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dus, with a cult generally limited to the domestic realm. Reviving an extinct tival where Ganapathi Murtees were carried around the town in bustling and on the exterior realm of the town through Ganesh, the beloved master of aggressiveness, the festival rapidly became anti-colonial as well as anti-Muslim, with the association of the Ganapathi tradition to the remembrance of the martial feats of the Maratha3 and having been instrumental in the downfall of Aurangzeb’s empire. The spirit of past Maratha glory would be revived throughout the year with plays exalting Maratha history and religion. The main attractions were large mandaps, which were imposing stages decorated with tableaux ordered from the reformers in the Chitpavan milieu had given their blessing to the frownedupon world of actors and djalsa dancers. Furthermore, they would make a Marathi intellectuals and novelists were strong votaries of Tilakite nationalism, and a large portion of their compositions was meant to be performed publicly. It is in this milieu that new treatises established the genres known as of drawing larger crowds. In this cultural context, regionalism, nationalism, mythology, reformed religion, painting, the press and theatre troupes were

The Great Director To visualize the birth of Indian cinema, there is no better summarizing he stands at the crossroad of all the major cultural forces of early twentieth industry would emerge. Phalke was born in Nasik to an orthodox ChitapaBrahmin from a lineage of Sanskrit scholars and temple priests. A gifted student with an inclination for both intellectual achievement and artistic creation, Phalke studied painting in Bombay at the JJ School of Arts, where he was at the Archaeological Department convinced him of India’s glorious, classi-

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Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

Canons IX:2  

Personal Study, Personal Religion McGill University Undergraduate Journal of Religious Studies

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