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to the common man. As much as ritual experience, politics had to start from within and then spread to create communitas. The deeply emotional and devotional potentiality of the mythological genre made it the perfect vehicle for Gandhian nationalism. In Le CinÊma ou l’Homme imaginaire, sociologist Edgar

the halls, movies gained in meaning when Gandhi and his followers toured the land and expounded their philosophy to the crowds. Despite the fact that, unwere often connected to the freedom struggle and concerned with its themes see their heroes in action. Political ideologies were neither unfamiliar nor new to the rural populations, whose involvement in civil movements was much needed. Ideas from different camps were available to the literate through the pealed to by nationalist orators. Central to the political discourse, the concept of race was implicitly dis-

often anachronistically considered the pure post-Aryan language, existing prior character progressively abandoned the richly embroidered and cotton pajamas pants found in Parsi theatre and instead adopted the silky dhotis and toga-like shawls of the constructed classical India that is portrayed in museums and texts. The most faithful reconstitution of puranic narratives was of great importance, since the canonical wholesomeness of these stories was far from being taken for granted by the audiences of mythologicals. Religious reforms and Phule argued for the royal anteriority of untouchable castes, challenging the historical interpretation of the social map of epics and legends. In Southern ing it as a narrative of Aryan domination, where Brahmanical gods and hefrom the shudra Kurmi and Koeri castes claimed to be the real kshatryas as

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Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

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