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Chesterton is only partially conscious when reasoning in this manner. Nevertheas opposed to Lacan’s system. I will now proceed to proposing a solution that harmonizes this disparity. Taking the implications of both the Chestertonian and Lacanian/ i ekian systems into account, I believe that a viable hybrid system can emerge through symbolic reasoning, as Chesterton does throughout Orthodoxy. This is because symbols capture both the unconscious landscape while simultaneously revealing the unconscious in a more lucid way to an individual’s conscious mind. In this way, symbols would provide us with the necessary tools to sway the unconscious into changing our axioms and contingent meta-religious choices, thus ensuring the element of freedom. To illustrate this process I will conduct the following thought experiment. An individual realizes that her current axiomatic commitment results in meta-religious consequences that she deems unfavourable. For example, an individual holding the theist axiom has a perceived understanding that their belief in a divinity necessitates the reinstatement of the institution of such freely, with her new chosen axiom, in this case the atheist axiom. She would mer axiomatic commitments, such as what Chesterton does when considering previous theist axiom may be the effects of slavery, whereas the symbol representing the new axiomatic choice may be the fair treatment of all individuals. sequence as well as between the axioms to which these images are associated. this novel image would have conscious backing and be constituted by a perceived within a particular space within the unconscious, and does not win over the entire unconscious towards this new axiomatic choice, thus not completely creating the desired change. This problem would be resolved as the individual conmeta-religious consequences from her former axiom, and over time this process would mitigate the sway that the former axiom has over the unconscious, eventuwe have given both a comprehensive explanation for how people acquire axioms and simultaneously provided the element of freedom in making axiomatic choices, consequently resulting in more favorable meta-religious consequences. i ek’s thought, we can claim that it is maintaining our atheist or theist axioms that enables us to Orthodoxy it became apparent that engaging with the theist or atheist axiom was what produced the meta-religious consequences of health or madness. As we

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Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

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