Page 49

Through Ginsberg’s intercessions, the poem’s ideas are constantly held to their surroundings, as he comically mentions quotidian physical aspects, such -

Mahasiddha livelihood to realign his worldview. This allusion is of immense importance, as it draws a direct parallel between the Master-Teacher relationship of two legendary Buddhist poet-saints and the contemporary situation of Trungpa and Ginsberg, -

Trungpa perceives within it, oppositions drawn side by side in the unorthodox tales of saints. Moving along in this fashion, Trungpa tries to give praise to the poetthe contemporary poets’ work with that of Buddhist religiosity in a form of the realm of the present moment, nor from the objects that make it what it is.

minder of the situation’s inherent emptiness, the seemingly non-Buddhist path, absent of dharma, is framed as being just as valuable as that of the literal Buddhist path of dharma, and indeed, both form roads towards the same single end, which is nonetheless Buddhist religiosity of the same accord. Using methods not directly linked to Buddhism is once again a form of skillful means, as the entirety of the world is not necessarily acquainted with the Buddha’s teachings. Trungpa and Ginsberg thus note that experiences ultimately working towards nirvana – even if they do so without knowing, or do so outside of the Buddhist tradition – can nonetheless form a part of Buddhist practise. Through this clash and opposition, this craziness, they carve their road and voices through the great tiness and one’s surroundings both dependently arise together, though it requires

41

Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

Advertisement