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Research for all people, on all cancers Key Questions

Diagnosis Research

Prevention

Cancer Type

Cancer Council Research Activity Report 2009

Treatment


Vision Cancer defeated. Our vision will be realised when lives are not cut short by cancer nor their quality of life diminished.

Mission To defeat cancer through engaging the community. Cancer Council NSW connects people and organisations to the cancer cause. Together we can build insights into the significance of cancer in our lives and contribute our talents to the vision of cancer defeated. We work across all cancers. The impact from our work together will be visible in changing • the lives of cancer patients and carers • scientific knowledge • community understanding and behaviour • society, policy and practice to advance cancer control. Increasingly, people will work in organisations, families and social settings that advance the control of cancer and where resources (people/ volunteers/pro bono) are developed globally and locally to meet the challenges of cancer.

Our research mission Our mission is to engage in the highest quality scientific research to better understand the causes, management, outcomes and impact of the leading and emerging cancers. Ultimately, our mission is to contribute to a reduction in the burden of cancer.

For further information: Contact A/Prof Freddy Sitas, Director, Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council NSW. E: freddys@nswcc.org.au T: (02) 9334 1837


Contents About us

Our activities

2

4

Who we are and what we do

4

Cancer Research Division Director’s message

6

Medical Director’s message

7

The work of the Cancer Research Division

8

What is the value of research?

10

Epidemiological research

12

Significant research highlights and case studies

14

Behavioural research

16

Behavioural research highlights and case study

16

External research program

18

STREP grants

18

Program grants Project grants

21

22

Incorporating research into practice

23

Appendix Cancer Research Division Staff and Students

24

Grants Awarded to Cancer Council Presentations

24

26

27

Epi Hour Program 2009

30

Posters

30

Academic Publications

Cancer Research Division - Collaborators

32

34

External Research Funded by Cancer Council NSW

36

Cancer Council NSW Board of Directors

39

Cancer Council NSW Ethics Committee

40

Cancer Council Cancer Research Committee

40

Internal Research Review Committee

40

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We are a central catalyst for progress in the cancer landscape

About us Our research goal We are an independent, forward-thinking community of people making a real difference to the defeat of cancer. Our research goal is to generate new knowledge and insights into how cancer is prevented, diagnosed and treated. It is because of scientific discoveries that the potential for cancer to be prevented (or, if not prevented, to be detected and treated at a curable stage) is now possible. When people have knowledge they can achieve great things. Because of improved knowledge, we are closer than ever before to understanding cancer and how to better treat and prevent it. We are a central catalyst for progress in the cancer landscape and want all parties to join together to beat cancer. To this end we work with health and research organisations, the government, other businesses and, most importantly, with the community and those committed individuals within it.

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In 2010, we have committed over $15 million to a portfolio of groundbreaking research projects designed to help achieve this aim. Cancer Council’s funding and our support of a broad range of work have contributed materially to the global understanding of cancer; our work is not bound by geography. We represent the cancer needs of all people and do not ignore any cancer type or any evidence-based approach to cancer control. Each of our projects is connected to the real needs of real people, at all stages of the cancer journey – prevention, diagnosis, treatment, survivorship and end of life. We will continue to develop Cancer Council as a place of international standing in population research on cancer by applying the best statistical and scientific techniques to answer questions of crucial importance to cancer control.


We collaborate with universities and institutes across the globe

Through applied research and development we will respond rigorously and systematically to the real-world challenges of cancer. This will include contributing the results of community-based field trials based on rigorous scientific methods, to improve our knowledge and understanding of cancer prevention and treatment and the ways we can support cancer patients. Cancer Council is a place of energy and innovation in cancer – a place where one can work freely with allies and partners and where we can make cancer history together. The people of NSW, and beyond these, the people of the world, are the direct beneficiaries of our knowledge and insight to meet the cancer challenge.

Dr Andrew Penman CEO

We have links to local and overseas universities and institutes, such as the Universities of Oxford, Alberta, Hong Kong and Nevada, The Imperial College London, University College London,The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, The Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, The US National Cancer Institute, The Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, The South African Medical Research Council, The National Health Laboratory Service, The American Cancer Society, World Health Organization, The International Agency for Research on Cancer, The German Cancer Research Centre, Cancer Care Manitoba Foundation, and the British Colombia Cancer Agency.

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Cancer Council research activities Who we are and what we do

How we do it

We harness the knowledge of brilliant minds which cover the expanse of cancer research to accelerate breakthroughs in why people get cancer and how to prevent, diagnose, treat and manage the disease.

We only invest in promising cancer research, and we conduct population-based forecasting to meet future needs in prevention, services, screening and vaccinations.

We have an internal structure that supports division-led and cross-divisional research projects to extract knowledge and foster collaboration amongst specialist areas. Our research portfolio comprises an internal and external research program, each addressing a range of cancer research questions. This portfolio of research activity is designed to investigate the causes, management, outcomes and impact of a wide range of cancers, and provide evidence for developing interventions that can improve patient outcomes at all disease stages. Internal research – With 60 scientific staff, students and volunteers working with more than 230 collaborators, our Cancer Research Division is one of the largest public health cancer research operations in Australia. Its activities are designed to provide comprehensive answers to the current and future needs of local and international cancer control programs. External research – In 2009 Cancer Council allocated over $9 million to an extensive portfolio of research, undertaken by some of Australia’s leading cancer researchers, as well as supporting professional development of early career researchers.

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Our research activities cover an expanse of priority areas including epidemiological, behavioural and fundamental research. The epidemiological research activities of the Cancer Research Division are undertaken by the Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit (CERU) based in our Woolloomooloo office. CERU undertakes studies to discern patterns and relationships in cancers to find out why certain cancers occur in some people and to understand the consequences of a cancer diagnosis. We also have a long-standing partnership with the University of Newcastle through our Centre for Health Research and Psycho-Oncology (CHeRP), directed by Professor Afaf Girgis. This centre investigates the behavioural and environmental factors that affect the risk of cancer, including attitudes, knowledge and high-risk behaviours, to develop interventions to lower the risk of cancer. CHeRP also examines the psychosocial issues that affect cancer patients, their partners and caregivers, to improve the provision of support services. These internal activities complement our externally funded research program, which is managed by the Research Strategy and Scientific Development Unit (RSSD) and is headed by Dr Monica Robotin. It comprises Project Grants, Program Grants, Innovator Grants and the Strategic Research Partnership program (STREP). These grants provide a network of fundamental researchers with the funding they need to work on Cancer Council’s research priorities.


The findings from these research activities are then utilised by our Health Strategies Division and Cancer Information and Support Services Division to ensure community reach and evidence-based cancer prevention and cancer care solutions are implemented.

Collaboration Collaboration helps to build dialogue and share ideas on how to accelerate research and treatment discoveries for cancer outcomes. Our work is enriched through access to an international network of more than 230 collaborations with experts, academics, organisations, global networks and communities. These studies cover tobacco, infection and cancer, patterns of survival, screening, and estimating the burden of disease due to cancer.

We harness the knowledge of brilliant minds which cover the expanse of cancer research to accelerate breakthroughs in why people get cancer and how to prevent, diagnose, treat and manage the disease.

Collaboration also helps us to provide the right people, technology and infrastructure to support and service our research communities.

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We take great pride in our work influencing change.

Cancer Research Division Director’s Message With over 200 nationalities, Australia has one of the most diverse populations in the world. This places us in an extraordinary position to conduct large-scale population studies in a way no other country can, supporting the exploration and creation of new knowledge about cancer. Through our world-class research assets, our epidemiology unit has captured data on 13% of the NSW adult population, positioning us internationally as a research centre of significance. The Cancer Research Division fosters a dynamic research environment, and is a central force steering cancer research in Australia. Our research has had far-reaching implications for government policies, locally and abroad, and continues to be internationally recognised through publication in leading peer-reviewed journals.

our ongoing work in the Prostate Cancer Program, with the Prostate Cancer Care and Outcomes Study providing significant new information about the quality of life of men after treatment for prostate cancer and the completion of nationally accredited guidelines for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer. Our Palliative Care-Needs Assessment Tool and guidelines developed by CHeRP are now nationally disseminated. We have completed a major randomised controlled trial of proactive telemarketing of smoking cessation services; and are continuing with Australia’s largest long-term studies of the psychosocial wellbeing of cancer survivors and their partners or caregivers.

This year we also continued to build on our existing genetic biorepository (Biobank), now holding over 100,000 samples from 24,000 people. We will develop the best possible resource in this area for answering future research questions on how our genes interact with our environment to cause cancer. In the next three years we will be finding out if any viruses are involved in causing the common skin cancers and cancer of the oesophagus.

We also made significant contributions in the following areas: identifying optimal long-term scenarios for cervical screening modalities in light of the new HPV vaccine; identifying gaps in screening behaviour among migrants; identifying differences in the pathways to diagnosis of thyroid cancer; and inconsistencies in the management of patients with lung cancer. Cancer Council-led research also demonstrated that liver cancer prevention using antiviral treatments saves more lives and is more cost effective than screening for liver cancer in people with chronic hepatitis B infection. Every research activity we undertake is carefully selected and prioritised by our internal and external independent peer review and feasibility panels to ensure the best quality research is undertaken. We are confident that our research contributes the best knowledge to change policies and practice, and to significantly reduce the burden of cancer.

We take great pride in our work influencing change. Some of the highlights of our research activities this year included

A/Prof Freddy Sitas Director, Cancer Research Division

Our world-class research assets for cancer epidemiology, the Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk Study (CLEAR), and the 45 and Up Study, will provide invaluable information that we can interpret and translate into cancer treatment, prevention and cure.

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Medical Director’s Message Investment in cancer research represents Cancer Council’s largest expenditure of donor funds. Our external research portfolio comprises over 70 individual grants, awarded to leading Australian cancer researchers and tailored to respond to an ever-changing research environment. This flexibility and responsiveness ensures that we can fund the most promising research ideas and best research teams, to improve the scientific understanding of cancer. We collaborate with consumers to ensure that the research we fund is congruent with community values and beliefs. Our trained consumers take part in assessing research applications and in setting research priorities for our organisation. In response to consumer feedback, in 2009 we added a new Program grant to our research portfolio -– the Pharmacogenomics Research for Individualised Medicine program, which will advance the development of personalised cancer medicine in Australia. In addition to the administration, monitoring and evaluation of the Cancer Council’s external research portfolio, our Unit develops and evaluates novel cancer prevention interventions. We are piloting a program to reduce liver cancer incidence in people with chronic hepatitis B infection in collaboration with General Practitioners, hospital specialists and researchers. The B Positive project seeks to identify people with chronic hepatitis B infection in South-West Sydney and follow them up according to their individual level of risk of developing liver cancer, informed by the best available evidence. The program is complemented by community and medical practitioner education about hepatitis B and liver cancer.

NSW – a microcosm of Australia With a population of seven million, a third of Australia’s Aboriginal population, and one quarter of its residents born overseas, NSW’s large and culturally diverse population represents a microcosm of both Australia and the world. This diverse population base allows CCNSW to conduct and fund research into the underlying causes of various cancers and how best to prevent them at the population level. Results from this research allow us to dispel myths, support positive behavioural change and inform public policy and practices. We also explore new and improved ways of diagnosing and treating different cancers and undertake studies into enhancing the quality of life of those affected by the disease.

Dr Monica Robotin Medical Director

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The work of the Cancer Research Division

Well

Causes & Prevention

Diagnosis

Prevalence

• Cervical Cancer Causes

• CLEAR • 45 & Up

Study • PCOS Sun

Health Services Research • Modelling

Cervical Cancer Screening & Vaccination Program • NZ Women’s Health Study

Modelling / Forecasting

Survival

• Patterns

Health Study

• CLEAR • InterSCOPE • Skin Health

Treatment

• Mens Health Study • Aboriginal Pathways to Diagnosis of Cancer • Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study • Pathways to Diagnosis of Thyroid Cancer • Diagnostic processes in cervical screening

• Prevalence

and Forecasting Reports

• Global

Burden of Disease Study

of Care for Prostate, Colon, Lung & Pancreatic Cancers • Prostate Cancer Guidelines • Linked Data • Use of Complementary Medicine in Prostate Cancer • Treatment Algorithms for Lung Cancer • Aboriginal Patterns of Cancer Care

Mortality

• Tobacco

Attributed Mortality China/Sth Africa

• Colorical

Cancer Survival • Survival Modelling

• Trends in

incidence & mortality

• Monitoring • Food

Marketing

Cancer Prevention

Psychosocial Research

• Telemarketing

• TAFE

Lifestyles Survey • Physical Activity Promotion

cancer risk behaviours • Smoking Cessation in Disadvantaged Groups • Tackling Tobacco Research • Vit D Community & GP Surveys

• Cancer

Survival

• Lifestyles

• Evaluation Improving quality of care

Note: These diagrams represent only a sample of the Cancer Council research projects in 2009. See appendix for more detail.

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of CCNSW Support Programs • Routine Psychosocial Screening

Intervention Study • Partners & Caregivers Studies

• Palliative

Care Needs


Cancer Council NSW - Research Internal and Externally Funded Research 2010

Average funding per program per year

No. of projects in 09

$250,000

3

$250,000

3

$1,280,000

38

$300,000

1

$100,000

6

$500,000

1

$400,000

3

$120,000

19

$120,000

18

$120,000

22

CANCER RESEARCH DIVISION

$60,000

60

CANCER INFORMATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

CANCER INFORMATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

$26,527

6

HEALTH STRATEGIES DIVISION

HEALTH STRATEGIES DIVISION

$65,240

4

COMMISSIONED RESEARCH

COMMISSIONED RESEARCH

$48,000

8

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2006 STRATEGIC RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS (STREP) 2008 STRATEGIC RESEARCH PARTNERSHIPS (STREP) 2011 (STREP) CANCER TRIALS NSW

CANCER TRIALS NSW b positive

B Positive 45 & UP COHORT STUDY

45 & UP COHORT STUDY

Innovator grants INTERNATIONAL PANCREATIC CANCER GENOME CONSORTIUM Research program grants

Research program grants

2007 project grants 2008 project grants

Project grants

2009 RESEARCH PROGRAMS

192

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What is the value of research?

What methods do we use?

Research underpins the framework for understanding our society and helps to steer ethical decision making in policy, practice and legislation. Without research, we wouldn’t be able to discern myth from fact or opinion over evidence, with potentially catastrophic consequences – wasting money and resources, and putting people’s lives at risk. Research also helps to organise and provide systematic ways to find answers to questions; its goal is always to provide the scientific evidence to inform and empower.

Our research portfolio supports a broad field of cancer research disciplines, designed to provide insights into all aspects of cancer control.

At Cancer Council we use clear evidence to make significant decisions about the many aspects of cancer and its burden to the community.

We undertake epidemiological studies to discern patterns and relationships in cancers to find out why certain cancers occur in some people and to better understand the consequences of a cancer diagnosis.

From fundamental research into the genetic causes of cancer through to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, our research activities always aim to improve patient outcomes through informed decision making. Through transparent governance processes, we ensure that every dollar allocated to cancer research is invested in the most promising research projects, to advance our understanding of cancer and to attract the most talented staff to make that happen. We involve the community in decision making by inviting consumer input into the selection and evaluation of grant proposals through our Consumer Review Panel, which represents an integral part of the selection process for all Project Grants submitted for Cancer Council funding. A consumer-led initiative also instigated the creation of a new grant scheme investigating the promise of personalised medicine in cancer (Pharmacogenomics grant). It is our emphasis on excellence that has secured our strong international reputation within the research community.

By analysing and interpreting data on cancer risk, incidence, mortality and survival, we can improve our understanding of the causes, treatment and burden of cancer.

Epidemiological research

We also use statistical and mathematical models to predict future scenarios in cancer prevalence and the outcomes of government policy decisions, such as the adoption of the national human papillomavirus vaccination program.

Behavioural research Use of both qualitative and quantitative research tools allows us to better understand the lifestyle behaviours and attitudes that affect people’s cancer risk, as well as the physical, emotional, social and psychological impact that a cancer diagnosis and treatment has on patients, their partners and caregivers. Behavioural science allows us to measure changes in areas such as healthy eating, sunsmart and tobacco-related behaviour, in order to develop effective cancer prevention strategies. It also helps us to develop health care interventions designed to improve the quality of life of those affected by cancer.

Translational research Translational research converts the knowledge derived from basic research more quickly and efficiently into better diagnoses and improved treatment outcomes, that lead to a better quality of life for those affected by cancer. By providing a carefully crafted framework for our external research program, we support the cancer research process through the identification and funding of specific research priorities. This process supports both well-established external teams and researchers working on more novel studies which could yield significant benefits in the future.

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What is research? When most people think of research they tend to think of people in white coats working with test tubes, but laboratory work is only one facet of scientific research. Research is often defined as any activity undertaken to increase knowledge. It involves systematically investigating a problem or question. Although much of the detailed work to understand what is happening at the cellular level requires laboratory work, there are many other issues related to cancer and the burden it imposes on communities. Research also involves behavioural studies, such as how best to deliver cancer prevention messages about high-risk behaviours to specific groups within the population. It can also involve extensive computer simulations to highlight what is occurring across large populations. This type of work can provide important insights into the most efficient and effective way of spending the limited funding available for cancer diagnosis and treatment. Systematically reviewing and seeking improvements in the care provided to cancer patients and the outcomes achieved also represents a significant area for detailed investigation and study.

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Epidemiological research Providing clear, evidence-based data on the wide range of issues surrounding cancer control is vital to closing the gap between what is known and what is practised in this area.

What we do The Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit (CERU) undertakes a broad range of epidemiological research projects. These projects range from studying the causes of cancer through to forecasting future scenarios to assist with long-term planning of cancer control programs and establishing the patterns of care received by cancer patients in NSW.

Our research programs Our core areas of research are: • Causes of cancer – focusing on tobacco, infection and hormones. • Health services research – investigating pathways to diagnosis, patterns of care studies to follow the patient journey to determine whether patients are receiving treatment in line with best practice guidelines, and intervention development and implementation. • Epidemiological modelling and forecasting – evaluating screening and vaccination programs, and assessment of cancer prevalence and future cancer care needs. Within these programs we focus on common and emerging cancers. Our greatest expertise relates to breast, cervical, gastrointestinal tract, lung, prostate, skin and thyroid cancers.

Research activities in 2009 CERU was involved in a wide range of research projects this year, including: Mortality reduction from breast cancer The prolonged use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) by women following menopause has declined markedly following communication of the cancer risks associated with its use. Research undertaken by the CERU team was able to demonstrate that there had been a nine percent fall in new cases of breast cancer among women over 50 years of age in the period 2001-05. Modelling and cervical cancer During 2009, our modelling group (which is part of Modellers Sans Frontieres), completed two assessments of new cervical screening technology options for the Department of Health and Ageing’s Medical Services Advisory Committee. This study contributed to policy decisions on the optimisation of Australian cervical cancer screening and guided the programs and approaches taken in the UK, New Zealand and China. The group also presented an evaluation of primary human papillomavirus DNA testing for cervical cancer prevention in China at the International Papillomavirus Society Meeting in Sweden. ABC Women’s health study ABC management commissioned CERU to undertake a national study to investigate if there was a higher rate of breast cancer among female ABC employees than in the wider Australian population. This followed an apparent cluster of cases at the ABC’s Toowong studio in Queensland. The study found ABC employees (outside of Queensland) have the same breast cancer risk as the rest of the Australian population and the apparent cancer cluster was not a widespread problem experienced by other ABC studios. Guidelines for the management of advanced prostate cancer This research involved a review of scientific literature covering the treatment of men with advanced prostate cancer. In this study, CERU researchers and an expert group of clinicians developed clinical treatment guidelines and patient guides to help practitioners and patients choose the best course of treatment.

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What is epidemiology? Epidemiology is the study of illness in specified populations and the application of this study to the control of health problems. Epidemiology may encompass observation, analytical research and hypothesis testing in the areas of disease, death, behaviour, reaction to preventive regimens and the provision and use of health services. Descriptive epidemiology provides information about how much disease exists in a population, and by how much this differs between groups. Analytical epidemiology endeavours to search for reasons why these differences occur. The aim of epidemiology is to promote, protect and restore health.

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Significant research highlights During 2009, a number of our research activities made important contributions to the various stages of the cancer journey. These included:

Lung cancer study This project studied the treatment experiences of over 1,800 lung cancer patients in NSW in the period 2001-02 and found significantly fewer people received radiotherapy than suggested by best practice treatment guidelines. The study concluded that radiotherapy is underutilised in NSW, with the greatest gap between optimal treatment and practice being in those diagnosed with limited stage small cell lung cancer and stage III non-small cell lung cancer. The research also explored some of the reasons why radiotherapy is not used. Although some patients refuse radiotherapy, the practices of physicians were found to be far more important predictors.

Pathways to thyroid cancer diagnosis This study involved 452 people with thyroid cancer to determine the circumstances leading to their diagnosis. It also collected information on their exposure to the risk factors thought to be related to thyroid cancer. The research found 40% of diagnoses were made due to patient concern, 16% occurred when the doctor noticed a lump, 11% were incidental findings from a medical imaging procedure after diagnosis of a benign thyroid disorder. Analysis of the data collected on known and possible risk factors for thyroid cancer is still in progress and should prove extremely valuable in developing further thyroid cancer research.

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Screening behaviours in migrants With 23% of the NSW population born overseas, more information is needed on the differences in cancer types and exposures between migrants and the locally born population. Using the population data provided by the 45 and Up Study, this study focused on migrants’ use of cancer screening. The study found screening for bowel cancer was significantly underused by many migrant groups compared to Australian-born participants. Mammography use was also lower among women born in certain geographic areas. In contrast, there was little variability in Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA testing). The data also indicates that as the number of years lived in Australia increases, cancer testing among migrants approaches the level of that for Australian-born residents.

Cervical health study Worldwide, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in women. This study is examining the importance of various factors such as smoking, exposure to human papillomaviruses, and medications such as oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy in the development of pre-invasive cervical cancer. Over 11,000 women with pre-cancerous cervical abnormalities have been recruited to the study, making it one of the largest studies into women’s health in Australia. Blood samples from more than 4,000 participants are currently being analysed for biomarkers, and liquid-based cytology samples will be reviewed.


Case study – Prostate Cancer Care and Outcomes Study While prostate cancer is a significant health issue for men, survival after diagnosis has increased substantially in the past two decades. However, not enough is known about the quality of life for patients after their treatment. This study is investigating the patterns and outcomes of care for NSW men aged under 70 who are diagnosed with prostate cancer. It aims to assess the quality of life five years after diagnosis for 1,995 men with prostate cancer and for a further group of 495 men without prostate cancer. The men participating in the study were initially interviewed to provide a baseline and then reinterviewed at one, two, three and five years after diagnosis. This study, which was originally funded by the Department of Veterans Affairs, is managed by Dr David Smith and aims to describe the medium- and long-term outcomes of treatment for prostate cancer. It assesses patients’ supportive care needs, their quality of life, and the treatments received by newly diagnosed men. The study has also quantified the effects of different management approaches such as surgery, radiotherapy and hormonal therapy three to five years after diagnosis. The main area of interest is the effect on the quality of life for men, with the focus being on incontinence, bowel problems and impotency. The study concluded that in men with early stage prostate cancer, general mental and physical health is rarely affected long-term by their type of treatment. However, the treatment type does carry specific effects which remain in the long-term. The majority of men in the study experienced worse sexual function after treatment compared to both their pre-treatment function and the function of men from the general population. However, not all men are bothered by the associated losses in sexual, urinary or bowel function. The results were recently published in the British Medical Journal and the researchers believe the choice of treatment for prostate cancer patients needs to take into account each man’s preferences for the possibility of these side effects. The study is now looking at the quality of life outcomes for men with advanced prostate cancer. Researchers are examining the five-year quality of life outcomes in greater detail and investigating men’s preferences for treatment side effects. Statistics will also be compiled for 10- and 15-year recurrence and survival for prostate cancer patients. If additional funding is received, 10-year quality of life follow-up research will be undertaken. In addition to the main research project, two additional sub-studies are underway. The first of these is the Prostate Cancer Outcome Sun study, which is exploring the association between Vitamin D and the recurrence of prostate cancer. This involves testing blood samples and an analysis of questionnaire data provided by study participants. A further study into the use of complementary and alternative therapies by men with prostate cancer has been funded by the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia. This study aims to understand the range and effectiveness of complementary therapies men use to beat prostate cancer or overcome any side effects.

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Behavioural research

Research highlights

Understanding how cancer affects patients, carers and families, as well as how individual, behavioural, lifestyle and social factors affect the risk of developing or surviving cancer, is important for developing effective cancer prevention strategies and providing better cancer care.

Some of the important projects undertaken by CHeRP during 2009 included:

What we do Much of the behavioural research work completed by Cancer Research Division is undertaken by our Centre for Health Research and Psycho-Oncology (CHeRP). CHeRP’s research covers the full spectrum of the cancer journey, from the prevention of cancer, the psychosocial consequences of diagnosis and treatment, to end-of-life issues. Based at the University of Newcastle, CHeRP draws on the expertise of a network of health experts, including the researchers working at the Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) and Priority Research Centre in Health Behaviour.

Our core research areas Our core areas of research are: • Reducing inequalities in cancer prevention and control – understanding the social and environmental factors that increase risk of cancer, and developing strategies that reduce social inequalities in risk-status behaviours such as smoking, alcohol use, sun exposure and cancer screening behaviours. • Nutrition and physical activity – understanding the issues that support healthy eating and cancer smart practices, and developing and evaluating interventions to optimise the energy balance to reduce cancer risk. • Cancer survivorship – state-wide studies assessing the psychosocial wellbeing of cancer survivors and partners/caregivers, developing and testing interventions to improve survivor and/or family wellbeing, developing and refining patient-reported outcome measures. • Advanced cancer and palliative care – descriptive research to better understand the unmet needs of advanced cancer patients and their families, developing and testing interventions to improve needs-based care for people with advanced disease and their caregivers, and translation of research into clinical practice.

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Partners and caregivers study This ongoing study involves 547 partners and caregivers of cancer survivors and is providing valuable information on issues such as their level of anxiety, unmet needs, and the impact of caring on their work and financial situation. Information is being collected from partners and caregivers over five years to track how these issues change over time. Analysis of data collected at six months post-diagnosis found that partners and caregivers have higher levels of distress than the person diagnosed with cancer. Analysis is currently underway to identify the characteristics of partners and caregivers who experience high levels of anxiety and depression.

Palliative care needs assessment study This year, CHeRP completed a prospective, multisite, multi-discipline study to assess the impact of the introduction and systematic use of the Palliative Care Needs Assessment Guidelines and the Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease – Cancer (NAT: PD-C) on the needs and service utilisation of people with advanced cancer and their caregivers. The study found that the NAT: PD-C is a highly acceptable and efficient tool and that the routine, systematic and regular use of the Guidelines and NAT: PD-C in a range of clinical settings can facilitate the timely provision of needsbased care, including palliative care.

Evaluation of Cancer Council NSW support services Evaluation is an intrinsic part of Cancer Council NSW practices and ensures that the programs and services we deliver continue to meet the needs of those affected by cancer. During 2009, CHeRP completed evaluations of the acceptability of the Cancer Council Connect program and the Telephone Support Group service. Although some areas for improvement were identified, both services were highly regarded by participants, and highlighted the value of including peer support as part of the suite of supportive care services available to people affected by cancer.


Case study – Tackling Tobacco While smoking rates in Australia have been steadily declining over the past 30 years, this decline has not been equal among all sub-groups of the population. Severely disadvantaged and marginalised groups such as the homeless, prisoners, indigenous people, individuals with a low income, and individuals with a mental illness are consistently found to have significantly higher rates of tobacco use. Tackling Tobacco is a research partnership between CHeRP and Cancer Council NSW’s Tackling Tobacco team to gain insights into how smoking rates can be reduced among socially disadvantaged groups. This program of research studies is investigating the acceptability and effectiveness of engaging nongovernment community service organisations to deliver smoking cessation support to their disadvantaged clients. Community organisations have ongoing contact with a large number of highly disadvantaged members of the community and are in a position to provide personalised and tailored quit support. However, little is currently being done within community service organisations to help clients quit smoking. To explore the acceptability and feasibility of providing smoking cessation support in the community service setting, in-depth interviews and focus groups were conducted with managers, staff and clients of 11 New South Wales-based community service organisations. Overwhelmingly, results suggested that the non-government, community social service setting is a promising access point for targeting socially disadvantaged smokers. Managers and staff reported that smoking was a significant issue for their clients, contributing not only to poor health but also to financial strain. They perceived the provision of smoking care as being compatible with their role as care providers, and were keen to access quit smoking programs and resources. Many clients reported a desire to quit smoking and thought that personalised support from the community service organisation would be helpful. To build on these promising findings, in 2010 a pilot study funded by Cancer Council NSW, University of Newcastle and Cancer Institute NSW is being conducted in a Sydney-based community service organisation. Support workers within Anglicare’s Personal Helpers and Mentors program will receive smoking cessation training and will be asked to provide quit smoking advice to their clients. Outcomes including smoking status, number of quit attempts, intention to quit and the acceptability of receiving and providing this type of support will be measured over six months. In addition, the research team is also currently conducting a health survey of 300 clients accessing a community service for emergency relief, measuring a variety of health-risk behaviours including diet, physical activity, sun protection behaviours, tobacco use, alcohol use and cancer screening behaviours. Clients are also asked to provide a breath sample to biochemically verify their self-reported smoking status. The results of the pilot studies were used to inform the development of a four-year randomised controlled trial led by Dr Billie Bonevski, which has recently received more than $400,000 in funding from the National Health and Medical Research Council.

What is Psycho-oncology? Psycho-oncology is the study of the effects of cancer on a person’s psychological health and the study of social and behavioural factors that may affect the disease

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External research program Cancer Council supports some of the best and brightest cancer researchers currently working in Australia through its external research program. The external research program is managed by the Research Strategy and Scientific Development Unit (RSSD) and is headed by Dr Monica Robotin. In 2009, Cancer Council allocated over $9 million to external research projects.

Our aim Our aim is to make fundamental game-changing contributions to science and to the way cancer is prevented and treated – and ultimately to save lives.

How we support research Cancer Council supports cancer research through funding and supporting a range of grant schemes, which range from short-term projects aiming to build momentum in areas where scientific information is scant and research teams are few (such as one-year funding for Innovator grants), to long-term programs aiming to answer a broad spectrum of research questions around specific cancers (such as the five-year Program Grant scheme and the Strategic Research Partnership grants). At the same time, we strive to identify and fund specific research activities that offer the greatest promise in accelerating progress in cancer research. Our external research funding program currently comprises over 70 discrete research activities, including 59 Project Grants, three Program Grants, six Strategic Research Partnerships (STREP) and six Innovator Grants.

Strategic Research Partnerships grants (STREP) What are STREP grants? STREP grants are designed to facilitate collaboration with clinical research teams to provide an environment for discovery research and solve high-priority research questions with a tangible impact on cancer control. STREP grants are not purely investigator driven, but involve consensus and collaboration between all key stakeholders to address the challenge of capacity building in underresourced areas of cancer research.

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How does the STREP process work? Strategic Research Partnership (STREP) grants are five-year collaborative research ventures with well-established research and clinical groups. These grants involve three stages, with the aim to accelerate the uptake of new research findings into clinical practice (translational research), particularly for those cancers with poor outcomes and where funding through other mechanisms has lagged behind the clinical need. Stage 1 – Core research agenda • Researchers assemble groundbreaking teams and develop the potential for broader collaboration. • Core research agenda developed and implemented. Stage 2 – Consensus building for research prioritisation • CCNSW undertakes an evidence-based review of science and practice. • CCNSW and the research team identify highpriority research objectives with input from experts in the field, cancer patients and carers. Stage 3 – Research procurement • CCNSW develops a research procurement strategy to address the objectives identified in stage 2.

Our aim is to make fundamental game-changing contributions to science


Case study – investigating pancreatic cancer Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in Australia. Despite these poor outcomes, pancreatic cancer research has been poorly funded, meaning that significant research developments in this area have been lacking for several decades. To address this problem, Cancer Council awarded a STREP grant to a team led by Professor Andrew Biankin at the Garvan Institute of Medical Research. The aim of the project is to improve the early diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer patients in NSW through a coordinated multi-disciplinary approach, in order to improve quality of care in this cancer. The staged approach of the STREP process identified seven priority areas in pancreatic cancer research. This is an ambitious list of promising research directions to improve understanding of what genetic and environmental factors influence the likelihood of developing pancreatic cancer; knowledge of tumour biology; identification of new treatments; and development of strategies to detect the cancer at an earlier stage. To this end, Cancer Council funds six Innovator Grants in Pancreatic Cancer and supports the Australian component of the International Cancer Genome Consortium. Innovator Grants in Pancreatic Cancer were designed to encourage new researchers to enter the field of pancreatic cancer research, and try out new research ideas with a degree of risk beyond that normally accepted in grant funding schemes. The Innovator Grants, which are part of the pancreatic cancer program, will provide answers to questions about pancreatic cancer that relate to areas of research including: Dr Fares Al-Ejeh, Royal Adelaide Hospital ‘Novel combination therapy against human pancreatic cancer’ Professor Minoti Apte, University of New South Wales ‘Hitting the Right Target: Inhibition of growth factor effects on the stromal cell as a novel therapeutic approach in pancreatic cancer’ Dr Jennifer MacDiarmid, EnGenelC Pty Ltd ‘siRNA-packaged, targeted nanocells for reversal of gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer and treatment of the cancer with gemcitabine-packaged, targeted nanocells’ Dr Phoebe Phillips, University of New South Wales ‘Targeting the microtubule cytoskeleton in the treatment of pancreatic cancer’ Professor Des Richardson, University of Sydney ‘Development of novel and selective chemotherapeutics for treatment of pancreatic cancer’ Dr Aiqun Xue, Royal North Shore Hospital ‘Discovery of prognostic serum biomarkers of pancreatic cancer’

Prof Andrew Biankin, Garvan Institute of Medical Research

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Making pancreatic cancer research count

Supporting pancreatic cancer patients

As part of our commitment to pancreatic cancer research, Cancer Council is providing financial support of $2.5 million over five years to the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) project.

Providing better support to people affected by cancer of the pancreas is another important component of the work being funded through Cancer Council’s STREP Grant.

The ICGC project is an ambitious biomedical and clinical research study involving some of the world’s leading scientists working together to better understand the genetic changes associated with 50 of the most common cancer types. Australia is part of an international consortium which is mapping the pancreatic cancer genome. This will allow the development of better ways of diagnosing this cancer earlier, providing individualised treatment, and hopefully understanding how to prevent this cancer in the future. The Australian scientific team is led by Professor Sean Grimmond from the Institute of Molecular Biosciences at the University of Queensland and Professor Andrew Biankin from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research in Sydney. To facilitate the work of the Australian team, the NSW Pancreatic Cancer Network will be extended nationally. The Network was initially established through Cancer Council’s STREP program to improve the management of pancreatic cancer in NSW by bringing together experts in pancreatic cancer from different specialties.

Additional funding through Cancer Australia’s Building Cancer Support Networks Program Grant enabled Cancer Council NSW, in collaboration with the NSW Pancreatic Cancer Network, to undertake a research project to improve our understanding of the support and information needs of pancreatic cancer patients, their families and carers. The project involved analysing the support and information needs of those affected by this cancer and then developing and evaluating models of supportive care for them. The initial research identified significant unmet needs among this patient group. The data was then used to develop a range of support tools tailored to their specific needs. These include printed information booklets, multimedia tools, an online forum, telephone support groups, voluntary peer support and establishment of local community support groups. The support model developed during this project provides a valuable template that can be adapted for use with patient groups affected by other cancers and is readily transferable to supportive care programs outside NSW.

Cancer Council is providing financial support of $2.5 million over five years to the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) project.

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Program Grants What are Program Grants? Program Grants provide funding to research groups in NSW with a track record of research excellence, who undertake broad-based, collaborative research in multidisciplinary teams they seek to address a wide range of research questions that require a longer-term research focus and commensurate financial support. Grants are for a period of five years, rather than the more usual three-year grant period.

The added funding security provided by this grant scheme enhances the productivity of these research teams by providing support for free and flexible enquiries that go beyond what is achievable through other types of funding grants. Program Grants are awarded in the fields of molecular and cellular biology, experimental therapeutics, clinical research, behavioural research, epidemiology, psychosocial research and health services.

Case study – cellular immortalisation One of the significant pieces of research currently being funded under a five-year Cancer Council Program Grant is the work of Professor Roger Reddel from the Children’s Medical Research Institute. This research project focuses on the study of cancer cell immortalisation, or the process which allows cancer cells to divide an unlimited number of times. The growth of cancer depends on the immortalised cell populations they contain. Their immortality is a property that clearly distinguishes them from normal cells. These characteristics represent ideal targets for treatments that can be effective against most types of cancer and have few side effects on the normal, non-immortalised cells. Professor Reddel was awarded his current Program Grant in 2006. His research team has gained world recognition for discovering the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT), a mechanism used by some cancer cells to achieve immortal growth. Almost all cancers use one of two mechanisms to multiply indefinitely and become ‘immortal’. About 15% of cancers, including some aggressive brain and bone cancers, and some breast and lung cancers, use the ALT mechanism. The other 85% use the enzyme telomerase, which was discovered by Australian-born Professor Elizabeth Blackburn and her US colleagues, who were awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Medicine for this discovery. Of note, the Cancer Council funded Professor Blackburn’s research back in 1986. In 2009, Dr Jeremy Henson from Professor Reddel’s team developed an assay that will speed up the search for drugs to treat these cancers, because it offers a rapid method for screening compounds to determine whether they could be developed further as anti-cancer drugs. For some aggressive brain tumours, and maybe some other cancers, this test will provide more accurate life expectancy information for patients where doctors now have very little clarity. The assay can also be used as a blood test for some cancers.

Bone cancer cells that use the ALT mechanism for immortal growth

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Project Grants What are Project Grants? Cancer Council awards Project Grants for research into all aspects of cancer. These include its causes, mechanism, prevention, treatment and care, and the organisation and performance of cancer control services.

Grants awarded in 2009 In 2009, Cancer Council awarded 22 new Project Grants and supported 37 continuing grants, taking the total number of Project Grants to 59.

This research will focus on how IQGAP1 regulates the invasive processes, so that new therapies can be established to reduce further tumour spread and improve overall survival. Dr Xu Dong Zhang, University of Newcastle Targeting p53 isoforms to promote chemo-sensitivity in human melanoma

Examples of the research projects funded through the Project Grants scheme include:

Melanoma is a major health problem in Australia. Killing tumour cells by DNA-damaging chemotherapy is mediated by the tumour suppressor p53. Metastatic melanoma is unresponsive to DNA-damaging chemotherapy, even though p53 is detected, suggesting that p53 is nonfunctional. This project will study the role of p53 variants in regulating p53 activity in response to DNA-damaging drugs. The study will provide insights into how p53 becomes inactivated in melanoma and why melanoma is resistant to chemotherapy.

Dr Chris Jolly, Centenary Institute of Cancer Medicine and Cell Biology Understanding AID-induced cancer

Dr Geraldine O’Neill, University of Sydney Understanding the events that switch ‘on’ and ‘off’ molecules that cause metastasis in breast cancer

This funding helps make NSW and its scientists important players in the global effort to better prevent, cure, treat and palliate cancer.

Research highlights 2009

This work aims to understand how DNA repair systems that normally ensure DNA breaks are harmless can be ‘tricked’ into amplifying DNA damage and causing cancer. Dr Michael Murray, University of Sydney Development of personalized dosage protocols While the use of two new anticancer drugs imatinib and sunitinib has revolutionised the treatment of several cancers, about 20% of patients suffer significant toxicity or are undertreated, due to differences in the ways the drugs are metabolised in the body. This study is seeking to develop models to allow tailored drug dosages to be devised. Dr Mary Bebawy, University of Sydney Transfer of P-glycoprotein in multi-drug resistance This study aims to examine whether microparticles play a role in the spread of multi-drug resistance between cancer cells. Findings from this project could assist in the development of new treatment strategies which target and inhibit the process of microparticles during cancer treatments. Dr Kerrie McDonald, University of Sydney IQGAP1 regulation of glioma cell migration For most patients diagnosed with High Grade Glioma, there is no realistic possibility of a cure, or even longterm survival, due to tumour invasiveness, which is poorly targeted by conventional therapy. Recent studies by this group identified the association of IQGAP1 protein expression with poor overall survival.

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Over 65% of breast cancers are oestrogen receptor positive and the oestrogen receptor is a major target of anti-breast cancer therapies. Disseminated, metastatic breast cancer is refractory to treatment and a common cause of patient mortality, and oestrogens are emerging as potential regulators of metastatic cancer. The goal of our project is to determine how oestrogen switches on a newly identified regulator of cancer cell metastasis.

Cancer Trials What are Cancer Trials NSW? CCNSW funds 40 cancer trials nurses and data managers across seven area health services and in 26 metropolitan and regional hospitals in NSW. Cancer clinical trials are the best way to improve the care and treatment of people with cancer, so in 2001 CCNSW developed Cancer Trials NSW, a collaborative initiative that supports and promotes cancer clinical trials research in NSW. In 2006, the initiative came under the control of the NSW Cancer Institute, with CCNSW continuing to provide $1.3 million per annum to support the program.


Incorporating research into practice Health Strategies Division While research into every aspect of the cancer journey is important, it is vital that the valuable knowledge uncovered by this work is used to effectively inform communities about these findings and to influence government policy.

Our objectives In Health Strategies, our core mission is to prevent cancer by creating healthy environments, promoting healthy public policy and providing clear evidence-based advice to the people of NSW.

How we use our findings Nearly 50% of all cancers have known risk factors and are, in theory, preventable. By reducing exposure to the risk factors identified during our research activities, we can make an important contribution to cancer prevention. Cancer Council’s Health Strategies Division has a strong strategic partnership with the Cancer Research Division and works to ensure the findings from our research work are translated into workable information that can be delivered to various communities. The Health Strategies Division aims to ensure the cancer prevention solutions presented to communities are evidence-based and supported by the highest quality research activities. The focus areas for this work are nutrition, skin cancer prevention and tobacco control.

Case study – sports sponsorships Food marketing is a focus area for Cancer Council, as marketing to children has been identified as an important intervention point for preventing childhood obesity and increased cancer risk in adulthood. Strategic research in this area provides a strong evidence base for our advocacy for the introduction of specific legislation reducing the marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages directed towards children. To further this work, Cancer Council has been awarded an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant in partnership with The University of Sydney. This project will investigate the scope and pervasiveness of food company sports sponsorship. It will also undertake a pilot study to determine the effectiveness of a framework to reorient sports sponsorship towards improved promotion of health.

Research highlights 2009 This year we made valuable progress in several key research areas: Effects of food marketing on children and parents – This research is designed to provide greater insight into the impact of food marketing on children and their parents. The project was funded by an Australian Research Council Linkage Grant in collaboration with University of Western Australia, University of South Australia and Cancer Council South Australia. Eat it to beat it – This pilot community intervention program in the Hunter region is designed to develop awareness about the importance of increasing fruit and vegetable consumption to help prevent cancer. ‘Fruit & Veg $ense’ sessions have also been held to increase practical skills and knowledge of parents about purchasing and preparing fruit and vegetables within a budget.

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Appendix Cancer Research Division Staff and Students A/Prof Freddy Sitas, BSc, MSc (Med), DPhil Director, Cancer Research Division Naomi Crain, BA, AdvDipFamTh Executive Assistant to Director Kate Christian, BSc Operations Manager

Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit (CERU) Prof Dianne O’Connell, BMaths(Hons 1), PhD Manager and Senior Epidemiologist Dr Karen Canfell, BE(Hons), DPhil Research Fellow Dr David Smith, BA, MPH, PhD Research Fellow Dr Xue Qin Yu, MPH, PhD Research Fellow Dr Marianne Weber, BA(Hons), PhD Research Fellow Rajah Supramaniam, BSc, MPH(Hons) Program Manager Megan Smith, BE, MPH Program Manager Dr Jufang Shi, MD, MPH, PhD Research Fellow Dr Carolyn Nickson, BA, Grad Dip, PhD Research Fellow

Statisticians Sam Egger, BSc, MBiostat David Goldsbury, BSc(Hons) Project Coordinators Alicia Delgado, BA, MSW(Hons) – Maternity Leave Leighna Carmichael, BA, MSc – Maternity Leave Cat Van Kemenade, MSc (HumMovSc), MPH Leonardo Simonella, BA, MPH(Hons) Dr Barbara Ling, BSc, PhD (Optom & Vision Sci) Katie Armstrong, BAppSc (HIM) Suzanne Hughes, BSc(Hons), MNutri Diet Michael Revius, BSc Jenny Rodger, BA(Hons), MSc Clare Kahn, BMus(Hons), MMus (Perf) Dr. Jjoyce Burcham, PhD Programmers Jie Bin Lew, BSc Robert Walker, BSc Lab Manager Quoc Nguyen Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer Veronica Saunders Field Officer John Dennis, BSc(Hons), MSc(Hons) Laboratory Research Assistants Smitha Rajappan, BPharm, MAppSc Sarita Tiwari, MAppSc, MOBT, D.M.L.T. Research Assistants Jessica Darlington-Brown, BSc (Population Health) Christina Christou, BHS, MPH, Dip Nat Moa Aye, MBBS, MPH Karen Allison, BBehavHlthSc Administration Kimberley McGregor – Maternity Leave Yulia Kim, BLing Claire Wang, BEc, MCommerce Stephanie Deuchar, BA Postgraduate Students Nayyereh Aminisani (PhD) Yoon-Jung Kang (PhD) Visalini Nair-Shalliker (PhD) Leonardo Simonella (PhD)

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Centre of Health Research and Psycho-oncology (CHeRP) Prof Afaf Girgis, PhD, BSc (Hons) Director Genevieve Comiskey Executive Assistant to Director A/Prof Raoul Walsh, PhD, BSc, DipEd Senior Research Academic Dr Christine Paul, PhD, BA (Hons) Senior Research Academic Dr Erica James, PhD, BAppSci, GDipHlthProm, MBus Senior Research Academic Dr Billie Bonevski, PhD, BA (Hons) Senior Research Academic Ms Allison Boyes, MPH, BA(Psych) Research Academic Ms Amy Waller, BA(Psych) (Hons) Research Associate Dr Sylvie Lambert, PhD, RN Post Doctoral Research Fellow Senior Research Officers Vibeke Hansen, BA(Psych)(Hons) Lorraine Paras, BA, GDipHlthProm Flora Tzelepis, BSc(Psych)(Hons)

CEO’s Division Research Strategy Scientific Development Unit (RSSD) Dr Monica Robotin, MBBS, FRACS, MBA, MIH, M Appl Epid Medical Director Cath Holliday, BN MHSc MHP Research Strategy Manager Nysha Thomas, BSc Project Officer Ron Gale Administrative Assistant Steven Tipper, BAppSc(Biomed Sc), MHA, FCHSM Manager, Scientific Development John Woodward, BHSc Project Officer, ‘B Positive’ Project Dr Vidyadhar Putha Project Coordinator, B Positive Project Na Quynh Phu Pham, PhD (Ed), MA (Eng Studies), BA (Linguistics) Vietnamese Community Liaison Officer, ‘B Positive’ Project Paul Lee [Bo Li] Chinese Community Liaison Officer, ‘B Positive’ Project Melissa Pigot, BPsych (Hons); Grad. Cert. Journalism Senior Research Officer

Statistician Christophe Lecathelinais, DESS de Mathématiques Appliqué Research Officers Shari Bonnette, BSocSci Jamie Bryant, BPsych(Hons) Sarah Campbell, BPsych(Hons) Sarah Duncan, BPsych(Hons) Emma Gorton, BPsych(Hons) Alix Hall, BPsych(Hons) Fiona Stacey, BAppSc(Con Sci)(Hons) Alison Zucca, MMedSci, BA(Psych)(Hons) Dissemination Officer Judith Borwein Administrative Assistants Suzanne Myles, BA Elisabeth Fenn-Mitchell Data Manager Sandra Dowley Postgraduate Students Allison Boyes, PhD Candidate (P/T) Jamie Bryant, PhD Candidate (F/T) Sarah Campbell, Professional Doctorate Candidate (P/T) Lorraine Paras, PhD Candidate (P/T) Carla Saunders, PhD Candidate (P/T) Camille Short, PhD Candidate (F/T) Flora Tzelepis, PhD Candidate (P/T) Amy Waller, PhD Candidate (F/T)

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Grants Awarded to Cancer Council Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit (CERU) 1.

Shi JF, Canfell K. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of cervical cancer prevention strategies in China. UICC/ACSBI Fellowship. 2009-11.

2.

Neale R, O’Connell D, Janda M, Merrett N, Goldstein D, Beesley V, Wyld D, Gooden H. Patterns of care and quality of life in patients with pancreatic cancer. NHMRC Project Grant. 2010-12. $655,213

3.

Canfell K, Sitas F, Barnabas R, Garnett G, Beral V, Clements M, O’Connell D. Optimising cervical screening after the introduction of HPV vaccination in Australia: modelling of outcomes. NHMRC Project Grant. 2007-09. $304,692

20. Ward R, Pearson S-A, Haas M, O’Connell D, McKinnon R, Henry D. Establishment of a network to evaluate new and emerging cancer therapies. Cancer Australia Priority-driven Collaborative Research Scheme. 2008-10. $600,000 21. O’Connell D. Developing, promulgating and assessing treatment algorithms for the management of lung cancer in NSW. Cancer Institute NSW 2009-10. $69,060. 22. Marshall V, Reeve T, Pinnock C, Smith D, O’Connell D. Development of clinical practice guidelines for metastatic prostate cancer. Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia. 2009. $43,000.

4.

Canfell K. Economic evaluation of HPV vaccination and cervical screening in New Zealand. National Screening Unit, New Zealand Ministry of Health. 2008-09

5.

Canfell K. MSAC Application 1122 Automated LBC and MSCA Reference 39 Human Papillomavirus DNA testing. Medical Services Advisory Committee, Department of Health and Ageing/NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney. 2008-09

1.

6.

Canfell K. MAVERIC. Manual vs Automated Cytology in the UK (Consultancy). UK National Health Service Cervical Screening Programme. 2009-10

Bonevski B, Girgis A, Ewald B, Armstrong B. GPs and Vitamin D deficiency: A survey of knowledge, attitudes and practices. Cancer Council NSW, 2008-09. $24,615

2.

7.

Armstrong BK, Kedda MA, Smith D, Steginga S, Kricker A, Kimlin M. Sun exposure, Vitamin D and the outcome of prostate cancer. NHMRC Project Grant. 2007-09. $468,013

Bonevski B, Paul C. Action research for tackling tobacco in community based social services. Cancer Council NSW. 2008-09. $55,085

3.

Bonevski B, Paul C. Tackling tobacco in community based social services: a pilot study. University of Newcastle Strategic Pilot Research Grant. 2008-09. $8,487

4.

Bonevski B. Oceania Tobacco Control 09 Conference . Cancer Council Australia Travel Grant 2009. $1,200

5.

Bryant J. Tackling Tobacco: An exploration of methods to reduce smoking in socially disadvantaged populations. Cancer Institute NSW Research Scholars Award. 2009-11. $55,305

6.

Butow P, Girgis A, Goldstein M, Eisenbruch M, King M, Jefford M. Psychological morbidity, unmet needs, quality of life and patterns of care in migrant cancer patients: The first year. Cancer Australia & beyondblue. 2009-12. $600,000

7.

Butow P, Rankin N, Turner J, Girgis A, Dhillon H, White K, Jefford M. Support for Cancer Clinical Trials Program: Psycho-oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG). Cancer Australia. 2008-10. $1,249,864

8.

James E. 11th World Congress of Psycho-oncology 2009. PoCoG Travel Reimbursement Scheme. 2009. $3,904

9.

James E, Girgis A, Plotnikoff R, Sanson-Fisher R, Boyes A, Lubans D, Bonevski B, Morgan P. A trial of physical and social support for cancer survivors and their partners and caregivers. University of Newcastle Internationally Renowned Scholars Program (Prof Kerry Courneya). 2009. $12,000.

8.

9.

O’Connell D, Butow P, Armstrong B, Treloar C, Knight R, Dillon A, Newman C, Supramaniam R. Patterns of cancer care for Indigenous people in NSW. NHMRC Health Services Research Grant. 2007-11. $1,580,755 Armstrong B, Seibel M, Clements M, Kricker A, (Nair-Shaliker V, PhD Student). Relationship between prostate specific antigen, sun exposure and Vitamin D. Prostate Cancer Foundation/Cancer Council NSW/NHMRC Project Grant. 2008-10. $300,000

10. Harris M, Knight R, Spigelman A, O’Connell D, Barton M, Veitch C. Referral pathways in colorectal cancer: general practitioners’ patterns of referral and factors that influence referral. Cancer Australia Prioritydriven Collaborative Research Scheme. 2008-10. $598,750

Centre of Health Research and Psycho-oncology (CHeRP)

11. Sitas F, O’Connell D. ABC Women’s Health Study. Commissioned by the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 2008-09. $225,000 12. Canfell K. HPV triage evaluation in pilot and sentinel sites in England. 2008-09 13. Canfell K, Armstrong B, Aminisani N, Sitas F. Cervical cancer screening behaviour in women born in Asian and Middle Eastern countries compared to Australian-born women: A linkage study in NSW. University of Sydney.2009 $14,513 14. Sitas F, Armstrong B, Banks E, Kricker A, Weber M, Pawlita M. Infectious and lifestyle determinants of non-melanoma skin cancer. NHMRC Project Grant. 2009-11. $953,200 15. Yu XQ. Projecting prevalence by phase of care for colorectal, lung, breast and prostate cancer in New South Wales. NHMRC Fellowship. 2009-12. $279,000 16. O’Connell DL, Chambers S, Moxey A, Smith DP. Use of complementary and lifestyle therapies by men with prostate cancer: a population-based study. Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia . 2009-11. $137,766 17. Simonella L, Lewis H, Canfell K, Smith M, Sitas F, Neal H, Casey D, Maxwell A. New Zealand Women and HPV Study. National Screening Unit, New Zealand Ministry of Health. 2009. 18. Sitas F, O’Connell D, Banks E, Frazer I, Canfell K (Canfell K added as Chief Investigator in May 2009). The effect of exogenous hormones, smoking and HPV on the incidence of screen detected pre-invasive cervical cancer. NHMRC Project Grant. 2006-10. $1,151,625 19. Sitas F, Canfell K, O’Connell D, Banks E, Ward R, Baron M. The NSW Cancer Lifestyle and Evaluation of Risk (CLEAR) Study. Cancer Council NSW. 2006-11. $2,500,000

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10. James E, Sundquist K, Boyes A, Chapman K, Girgis A. Promotion of healthy lifestyles and risk modification for cancer survivors and their partners/caregivers. Department of Health and Ageing. 2009-2010: $198,000 11. Jiwa M, Girgis A, Shaw T, Nation R, Dooley M, Roberts M, Wilkinson A, O’Conneor M, Halkett G, Mitchell G, Stokes J, Fisher C, Davidson P. Palliative Care in Community Pharmacy. Pharmacy Guild of Australia. 2008-09: $643,534. 12. Lam W, Tsang J, Suen D, Epstein R, Kwong A, Girgis A, Fielding R. A longitudinal study of psychosocial needs and psychological distress of Chinese women with advanced breast cancer. University of Hong Kong. 2008-09. $HK106,000 ($AUS14,145) 13. Lambert S, Girgis A, Chambers S. Coping with cancer: Development of a self-directed intervention for patients and their primary support person. University of Newcastle School of Medicine & Public Health Early Career Researcher Pilot Grants 2009. 2009. $10,000 14. Lambert S, Girgis A, Chambers S. Coping with cancer: Development of a self-directed intervention for patients and their primary support person. University of Newcastle Priority Research Centre for Health Behaviour Summer Scholarship. 2009: $4,000


Presentations CERU 15. Moyez J, Girgis A, Shaw T, Nation R, Dooley M, Roberts M, Wilkinson A, O’Connor M, Halkett G, Mitchell G, Stokes J, Fisher C, Davidson P. Palliative Care in Community Pharmacy. Pharmacy Guild of Australia. 2008-09. $643,534 16. Sanson-Fisher R, Girgis A, Wiggers J, Jones A, Durrheim D, Paul C, James E, Bonevski B, Bell C, Boyes A, Kypri K, D’Este C, Attia J, Wolfenden L, Tuyl F, Francis L, Freund M, Johnson C, Jayasekara H, Gwynn J, Bowman J, Outram S, Lynagh M, Johnson N, Gilligan C, Sibbritt D, Tursan d’Espaignet E, Campbell E. Priority Research Centre in Health Behaviour. University of Newcastle. 2009. $79,800 17. Steginga SK, Girgis A, Occhipinti S, Turner J, Carter R, Dunn J. Improving the psychosocial health of people with cancer and their carers: A community based approach. beyondblue and Cancer Australia. 2009-12. $540,284 18. Zucca A. Travel grant to attend the COSA 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. PoCoG Travel Grant. 2009. $1,434

Cancer Information and Support Services (CISS) 1.

Building Cancer Support Networks Initiative: Better Cancer Support Through Consumers 2009 –– Brain Cancer Multimedia Support Network Grant.

2.

Building Cancer Support Networks Initiative: Better Cancer Support Through Consumers 2009 – Cancer of Unknown Primary Grant.

Health Strategies Division (HSD) 1.

Pettigrew S, Quester P, Chapman K, Miller C. Investigating the indirect effects of child targeted food promotion. ARC Linkage Grant 2010-2011. $105,750.

2.

Baur L, Bauman A, Kelly B, Chapman K, Smith B. Food and drink company sponsorship of children’s sport: publicity or philanthropy – 2009 – 2011. $290,500.

1.

Canfell K. Modelling cervical cancer screening in the era of HPV vaccination. Invited talk at Cancer Council NSW Research Awards. 2009; Sydney.

2.

Canfell K. Modelling cervical cancer screening in context of HPV vaccination. Merck Inc. Outcomes Advisory Panel Meeting. November 2009; Philadelphia USA.

3.

Canfell K. Role of modelling informing policy. Invited talk and participation in expert panel discussion. Preventing Cervical Cancer Conference. 2009; Melbourne.

4.

Canfell K. Strategies for cervical screening. Oral presentation at Cervical Cancer Seminar. 2009; Royal Hospital for Women, Randwick.

5.

Canfell K, Shi J-F, Nig Y, Lew JB, et al. Cost-effectiveness of various cervical screening modalities in rural China. Oral presentation at the International Papillomavirus Society Meeting. 2009; Malmo, Sweden.

6.

Canfell K. Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit at CCNSW: Overview and Case Study. NSW Cancer Epidemiology Network Meeting. December 2009; University of Sydney.

7.

Goldsbury D, O’Connell DL. Survival after cancer surgery: is there a difference between public and private hospitals? Oral presentation at the Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast.

8.

James E, Weber M, O’Connell D, et al. Lifestyle behaviours and future health promotion priorities for breast cancer survivors: results from the 45 and Up Study cohort. Oral presentation at UICC Reach to Recovery International Breast Cancer Support Conference. 2009; Brisbane.

9.

Sitas F. Case-control approaches to elucidate associations between infection and cancer. Invited lecture at German Cancer Research Centre. 2009; Heidelberg, Germany.

10. Sitas F, O’Connell DL, Burcham JL, et al. Breast cancer risk among Australian Broadcasting Corporation female employees in Australia. Winner of Best of the Best Oral Presentations. Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast. 11. Smith DP. Finding and using information and data. Oral presentation at Cancer Council Consumer Advocacy Forum. 2009; Sydney. 12. Smith DP. The Prostate Cancer Care and Outcomes Study. Inaugural NSW and ACT Cancer Epidemiology Network Meeting. 2009; Sydney. 13. Supramaniam R. Patterns of Cancer Care for Aboriginal People in New South Wales (APOCC). Oral presentation to Durri Aboriginal Medical Corporation. 2009; Kempsey. 14. Supramaniam R. Cancer research funded by the Cancer Council. Oral presentation to Port Macquarie Connecting Communities Forum. 2009; Sails Resort, Port Macquarie. 15. Supramaniam R, O’Connell D, Treloar C. Patterns of Cancer Care for Aboriginal People in New South Wales (APOCC). August 2009 Departmental Lecture at University of Otago. Wellington, New Zealand. 16. Supramaniam R, O’Connell D. Cancer care for Aboriginal people. Oral presentation given to the Australasian Faculty of Public Health Medicine. May 2009. Sydney

CHeRP 1.

Bonevski B, Bryant J, Paul C. Paying the poor to quit: welfare service staff and client perceptions about financial incentives for smoking cessation. Oceania Tobacco Control Conference. 2009; Darwin.

2.

Boyes A. It’s been a journey, I am a survivor. Breast Cancer and Beyond Pre-Congress Workshop, Cancer Nurses Society of Australia 12th Winter Congress, June 2009Newcastle.

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Presentations 3.

Boyes A. Implementation of a model to routinely assess and manage cancer patients’ psychosocial wellbeing. Psycho-Oncology Co-operative Research Group (PoCoG) Concept Development Workshop. September 2009; Sydney.

4.

Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C, O’Brien J, Oakes W. “It’s got a hold on me”: An exploration of barriers and facilitators to quitting smoking among disadvantaged Australian smokers. Oceania Tobacco Control Conference. 2009; Darwin.

5.

Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C. A methodological review of interventions aimed at reducing smoking rates among the socially disadvantaged. National Heart Foundation Conference. 2009; Brisbane.

6.

Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C. Addressing smoking cessation in community social services: barriers and opportunities. National Heart Foundation Conference. 2009; Brisbane.

7.

Bryant J. Smoking cessation for socially disadvantaged clients of community based welfare services: A qualitative study of barriers and facilitators. National Heart Foundation Conference. 2009; Brisbane.

8.

Butow P, Lobb E, Schofield P, Goldstein D, Eisenbruch M, Girgis A, Jefford M, King M, Sze M, Aldridge L. Oncology consultations with patients from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds: The interpreter perspective. 11th World Congress of PsychoOncology. 2009; Vienna, Austria.

9.

Ewald B, James E, Johnson N, Paras L. Efficacy of exercise physiologist counselling in primary care patients: A pilot study to determine feasibility and acceptability. Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Seventh National Physical Activity Conference, Sixth National Sports Injury Prevention Conference. 2009; Brisbane.

10. Freund M, Campbell E, Paul C, Wiggers J, Knight J, Nicholas C. Smoking cessation care provision in NSW public hospitals: Have care levels changed in the past five years? Oceania Tobacco Control Conference. 2009; Darwin. 11. Girgis A, Stacey F, Breen S, Neil A. Feedback of patient reported outcomes: Is it better to tell a caseworker or the patient’s oncologist and general practitioner? 11th World Congress of Psycho-oncology. 2009; Madrid. 12. Girgis A. Palliative Care Needs Assessment Tool: Validity, reliability & clinical utility. Palliative Care Outcomes Collaboration (PCOC) Scientific and Clinical Advisory Committee Meeting. 2009; Sydney. 13. Girgis A. The role of consumers in reviewing research priorities and funding applications. Consumer involvement in research: a priority setting workshop, 15th UICC Reach to Recovery Breast Cancer Support Conference. 2009; Brisbane. 14. Girgis A. International survivorship research activity. Breast Cancer Network Australia (BCNA) Survivorship Think Tank. 2009; Melbourne.

19. James E, Weber M, O’Connell D, Chapman K, Girgis A, Sitas F, Paul C. Lifestyle behaviours and future health promotion priorities for breast cancer survivors: results from the 45 and Up Study cohort. UICC Reach to Recovery International Breast Cancer Support Conference. 2009; Brisbane. 20. Kirk J, Stevens M, James E. Cancer and the GP. General Practitioner Conference & Exhibition, 2009, Sydney. 21. Lambert S. An in-depth exploration of health information-seeking behaviour among individuals diagnosed with breast, prostate or colorectal cancer. University of Newcastle Public Health Seminar, 2009; Newcastle. 22. Loiselle C, Lambert S. Theoretical and evidence-based development of the profile of preferences for cancer information scale. 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology, 2009. Vienna, Austria. 23. Paul C, Bonevski B, Bryant J, Sanson-Fisher RW. Tobacco control research and issues of social disadvantage: Framing an evidenceinformed agenda. Oceania Tobacco Control Conference. 2009; Darwin. 24. Paul CL, Ross S, Hill W, Bryant J. Understanding life as a smoker in high versus low socio-economic environments: results of focus groups segregated by age, gender and socio-economic position. Oceania Tobacco Control Conference. 2009; Darwin. 25. Stacey F. Lifestyle and cancer: what do we know? Cancer Nurses Society of Australia (CNSA) 12th Winter Congress. 2009; Newcastle. 26. Waller A, Girgis A, Johnson C, Lecathelinais C, Sibbritt D. Impact of palliative care needs assessment intervention on patient outcomes and service utilisation. Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast. 27. Zucca A. Cancer Research at CHeRP. Cancer Council NSW Understanding Cancer Forum. 2009; East Maitland.

CISS 1.

Batt GM, Newling G: How are the financial strains of cancer care best addressed? COSA 2009, Gold Coast.

2.

Gilbert E, Hawkins Y, Ussher JM, Perz J. Sundquist K. Changes in sexuality and intimacy following the diagnosis and treatment of cancer: the experience of partners in a sexual relationship with a person with cancer. Poster and paper presented at COSA, 2009, Gold Coast.

3.

Gilbert E, Ussher JM, Perz J. Butow P, Wain G. Joyce C. Gender differences in self-silencing and psychological distress in informal cancer carers. Paper presented at OZPOS/PoCoG professional day at COSA, 2009, Gold Coast.

4.

Gooden H, Batt G, White K, Biankin A, Smith R. Sharing Our Vision: Support and Understanding for people affected by pancreatic cancer. Cancer Nurses Society of Australia (CNSA) 12th Winter Congress. 2009, Newcastle.

5.

Pearce K, Bourbous M, May S, Sundquist K. One size doesn’t fit all Cancer Council NSW responds to the unique supportive care needs of women with breast cancer. Presentation at Reach to Recovery conference 2009, Brisbane.

6.

Sundquist K. Sexuality and Intimacy for Women with Breast and Gynaecological Cancer. Paper presented at Family Planning NSW Conference 2009, Sydney.

7.

Sundquist K. Sexuality and Dying: Taboo Topics. Paper presented at Inaugural Home Hospice Conference, 2009, Sydney.

15. Girgis A. Supporting 20 years of cancer research: Overview of CHeRP programs. Oral presentation for Cancer Council NSW. 2009; Newcastle. 16. Girgis A. How does a cancer diagnosis affect survivors and their caregivers? Tasmanian Haematology Immunology & Neoplasia Group Scientific Meeting. 2009; Launceston. 17. Girgis A, Waller A, Currow D, Johnson C, Lecathelinais C, Sibbritt D, on behalf of the Palliative Care Needs Assessment Research Team. Systematic assessment of palliative care needs: Efficacy, time and resource implications and future directions. 10th Australian Palliative Care Conference, 8th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference. 2009; Perth. 18. James E, Boyes A, Girgis A, Paras L, Lecathelinais C, Eakin E, Zucca A, Reeves M, Paul C. Physical activity amongst Australian cancer survivors: Prevalence of activity, receipt of health professional recommendation, and survivors’ preferences for the timing and delivery of programs. 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology. 2009; Vienna, Austria.

28


HSD

RSSD

1.

Alcock R – Building Capacity for Grassroots Advocacy. AHPA Conference, May 2009.

1.

2.

Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C, O’Brien J, Oakes W - “It’s got a hold on me”: An exploration of barriers and facilitators to smoking among disadvantaged Australian smokers. Oceania Tobacco Control Conference, October 2009.

Pham PQM and Tipper S. Hepatitis B Brochures and Language: A Discourse Analysis, 2nd International Conference on English, Discourse and Intercultural Communication; 2009 Macao.

2.

Robotin M, Kansil M, Howard K, George J, Tipper S, Dore G, Levy M, Penman A. Times are a’changing: Preventing hepatocellular cancer through population-based hepatitis B screening and treatment of high risk cohorts in Sydney, Australia. Gastrointestinal cancers symposium, January 2009, San Francisco.

3.

Robotin M, Tipper S, George J, Penman A. Where the rubber meets the road in liver cancer prevention: lessons from the B Positive project. 3rd International Cancer Control Congress, 2009, Cernobbio, Italy.

4.

Robotin M. Towards personalized medicine for pancreatic cancer. Patient perspective and funding support. Australasian Pancreatic Club meeting, August, 2009, University of New South Wales.

5.

Robotin M. “Perspectives on funding translational research.” University of Sydney Cancer Research Symposium, ‘Succeeding in Research Translation’, July 2009, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital.

6.

10. Kelly B, Hughes C, Chapman K; Chun-Yu Louie J; Dixon H; Crawford J; King L; Daube M; Slevin T. Front-of-Pack Food Labelling: Traffic Light Labelling Gets the Green Light. European Congress on Obesity, May 2009, Amsterdam.

Robotin M. “Community-based management of chronic hepatitis B in at-risk communities in NSW, Australia: implications for CHB management in Indigenous populations.” Annual meeting of the International Circumpolar Arctic Viral Hepatitis Working Group, July, 2009 Yellowknife, North West Territories, Canada.

7.

11. Kelly B, Hughes C, Chapman K; Chun-Yu Louie J; Dixon H; Crawford J; King L; Daube M; Slevin T. Front-of-Pack Food Labelling: Traffic Light Labelling Gets the Green Light. Public Health Association of Australia Conference. September 2009, Canberra.

Robotin M. “The B Positive’ Project: Community-based diagnosis and treatment of chronic hepatitis B in at-risk communities.” Ministerial Advisory Committee on Hepatitis (MACH), March, 2009, Sydney.

8.

Tipper S, Pham NQN, Lee P. Cancer Council NSW ‘B Positive’ Project: working with CALD at-risk communities to provide education about Chronic Hepatitis B. National Hepatitis Health Promotion Conference 2009, Hobart.

3.

Castagna F, Potente S, Myors J. In Your Face: A Study of Youth Culture using a skin cancer prevention curriculum resource, English Teachers Association Conference, November 2009.

4.

Chapman K. The perfect diet for cancer prevention, Institute of Obesity, Nutrition and Exercise at Sydney University, June 2009.

5.

Chapman K. NSW Healthy Food Basket Survey, Sydney Food Fairness Alliance Conference. October 2009, Sydney.

6.

Chapman K. Parents Jury, Cancer Society November 2009, New Zealand.

7.

Hull, P. Working with the community sector to reduce tobacco related harms: findings from the Cancer Council NSW.

8.

Kelly B, Chapman K. TV Food Advertising to Children: A Global Perspective. European Congress on Obesity, May 2009, Amsterdam.

9.

Kelly B, Chapman K. TV Food Advertising to Children: A Global Perspective. Public Health Association of Australia Conference September 2009, Canberra.

12. Kelly B, Chapman K, King L. Using a research framework to identify knowledge gaps in research on food marketing to children in Australia. Public Health Association of Australia Conference September 2009, Canberra. 13. Kelly B. Sponsorship of sport: what one hand giveth the other taketh away. Boden Institute of Obesity, Nutrition and Exercise – November 2009, University of Sydney. 14. Malpas G, Coppa K, Potente S. - Utilising a social change analysis to develop skin cancer prevention interventions for outdoor workers. Health Promotion Conference May 2009, Perth. 15. Potente S, Williams A, Malpas G. Between a rock and a hot place: Ethnographic research on youth sun protection. Australian Market and Social Research Society Conference September 2009, Sydney. 16. O’Brien J – Engaging the community sector as a way to reduce smoking related harm among high prevalence populations: Evaluation findings from the first round of CCNSW’ Tackling Tobacco Community Initiatives Scheme. Conference of the Public Health Association of Australia – September 2009 17. O’Brien J – Tackling Tobacco Program: Engaging the community sector to reduce smoking related harm among disadvantaged populations. Oceania Tobacco Control Conference – October 2009 18. Tackling Tobacco program. Oceania Tobacco Control Conference, Reducing Inequality Through Tobacco Control, October 2009, Darwin.

29


EPI Hour 2009

Posters

Epi Hour is a monthly presentation series hosted by the Cancer Epidemiology Research unit. We source speakers from within the Cancer Research Division, or from our extensive list of collaborators. Presentations highlight the most recent findings and outcomes of research into cancer, with a strong focus on epidemiology. We hope that Epi Hour is an accessible way for Cancer Council NSW staff and members of the public to keep up-to-date on the latest research findings.

CERU

A/Prof Freddy Sitas Director, Cancer Research Unit, Cancer Council NSW Infectious Agents and Cancer

1.

Nickson C, Lew JB, Clements M, et al. HPV type-specific natural history models identified through simulation modelling. Poster presentation at the International Papillomavirus Society Meeting. 2009; Malmo, Sweden; Cancer Council NSW.

2.

Rodger J, Supramaniam R, O’Connell DL, et al. Challenges in conducting the Aboriginal Patterns of Cancer Care (APOCC) Project. Poster presentation at the Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast.

3.

Mr Leonardo Simonella PhD Candidate, Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit, CCN Lung cancer treatment guidelines and current practice: reasons for deviation and effects on survival

Simonella L, Lew JB, Egger S, et al. Sexual behaviour in Australia and New Zealand and impact on HPV vaccination. Poster presented at the International Papillomavirus Society Meeting. 2009; Malmo, Sweden; Cancer Council NSW.

4.

Dr Xue Qin Yu Statistician, CERU, Cancer Council NSW Global Burden of Disease Report

Sitas F, Yu XQ, O’Connell DL, et al. Higher risk of smoking related cancers in people with non-melanoma skin cancer: opportunities for prevention. Poster presentation at the Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast.

5.

Smith MA, Walker RJ, Brotherton JM, et al. Impact of female HPV vaccination on males in Australia. Poster presentation at the International Papillomavirus Society Meeting. 2009; Malmo, Sweden; Cancer Council NSW.

6.

Supramaniam R, O’Connell DL. Beyond access: is aboriginality a risk factor for survival after breast cancer? Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast.

7.

Vinod SK, Simonella L, Goldsbury D, et al. Underutilisation of Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer in New South Wales, Australia. Poster presentation at World Lung Cancer Conference. 2009; San Francisco, USA; Cancer Council NSW.

8.

Kahn C, O’Connell DL, Simonella L, Sywak M. Pathways to the diagnosis of thyroid cancer in New South Wales. Poster. COSA 36th Annual Scientific Meeting 2009 Gold Coast.

9.

Shi JF, Canfell K, Lew JB, et.al. Cost-effectiveness of various cervical screening modalities in rural China. Poster presentation at the International Papillomavirus Society Meeting. 2009; Malmo, Sweden.

Amy Waller PhD Candidate, Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology Palliative Care Needs Assessment Program Dr Marianne Weber Research Fellow, CERU, Cancer Council NSW The 45 and Up Study and Cancer Related Research Dr Karen Canfell Senior Research Fellow, CERU, Cancer Council NSW Evaluation of Cervical Cancer Prevention Strategies in Australia, New Zealand and China Rajah Supramaniam Biostatistician, Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit, CCN Aboriginal Patterns of Cancer Care Study Dr Billie Bonevski Senior Research Academic, Centre for Health Research & Psychooncology, Cancer Council NSW & University of Newcastle Tackling Tobacco Strategy A/Prof Dianne O’Connell Senior Epidemiologist and Manager, CERU, Cancer Council NSW ABC Women’s Health Study Dr David Smith Research Coordinator, CERU, Cancer Council NSW Five Year Quality of Life Outcomes for Men with Prostate Cancer – The NSW Prostate Cancer Outcomes Study A/Prof Freddy Sitas Director, Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council NSW HPV and Oesophageal Cancer – the evidence so far

30

10. Canfell K, Shi JF, Lew JB et. Al. Lifetime outcomes after a single round of cervical screening with HPV testing in rural China. Poster presentation at the International Cancer Control Congress. 2009; Como, Italy.

CHeRP 1.

Aldridge L, McGrane J, Butow P, Goldstein D, Girgis A, Jefford M, Schofield P, King M, Eisenbruch M, Duggal-Beri P, Sze M, Lobb E, Grayson N, Faraji S. Unmet needs in Chinese, Greek and Arabicspeaking cancer patients in New South Wales. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast.

2.

Aldridge L, Butow P, Goldstein D, Eisenbruch M, Girgis A, Jefford M, Schofield P, King M, Duggal-Beri P, Sze M, Lobb E, Grayson N, Faragi S. Unmet needs in Chinese, Greek, Arabic and Englishspeaking cancer patients in New South Wales. Poster presentation at 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology. 2009; Vienna, Austria.

3.

Bonevski B, Paul C, Bryant J, Melville C. Smoke-free at NSW TAFE: Untapped potential? Oceania Tobacco Control 09; 7-9 October 2009; Darwin.

4.

Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C. A weak rudder on the ship of disadvantage: assessing methodological rigour in smoking cessation research with disadvantaged groups. Oceania Tobacco Control 09; October 2009; Darwin.

5.

Bryant J, Bonevski B, Paul C, O’Brien J, Oakes W. Smoking cessation for disadvantaged smokers. Do community welfare organisations have a role to play? Oceania Tobacco Control 09; 7-9 October 2009; Darwin.


6.

7.

8.

9.

Butow P, Lobb E, Schofield P, Jefford M, Goldstein D, King M, Eisenbruch M, Girgis A, Sze M, Aldridge L. Oncology consultations with patients from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds the interpreters’ perceptions of roles, challenges and support needs. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast. Hall AE, Boyes AW, Bowman J, Zucca AC, Girgis A. “The young ones”: psychosocial wellbeing and service utilisation of young cancer survivors. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast. James E, Boyes A, Girgis A, Paras L, Lecathelinais C, Eakin E, Zucca A, Reeves M, Paul C. Physical activity amongst Australian cancer survivors: Prevalence of activity, receipt of Health Professional recommendation, and survivors’ preferences for the timing and delivery of programs. Meeting of the International Society for Behavioural Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), June 2009, Portugal. Mitchell G, Girgis A, Jiwa M, Sibbritt D, Burridge L. Overcoming methodological barriers to conducting GP research in a vulnerable population: caregivers of palliative care patients. Poster presentation at 2009 General Practice & Primary Health Care Research Conference. 2009; Melbourne.

10. Short C, James E, Girgis A. Tailored lifestyle programs: A ‘How to” guide to researchers and health professionals. Poster presentation at 11th World Congress of Psycho-Oncology. 2009; Vienna, Austria. 11. Short C, James E, Girgis A. Tailoring to promote physical activity and broken sedentary time amongst chronic disease populations . 2009 Australian Conference of Science and Medicine in Sport, Seventh National Physical Activity Conference, Sixth National Sports Injury Prevention Conference. 14-17 October 2009; Brisbane. 12. Thewes B, Boyes A, Girgis A. Fear of recurrence in adult cancer survivors: results of a registry-based study. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast. 13. Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Wiggers J, Knight J, Daly J, Girgis A. Recruiting non-volunteer smokers to proactive telephone counselling: what are their long-term cessation rates? Oceania Tobacco Control 09. 7-9 October 2009; Darwin. 14. Waller A, Girgis A, Johnson C, Currow D, Lecathelinais C, Sibbritt D, on behalf of the Palliative Care Project Team. Evaluation of a palliative care needs assessment intervention. 10th Australian Palliative Care Conference and the 8th Asia Pacific Hospice Conference. 24-27 September 2009; Perth. 15. Waller A, Girgis A, Lecathelinais C, Scott W, Foot L, Sibbritt D, Currow D. Validity, reliability and clinical feasibility of a needs assessment tool for people with progressive cancer. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast. 16. Zucca A, Boyes A, Girgis A, Hall AE. Travel all over the countryside: travelling for cancer treatment in NSW and Victoria. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australasia 36th Annual Scientific Meeting. 2009; Gold Coast.

Disadvantage. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009, Gold Coast. 4.

Newling G, Robinson K, Powell A, Braham J, Batt G. Cancer Information in Car Parks. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009, Gold Coast.

5.

O’Callaghan V, Asprey G, Sundquist K. Subsidised Massage Program for Women with Breast Cancer Poster presentation at COSA, 2009, Gold Coast.

6.

Sundquist K, Blair T, Pearce K. Cancer Care – Building resilience in challenging times. Poster presented at COSA, November 2009.

7.

Ussher JM, Wong WTE, Perz J, Butow P, Wain G. A qualitative analysis of changes in relationship dynamics and roles between people with cancer and their primary informal carer. Poster presented at COSA, November 2009.

8.

Ussher JM, Perz J, Butow P, Wain G, Joyce C, Gilbert E. Gender differences in self-silencing and psychological distress in informal cancer carers. Poster presented at COSA, November 2009.

9.

Wilson T. Achievements & Challenges of the Eat It To Beat It Program, Collaboration of Community Obesity Prevention Sites National Conference, 2009, Melbourne.

RSSD 1.

Holliday C, Thomas N, Pigot M, Crossing S, Robotin M. Consumer research forum: proactively engaging consumers in research. Poster presentation at COSA Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009. Gold Coast.

2.

Holliday C, Robotin M. The Delphi process: a solution for reviewing novel grant applications. Poster presentation at COSA Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009. Gold Coast.

3.

Holliday C, Pigot M, Sieczko P, Robotin M. Increasing patient recruitment in a national brain tumour study. Poster presentation at COSA Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009. Gold Coast.

4.

Pigot M, Holliday C, Hodgkinson V, Robotin M. Use of a volunteer workface to enhance participation in health research. Poster presentation at COSA Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009. Gold Coast.

5.

Pigot M, Holliday C, Gardoll M, Mealey M, Robotin M. Identification of health research competencies to develop training for a volunteer workforce. Poster presentation at COSA Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009. Gold Coast.

6.

Tipper S, Lee P, Pham NQP, Robotin M. Targeted community education through community organisations in the ‘B Positive’ Project: raising awareness, improving access and taking action to manage chronic hepatitis B infection and prevent liver cancer. Poster presentation at COSA Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009, Gold Coast.

7.

Tipper SW, Robotin, Zwar NA, George J. Using chronic disease management planning to optimize the management of chronic hepatitis B and prevent liver cancer Poster presentation at COSA Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009, Gold Coast.

CISS 1.

Newling G, Plant A, Scott M, Batt G. Accommodating Change – Recommendations of the Review of Hospital-Allied Accommodation for People Affected by Cancer in NSW. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009, Gold Coast.

2.

Newling G, Rayson D, Batt G. Caring for Kids During Cancer. A Trial Program to Determine Unmet Need for Childcare During Cancer Treatment. Poster presentation at Clinical Oncological Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting, 2009, Gold Coast.

3.

Newling G, Kapadia A, Batt G. Centrelink Benefits, Hardship Programs and People Affected by Cancer and Financial

31


Academic Publications CERU 1.

2.

Avenell A, Gillespie WJ, Gillespie LD, et al. Vitamin D and vitamin D analogues for preventing fractures associated with involutional and post-menopausal osteoporosis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2009; CD000227. Banks E, Canfell K. Invited Commentary: Hormone therapy risks and benefits--The Women’s Health Initiative findings and the postmenopausal estrogen timing hypothesis. Am J Epidemiol 2009; 170: 24-28.

3.

Banks E, Reeves GK, Balkwill A, Liu B, Roddam A. Million Women Study Collaborators (including Canfell K). Hip fracture incidence in relation to age, menopausal status and age at menopause: prospective analysis. PLoS Medicine (2009); 6 11 e1000181.

4.

Bouvard V, Baan R, Straif K, et al. A review of human carcinogens-Part B: biological agents. Lancet Oncol 2009; 10: 321-322.

5.

Canfell K, Banks E, Clements M, et al. Re: Decrease in breast cancer incidence following a rapid fall in use of hormone replacement therapy in Australia. Med J Aust 2009; 190: 164-165.

6.

Canfell K, Banks E, Clements M, et al. Sustained lower rates of HRT prescribing and breast cancer incidence in Australia since 2003. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2009; 117: 671-673.

7.

Canfell K, Banks E. Oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy and cancer of the female reproductive system. Chapter in: Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A, editors. When Cancer Crosses Disciplines. Imperial College Press, London 2009.

8.

Dyer S, Lord S, Wortley S, Howard K, Canfell K, Smith M, Lew JB, Creighton P, Kang YJ, Clements M, on behalf of the Medical Services Advisory Committee. Human Papillomavirus triage test for women with possible or definite low-grade squamous intra-epithelial lesions. Assessment Report 39, Canberra, Department of Health and Ageing, 2009.

9.

Dyer S, Lord S, Wortley S, Howard K, Canfell K, Smith M, Lew JB, Creighton P, Kang YJ, Clements M, on behalf of the Medical Services Advisory Committee. Automation-assisted and liquid-based cytology for cervical cancer screening. Assessment Report 1122, Canberra, Department of Health and Ageing, 2009.

10. Egger S, Petoumenos K, Kamarulzaman A, et al. Long-term patterns in CD4 response are determined by an interaction between baseline CD4 cell count, viral load, and time: The Asia Pacific HIV Observational Database (APHOD). J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 2009; 50: 513-520. 11. Gill AJ, Johns AL, Eckstein R, et al. Synoptic reporting improves histopathological assessment of pancreatic resection specimens. Pathology 2009; 41: 161-167. 12. Habib MR, Solomon MJ, Young JM, et al. Evidence-based and clinical outcome scores to facilitate audit and feedback for colorectal cancer care. Dis Colon Rectum 2009; 52: 616-622.

17. Reeves GK, Pirie K, Green J, Bull D, Beral V, Million Women Study Collaborators (including Canfell K). Reproductive factors and specific histological types of breast cancer: prospective study and metaanalysis. Br J Cancer 2009; 100: 538-544. 18. Ringland CL, Arkenau H-T, O’Connell DL, Ward RL. Second primary colorectal cancers (SPCRCs): experiences from a large Australian Cancer Registry. Annals of Oncology 2009; doi: 10.1093/annonc/ mdp288. 19. Simonella L, O’Connell DL, Vinod SK, et al. No improvement in lung cancer care: the management of lung cancer in 1996 and 2002 in New South Wales. Intern Med J 2009; 39: 453-458. 20. Sitas F, O’Connell DL, Jamrozik K, et al. Smoking questions on the Australian death notification form: adopting international best practice? Med J Aust 2009; 191: 166-168. 21. Smith DP, Banks E, Clements MS, et al. Evidence-based uncertainty: recent trial results on prostate-specific antigen testing and prostate cancer mortality. Med J Aust 2009; 191: 199-200. 22. Smith DP, Clements MS, Wakefield MA, et al. Impact of Australian celebrity diagnoses on prostate cancer screening. Med J Aust 2009; 191: 574-575. 23. Smith DP, King MT, Egger S, et al. Quality of life three years after diagnosis of localised prostate cancer: population based cohort study. BMJ 2009; 339: b4817. 24. Sweetland S, Green J, Liu B, Berrington de Gonzalez A, Canonico M, Reeves G, Beral V, on behalf of the Million Women Study collaborators (including Canfell K). Duration and magnitude of the postoperative risk of venous thromboembolism in middle aged women: prospective cohort study. British Medical Journal 2009; 340 c417. 25. Vinod SK, Simonella L, Goldsbury D, et al. Underutilization of radiotherapy for lung cancer in New South Wales, Australia. Cancer 2009; 116: 686-694. 26. Weber MF, Banks E, Smith DP, et al. Cancer screening among migrants in an Australian cohort; cross-sectional analyses from the 45 and Up Study. BMC Public Health 2009; 9: 144. 27. Woods LM, Rachet B, O’Connell D, et al. Large differences in patterns of breast cancer survival between Australia and England: a comparative study using cancer registry data. Int J Cancer 2009; 124: 2391-2399. 28. Yu XQ, O’Connell D, Armstrong B. Response to Barraclough et al. on ‘degree-of-spread artefact in the NSW Central Cancer Registry’. Aust NZ J Public Health 2009; 33: 95-96. 29. Yu XQ. Socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer survival: relation to stage at diagnosis, treatment and race. BMC Cancer 2009; 9: 364.

CHeRP 1.

Bonevski B, Walsh RA, Paul CL. Government slow to act on public preference for total pub smoking ban (letter). Aust N Z J Public Health 2009; 33: 95.

2.

Boyes A, Zucca A. Evaluation of Cancer Council NSW Telephone Support Groups: Satisfaction and impact. Report prepared for Cancer Council NSW. 2009; Newcastle; Centre for Health Research and Psycho-oncology.

14. Jiang J, Liu B, Sitas F, et al. Smoking-attributable deaths and potential years of life lost from a large, representative study in China. Tob Control 2009;

3.

Boyes AW, Girgis A, Zucca AC, Lecathelinais C. Anxiety and depression among long-term survivors of cancer in Australia: results of a population-based survey. Med J Aust 2009; 190: S94-S98.

15. Lei WK and Yu XQ. Survival Analysis on Population-based Cancer Registry of Macao SAR, 2003-2005. Sydney, Australia, Cancer Council NSW; WPRO, World Health Organisation, 16-10-2009.

4.

Boyes A, Girgis A, Zucca A, Lecathelinais C. Anxiety and depression among long-term survivors of cancer in Australia: results of a population-based survey. (letter) Med J Aust 2009; 191 (5): 294-295.

16. Mayosi BM, Flisher AJ, Lalloo UG, et al. The burden of noncommunicable diseases in South Africa. Lancet 2009; 374: 934-947.

5.

Boyes A, Hodgkinson K, Aldridge L, Turner J. Issues for cancer survivors in Australia. Cancer Forum 2009; 33(3).

13. International Collaboration of Epidemiological Studies of Cervical Cancer (Incl Sitas F and Canfell K). Cervical Carcinoma and Sexual Behaviour: Collaborative Reanalysis of Individual Data on 15,461 Women with Cervical Carcinoma and 29,164 Women without Cervical Carcinoma from 21 Epidemiological Studies. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2009; 18: 1060-1069.

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6.

Boyes A, Girgis A, Lecathelinais C. Brief assessment of adult cancer patients’ perceived needs: development and validation of the 34-item Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS-SF34). Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 2009; 15: 602-606.

7.

Chambers SK, Girgis A, Occhipinti S, Hutchison S, Turner J, Carter R, Dunn J. Beating the blues after Cancer: randomised controlled trial of a tele-based psychological intervention for high distress patients and carers. BMC Cancer 2009; 9: 189.

8.

9.

Chapman K, James EL, Read J. The benefits of nutrition and physical activity for cancer survivors. In: Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A, editors. When cancer crosses disciplines: A physician’s handbook. 2009; United Kingdom; Imperial College Press. Chen FC, Jackson P, Kippen S, James E. Media reporting of the suicide phenomenon in Taiwan: A content analysis. Environmental Health 2009; 9 (1&2): 44-59.

10. Dickson-Swift V, James E, Kippen S, Talbot L, Verrinder G, Ward B. A non-residential alternative to off campus writers’ retreats for academics. Journal of Further and Higher Education 2009; 33: 229239. 11. Dickson-Swift V, James EL, Kippen S, Liamputtong P. Researching Sensitive Topics: qualitative research as emotion work. Qualitative Research 2009; 9: 61-79. 12. Freund M, Campbell E, Paul C, Sakrouge R, Lecathelinais C, Knight J, Wiggers J, Walsh RA, Jones T, Girgis A, Nagle A. Increasing hospital-wide delivery of smoking cessation care for nicotinedependent in-patients: a multi-strategic intervention trial. Addiction. 2009; 104: 839-849. 13. Girgis A, Hansen V, Goldstein D. Are Australian oncology health professionals burning out? A view from the trenches. Eur J Cancer 2009; 45: 393-399. 14. Girgis A, Butow P. Cancer Survivorship: research priorities at the national and international levels. Cancer Forum 2009; 33(3). 15. Girgis A, Lambert S. Caregivers of cancer survivors: the state of the field. Cancer Forum 2009; 33(3). 16. Girgis A, Breen S, Stacey F, Lecathelinais C. Impact of two supportive care interventions on anxiety, depression, quality of life, and unmet needs in patients with nonlocalized breast and colorectal cancers. J Clin Oncol 2009; 27: 6180-6190. 17. Girgis A, Cockburn J, Butow P, Bowman D, Schofield P, Stojanovski E, D’Este C, Tattersall MH, Doran C, Turner J. Improving patient emotional functioning and psychological morbidity: Evaluation of a consultation skills training program for oncologists. Patient Education and Counselling 2009; 77: 456-462.

24. Kypri K, Walsh RA, Sanson-Fisher RW. Australian universities’ open door policies on alcohol industry research funding (letter). Addiction 2009; 104: 324-329. 25. Miller PG, Kypri K, Chikritzhs TN, Skov SJ, Rubin G. Health experts reject industry-backed funding for alcohol research. Med J Aust 2009; 190: 713. 26. Paul C, Girgis A, Anniwell L, Paras L, Lecathelinais C. Outcomes of solarium industry efforts to improve compliance with recommended practices: a clear case for formal regulation. Photoderm Photoimm Photomed 2009, 1-6.; 27. Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A, editors. When cancer crosses disciplines: A physician’s handbook. 2009; London; Imperial College Press. 28. Turner J, Hodgkinson K, Boyes A. Cancer and the psycho-oncologist. Psychosocial well-being of cancer survivors. Chapter in Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A, editors. When cancer crosses disciplines: A physician’s handbook. 2009; London; Imperial College Press. 29. Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Wiggers J, Knight J, Lecathelinais C, Daly J, Neil A, Girgis A. Telephone recruitment into a randomized controlled trial of quitline support. Am J Prev Med 2009; 37: 324-329. 30. Tzelepis F, Paul CL, Walsh RA, Wiggers J, Duncan SL, Knight J. Active telephone recruitment to quitline services: are nonvolunteer smokers receptive to cessation support? Nicotine Tob.Res 2009; 11: 1205-1215. 31. Waller A, Girgis A, Currow D, Lecathelinais C, Sibbritt D. Evaluation of a palliative care needs assessment intervention. Supportive Care in Cancer Journal 2009; 17: 975. 32. Walsh RA, Tzelepis F, Stojanovski E. Australian superannuation funds and tobacco investments: issues for DAR readers. Drug Alcohol Rev 2009; 28: 445-446. 33. Ward B, James E, Graham M, Snow P. Assessing Epidemiological Learning Amongst Undergraduate Students. Focus on Health Professional Education: A Multi-Disciplinary Journal 2009; 10: 26-38.

CISS 1.

Hawkins Y, Ussher J.M, Gilbert E., Perz J, Sandoval M, Sundquist K. Changes in sexuality and intimacy following the diagnosis and treatment of cancer: The experience of informal cancer carers. Cancer Nursing: An International Journal for Cancer Care, (2009). 34(4), 271280.

2.

Saunders C, Gooden H, Robotin M, Mumford J. As the bell tolls: A foundation study on pancreatic cancer consumers’ research priorities. BMC Research Notes 2009, 2:179. http://www.biomedcentral. com/1756-0500/2/179

18. Hall A and Boyes A. The psychosocial wellbeing of young adults diagnosed with cancer. 2009; Newcastle, Centre for Health Research and Psycho-oncology. 19. Harris S, James E, Snow P. Pre-discharge occupational therapy home assessment visits: Towards an evidence base. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal 2009; 52: 85-95. 20. James E, Ward BW, Dickson-Swift VA, Kippen SA, Snow PC. Best practice in research methods assessment: opportunities to enhance student learning. Teach research methods in the social sciences. 2009; Surrey, Ashgate Publishing Group. 21. James EL, Flood V, Armstrong B, Stacey F. Diet, Physical Activity and Cancer - the evidence. Chapter in Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A, editors. When cancer crosses disciplines. 2009; London; Imperial College Press. 22. Jiwa M, O’Shea C, McKinley RK, Mitchell G, Girgis A, Sibbritt D, Burridge L, Marthe Smith, Chan She Ping Delfos W, Halkett G. Developing and evaluating interventions for primary care - a focus on consultations in general practice. Australasian Medical Journal 2009; 1: 3-7. 23. Kralikova E, Bonevski B, Stepankova L, Pohlova L, Mladkova M. Postgraduate medical education in tobacco and smoking cessation in Europe. Drug and Alcohol Review 2009; 28: 474-483.

HSD 1.

Bauer J, Read J, Chapman K. Addressing the nutritional needs of patients undergoing treatment for cancer: a dietitian’s view. In: Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A (editors). In consultation: when cancer crosses disciplines. London: Imperial College Press. 2009

2.

Castagna F, Potente S, Garofano R. Empowering students: exploring multimedia literacy through youth culture using a skin cancer prevention curriculum resource. Metaphor Journal of the English Teachers Association. December 2009.

3.

Chapman, K, James EL, Read J, Bauer J. The benefits of nutrition and physical activity for cancer survivors. In: Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A (editors). In consultation: when cancer crosses disciplines. London: Imperial College Press. 2009

4.

Chapman K, Kelly B, King L. Using a research framework to identify knowledge gaps in research on food marketing to children in Australia. Australian New Zealand Journal of Public Health. 2009, 33: 253-257

33


Academic Publications

Cancer Research Division Collaborators at December 2009

5.

Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit (CERU)

Kelly B, Chapman K, Hardy L, King L, Farrell L. Parental awareness and attitudes of food marketing to children: A community attitudes survey of parents in New South Wales, Australia. J Paediatr Child Health 2009, 45 (9): 493-497

6.

Kelly B, Hughes C, Chapman K; Chun-Yu Louie J; Dixon H; Crawford J; King L; Daube M; Slevin T. Consumer testing of the acceptability and effectiveness of front-of-pack food labelling systems for the Australian grocery market. Health Promotion International 2009; 24 (2): 120-129

7.

Ma RW, Chapman K. A systematic review of the effect of diet on prostate cancer prevention and treatment. J Human Nutrition and Dietetics 2009

RSSD 1.

Alam N, Robotin M, Baker D. Epidemiology of primary liver cancer. Cancer Forum 2009, 33 (2) 88-92.

2.

Alam N, Robotin MC, Baker D. Epidemiology of primary liver cancer in Australia. Cancer Forum, July 2009 Vol 33 Issue No 2 www. cancer.org.au/cancerforum.

3.

George J, Robotin M. Overview: Hepatocellular carcinoma - the future starts now. Cancer Forum 2009, 33 (2) 83-87.

4.

George J, Robotin M.C. Overview: Cancer Forum, July 2009 Vol 33 Issue No 2 www.cancerforum.org.au/Issues/2009/July/Forum/ Hepatocellular_carcinoma.htm.

5.

Robotin MC, Kansil M, Howard K, George J, Tipper S, Dore GJ, et al. Antiviral therapy for hepatitis B-related liver cancer prevention is more cost-effective than cancer screening. Journal of Hepatology 2009;50(5):990-998.

6.

Robotin M, Olver I, Girgis A. “When cancer crosses disciplines. A clinician’s handbook”. Imperial College Press, 2009, 1129 pp.

7.

Saunders C, Gooden H, Robotin M, Mumford J. As the bell tolls: a foundation study on pancreatic cancer consumers’ research priorities. BMC Research Notes 2009, 2:179 doi:101186/17560500-2-179 http://www.biomedcentral.com/1756-0500/2/179.

8.

Sundquist K, Robotin M. “What matters to patients and to carers” in “When cancer crosses disciplines. A clinician’s handbook” (pp 317342) Editors M Robotin, Ian Olver and Afaf Girgis. 2009. Imperial College Press.

9.

Tipper S, Penman A.G. The NSW HBV and liver cancer pilot program: an update on the ‘B Positive’ Project. Cancer Forum, July 2009 Vol 33 Issue No 2 www.cancer.org.au/cancerforum.

34

Dr Christian Abnet, National Cancer Institute, USA Prof Raymond Abratt, University of Cape Town, South Africa Dr Stephen Ackland, Calvary Mater Hospital, Newcastle Prof Bruce Armstrong, University of Sydney Mr Don Baumber, Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia Prof Emily Banks, Australian National University A/Prof Jan Barendregt, School of Population Health, University of Queensland Prof Ruanne Barnabas, University of Washington, USA Prof Michael Barton, Sydney South West Area Health Service Dr Vanessa Beesley, Queensland Institute of Medical Research Dr Stephen Begbie, Port Macquarie Hospital Prof Dame Valerie Beral, University of Oxford, England Prof Andrew Biankin, Bankstown Hospital and Garvan Institute, Sydney Prof Tony Blakely, University of Otago, New Zealand A/Prof Leigh Blizzard, Menzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania Dr Paulo Boffetta, International Agency for Research on Cancer, France A/Prof Mark Boughey, St Vincent’s Hospital, Melbourne Prof John Boyages, Breast Cancer Institute, Westmead Hospital Prof Steven Boyages, South West Sydney Area Health Service Prof Michael Boyer, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Prof Debbie Bradshaw, South African Medical Research Council, South Africa Dr Mary Brooksbank, University of Adelaide, South Australia Dr Loren Brener, National Centre in HIV Social Research, University of NSW Dr Julia Brotherton, Victorian Cytology Service, Melbourne Prof Matthew Brown, Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine, University of Queensland Prof Phyllis Butow, University of Sydney Dr Mick Campion, Royal Hospital for Women, Sydney Dr Diane Casey, New Zealand National Screening Unit, Auckland, New Zealand Prof Suzanne Chambers, Cancer Council QLD A/Prof Philip Clarke, University of Sydney Dr Mark Clements, Australian National University Dr Gary Clifford, International Agency for Research on Cancer, France Dr Vincent Cogliano, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France Prof Michel Coleman, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, England Dr Catherine Cook, University of Manitoba, Canada Dr Michael Coory, University of Queensland Prof Yvonne Cossart, University of Sydney Mrs Sally Crossing, Cancer Voices, Sydney Ms Michelle Cunich, University of Sydney Prof Chris Cunningham, Massey University, New Zealand Dr Min Dai, Cancer Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China Dr Joshua Dass, Townsville Hospital, Queensland Dr Sandford Dawsey, National Cancer Institute, USA Prof Geoff Delaney, Sydney South West Area Health Service Dr Alain Demers, CancerCare Manitoba, Canada Dr Elizabeth Dennett, University of Otago, New Zealand Prof Kevin Dew, Victoria University, New Zealand Mr Anthony Dillon, Yoorang Garang Indigenous Student Support Unit, University of NSW Professor Gillian Duchesne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria Dr Suzanne Dyer, National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit, Sydney Prof Sandra Eades, Indigenous Maternal and Child Health, Baker IDI, Melbourne Dr Brenda Elias, University of Manitoba, Canada Dr Lis Ellison-Loschmann, Research School of Public Health, Wellington, New Zealand Dr Ruth Etzioni, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, Seattle, USA


Dr Silvia Franceschi, International Agency for Research on Cancer, France Prof Ian Frazer, Diamantina Institute, University of Queensland Dr Katherine French, Imperial College London, England Prof RA (Frank) Gardiner, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Queensland Prof Geoff Garnett, Imperial College London, England A/Prof Gail Garvey, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, University of Queensland Dr Melina Gattellari, University of NSW Dr Robyn Godding, Cancer Institute NSW, Sydney Dr Kumar Gogna, Mater Radiation Oncology Unit, Brisbane Dr David Goldstein, Prince of Wales Hospital and University of NSW Ms Christine Groves, University of Otago, New Zealand Prof Howard Gurney, Westmead Hospital and University of Sydney Prof Marion Haas, University of Technology, Sydney Prof Neville Hacker, Royal Hospital for Women, Sydney Dr Gerry Harnett, Dept of Health, Western Australia Prof Mark Harris, University of NSW Dr Andrew Hayen, University of Sydney Prof David Henry, University of Toronto, Canada Prof Michael Hensley, University of Newcastle Dr Kirsten Howard, University of Sydney Prof Konrad Jamrozik, School of Population Health and Clinical Practice, University of Adelaide (Deceased) Dr Ahmedin Jemal, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA Prof Jingmei Jiang, Peking Union Medical College, China Dr Monika Janda, Queensland University of Technology Prof Louisa Jorm, University of Western Sydney Miss Lei Wai Kei, Health Bureau, Macao Dr Farin Kamangar, National Cancer Institute, USA Dr Danuta Kielkowski, National Institute for Occupational Health, Johannesburg, South Africa Prof Susan Kippax, Social Policy Research Centre, University of NSW Dr Erich Kliewer, CancerCare Manitoba, Canada A/Prof Andrew Kneebone, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney Prof Rosemary Knight, Dept of Health and Ageing Prof Jonathan Koea, Auckland Hospital, New Zealand Dr Anne Kricker, University of Sydney Dr Eng-Siew Koh, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney Dr Rosa Legood, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, England Dr Hazel Lewis, New Zealand National Screening Unit, Wellington, New Zealand Dr Alan Lopez, School of Population Health, University of Queensland Dr Sally Lord, National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Unit, Sydney Ms Babatyi Malope-Kgokong, National Health Laboratory Services, Johannesburg, South Africa Prof Patrick MacPhail, Clinical HIV Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Prof Reza Malekzadeh, Tehran University, Iran Ms Jill Margo, News Limited, Sydney Prof Villis Marshall, University of Adelaide Prof Brian McCaughan, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney Mr Bill McHugh , Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia Prof Ross McKinnon, University of South Australia Prof Neil Merrett, Liverpool Hospital and University of Western Sydney A/Prof Jeremy Millar, The Alfred Hospital, Melbourne Dr Annette Moxey, University of Newcastle Dr Harold Neal, New Zealand National Screening Unit, Auckland, New Zealand Dr Rachel Neale, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, University of Queensland Dr Christy Newman, University of NSW Ms Leah Newman, Menzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania Dr Rob Newton, University of York, England Dr Yan Ning, Dalian Medical University, People’s Republic of China Prof Ian Olver, Cancer Council Australia Mr Petr Otahal, Menzies Research Institute, University of Tasmania Dr Max Parkin, Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, England Dr Shane Pascoe, University of NSW

Dr Nick Pavlakis, Armidale Hospital Dr Michael Pawlita, DKFZ, German Cancer Research Centre, Germany Dr Sallie-Anne Pearson, University of NSW Prof Matthew Peters, Concord Hospital, Sydney Prof Sir Richard Peto, Clinical Trial Service Unit, University of Oxford, UK Dr Carole Pinnock, Repatriation General Hospital, Adelaide Dr Michael Quinn, Royal Hospital for Women, Melbourne Prof Bernard Rachet, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, England Prof Tom Reeve, Cancer Council Australia Dr Barbara Rose, Dept of Infectious Diseases, University of Sydney Prof Mark Rosenthal, Royal Melbourne Hospital Dr Hana Ross, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, USA Dr Sabe Sabesan, Townsville Hospital, Queensland Prof Glenn Salkeld, University of Sydney Dr Tony Sara, South East Sydney Illawarra Area Health Service, Sydney Dr Diana Sarfati, Health Inequalities Research Programme, University of Otago Prof Vikash Sewram, MRC Oncology Research Unit, Durban, South Africa A/Prof Tom Shakespeare, North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour Dr Jufang Shi, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Mr Max Shub, Prostate Cancer Action Group Dr Andrew Simpson, Blood and Cancer Centre, Wellington, New Zealand Mr Terry Slevin, Cancer Council WA Prof Alan Spigelman, St Vincent’s Cancer Services, Sydney Dr Nigel Spry, University of Western Australia Dr James Stanley, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand Dr Lara Stein, National Health Laboratory Service Medical Research Council, South Africa Dr Philip Stricker, St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney Dr Christopher Sweeney, Royal Adelaide Hospital Dr Mark Sywak, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney Dr Jeffrey Tan, Royal Hospital for Women, Melbourne Dr Phil Taylor, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, USA Prof Richard Taylor, University of NSW A/Prof Carla Treloar, University of NSW Dr Craig Underhill, Border Oncology, Griffith Dr Owen Unger, Westmead Hospital, Sydney Ms Margaret Urban, Cancer Epidemiology Research Group, Johannesburg, South Africa Dr Patricia Valery, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, University of Queensland Prof Craig Veitch, University of Sydney A/Prof Alison Venn, Menzies Research Institute, Tasmania Dr Rosalie Viney, University of Technology, Sydney Dr Shalini Vinod, Sydney South West Area Health Service Prof Henry Wabinga, Makerere University, Uganda Ms Vicki Wade, Area Director of Aboriginal Health, Sydney Area Health Service, Sydney Prof Robyn Ward, University of NSW and Prince of Wales Clinical School Dr Tim Waterboer, DKFZ, German Cancer Research Centre, Germany A/Prof Penny Webb, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, University of Queensland Dr Lucy Webster, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga Dr Janelle Wheat, Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga Dr Denise Whitby, AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, USA Prof David Whiteman, Queensland Institute of Medical Research, University of Queensland Dr Kirsten Wiltshire, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne Dr Laura Woods, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, England A/Prof Jane Young, University of Sydney Dr David Wyld, Royal Brisbane Hospital, Queensland Dr Fanghui Zhao, Cancer Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, People’s Republic of China

35


Cancer Research Division Collaborators at December 2009

External Research Funded by Cancer Council NSW

Centre for Health Research and Psycho-Oncology (CHeRP)

New Research Project Grants

Ms Lynley Aldridge, University of Sydney Prof Bruce Armstrong, University of Sydney Dr Surinder Baines, University of Newcastle Prof Amanda Baker, University of Newcastle Prof Wendy Brown, University of Queensland Prof Phyllis Butow, University of Sydney Prof Suzanne Chambers, Cancer Council Queensland Prof Kerry Courneya, University of Alberta, Canada Ms Bronwyn Crosby, Quitline Prof David Currow, Cancer Australia Dr David Dalley, St Vincent’s Hospital Mr Richard Doll, BC Cancer Agency, Canada A/Prof Elizabeth Eakin, University of Queensland Dr Ben Ewald, University of Newcastle Prof Richard Epstein, Hong Kong University, Hong Kong Prof Richard Fielding, Hong Kong University, Hong Kong Dr Dion Forstner, Liverpool Hospital Dr Mark Foster, Hunter Urban Division of General Practice Prof Maree Gleeson, Hunter Medical Research Institute Dr Georgia Halkett, Curtin University Dr Katharine Hodgkinson, Headway Health Dr Graeme Horton, University of Newcastle Mrs Deborah Huff, Heart Foundation Dr Natalie Johnson, University of Newcastle Prof Karen Kayser, Boston College, USA Prof Brian Kelly, University of Newcastle A/Prof Sharon Kilbreath, University of Sydney Prof Madeleine King, University of Sydney Mrs Jenny Knight, Hunter New England Population Health Dr Ava Kwong, Queen Mary Hospital Dr Wendy Lam, Hong Kong University, Hong Kong Dr Winston Liauw, St George Hospital Dr Marita Lynagh, University of Newcastle Dr David Lubans, University of Newcastle Dr Parker Magin, University of Newcastle Dr Lesley McDonald-Wicks, University of Newcastle Dr Patrick McElduff, University of Newcastle Ms Margaret McJannett, Clinical Oncological Society of Australia Ms Catherine Melville, TAFE NSW – South Western Sydney Region A/Prof Geoff Mitchell, University of Queensland Ms Julie-Anne Mitchell, Heart Foundation A/Prof Philip Morgan, University of Newcastle Prof Jiwa Moyez, Curtin University of Technology Dr Amanda Nagle, Heart Foundation Mr Geoffrey Otton, Gynaecologist Prof Julie Pallant, University of Melbourne Professor Ron Plotnikoff, University of Newcastle Dr Anthony Proietto, John Hunter Hospital Ms Katherine Pronk, Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre Dr Marina Reeves, University of Queensland Laureate Prof Rob Sanson-Fisher, University of Newcastle A/Prof David Sibbritt, University of Newcastle Ms Wendy Scott, St Charles Gardiner Hospital Dr Michael Seldon, Calvary Mater Hospital, Newcastle A/Prof Tom Shakespeare, North Coast Cancer Institute Dr Dacita Suen, Queen Mary Hospital Dr Belinda Thewes, University of Sydney A/Prof Jane Turner, University of Queensland Dr Janice Tsang, Queen Mary Hospital Prof Robert West, University College London, United Kingdom A/Prof John Wiggers, Hunter New England Population Health Dr Luke Wolfenden, University of Newcastle

36

1.

Ashman L. Tetraspanin proteins in prostate cancer progression and prognosis. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant 20092011. $109,000

2.

Bebawy M. Microparticle-mediated transfer of P-glycoprotein in conferring multidrug resistance in cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $107,375

3.

Byrne J. The molecular basis of cell transformation produced by TPD52 overexpression. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $88,750

4.

Chen S. Randomised trial of diagnostic strategies for invasive aspergillosis in at-risk haematology patients: Funding extension. Westmead Hospital. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $ 65,875

5.

Daly R. Tyrosine kinase profiling of human basal breast cancers. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant 20092011. $113,250

6.

Fabbro M. Dynamin inhibitors as new anti-cancer drugs. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $ 112,500

7.

Goldstein D. LAP07: Randomised multicentre phase III study in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: gemcitabine with or without chemoradiotherapy and with or without erlotinib. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $28,778

8.

Gottlieb D. Adoptive immunotherapy for the prevention of Varicellazoster virus reactivation post stem cell transplant. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $98,750

9.

Haass N. The role of melanoma stem cells in melanomagenesis. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $39,000

10. Hart D. RNA Loading of Tumour Associated Antigens and the Activation of Blood Dendritic Cells for Prostate Cancer Immunotherapy. University of Queensland. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $33,050 11. Haydon A. Monash University. SCOT - Short Course Oncology Therapy. A study of adjuvant chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $33,308 12. Jolly C. Understanding AID-induced cancer: Unravelling complex mutation and repair pathways. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $114,000 13. Leong T. Randomised phase II/III study of preoperative chemoradiotherapy versus chemotherapy for resectable gastric cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $6,160 14. McDonald K. The role of IQGAP1 in actively migrating glioma cells and its regulation by miR-124. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $113,750 15. Murray M. Development of personalised dosage protocols for tyrosine kinase inhibitors in oncology patients. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $93,550 16. Naylor M. Role of beta1 integrin in prostate development and carcinogenesis. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $114,000 17. O’Neill G. The signalling switch function of the pro-metastatic, adhesion adaptor protein HEF1. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $114,000 18. Poulsen M. Phase II efficacy study of chemo-radiotherapy in PET staged II-III merkel cell carcinoma of the skin. Princess Alexandra Hospital. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $10,278 19. Tangye S. EBV-specific CD8+ T cells in anti-tumour immune responses in patients predisposed to developing lymphoma. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $94,000


20. Williams M. A dosimetric Inter-Comparison of Australian Radiotherapy IMRT Systems (ICARIS). University of Wollongong. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $113,875

17. Swarbrick A. Defining the role for Id1 in breast cancer metastasis. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant 20082010. $117,750

21. Young J. Quality of life outcomes and cost effectiveness of pelvic exenteration for people with advanced rectal cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $21,392

18. Trevena L. A randomised trial of a web-based toolkit for applying evidence in the general practice cervical cancer prevention visit. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $93,500

22. Zhang Z. D. Targeting p53 isoforms, 40p53 and p53Ă&#x;, to promote chemo-sensitivity in human melanoma. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant 2009-2011. $38,000

19. Verrills N. PP2A: a novel target for leukaemia therapy. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

Total New Research Project Grants

$1,662,641

Continuing Research Project Grants 1.

Apte M. Desmoplasia in Pancreatic Cancer: Role of Pancreatic Stellate Cells in Cancer Progression. University of NSW. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

2.

Armstrong B. Relationships between prostate specific antigen, sun exposure and vitamin D. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2009. $74,220

3.

Ashton L. Long-term health outcomes in survivors of childhood cancer and their families. University of NSW. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

4.

Baker M. Lynchpin protein interactions that drive epithelial cancer malignancy. Macquarie University. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

5.

Boyer M. A Randomised, phase III trial of adding nitroglycerin to first line chemotherapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $98,350

6.

Clifton-Bligh R. Cross-talk between PPARg and MAP kinase pathways in thyroid cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $78,500

7.

Crossley M. The role of zinc finger proteins in B cell cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

8.

Damian D. Nicotinamide protection from ultraviolet radiation-induced skin carcinogenesis in humans. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

9.

Friedlander M. Accelerated first line chemotherapy for advanced germ cell tumours. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $83,274

10. Friedlander M. Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy with Paclitaxel and Cisplatin after Optimal Debulking Surgery for Ovarian Cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $39,400 11. Kneebone A. A phase III trial comparing adjuvant versus salvage radiotherapy for high risk patients post radical prostatectomy. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $79,000 12. Mackay F. Role of neuropeptide Y1 receptor in regulatory T cell function - a new angle to treat autoimmunity and cancer. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

20. Ankeny R. Toward a Best Practice of Emerging Technologies: PGD and HLA Typing for Paediatric Transplantation. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $90,853 21. Becker T. The tumour suppressor p16INK4a binds the chromatin remodelling factor BRG1 to regulate the cell cycle and senescence. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $77,250 22. Daly R. A new role for cortactin in head and neck cancer. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $98,750 23. DeFazio A. Chemo-sensitising pathways in ovarian cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $99,700 24. Goldstein D. Adjuvant Chemotherapies in Resectable Pancreatic Cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $35,965 25. Gottlieb D. A programme of clinical adoptive immunotherapy for treatment of Cytomegalovirus in stem cell transplant patients. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $99,250 26. Greer P. High precision MRI based prostate radiotherapy. University of Newcastle. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $107,250 27. Jordens C. A qualitative study of the experience of multiple myeloma. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $98,063 28. Kangas M. Treatment of Anxiety and Depression in Head and Neck Cancer Patients. Macquarie University. CCNSW Project Grants 2007-2009. $98,375 29. Lyons JG. Regulation of keratinocyte differentiation by Snail. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $82,250 30. MacKenzie K. The role of p16INK4a repression in telomere-driven karyotypic evolution and malignant progression. University of NSW. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $97,250 31. Ormandy C. Does expression of the ets transcription factor Elf5 limit tumour progression? Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $99,020 32. Rizos H. The melanoma-associated ARF tumour suppressor modulates cell proliferation and apoptosis via target protein sumoylation. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 20072009. $82,250 33. Scott K. Secreted phospholipase A2 in prostate cancer. University of NSW. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $100,000 34. Sze D. Characterisation of cancer stem cells in myeloma leading to novel anti-tumour drug development. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $91,750

13. Mackenzie K. Delineation of the role of telomeres and telomerase in erythropoiesis. University of NSW. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $98,150

35. Ung O. SNAC2: A randomised trial of extending sentinel node based management to women with larger or multifocal breast cancers. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $97,706

14. Rasko J. Dissecting BORIS Function in Neoplasia. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

36. Ward R. Methylation in sporadic colorectal cancer extends over a large chromosomal region. University of NSW. CCNSW Project Grant 2007-2009. $86,250

15. Reeve V. Protection against photoimmune suppression and skin cancer via oestrogen receptor signalling. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 2008-2010. $100,000

Total Continuing Research Project Grants

$3,304,076

16. Suchowerska N. Radiobiological Modelling for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy. University of Sydney. CCNSW Project Grant 20082010. $100,000

37


External Research Funded by Cancer Council NSW Program Grants

6.

1.

Hogg P, Dawes I, Lock R. New arsenical-based cancer drugs. University of NSW. CCNSW Program Grant 2006-2010. $369,496

2.

Norris M, Haber M, Marshall G, Kavallaris M. Improved treatment outcomes for children with leukaemia. University of NSW. CCNSW Program Grant 2006-2010. $400,000

3.

Reddel R. Alternative lengthening of Telomeres: a target for cancer treatment. Children’s Medical Research Institute. CCNSW Program Grant 2006-2010. $400,000

Total Research Program Grants

$1,169,496

Strategic Research Partnership Grants 1.

Biankin A, Kench J, Goldstein D, Smith R, Apte M, Smith G. NSW South Wales Pancreatic Network. Garvan Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Strep grant 2006-2010. $250,000

2.

Meiser B, Lobb E, Tucker K, Andrews L, Kirk J, Friedlander M, Mireskandari S, Kasparian N, Wakefield C. Psychosocial impact of hereditary cancer and the development and evaluation of effective patient education and decision support strategies. University of NSW. CCNSW Strep Grant 2006-2010. $250,267

3.

4.

Ward R, Hawkins N, Hogg P, Spigelman A. The Colorectal Cancer Research Consortium: A model for the integration of biomedical research into patient care. University of NSW. CCNSW Strep Grant 2006-2010. $301,170 George J, McCaughan G, Dore G, Liddle C, Strasser S. Epidemiology, prevention and management of liver cancer in NSW: Towards a strategic research partnership. University of Sydney. CCNSW Strep Grant 2008-2012. $250,000

Al-Ejeh F. Novel combinational therapy against human pancreatic cancer. Queensland Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Innovator Grants 2009. $99,820

Total New Innovator Grants $583,407 Total Investigator-Initiated Research Grants

$8,294,574

Other Research Programs 1.

Cancer Trials NSW (CTN) $1,420,115

2.

Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit (CERU)

3.

Centre for Health Research & Psycho-Oncology (CHeRP) $675,000

4.

45 and Up Cohort Study $300,000

$2,839,000

Commissioned Research Projects 1.

The Partners/carers study: A longitudinal study of the psychosocial outcomes of the partners/carers of cancer survivors. $41,512

2.

Evaluation of the Cancer Council NSW Telephone Support Groups. $7,667

3.

GPs and Vitamin D deficiency: A survey of knowledge, attitudes and practices. $12,307

4.

Evaluation of Cancer Council Connect. $2,010

5.

Action research for tackling tobacco in community based social services. $27,540

6.

Satisfaction survey evaluation of the Cancer Council Helpline and Call Back service. $20,000

7.

Mapping relative transport disadvantage among people affected by cancer in NSW. $3,000

5.

Palmer L, Nowak A, Teo C, McDonald K, Wheeler H, Joseph D, Robinson B. University of Western Australia. Clinical Outcomes and Genetic Epidemiology of high grade Glioma: COGEG. CCNSW Strep Grant 2008-2012. $249,998

8.

Multiple perspectives on sexuality and intimacy post-cancer, leading to the development and evaluation of supportive interventions. $30,000

9.

STREP Grants Stage 2 prioritisation processes. $100,000

6.

Whiteman D, Lord R, Watson D, Phillips W, Hayward N. PROBE-NE: Progression of Barrett’s Esophagus to Cancer Network. Queensland Institute of Medical Research. CCNSW Strep Grant 2008-2012. $273,519

10. STREP Grants Stage 3 consultation for research procurement in pancreatic cancer. $50,000

Total Strategic Research Partnership Grants

$1,574,954

11. Evaluation of parental knowledge, attitudes and perceptions about fruit and vegetables. $90,000 12. Nature and extent of sports sponsorship in children’s sporting clubs and opportunities for policy intervention. $25,000 13. Effects of food marketing on children and parents. $25,000

New Innovator Grants in Pancreatic Cancer 1.

2.

Richardson D. Development of Novel and Potent Anti-Tumour Agents for the Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer. University of Sydney. CCNSW Innovator Grants 2009. $100,000 Xue A. Discovery of prognostic serum biomarkers for pancreatic cancer. Royal North Shore Hospital. CCNSW Innovator Grants 2009. $87,100

3.

MacDiarmid J. siRNA-packaged, targeted nanocells for reversal of gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer and treatment of the cancer with gemcitabine-packaged, targeted nanocells. EnGeneIC Pty Ltd. CCNSW Innovator Grants 2009. $98,500

4.

Phillips P. Targeting the microtubule cytoskeleton in the treatment of pancreatic cancer. University of NSW. CCNSW Innovator Grants 2009. $100,000

5.

Apte M. Hitting the Right Target: Inhibition of Growth Factor Effects on the Stromal Cell as a Novel Therapeutic Approach in Pancreatic Cancer. University of NSW. CCNSW Innovator Grants 2009. $97,987

38

14. Youthblock evaluation for Tackling Tobacco Program. $30,000 15. AHMRC ‘Breathe’ Project randomised trial. $50,000 Total Other Research Programs and Commissioned Research $5,748,151 TOTAL RESEARCH FUNDED

$14,042,725


Cancer Council NSW Board of Directors Area Health Services and Hospitals with Cancer Trials Nurses and Data Managers in 2009 Greater Southern Area Health Service Border Medical Oncology Riverina Cancer Care Centre Hunter Area Health Service New England Armidale Hospital Manning Rural Referral Hospital Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital Tamworth Base Hospital North Coast Areas Health Service Coffs Harbour Health Campus Lismore Base Hospital The Tweed Hospital Northern Sydney/Central Coast Area Health Service Mater Medical Centre Royal North Shore Hospital Sydney Haematology and Oncology Centre South Eastern Sydney/Illawarra Area Health Service Prince of Wales Hospital Sacred Heart Hospice, St Vincent’s Hospital St George Hospital St Vincent’s Hospital Sydney Children’s Hospital Wollongong Hospital Sydney South West Area Health Service Campbelltown Hospital Concord Repatriation General Hospital Liverpool Hospital Royal Prince Alfred Hospital Sydney Melanoma Unit

Mr Bruce Hodgkinson SC (Chair) Barrister, Denman Chambers Prof Stephen Ackland Staff Specialist, Medical Oncology Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital Ms Jill Boehm OAM (Deputy Chair) Dr Patrick Cregan Clinical Director, Surgery, South West Sydney Area Health Service A/Prof Graham Mann Westmead Institute of Cancer Research Ms Melanie Trethowan Consultant Mr Paul Lahiff CEO, WD Scott Mr Stephen Roberts Consultant Mr Bob Sendt Consultant and former NSW Auditor-General Ms Mary Chiew General Manager, Giorgio Armani Australia

In attendance: Dr Andrew Penman AM CEO, Cancer Council NSW Mr Ted Starc Director, Corporate Services and CFO, CCNSW Ms Angela Aston Company Secretary, CCNSW

Sydney West Area Health Service Nepean Hospital The Children’s Hospital at Westmead Westmead Hospital

39


Cancer Council NSW Ethics Committee All research undertaken at Cancer Council NSW undergoes ethical review to comply with the Guidelines on Ethical Research Involving Humans. The Ethics Committee is comprised of lay people and members of the medical, research, legal and religious communities. The committee assesses the research’s ethical impact on participants, researchers and the general community. This impact is then weighed up against the benefits in the defeat of cancer. The Ethics Committee, a committee of the board of Cancer Council NSW, considers research proposals and the ethical aspects of requests for: Access to identifying or potentially identifying data owned or held by Cancer Council NSW for research or other purposes. Linkage of data obtained from different sources within Cancer Council NSW or linkage of data from a Cancer Council data collection with data from an extra collection. Research involving human subjects undertaken by staff of Cancer Council NSW. The Ethics Committee communicates with the board of Cancer Council NSW through confirmed minutes and recommendations, which are included on the board’s meeting agenda.

Committee Members A/Prof Bettina Meiser (Chair) Non-medical Graduate with Research Experience Dept of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital Ms Amanda Adrian Laywoman Ms Vivienne Gregg – to Jan 2010 Consumer Advocate Ms Meghan Carruthers Lawyer, Ebsworth & Ebsworth Mr Bill McCarthy AM Medical Graduate with Research Experience Ms Joanne Muller Lawyer, Private practice Ms Alice Oppen Laywoman Rev David Pettitt Minister of Religion Anglican Chaplain, Metropolitan Reception and Remand Centre Mr John Tong – to Dec 2009 Layman Dr Marianne Weber – maternity leave Epidemiology Research, CCNSW Mr Leo Simonella – maternity relief Epidemiology Research, CCNSW

In attendance: Ms Angela Aston Ethics Executive Officer, CCNSW Ms Stephanie Deuchar Ethics Secretary, CCNSW

Cancer Council Cancer Research Committee Prof Bruce Armstrong (Chair) Professor of Public Health, Medical Foundation Fellow University of Sydney Prof Stephen Ackland Staff Specialist, Medical Oncology Newcastle Mater Misericordiae Hospital Cancer Council NSW Board Member Ms Jane Bennett Consumer Representative

40

Prof Andrew Biankin Garvan Institute of Medical Research Prof Andrew Grulich National Centre in HIV Epidemiology & Clinical Research, University of NSW Prof Don Iverson Faculty of Health & Behavioural Sciences, University of Wollongong A/Prof Graham Mann Westmead Institute of Cancer ResearchCancer Council NSW Board Member A/Prof Bettina Meiser Dept of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital Mr John Newsom – to Nov 2009 Consumer Representative Prof Murray Norris Deputy Director, Children’s Cancer Institute Australia Dr Andrew Penman AM CEO, Cancer Council NSW Prof Roger Reddel Head, Cancer Research Unit, Children’s Medical Research Institute Dr Monica Robotin CCNSW and University of Sydney Prof Kate White Director, Research Development and Support Unit University of Sydney

In attendance: Mr Ron Gale – to Aug 2009 Minute Secretary Ms Catherine Holliday Manager, Research Strategy Unit, CCNSW Ms Nysha Thomas Project Officer, Research Strategy Unit, CCNSW

Internal Research Review Committee Research conducted and funded by Cancer Council NSW undergoes scientific review by the Internal Research Review committee. The review is conducted by three peers from outside the organisation who review and give feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of the research. To provide a broader research review service for our internal researchers, the Internal Research Review committee amended its terms of reference during the year to include a review of external proposals submitted to the Cancer Council’s Ethics Committee. The Committee is chaired by Professor Louisa Jorm, Director of Research, Sax Institute, with participation by Cancer Council senior management. In addition, the Cancer Research Committee has a standing committee on scientific assessment which services the scientific peer review requirements.

Committee Members Prof Louisa Jorm (Chair) Sax Institute Dr Monica Robotin Medical Director, Cancer Council NSW A/Prof Freddy Sitas Director, Cancer Research Division, Cancer Council NSW Ms Vivienne Gregg Consumer Representative Ms Gill Batt Director, Cancer Information and Support Services Division, Cancer Council NSW Prof Afaf Girgis Director, Centre for Health Research and Psycho-oncology, Cancer Council NSW


Contact CERU Cancer Epidemiology Research Unit Cancer Council NSW PO Box 572 Kings Cross NSW 1340 P: 02 9334 1837 F: 02 8302 3550 E: crd@nswcc.org.au CHeRP Centre for Health Research & Psycho-oncology (CHeRP) The University of Newcastle Room 230A, Level 2, David Maddison Building Cnr King & Watt Streets Newcastle NSW 2300 P: 02 4913 8604 F: 02 4913 8601 E: cherp@newcastle.edu.au www.cancercouncil.com.au/cherp RSSD Research Strategy & Scientific Development Cancer Council NSW PO Box 572 Kings Cross 1340 P: 02 9334 1854 E: research@nswcc.org.au

Š Cancer Council NSW 2009 ABN 51 116 463 846 CAN2038 08/10 41


153 Dowling Street Woolloomooloo NSW 2011

www.cancercouncil.com.au

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Cancer Council Research Activity Report 2009