Weed workshops have increased over the last four years, with a 30% increase in the last financial year. The number of biodiversity education events increased more than five times from 2010-11 to 2011-12. This is due to the increased support provided by the ‘Sustainability Action Values Everyone’ Project (for more details, see the Case Study on page 24). These education events included Indigenous Gardening workshops, delivered in partnership with Canterbury City Community Centre, and a ‘Train the Trainer’ Biodiversity Tour package Above: ‘Low maintenance gardening’ workshops were a hit for Seniors Week 2012, teaching easy gardening techniques and how to keep weeds at bay

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.3.3

Air quality is improved

Trend Indicator: Indicator

Regional air quality index

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

67

54

53

59

58

Number of air pollution complaints to Council

Sydney Central-East Pollution levels

2007-08

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

High

3

24

18

14

9

Medium

44

72

65

29

41

Low

317

269

282

322

315

Source: NSW Office of Environment & Heritage

Air pollution is a regional issue as it is influenced by human activities, natural events and weather patterns across the greater metropolitan region. In this respect, improving air quality is also a regional responsibility. The Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) monitors ozone, nitrogen dioxide, visibility, carbon monoxide, sulfur dioxide and particles in the air at 14 sites around Sydney. The closest air quality monitoring site to Canterbury is in Beaman Park, Earlwood. Figure 14. Proportions of high, medium, and low pollution proportion of days per year days in Earlwood

100

88.2 77.3

73.7

80

86.3

60 40 20

19.7

17.8

6.6

4.9

3.87.9

11.2 2.5

0 2008-09

2009-10 High

2010-11 Medium

2011-12

Low

Source: NSW Office of Environment & Heritage

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.3.3

(Continued)

Figure 14 shows the number of days in each of the past five financial years when the regional air quality index (RAQI) was low (below 66), medium (67-99), and high (above 100) at Beaman Park, Earlwood, and Figure 15 shows the number of air pollution complaints received by Council during this same time frame.

Number of complaints

Figure 15. Number of air pollution complaints to Council

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

Source: Environmental Health Team

Status Overall, these indicators show that air quality has neither drastically improved nor worsened in the last five years. The numbers of low pollution days, and the numbers of air pollution complaints to Council, have remained relatively constant in the last five years. The latter is not a very effective indicator of air quality however, because numbers are highly influenced by human behaviour. Highlights of Actions for 2011-12 The extensive promotion of active transport such as walking and cycling across the City, through: o Participation the GreenWay project to encourage uptake of active transport options in the corridor between the Cooks River cycleway and Iron Cove, in partnership with Marrickville, Leichhardt and Ashfield Councils. o Participation in the SAVE Program, in partnership with Marrickville, Randwick and City of Sydney Councils and Housing NSW, providing bike maintenance and cycling safety training workshops to the community. o Community Bike Shed members have repaired 28 old, unwanted bicycles to give away to communities in need across the City. ďƒź Council officers responded to 86 air quality complaints by investigating, providing information and taking the appropriate regulatory action, where appropriate. ďƒź

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

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Outcome 3.3.5

People in our community are aware and actively support protection of our natural environment Level of participation from community, schools and businesses in

Trend Indicator: environmental programs Indicator Number of businesses engaged in OEH Energy Efficiency for Small Business

2008-09

2009-10

2010-11

2011-12

2

81

127

35

Number of entries in the Local Business Awards Sustainable Business category

New indicator

5

8

Number of Sustainable Teachers meetings held

1

1

3

4

New indicator

14

42

79

318

1,079

1,079

2,839

2

5

5

5

Number of community workshops held Number of volunteer hours dedicated to sustainability and environmental works Number of Environment and Sustainability Committee meetings held

Our community is highly motivated by the natural assets in our local environment and is very dedicated to protecting and restoring natural places. In response, Council facilitates and supports a number of tree planting and bush regeneration groups. Our community also prioritises taking action to reduce their households’ impacts on the environment by reducing energy and water use. Our business community is actively improving the environmental sustainability of their operations. Figure 16. Community engagement in environmental activities

2839

120

127

3000

2500

100

2000

80

81

79

1500

Hours

Number of businesses/workshops

140

60 1079 40

42

20 2 0

1079

318 0

2008-09

1000 35

14 2009-10

Businesses engaged

500

0 2010-11

Community workshops

2011-12 Volunteer hours

Source: Waste; Environmental Strategy Teams

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Outcome 3.3.5

90

(Continued)

Figure 17. Breakdown of community workshops held, by program

80

10

70 60

33

50 40 30

26

20 10 0

12 2

10 6

2009-10

2010-11 Sustainability

Status

Weeds & Biodiversity

36

2011-12 Earthworks

Source: Waste; Environmental Strategy Teams

There has been a significant increase in the number of volunteer hours dedicated to working on environmental projects, as shown in Figure 16. This is most likely due to a combination of positive factors: the establishment of two new bush regeneration sites, an increase number of individuals volunteering, and an increase in the number of working bee dates and opportunities to volunteer. Volunteer environmental restoration work is possible through engaging the community. Biodiversity and weed workshops have assisted with generating engagement for bushcare actions. The number of these workshops and events have increased dramatically, as shown in Figure 17 and Box 1 (see page 18), with the commencement of a Biodiversity Officer and continuation of a Noxious Weeds Officer in 2011. Community workshops are run on a variety of topics: energy and water saving, gardening, natural cleaning, smart shopping, recycling, composting and worm-farming, biodiversity, birdscaping, weed management and bicycle skills. Workshops are well-attended by the community, demonstrating community interest in living more sustainability. The SAVE (Sustainability Action Values Everyone) Program was a grant-funded, multi-council partnership that supported the delivery of many workshops and biodiversity tours 2011-12. It also established a new community garden in Jubilee Reserve, Lakemba, and the Community Bike Shed, in Campsie. For more information on this exciting project, see the Case Study on page 24. Highlights of Actions for 2011-12     

Established two new bush-care groups at Gough Whitlam Saltmarsh and Cup and Saucer Creek Wetland, and held two volunteer training days on saltmarsh habitat and bushcare Established the Community Bike Shed project, with local residents repairing old, unwanted bicycles and distributing them to disadvantage people in our local community. Successful delivery of SAVE Program, engaging nearly 1000 people in seven projects. Supporting new community group, Environment@Lakemba, who are working to engage their local community to reduce littering in parks, streets and Lakemba Town Centre. Continued support for the work of the Cooks River Valley Association, Mudcrabs and the Wolli Creek Preservation Society. These groups have been vocal advocates of the local environment in the community by supporting conservation efforts, campaigning for a national Container Deposit Scheme; and against extension of the M5 motorway through Wolli Creek.

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Case study: Sustainability Action Values Everyone Project Background The SAVE Program (Sustainability Action Values Everyone) was a collaborative partnership between City of Sydney, Marrickville Council, Randwick City Council, the City of Canterbury and Housing NSW supported by the New South Wales Government through its Environmental Trust. The program delivered sustainability projects to low income, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) communities. The program aimed to: 

build capacity and knowledge around environmental and sustainability issues in the community, and build the capacity of the partner organisation to work in collaboration and deliver environmental sustainability projects to these communities.

Over a three year period, to July 2012, this $1.75 million program worked with more than 50 organisations to develop and deliver 28 integrated environmental projects across the four council areas.

Snapshot:  $1.7million over three years  4 councils in partnership with NSW Housing  Over 50 organisations  28 projects delivered  Nearly 4000 local residents participated  299 workshops and consultation sessions  40 catchment tours  10 community gardens  10 rainwater tanks  2 bicycle-recycling projects

SAVE contributed to building capacity and knowledge around environmental and sustainability issues in the community. It also supported partner organisations to work collaboratively to deliver environmental sustainability projects to the communities. This case study provides a snapshot of the projects delivered in the City of Canterbury. Sustainability on a Shoestring – Pilot Series Delivered in partnership with Metro Community Housing, Sustainability on a Shoestring (SoS) aimed to help low income households to reduce their energy consumption through no or low-cost actions. Over 8 months, a combination of workshops, informal meetings and mentoring was used to engage 11 participants (out of 15 who started the project). Participants learnt about gardening, biodiversity, water conservation, recycling and waste minimisation. The primary focus was saving energy at home. Practical actions like turning off appliances and lights when not in use, short showers and washing in cold water saw some participants decrease their bills by 20-40% over the course of the project. A Toolkit has been developed to assist other affordable housing providers to help their tenants reduce their power bills and increase their understanding of environmental sustainability.

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Lakemba Community Garden

In partnership with Canterbury City Community Centre, a community garden was established in Jubilee Reserve in Lakemba. To support the new garden, ten workshops were run on organic gardening, composting, natural pest management, crop rotation and water wise gardening. Monthly working bees bring all members and ‘Friends of the Garden’ together. There are 30 active plots and a waiting list of local residents, interested in belonging to the garden. Nearly 90% of the participants at the garden workshops indicated that their knowledge about the environment has increased as a result of their involvement in the Garden. As a result of participation, there is an increased interest in other local environmental issues like reducing litter and increasing recycling.

Community Bike Shed

Community Bike Shed is run out of the Canterbury Men’s Shed (in Campsie) and is a partnership project of Canterbury City Community Centre and Council. The project aimed to improve access and participation in cycling, as a form of physical activity and sustainable transport. Old, unwanted and broken bicycles (and parts) are donated by the broader community and repaired by Community Bike Shed members. The repaired bicycles are distributed by local organisations to their communities. Over 500 volunteer hours have been dedicated to repair 28 bicycles that have been passed onto to people in the community who cannot afford them. Bicycle maintenance and cycling skills workshops were also run for over 40 participants – most of whom received a repaired bicycle from the project.

Biodiversity Tours and Train-the-Trainer program In partnership with the NSW Ethnic Communities Council’s team of Bilingual Sustainability Educators, 10 Biodiversity Tours were run with 186 participants. Tours took Arabic and Greek, Chinese-speaking, local residents to explore local, natural places like Riverwood Wetlands, Wolli Creek, Cup and Saucer Creek and Ewen Park, along the Cooks River. Council’s Biodiversity Officer developed and ran a ‘Train the Trainer’ workshop for the Ethnic Communities Council Bilingual Educators. The workshop covered how to run a biodiversity tour, focusing on some of our best wetlands, rivers and bush pockets in the local area. Our Biodiversity Officer included training to identify and talk about native flora and fauna species, and also weed management. This training was documented as a video resource for other councils: www.vimeo.com/saveprogram

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Biodiversity Photo Competition and Celebration Day As a result of the very popular and successful Biodiversity Tours, the Ethnic Communities Council, with support from Council and SAVE Program, coordinated the Biodiversity Photo Competition. Local residents were encouraged to photograph their favourite natural place in the Canterbury local government area. Fifty entries were received and the Biodiversity Celebration Day held to display the ten Finalists and announce the winner. Over 80 people attended the celebration event and enjoyed interactive, native animal displays, music and entertainment. Evaluation conducted at the Celebration Day found that over 95% of attendees had learnt something new about our local environment. The ten finalist photographs were displayed in a traveling exhibition through our four libraries from April to July 2012.

Sustainability on a Shoestring – Riverwood With Riverwood Community Centre, a series of Information Carnivals were held in Rossmore Avenue, Endeavor and Kentucky Place, Riverwood, to engage local residents in decision-making around options of environmental projects that could be undertaken in their local area. As a result, a second series of Sustainability on a Shoestring was delivered in partnership with Keep Australia Beautiful and with support from the Royal Botanic Gardens’ Community Greening project. Over 30 people participated in eight workshops and two sustainability tours – all delivered in English and Chinese. Workshops focused on sustainable gardening but included important education about reducing power use at home to save money on power bills. At the end of the project, 11 portable garden beds were installed for participants to grow their own herbs and vegetables at home.

For more information about SAVE Program resources and projects, visit: The SAVE Program – resources and tool kit www.save-program.org Sustainability on a Shoestring (www.shoestring.net.au). SAVE Program – videos www.vimeo.com/saveprogram City of Canterbury www.canterbury.nsw.gov.au Canterbury City Community Centre: Community Bike Shed www.4cs.org.au/bike_shed Canterbury City Community Centre: Lakemba Community Garden

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References Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS), 2006, 2011, Census Data http://www.abs.gov.au/ City of Canterbury, 2010/11, City Plan City of Canterbury, 2010/11, Environmental Management Plan NSW Government, Biodiversity Strategy http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/biodiversity/nswbiostrategy.htm NSW Government, 1998, Action for Air http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/air/actionforair/index.htm NSW Government, 2006A, Action for Air Update (2006) http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/air/actionforair/index.htm NSW Government, NSW Legislation http://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au/ NSW Government, 2005, Sydney Metropolitan Strategy http://www.metrostrategy.nsw.gov.au NSW Government, 2006B, Metropolitan Water Plan http://www.sydneywater.com.au/Water4Life/SecuringOurWaterSupply.cfm Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH), 2009A, NSW State of the Environment http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/soe/soe2009/index.htm Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH), 2009B, Who Cares about the Environment in 2009? http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/community/whocares.htm Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH), 2007, NSW Waste Avoidance and Resource Recovery Strategy 2007 http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/warr/WARRStrategy2007.htm OurRiver, Cooks River Sustainability Initiative (CRSI) www.ourriver.com.au Roads & Martime Services Cycling Count in Metro Sydney http://www.bicycleinfo.nsw.gov.au/counter_chart.html Sydney Water, StreamWatch www.streamwatch.org.au Sydney Water, 2009, Water Efficiency Programs http://www.sydneywater.com.au/Water4Life

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Abbreviations CMA

Catchment Management Authority

CP

City Plan

CREW

Cooks River Environmental Workers

CRFWG

Cooks River Foreshore Working Group

CRSI

Cooks River Sustainability Initiative

CRUWI

Cooks River Urban Water Initiative

CRVA

Cooks River Valley Association

DCP

Development Control Plan

DEC

Department of Environment and Conservation

EMP

Environmental Management Plan

LEP

Local Environmental Plan

LGA

Local Government Area

LGSA

Local Government and Shires Association

OEH

Office of Environment and Heritage

POEO Act

Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997

RTA

Roads and Traffic Authority

SAVE

Sustainable Action Values Everyone

SEPP

State Environmental Planning Policy

SoE

State of the Environment

SQID

Stormwater Quality Improvement Device

SSROC

Southern Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils

USP

Urban Sustainability Program

WRAPP

Waste Reduction and Procurement Policy

WSUD

Water Sensitive Urban Design

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Appendix 1 - Integrated Planning and Reporting

Our Integrated Planning Framework comprises a number of documents that reflect the Canterbury community’s priorities and guide long term action. These are: The Community Strategic Plan identifies the long-term aspirations our communities have for life and work in Canterbury City. It describes the City’s future through five themes, each with Long Term Goals and Community Outcomes, which cover the broad range of topics that are important for our City and our communities. Alongside the Community Outcomes are Strategies – which Council, partner organisations and individuals can use to work towards achieving the Community Outcomes, and Trend Indicators – things that can be monitored to determine if progress toward the Community Outcomes is being made. The End of Term Report reports on the implementation and effectiveness of the Community Strategic Plan.

The Council Delivery Plan is the strategic document which guides the action of Council for the next four years. It outlines the Activities – services, initiatives and infrastructure programs – that Council intends to undertake, and the Resources (people and money) needed to do so. The Council Delivery Plan document is structured around Community Outcomes, showing those Activities that are part of Council Strategies working towards achieving a Community Outcome. The Council Function that is responsible for undertaking the Activity and Council Performance Indicators are also shown.

The Council Operational Plan supports the Council Delivery Plan by providing specific information on the Activities that Council will undertake and measures of performance. In particular the details of Council Strategies (and associated Strategy Indicators), Services (and associated Output Estimates and Service Standards), and Initiatives to be delivered by each Function, Infrastructure Projects to be delivered, and the assignment of responsibility for implementation and reporting for these items, are shown. The Operational Plan also includes the details of the next year’s budget. Each year our Environmental Management Plan is also reviewed to support the Operational Plan. It outlines Council's environmental goals and strategies and lists actions that will support them.

The Resource Strategy outlines Council’s capacity to manage assets and deliver services over the next ten years. The Resource Strategy includes three key elements – an Asset Management Plan describing infrastructure policies and requirements, a Workforce Plan describing staff policies and requirements, and a Long Term Financial Plan, which sets policy directions for rates, borrowing, investments, service levels and additional infrastructure.

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The Annual Report outlines Council’s achievements in implementing its Delivery Program and Operational Plan and includes information on activities that have been completed and results of performance indicators. The Annual

Report includes a State of the Environment Report that looks specifically at our environmental and heritage performance over the last financial year. It addresses projects and services covered by our Environmental Management Plan and sections of the City Plan. Every four years, in the year of the ordinary election the

Annual Report also includes an outline of achievements in implementing the Community Strategic Plan.

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Setting our goals, outcomes and priorities Our City Strategic Plan 2008 - 2017 describes what we are planning to do over the next ten years to achieve these things, with long term goals, outcomes and priorities. It sets the direction for the other plans that comprise our integrated planning framework. The City Strategic Plan is prepared in consultation with the community. Our City Plan and Budget 2010-11 describes the activities we will undertake over the next four years to achieve our long term goals and outcomes. This document is reviewed every year in consultation with all Council business units. Our Operating Plan shows the activities - Services and Initiatives - each functional area of the organisation will undertake, and the Performance Measures we will use. Our Environmental Management Plan (EMP) 2010-11 outlines Council's environmental goals and strategies and lists actions that will support them. The Plan is prepared annually and is a key document supporting Council's City Plan and Operational Plan.

Reporting our progress The Annual Report highlights our achievements across all of Council over the last financial year. It provides a detailed account of our performance in relation to the projects, services and facilities that were included in our City Plan, and highlights our success in the management of our financial resources in providing them. The State of the Environment Report looks specifically at our environmental and heritage performance over the last financial year. It addresses projects and services covered by our Environmental Management Plan and sections of the City Plan.

Setting Goals, Outcomes and Priorities Community Consultation

Reporting Progress City Strategic Plan 10 year plan

Annual Report

City Plan and Budget 4 year plan

Operating Plan 1 year plan

State of the Environment Report Environmental Management Plan 1 year plan

2011-12 State of the Environment Report

Council documents can be downloaded from our website: www.canterbury.nsw.gov.au

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www.canterbury.nsw.gov.au CANTERBURY CITY COUNCIL 137 BEAMISH ST CAMPSIE NSW 2194


State of the Environment Report 2012