Page 60

terton wrote Orthodoxy, namely, as a response to criticism he received from his previous work, Heretics provide an alternative philosophy so as to supplement those philosophical positions he deemed faulty or lacking. Chesterton clearly saw value in providing this alternative since he understood that it would give impetus to the meta-religious change he sought to create within Heretics. This observation leads to the second which is that he is a proponent of free will. Although he provides no explicit tion of the absence of moral freedom observed within the rationalist’s life, and secondly by his continual emphasis on the possibility of different moral choices available to us as humans. Chesterton’s position of free will leads us to ask a second question: how possibly posit that his understanding of what motivates the will is something more mysterious, such as our feelings or our imaginations. Beyond these assumpsions in the Chestertonian system, and therefore must turn to another system so as to gain a better comprehension of this phenomenon. oms, and subsequently branch out into the i ekian extension of Lacanian psy-

understanding of reality is based on language, where language is made up of -

why it seems we arbitrarily cling to axioms within the Chestertonian system by

52

Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

Advertisement