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ISSUE: 3 • FALL/WINTER 2009 • CAD 6.95

VANOC Calls to Students to Volunteer Law Studies in Australia Choosing a Private Career College in Canada Volunteering in an Orphanage in Tanzania Study in the UK Undergraduate and Postgraduate Application Tips

Professional Accreditation for Degrees from Abroad


HIGH-DEMAND

bachelor’s degrees IN BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY In as few as three years DeVry’s fast-track degree programs can help you earn an accredited bachelor’s degree in today’s hottest fields, on campus or online. Discover the education that puts DeVry students ahead, and qualify for up to $9,000 in scholarships.

Calgary Campus location 2700 3rd Avenue SE

Put your future on the fast track today. Visit DeVryNow.ca or call 1.800.363.5558. The government of Alberta has granted DeVry Calgary accreditation to award Bachelor of Business Operations, Bachelor of Science in Computer Information Systems, and Bachelor of Science in Electronics Engineering Technology degrees.


Message From

THE EDITOR Dear Readers: It is that time of year again when we pack away our sandals and sun lotion, and look forward to the changing colour of the leaves and another unpredictable Canadian winter. This is also the time when we turn our thoughts to the start of another academic year – or the beginning of a new chapter for you recent graduates – and how to make important choices for the future. For your future. This issue is again full of great information about education and experience-related topics. You will find articles on professional accreditation, law studies abroad, career colleges in Canada, visiting South America – again, a great range of topics from which I am sure you will gather valuable information and resources. Something special about this issue is the underlying focus on balance: While you will find lots of great information on such areas as professional studies, graduate options, and how to make both short- and long-term plans for your life at any stage, we hope that you will also be inspired by articles detailing volunteer opportunities and the challenges and rewards that come with serving individuals and communities who have needs that your time and effort can help meet. The nice thing is that you don’t have to choose one route or the other: You can achieve a balance through combining any number of alternatives. Take a semester out to volunteer in a foreign country; or travel for a year before you embark on the next phase of your professional or academic chapter; or investigate which institutions offer co-op, exchange or sandwich programs; and alternatively, discover which experiential or volunteer organizations include language instruction components or vocational training of sorts. These are just some examples on how you can combine your many interests into a plan that is right for you.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

Be sure to research and contact the advertisers in these pages, as they can prove to be your number one resource. By investigating in more detail – checking their sites, contacting them with questions you may have – you will be amazed at the programs and services that you may have never even known about, let alone considered taking part in. As a closing note, I would like to draw your attention to UNICEF, which has a consistent presence in Canadian Student Magazine. Proudly, Canadian Student Magazine donates a percentage of its advertising revenue to UNICEF Canada. As Canadians, we are privileged in ways we often don’t even realize: Most of us cannot compute what it is like to be without safe drinking water, or to be afraid to go to sleep at night for fear of being infected by an insect, or not having access to education even at the primary age level. To this end, I urge school officials, students, and individual readers to try to make a difference where possible. Whether starting a Spread the Net campaign at school, or spearheading the classic UNICEF Halloween campaign in the office or classroom, we can all make a difference. Carpe diem!

Anita Kuehnel, Editor/Publisher Canadian Student Magazine

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INDEX

4-7

NEWS

8-9

STUDENT TESTIMONIALS

10

Law Studies in Australia

Helping You Set Goals

15-17

Australia Welcomes Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students

21-22

Les étudiants et étudiantes édifient un monde digne des enfants avec UNICEF Canada

27

28-29

Profile: DEVRY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY

18 Get a ‘Hands-On’ Education in New Zealand

Glossary of Terms in Canadian Education

30

Collège privé d’enseignement professionnel

31

Private Career Colleges

38-40

13

24

Destination France with CampusFrance School Trips a Great Way to Travel

32 Teach English in Japan

42 Earn a Masters Degree in Europe

rEvolve EPS Holdings Ltd. Director and Owner: Anita Kuehnel Chief Editor and Publisher: Anita Kuehnel anita@canadianstudentmagazine.com Administrative Manager: Sheila Fee sheila@canadianstudentmagazine.com

34 Masters of their Universe

Consultant: Savaş Akar We thank the following individuals and education bodies for their editorial contributions: Natalie Kleindyk, Cathy McNally, Kimberly Randall, Education New Zealand, Muneed Syed, Ava Vanderstarren, AUCC (Association of Universities and College of Canada), Ontario Ministry of Training,


46

52-53

Who’s in Your Seat?

58-59

UCAS Welcomes Canadian Students

60-61

Professional Degree Accreditation

62-63

Law School - The UK Edge

Think Education USA - Discover Your Potential

54 Sultan of the North: Monterrey México

56

65

An Intellectual Challenge

70-71

Profile: STELLENBOSCH UNIVERSITY

76-77

Students building a world fit for children with UNICEF Canada

80-81

TOP 150 UNIVERSITIES World University Rankings 2008

82-83

Big Universities: Daunting or Delightful?

VANOC Calls to Students Across Canada to Volunteer

67 Postgraduate Study in the UK

72 Buenos Aires: Ideal Location for the Student Traveler

84 Experience Volunteering at an Orphanage in Tanzania

Colleges, and Universities, Chris Browne, QS World Grad School Tour, Marta Maftei, Megan Brenn-White, Luz Betancur, Jennifer Robinson, James Durant, John G. Kelly, James Clark, Katharine Cuffari, Paige Nichols, Joanna Sharp, Lies Ouwerkerk, Jean-Marc Hachey

88 Debunking the Myths About How Young Professionals Find International Jobs

Graphic Design: IQ Design A. Ender Birer Printer: Şan Ofset Istanbul, Turkey Advertising and Sales: Anita Kuehnel ad@canadianstudentmagazine.com

rEvolve EPS Holdings Ltd. 106-310 West 3rd Street North Vancouver, BC V7M 1G4 Canada Tel: +1 604 986 7704 Fax: +1 604 986 3047 info@canadianstudentmagazine.com www.canadianstudentmagazine.com www.revolve-eps.com

© 2009 Canadian Student Magazine™. All rights reserved. For editorial matters, please contact the editor. The views of contributors do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. The publishers cannot be held responsible for loss or damage resulting from use of any information contained within this publication. Canadian Student Magazine is published semi-annually. Printed in Turkey.


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International Language Schools EF International Language Schools has the course, destination and language suited for your needs.

Do you have what it takes to succeed? We are here to answer your questions and help you sign up for an experience unlike any other!you Findthe usexperience EF offers on Facebook, Twitter and now that chatwill with us live on set you apart from your Meebo! peers: international travel

combined with language learning 1-800-387-1463 or www.ef.com Reserve today! Call us at 1-800-387-1463. Enroll for 4 weeks and mention CSM to receive $150 off!

Electronics Engineering Technology Degree Now Online through DeVry For over 35 years, DeVry has been at the forefront of awarding bachelor’s degrees in electronics engineering technology. DeVry Calgary recently received approval from Alberta Education to offer its Electronics Engineering Technology program online. Canadians now have the opportunity to put themselves at the forefront of an exciting career path in a way that is both flexible and accessible. For people seeking a career-focused education that is rapidly advancing and in high demand, DeVry Calgary gives students the latest tools and techniques needed to be successful in the electronics industry. For more information on this bachelor’s degree and exciting career path, please visit www.devry.ca

Gain the edge University of Bristol celebrates 100 years with yo u need visits to Canada: with EF 2009 marks the Centenary celebrations at Bristol. Take a look at our historic milestones:

www.ef.com

1910 - Chemistry building opened 1929 - Sir Winston Churchill became Chancellor 1930 - Department of Preventative Medicine established 1946 - First Drama department in the UK established 1958 - Queen Elizabeth II opened new Engineering building 1967 - Nobel Prize for Physics winner 1978 - Centre for Deaf Studies opened 1983 - Law Faculty celebrated 50th anniversary 1993 - Gorbachev received honorary degree 2001 - Professor Eric Thomas appointed Vice Chancellor 2006 - Tony Blair spoke at the University 2009 - Vice-Chancellor’s tour visits Toronto and Vancouver www.bristol.ac.uk/international/

Kingston University London With more than 20,000 students, Kingston University is the largest provider of higher education in South West London, offering an extensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate programs. The University is renowned for teaching excellence and has established itself as a growing force in research. The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) rate Kingston Business School as the best new university in the UK for Business Research. The Kingston Business School was rated by the RAE in 2008 as being of a quality that is recognized internationally, in terms of originality, significance, and rigor. www.kingston.ac.uk

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Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Middlesex is London

The University of Melbourne in Melbourne, Australia has introduced landmark educational reforms known collectively as the Melbourne Model. In moving to the new model, the University is responding to the challenges of today’s changing environment as well as aligning itself with the best of European and Asian practice and North American traditions. Under the Melbourne Model, students studying a new generation undergraduate degree complete a major in a particular discipline together with breadth subjects. These breadth subjects along with the opportunity for internships, study abroad and participation in industry projects offer students the chance to explore a range of interests. Learn more about the ‘Melbourne Experience’ by visiting us at www.futurestudents.unimelb.edu.au

Middlesex University offers visiting students the experience of a lifetime as you live and study in one of the world’s most vibrant cities. We are now accepting applications for Spring, Summer and Fall 2010 and you may be eligible for a scholarship of up to £2,000. We will be exhibiting at the Idealist Postgraduate Fair in Toronto, being held at the University of Toronto, on September 17, 2009. If you live in, or will be visiting, the Toronto area we would love to meet with you to discuss the many options open to you at Middlesex University and answer any questions you may have. You can find out more about the fair at their website or by contacting Middlesex’s North America and Caribbean Regional Office directly. We look forward to seeing you in September. www.mdx.ac.uk/study/international/index.asp

Now Recruiting! The Embassy of Japan in Canada invites Canadian citizens interested in exploring Japan to consider applying this fall for the 2010 JET Programme. This long-standing Japanese government initiative places enthusiastic university graduates in Japanese communities while arranging for their employment in local public schools and government offices. JET participants can count on one-year renewable contracts, a guaranteed salary, round-trip airfare, training and support, as well as the opportunity to explore first-hand the culture and daily life of this fascinating and dynamic country. For application information please visit the JET Canada website:

New in 2009 - Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Coaching) If you’re interested in changing peoples lives by helping them achieve the best possible outcomes personally and professionally then you might want to consider a career in life, executive or personal coaching. The Australian College of Applied Psychology (ACAP’s) new Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Coaching) teaches the fundamentals of positive psychology in order to prepare graduates for a career in this exciting field.

This year’s application deadline is November 27th, 2009.

The Bachelors takes three years to complete and can by studied on-campus in Australia (Sydney and Melbourne) or online or by distance from your home country. See www.acap.edu.au

JET is more than a job; it’s an opportunity!

CRICOS Provider Codes - 01328A (NSW), 02829E (VIC)

www.ca.emb-japan.go.jp/jetcanada.html

DCT’s Advanced Diploma in European Culinary Arts program has just been awarded “Exemplary Program Status” accreditation by the American Culinary Federation! Canadian Students who enroll either in DCT’s Culinary Arts or DCT & Lynn University-Switzerland’s Hospitality Management programs can qualify for an instant scholarship of CHF 500- (approx CAD 490-). Just apply directly to DCT online at www.dct.edu and enter “Canadian Student Magazine” in the box at the end of the form that asks how you heard about DCT. www.dct.edu

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

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Get Involved with Curtin Volunteers! At Curtin you can get more from your university experience by joining Curtin Volunteers! (CV!). CV! is Australia’s first and largest student-run volunteering organisation. Established over 15 years ago, CV! gives Curtin students, staff, and the general community opportunities to interact and network through a range of innovative volunteer programs such as:

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• Working with groups such as youth, Indigenous communities and disabled persons

• Environmental programs including conservation of wildlife, local rivers, and wetlands.

For more information visit www.cv.curtin.edu.au

Scholarship News

• King’s College London Graduate

• Funding of £10,000 per year is

• King’s International Graduate

• King’s awards the F. Kenneth Hare

School is offering scholarships to international students who wish to pursue a graduate programme in the 2010/11 academic session. Scholarship (KINGS) awards are available to applicants wishing to pursue full-time postgraduate research (PGR) or full-time postgraduate taught (PGT) programmes in any discipline.

available for up to three years for PGR programmes (subject to satisfactory progress) and for one year for full-time postgraduate taught programmes. Memorial Scholarship annually to a Canadian student who is accepted on a one-year full-time master’s programme in any discipline offered by the College.

Further information on scholarships and information for Canadian students can be found at www.kcl.ac.uk/canada

Graduates of Pittsburgh Technical Institute’s School of Building Technology now can prepare for growing career fields like HVAC, heating ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration, or HCSI, residential/ commercial “smart home” technology. Get charged up working with electronics? Possess strong customer service skills? HVAC or HCSI could be the right career for you. State-of-the-industry lab facilities and instructors with field experience create a hands-on learning environment that can have you working in an in-demand career in just 15-24 months. Learn more about PTI’s career-focused majors and internships. Visit What We Teach at www.pti.edu. More than 25 majors available.

Hollywood Rip Ride RockitSM NOW OPEN at Universal Studios Florida® Take your music for a rideSM on Hollywood Rip Ride RockitSM, the most personalized and immersive roller coaster experience in the world. For the first time ever, YOU pick the soundtrack while on-board cameras capture every scream-filled moment of your high-speed flight in, around, and over Universal Studios®. Back on the ground, you can even purchase a music video of your ride. The “never been done before” elements also extend to the track itself with several world’s-first moves. To purchase discounted tickets, Call 1-800-YOUTH15 or visit uogroupsales.com

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Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


You want a university program that prepares you for a lifetime of achievement and success. Consider Ontario’s newest university, the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT). UOIT’s environmentally-friendly campus overlooks the refreshing countryside on the outskirts of the city of Oshawa. UOIT is a 21st century university. UOIT Science programs utilize laptop computers, web-enhanced learning, and wireless campus facilities. Undergraduate students combine rigorous classroom studies with research experience on projects that benefit society. Co-operative education allows you to apply your learning to real-world problems so necessary for your successful entry into business, industry, the public sector, or further education. See what UOIT and the Faculty of Science has to offer at www.uoit.ca and www.science.uoit.ca/EN/ main/undergraduate/co-op_education.

TRAIN IN NEW ZEALAND – 2010 AND BEYOND Mahurangi Technical Institute MTI is situated in Warkworth, forty minutes North of Auckland with surf beaches and cafes right on the doorstep. One of the biggest private providers in the Rodney region, MTI puts approximately 2000 students through its doors annually. Friendly, approachable tutors come from a mix of professional and industry experience, bringing up to date knowledge from their various specialty subjects. Enrolling now for 2010

• • • • • •

Tourism Aquaculture Superyacht Crew Maritime Qualifications Hospitality much more

www.uoit.ca

Visit our website for further information www.mti.net.nz

New School Based Experience at NUI Maynooth

The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise confirms Queen Mary, University of London as a top research university

It is now possible for Study Abroad students to do an Educational Placement for one semester or full year. Practical teaching is carried out on two full days a week in schools where the principal and members of staff have agreed to co-operate with the NUI Maynooth Education Department. Each student is assigned by the school to a number of experienced co-operating teachers depending upon the subject areas involved. The student will work closely with these co-operating teachers, observe their teaching, and will be in turn observed by them. All of our education programs are focused on second level education, that is, ages 12-17 approximately. www.nuim.ie

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

The results of the, RAE published in December 2008, confirmed Queen Mary’s place in the very top group of research-led universities. Overall, the Times Higher Education, ranked Queen Mary 13th in the country for the quality of its research and the Guardian even higher, placing Queen Mary 11th in the UK. In particular the Law School scored highly and is now ranked 7th in England, based on 60 per cent of its research activity classed as world-leading (4*) (highest score possible) or internationally excellent (3*). Further information about Queen Mary, the RAE Results and the courses available please visit www.qmul.ac.uk

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STUDENT TESTIMONIALS

STUDENT TESTIMONIALS I decided to start studying as a career change and ACAP was the only school that would allow me to start at a postgraduate level. I was a Secondary School teacher and currently I’m interested in high school counselling, but am open to other possibilities. I’m waiting to see what my work experience placements are like and if I’m inspired to counsel in a different sector. The best thing about studying at ACAP is the lecturers who are interesting and offer challenging lessons. There is also lots of practical student centred learning, which is helping me retrain and better understand the topics. Most important to me is the small class sizes and intimate setting where you feel part of a learning community and not like a statistic as in larger universities. Melbourne is an interesting and vibrant city with lots to do and it is close to nature when I want to get away from it all. Lastly the climate is lovely. Christina Markin, from Vancouver, studying the Graduate Diploma of Counselling

Before coming to Bristol I studied Anthropology at York University in Toronto. I found out about Bristol’s Archaeology program over the internet. The multiple opportunities the program offers for hands–on experience made it very attractive. The accommodation is right in the centre of the city, and easy walking distance to the University and the shops. I’ve seen a lot of Bristol and the surrounding area, between class trips and exploring the city with my friends and flat mates. It’s a great city to live and study in, with all the resources and activities you could ask for. Allison Marcucci MA Landscape Archaeology

I know that by attending DCT University Center I am receiving one of the best educations in the world. Studying on the DCT/Lynn University Switzerland

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Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Program campus is giving me great social and cultural opportunities to improve my awareness and sense of the world. The international student body receives excellence in academic programs, which the graduates have turned into an amazing reputation for success within management levels of companies throughout the world. I have no doubt that when I look for a job after graduation, my studies in Switzerland will give me an advantage in the job market. Doğa Demirsu

Moving across the world to continue my studies at graduate level wasn’t an easy decision. However, once I arrived at King’s I knew that I had made the right choice. Studying with some of the top academics in the field of War Studies has been very exciting; this has opened my mind and vastly expanded my knowledge. The unique nature of the programmes offered at King’s initially inspired me to apply. However, it was the friendly, professional atmosphere that compelled me to become a member of staff at the Centre of Science and Security following my graduation. The experience and skills gained will help me meet my future professional goals when I return home to Canada. Alyson Vitunski Conflict, Security & Development MA

After completing my first Undergraduate Degree close to home, the opportunity to study abroad appealed to me. I was impressed with Kingston University London as a potential place to live and study. The LLB course at Kingston provides valuable teaching and support for developing a legal career.

I am the third person in my family to successfully complete a college degree but I am the first to pursue a course of study outside of the United States. From the second I stepped foot in Ireland I knew that I had discovered a new and exciting facet of my life and I have not looked back since. This experience at NUI Maynooth has shaped my future in a powerful way - by giving me an appreciation for the culturally and intellectually diverse world in which we live. Hillary Kramer, BA Spanish and English

It is the variety of subjects and opportunities available to Arts students that helps me get the most out of my degree. I will be graduating from an internationally respected university but will also have gained immeasurable experience. I am confident that no matter where in the world I intend to use it, my Melbourne degree will be a great advantage. Sarah Ouellette, University of Melbourne

Reflecting back on the past few months, I’m certain the opportunities I have been given at the ITESM Campus Querétaro were much different than those of an “ordinary” internship. Upon my arrival at the office of international programs, I have been treated like a friend and encouraged to excel with my Spanish comprehension and fluency.

Although I am uncertain whether I will remain in London to complete the required legal training after my degree completion, I believe the course will provide me with a good foundation for pursuing a career in the field of law.

My duties have ranged from diplomacy to assisting excursions throughout Mexico with international students. So far, this has been an invaluable educational and professional experience providing me with a diverse outlook on my future career and a constant challenge that changes day-today.

Elise Harris LLB - Law

Torin Gene Braaten University of Oregon JUL – DEC 2009

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


PTI’s instructors are awesome. They notice when I don’t understand and offer assistance. PTI was the right choice for me. Volkmar K. Pittsburgh Technical Institute, Multimedia Technologies student

As a graduate in business on a limited budget, studying a 2-year LLB at Queen Mary saves me both time and money, yet offers me an internationally recognised University of London degree. In addition, my participation in Queen Mary’s student-led Pro Bono Group,

Law Society, Bar Society, and Mooting Society have given me valuable volunteer experience and allowed me to establish important contacts within top City law firms. Finally, Queen Mary’s law department demonstrates a very high quality of teaching. It is clear from the time and personal interest demonstrated by each of my lecturers and tutors that they are committed to helping me succeed, both scholastically and in my future career. As a result of the skills I am gaining at Queen Mary, I am currently applying for training contracts in 2011 and hope to qualify as a solicitor in a UK commercial law firm by 2013. Janta Quigley, Senior Status LLB

When I was a college student, I noticed that all the companies have one thing in common – they hire MBAs as their CEOs and for any type of leadership positions. So, I went to NYIT Vancouver, finished the MBA program and went back home. In fact, the NYIT MBA has helped me a lot in finding a job in my home country and it has equipped me with the tools that I need – now it’s up to me to apply my knowledge.

medicine.

The undergraduate education at UOIT has not only provided me with a strong work ethic, but has prepared me in a practical sense for a future career in

STUDENT TESTIMONIALS

I was searching for a college with a creative program focusing on movies and 3-D animation. Pittsburgh Technical Institute has everything and more, including an impressive multimedia lab and lots of computers. I transitioned from Potsdam, Germany, to PTI with my dedicated admissions coordinator’s help. She took care of the paperwork so I’d have approval to study in the U.S. I’ve made friends and gotten involved in activities like my favorite hometown sport – disc golf!

The integration of technology in the field of medicine is becoming quite common, and as a laptop-based university, UOIT has inspired me to integrate technology as a useful learning tool in my future studies. UOIT has also instilled in me both a strong work ethic and valuable technical skills so that I can apply myself to reach my full potential and achieve my best in medical school. Shaqil Peermohamed, B.Sc. (Hons.), UOIT, 2008

EF has given me a basic skill set to build upon in the future. My favorite part was meeting new students from around the world!” Greg Bain, EF Shanghai From Columbus OH, age 29

Wendy Shih, MBA ‘08

Call for Editorial Content Canadian Student Magazine editorial content is contributed by industry professionals and inspired individuals. The content is mostly non-self promotional (except for charitable organizations), and as you can see, covers a range of topics relevant to our readership. The word count is typically between 600-1200 words, and we welcome photo suggestions. Note that we do credit author and institution for the articles and any photos submitted and published. If you have a topic of interest and an article you would like to contribute to Canadian Student Magazine and/or www.GoStudy.ca, we want to hear about it. Contact publisher Anita Kuehnel on anita@canadianstudentmagazine.com.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

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INSPIRATION

Helping You

Set Goals You may find it difficult to plan for the future, but this does not mean that you are not motivated or driven to achieve. It could be that you are trying to establish who you are, and part of this will include developing an understanding of your own interests, values and aspirations. Your aspirations may also tend to be more short term rather than having a longer term focus, so you may find that you are thinking about passing a test in the next few days, buying the latest cell phone, or planning for the next social event with friends, as opposed to making decisions about future choices likes careers or a savings plan. You could also be confused by the various options available to you or because you are interested in subjects, careers, or jobs that may be in conflict in some way with other people’s expectations of you. These expectations could be real or perceived and may be from family, friends, teachers, etc. Try and think about both the shorter term and longer term outcomes you would like to achieve when setting goals. Having short term plans will assist you to stay focused on what you are trying to achieve, feel as though you are being rewarded along the way for any hard work or self-discipline you are maintaining, and allow you to re-evaluate or adjust the longer term plans if your efforts look like they are surpassing the overall goal. It is important to remember that these longer term goals may not seem so real because they just seem so far away, but they are certainly important.

© Kenny Goh - Dreamstime.com

Having some flexibility to the plan can also mean that you stay motivated rather than get discouraged by any challenges or setbacks along the way. It is also important to set goals that are both realistic and achievable. Remember, there is nothing wrong with setting high standards and having dreams, as long as you can build a pathway that bridges the gap between ideas and outcomes. Contributed by: Natalie Kleindyk, Graduate Diploma of Science (Psychology), Bachelor of Arts (Psychology), ACAP Educator. Australia College of Applied Psychology www.acap.edu.au

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Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


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Make a difference for life with a qualification from the Australian College of Applied Psychology At the Australian College of Applied Psychology (ACAP) you can gain the skills and qualifications you need to work in counselling or coaching or to improve your people management techniques. ACAP has over 26 years experience in teaching applied psychology with specialist courses in counselling, people management and coaching. Our unique interactive learning environment provides you with the opportunity to develop your skills, increase your understanding of how people work and gain a qualification. We offer a flexible education that lets you study online or by distance education from your home country or, on-campus in Australia (Sydney, Brisbane or Melbourne).*

A few good reasons to choose ACAP: • With an average size of less than 20, our classes provide an opportunity for you to get to know your fellow students and educators through interaction and group discussion. • The educators who facilitate your learning are current practitioners in the field, meaning they bring their work experience to their teaching and pass on not only the latest theories and methods but also real life examples.

Study our: • Bachelor of Applied Social Science (051179F NSW, 060113E VIC) • Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Coaching) (065591A NSW, 068267M VIC) • Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Counselling) (057962A NSW, 060114D VIC) • Bachelor of Applied Social Science (Management) (057963M NSW, 060115C VIC) • Graduate Diploma of Counselling (048166D NSW, 065522C QLD, 060112F VIC) • Master of Applied Social Science (060133A NSW) • Master of Applied Social Science(Counselling) (060134M NSW) • Master of Applied Social Science (Management) (060135K NSW)

• The majority of courses at ACAP include a Student Placement (an unpaid work placement in an organisation related to your study). So you get the chance to practise your skills in a work environment, and get experience on your resume before you graduate.

For more information contact us today: Ph: +61 02 99646306 Email: info@acap.edu.au Skype: marketingacap Web: www.acap.edu.au *Not all courses are available at all campuses visit www.acap.edu.au for further information.

CRICOS Provider Codes: 01328A (NSW), 02829E (VIC), 02565B (QLD)


AUSTRALIA © Geotrac - Dreamstime.com

Law Studies in

Australia When Jim Hathaway welcomed students to the Juris Doctor program at the University of Melbourne in Australia last year, he could sense the excitement.

With half the students already holding at least two university degrees and the remainder with experience in another career, the Dean of the Faculty of Law says the 70 students were selected for a particular reason. “We were looking for students who have acquired a diversity of experience through travel, work and learning experiences,” he explains. “We want an

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

engaging class, and to have students with a confident sense of self and understanding of the place of law in the broader social spectrum.” Hathaway’s efforts to bring an international and thorough Juris Doctor program to the forefront developed when he first arrived in Australia. A Canadian, Hathaway taught law at Osgoode for 15 years and then in Michigan for another decade before he came to the Faculty of Law at the University of Melbourne. With more than 15 countries represented in the Juris Doctor class,

Hathaway says the program will suit the international students. “Whether you want to practice law in Hong Kong, London, New York or Toronto, you want a law degree that is going to give you the best credential, because you never know where life is going to take you,” he says. “You really want a credential that you can take anywhere with you, and that is transportable.” Hathaway’s logic is evident in the number of Canadians travelling abroad to complete their law degree. Whether Canadians move to England or

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AUSTRALIA

Australia, a law degree has transformed into an international experience for many. Australia’s Bond University is wellversed in the Canadian demand for an international law degree. Each year, dozens of Canadians board the plane to Australia to complete the Juris Doctor program at the Gold Coast-based university. Law professor Eric Colvin says there are countless reasons why Canadians travel abroad for their law degree. “An international education can give a broader perspective on life and a range of experiences which can be attractive to Canadian employers,” Colvin says. “Law firms, especially the

the law, but it gives you an interpersonal experience that will benefit you for your entire life and will help you in both your work and personal life,” he explains.

they all had summer positions. You need to rely on your other experiences and background to make you competitive,” he says.

Yet Hanna doesn’t disregard the journey it takes to come back home and successfully practice law. He took an extra year of courses at Osgoode in order to satisfy the National Council of Accreditation’s requirements.

Colvin offers another option for law school graduates.

“Getting started in Canada, it’s tough to get into that big firm area,” he says. “You have to be aggressive and apply a strong sense of marketing.” Hanna is a founding member of Bond’s Canadian Student Law Association, where Canadian students come

“If finances permit, I would stay on in Australia after graduation and complete the requirements for professional admission here,” he says. “This involves a practical legal training program which takes about six months. The result is that, when you are seeking employment in Canada, you are doing so as someone who is already a solicitor in Australia. This can enhance your attractiveness to a Canadian law firm.” Yet Colvin agrees with Hanna that returning to Canada takes preparation. “Bear in mind that law firms hire people, not degrees or marks,” Colvin says. “Try to build a picture of yourself as an all-rounder who not only has appropriate academic credentials, but who is actively engaged in a range of activities.” Hanna followed this approach, and it paid off.

commercial firms, have become more international in their outlook as the global economy has grown and their clients are engaged more and more in international trade transactions.” Ryan Hanna agrees. A 2005 Juris Doctor graduate, Hanna has since returned to Canada and is practicing law at a Toronto-based firm. He agrees with Colvin that an international law degree brings experience to a student. “Not only does an international law degree develop your understanding of

together on campus and host social functions and gain a better sense of understanding about their journey back home. Hanna’s own extracurricular activities were an attribute to his résumé, and says Canadians studying law abroad should do the same. “Don’t go there not knowing what you have to do to get back. Do as much as you can to get volunteer experience and get onto clubs; use it to sell yourself. When you’re back in Canada,

Though he worked hard to come back to Canada, Hanna says he wouldn’t complete his law degree any other way. “I feel that my degree from Australia has given me so much more than what I would get if I stayed home,” he says. “I’ll always remember my time overseas.” Contributed by: Cathy McNally of OzTREKK educational services. She can be contacted at cathy@oztrekk.com

Global Education + Global Networks = Global Opportunities The University of New South Wales (UNSW) is recognised as the top university in Australia for quality of learning and teaching under the 2009 Australian Government Learning and Teaching Performance Fund, achieving top scores for excellence in the categories of: n business, law and economics (for the third consecutive year) n science, engineering, computing and architecture

www.unsw.edu.au

UNSW John Niland Scientia Building

UNSW International Office: Tel. +61 2 9385 6996 n internationaloffice@unsw.edu.au


AUSTRALIA

Australia Welcomes

Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy Students To some, Australia is noted for its idyllic beaches and tropical climate; to others, iconic symbols of koalas and kangaroos come to mind. Outdoor enthusiasts thrive on the endless hiking trails and pristine surfing conditions, while tourists enjoy amicable locals and multicultural flair. In many ways, Australia has something for everyone – especially Canadian students. Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

Known to many as “the land down under,” Australia boasts a world-class, forward-thinking, and innovative educational system. It is also a popular choice among Canadian students seeking professional and graduate degrees. In fact, the number of Canadian students studying in Australia has been on the rise, with 4,641 Canadians enrolling in 2008, according to Australian International Education, a

division of the Australian Government. Considering Australia’s internationallyrecognized institutions, faculty and programs, this number is not surprising. Among the many study options available in Australia, rehabilitation science programs – namely Physiotherapy (PT) and Occupational Therapy (OT) – are of high interest. Australia has established a tradition of Study In Canada • Study Abroad

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AUSTRALIA excellence in the PT and OT fields that starts in the classrooms where future therapists are trained. Australian PT and OT programs provide both local and Canadian students an excellent stepping-stone into fulfilling careers.

international students. Typically, qualifications for acceptance into Australian PT and OT programs include a related Bachelor’s degree with a cumulative 3.0 GPA, with relevant work experience considered an advantage.

In addition to applying to Australian programs based on their strong academic reputation, Canadian students are setting their sights on earning qualifications down under as a creative way around the often limited student placements available in Canada. As with many professional degrees across the nation, there are significantly more students applying for places than there are openings. In fact, in 2008, only slightly more than 25 percent of 2,085 applicants were admitted into Ontario’s OT and PT programs. University of Waterloo graduate Angela Daniels was among those who didn’t get a spot. Now Daniels is preparing for an Occupational Therapy program in Australia. “I applied to Canada twice and didn’t get in,” she says, “so I decided to go this route instead.”

University of Toronto graduate Nettya Senthilnathan met these requirements when applying to the University of Sydney’s reputable Master of Occupational Therapy program. “I did a double major in Psychology and Health Science,” she says. “I had worked under an OT and found it interesting, so I thought it would be a good career to match my personality.” From that point, Senthilnathan’s decision to go abroad was an easy one. “I had heard great things about Australia from my co-workers,” she says. “The fact that we start school in March was also appealing, because that meant I didn’t need to wait until September.”

Daniels is not alone, and fortunately, Australian PT and OT programs reserve competitive placements for qualified

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school at the University of Sydney: “Australia is known for having good programs,” she says. “I came to Australia for a bit of adventure while still being in a place similar enough to home.”

Like Senthilnathan, Ontario native Elizabeth Williams followed her dream of becoming a Physiotherapist to graduate

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


The similarities between Australia and Canada are no mystery. Eliminate Canada’s chilling winters and plant a few palm trees, and the comparisons abound. Both countries adhere to similar parliaments, are geographically dispersed, and share roughly the same standards of living. Additionally, Australians and Canadians share a reputation worldwide as “friendly people.” These shared characteristics continue inside the classroom. And it is these aspects, namely between the two countries’ curricula, that allow

Foreign PT and OT qualifications require assessments by their regulating bodies: the Canadian Alliance of Physiotherapy Regulators (CAPR) and the Canadian Association of Occupational Therapists (CAOT), respectively. Both regulating bodies offer a credentialing process designed to find possible deficiencies in training, followed by a licensing examination. Daniels, like most students doing such training, welcomes the process. “I feel very confident that the education I will receive will prepare me for my future career,” she says. Canadian students who choose to study in Australia exhibit a strong commitment to furthering their education. They also tend to be ambitious and adventurous. Williams fits this description. “I came to Australia for a bit of adventure,” she says. Daniels is also thinking about all she will experience outside the classroom. “This is the only opportunity in my life that I will be able to go and live in another country for two years,” she says.

For students who take the time to explore the possibilities of completing a professional or graduate degree in Australia or elsewhere, the decision often grows easier as they consider the broader benefits of studying abroad, including the personal growth that comes from living overseas and experiencing the daily life and customs of a foreign country. “I am just looking forward to being in Australia and meeting new people,” Daniels says. “OT in Australia [offers] me a chance to experience a new country and culture while getting a quality education. That is very exciting to me.” Kimberly Randall is an Ontario-based regional director for AustraLearn / AsiaLearn / EuroLearn – Educational Programs of GlobaLinks Learning Abroad. Reach her at (647) 727-4966 or krandall@globalinksabroad.org. For Canadian student services, call 1-800-980-0033 or visit www.degreesoverseas.com.

Study in the heart of

Melbourne, auStralia Enhance your academic, personal and professional prospects through a full degree or semester program at RMIT University, a global university of technology. Our main campus is located in, and is an integral part of, Melbourne’s city centre, allowing RMIT students easy access to all the facilities, attractions and events that Melbourne and the state of Victoria provide. Established in 1887 and with a strong international reputation for cutting edge academic programs and best practice teaching in excellent facilities, RMIT University is one of Australia’s most dynamic and innovative universities offering:

CRICOS Provider Code: 00122A

» » » »

diverse study opportunities across various sectors applied learning with a distinct and competitive advantage strong links with industry, community partners and universities across the globe dedicated international student support.

A total of 10000 international students from over 100 countries choose to study at RMIT University in Melbourne. They join the 60000 other students who also study with us. Shouldn’t you study in the heart of Melbourne too?

>

To find out more, email: isu@rmit.edu.au or visit our web site.

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AUSTRALIA

Australian-trained PTs and OTs to transfer their degrees with relative ease back to Canada.


NEW ZEALAND

Get a ‘Hands-On’ Education in

© Lovrencg - Fotolia.com

New Zealand

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Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


© Ken Brown - Istockphoto.com

Studying in New Zealand is a ‘very hands-on’ experience for most. Whether they’re researching a doctoral thesis, training to become an outdoor adventure leader, or hoping to understand and predict natural disasters, they can enhance their studies in New Zealand with real-life experiences. For students specializing in geology or environmental studies, New Zealand is the ideal place to get their hands dirty. The country has several active volcanoes, underground geothermal areas, low-lying glaciers, and is situated on the border of two tectonic plates. This allows for some unique research opportunities. Over one-third of New Zealand’s area is protected parkland or forest, so it’s easy to access natural areas without having to stray far from educational facilities or urban conveniences. New Zealand’s remoteness also makes it a great place to study protected wildlife, with populations of penguins, albatross, the world’s only alpine parrot – the kea – and the world’s heaviest insect, the giant weta. New Zealand is also famous for being an adventure-lover’s playground. The rugged but accessible landscape makes it a must-do for hikers, mountaineers, kayakers, surfers, skiers, mountain bikers, and of course bungee jumpers! For some, the great recreational activities in New Zealand are just a bonus of studying here. For others, the recreational activities are a key element in their studies.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

Along with the eight universities, New Zealand has 21 Institutes of Technology and Polytechnics around the country offering practical courses which lead to certificates, diplomas and degrees in a number of subjects. Often their courses include the opportunity to get valuable work experience as part of their programs. This gives students skills that just can’t be learned in the classroom. Hundreds of private training providers round out the options for students, with courses that lead directly to careers in fields like IT, business, travel and hospitality.

The small population of New Zealand also means that class sizes tend to be smaller, allowing students more personal attention from lecturers and tutors. The small classes, along with the emphasis on discussion and participation in class, mean that students from overseas get to know their classmates quickly and make friends easily. Leisure time is important to New Zealanders, so students are likely to have a lot of fun while they’re in the country. That balance of great education and memorable experiences is what makes New Zealand such a popular place to study. Studying in New Zealand, whether for a few months or a few years, is an experience that international students treasure for the rest of their lives. You may get your hands a bit dirty, but you’ll also get a chance to participate in practical training and research to help launch your career. Source: Education New Zealand www.newzealandeducated.com

Study in

New Zealand has a national quality assurance system, called the New Zealand Qualifications Authority (NZQA). This ensures that students taking courses in New Zealand are consistently getting a great education that can be transferred to other schools around the world and is recognized by potential employers. This makes it easy to complete an entire degree in New Zealand or just a few specialized courses as part of a semester abroad.

NEW ZEALAND

Everything from a certificate to a postgraduate degree can be obtained in the field of outdoor recreation in New Zealand. Studying in a country renowned for adventurous outdoor experiences is ideal for students who want a piece of the action. In addition to more general qualifications, students in New Zealand can become qualified as skydiving instructors, scuba diving instructors, and skiing or snowboarding instructors, to name just a few.

New Zealand

Certificate in Aquatic Studies Specialist aquaculture education

Certificate in Superyacht Crew This year long certificate covers: 12 weeks hands on training. Designed to provide you with the skills and qualifications necessary to start a career in the superyacht industry. Course covers: Fire fighting, sea survival, STCW basic training, radar, hospitality, powerboat driving, helicopter safety and much more!

Finfish and aquatic biology, hatchery techniques, seafood microbiology, marine ecology, electric fishing and much more Study in our purpose built aquaculture research and education facility and licensed fish farm

Follow your dreams and contact us today!

Mahurangi Technical Institute 11 Glenmore Drive, PO Box 414 Warkworth, New Zealand 0941

Enrolling now for 2010

For more information email: office@mti.net.nz - www.mti.net.nz


UNICEF Canada lance un appel à tous les élèves des écoles secondaires et à tous les étudiants et étudiantes des cégeps, des collèges et des universités pour qu’ils contribuent à sauver la vie d’enfants dans le monde. Vous pouvez prendre part à l’action de l’UNICEF auprès des enfants les plus vulnérables dans le cadre de l’une des campagnes suivantes :

par l’entremise du programme Des écoles pour l’Afrique. Les jeunes d’ici soutiennent ceux des pays en développement depuis plus de 50 ans en participant à cette campagne. Cette année, nous aimerions que vous nous aidiez à franchir le cap des 100 millions de dollars recueillis depuis plus de 50 ans! Date importante : Le 31 octobre, Journée nationale de l’UNICEF Ce que vous pouvez faire : Organisez une collecte de fonds dans le cadre de la Campagne Halloween UNICEF. Consultez : www.campagnehalloweenunicef.ca

ou autour du feu de camp. Toutefois, pour des millions de personnes dans le monde, les moustiques sont porteurs de la malaria, aussi appelée paludisme, une maladie responsable de près d’un million de décès chaque année. En raison de leur petite constitution et de leur système immunitaire fragile, les enfants courent un risque particulièrement élevé de souffrir des graves symptômes de la malaria, ou même d’en mourir. Cette maladie est l’une des principales causes de mortalité chez les enfants africains de moins de cinq ans; elle est responsable de près d’un décès d’enfant sur cinq en Afrique. La campagne Un filet d’espoir vise à recueillir des fonds et à sensibiliser le public afin de prévenir la dissémination de la malaria chez les jeunes. Elle a pour objectif de recueillir les fonds nécessaires à l’achat de 500 000 moustiquaires pour le lit imprégnées d’insecticide de longue durée destinées aux enfants et aux familles au Libéria et au Rwanda. Un filet à dix dollars sauve des vies.

La Campagne Halloween UNICEF – Cette année, aidez-nous à franchir le cap des 100 millions de dollars recueillis depuis plus de 50 ans! En Afrique subsaharienne seulement, plus de 40 millions d’enfants ne vont pas à l’école. Près d’un enfant sur deux grandit derrière le mur invisible de la pauvreté et de la discrimination et n’a pas accès à l’école primaire.

Le défi Un filet d’espoir

La Campagne Halloween UNICEF permet d’offrir l’éducation, un cadeau qui peut transformer des vies, aux enfants du Malawi et du Rwanda

Pour bon nombre de gens, les moustiques sont associés à l’été : des piqûres qui provoquent une démangeaison dérangeante au parc

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

INSPIRATION

Les étudiants et étudiantes édifient un monde digne des enfants avec UNICEF Canada

Si vous pensez être trop petit pour changer les choses, essayez de dormir dans une chambre avec un moustique. ~ Proverbe africain

Date importante : Le 25 avril, Journée mondiale du paludisme Ce que vous pouvez faire : Participez au défi Un filet d’espoir et recueillez des fonds avec votre école et au sein de votre communauté afin de prévenir la malaria et de sauver la vie d’enfants. Consultez : www.unfiletdespoir.org

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INSPIRATION

un principe faisant passer avant tout l’intérêt supérieur de l’enfant pour résoudre les conflits de compétences intergouvernementaux qui influent sur la vie et la santé des enfants autochtones. Communiquez avec vos députés fédéral et provincial et demandez-leur de mettre en place une législation afin d’adopter le Principe de Jordan, de travailler pour garantir la prestation sans heurts des services de santé aux enfants autochtones, et de rendre le Programme de soins santé non assurés de Santé Canada accessible aux enfants métis.

Pour tous les enfants, sans exception

Consultez : www.unicef.ca/pourtouslesenfants

UNICEF Canada a publié cette année un rapport intitulé La santé des enfants autochtones : Pour tous les enfants, sans exception. Le rapport indique que les enfants autochtones sont parmi les plus marginalisés au sein de la société canadienne. Malgré certains progrès, la situation des enfants autochtones, incluant les enfants métis, inuits et des Premières Nations, est au moins deux à trois fois pire que celle des autres enfants canadiens. Enfants, ils sont moins susceptibles de consulter un médecin. Adolescents, ils sont plus susceptibles de devenir parents. Et, dans de nombreuses communautés, ils sont plus enclins à se suicider. Ces inégalités constituent l’un des plus grands enjeux auxquels fait face notre pays concernant les droits de l’enfant. Le rapport invite à passer à l’action afin de veiller à ce que les enfants autochtones aient les mêmes services et possibilités que les autres enfants canadiens et pour assurer la mise en application pleine et entière de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant des Nations Unies, laquelle célèbrera son 20e anniversaire le 20 novembre 2009. Date importante : Le 20 novembre, Journée internationale de l’enfant Ce que vous pouvez faire : Apprenez-en plus. Consultez le rapport au www.unicef.ca/ pourtouslesenfants. Rédigé par des expertes canadiennes en santé des enfants autochtones, ce rapport présente des points de vue et des mesures plus détaillées pour améliorer la vie des enfants métis, inuits et des Premières Nations. Manifestez votre appui à titre d’individu ou d’organisme au Principe de Jordan,

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permet de fournir de l’eau potable à des dizaines d’enfants dans les pays en développement. Date importante : Le 22 mars, Journée mondiale de l’eau Ce que vous pouvez faire : Organisez une marche pour l’eau avec vos parents, amies et amis lors de la Journée mondiale de l’eau. Consultez : www.unicef.ca/marchepourleau Vous pouvez aussi célébrer les vingt ans de la Convention relative aux droits de l’enfant. Adoptez l’un des droits de l’enfant et organisez une collecte de fonds en vue d’offrir un ou des Cadeaux précieux distribués par l’UNICEF à des jeunes vivant dans des camps de réfugiés ou dans l’une des régions les plus pauvres du monde. Consultez : www.unicef.ca dans la section Faire un don

La marche pour l’eau Plus du tiers de la population mondiale ne dispose pas d’installations sanitaires de base, et près de 890 millions de personnes utilisent toujours des sources d’eau non potable. Des milliers d’enfants meurent chaque jour par manque d’accès à de l’eau potable et à une hygiène de base. Les femmes et les enfants courent un risque particulièrement élevé en l’absence d’eau potable. Dans de nombreux ménages, la responsabilité incombe aux femmes et aux filles de puiser l’eau pour la famille, ce qui signifie qu’elles doivent parfois marcher toute la journée pour atteindre la source la plus proche. UNICEF Canada invite les gens de tout le pays à effectuer une marche pour l’eau afin de recueillir des fonds pour procurer de l’eau et des installations sanitaires. Chaque dollar recueilli

Exprimez votre créativité! Si l’une des causes auxquelles l’UNICEF se consacre vous intéresse particulièrement, pourquoi ne pas lancer votre propre campagne de collecte de dons? Consultez : www.unicef.ca/collectedefonds Vous avez lu entièrement cet article? Envoyez-nous un courriel à JConanCormier@unicef.ca et courez la chance de gagner un prix! Contribué par : Muneeb Syed, Coordonnateur de l’engagement des communautés, Canada. www.unicef.ca

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

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www.canadianstudentmagazine.com

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© Dabobabo - Dreamstime.com

INSPIRATION

School Trips a Great Way to Travel Have you ever wanted to travel? Travelling definitely opens your eyes to the world around you and makes you realize and appreciate different cultures. You learn so much more through hands-on experiences than you ever would in a classroom: I know that I have.

If you`re a student there are a lot of opportunities out there, including going with your school. It is an ideal way to travel if you don`t have a lot of money or time to spend, or if it is your first time going overseas and you want to try things out. The trips are costeffective and everything is planned out for you, so that you don`t have to worry and can just enjoy yourself. This year my school offered five trips for 26

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

students, including New York, Hawaii, the Galapagos Islands and the trip that I went on: Germany and Italy.

Guten Tag, my name is Ava. I am 17 years old and I am lucky enough to have traveled to Europe three times already. I went once with Girl Guides of Canada to Switzerland, once with my family to France and the most recent, my school trip to Germany and Italy during Spring Break. The trip was amazing and we started by flying into Frankfurt and then the Munich airport. Right away, our tour guide picked us up and we did a walking city tour, seeing some of the main sights. This included Marienplatz, Frauenkirche and the main areas of

the city. We only spent three days in Germany and then seven in Italy, so our time in Germany did go by quite quickly, yet was a lot of fun.

One thing that we did do in Germany was visit a Concentration Camp. We went to Dachau - the very first camp opened in 1933 for political prisoners. It was a very sad and touching place and the feeling there was incredibly difficult to describe. It felt deserted and empty, and there was a calm, that was very disturbing. It was a very touching and emotional day for all of us. On our last day in Germany we went to Schloss Neuschwanstein for a tour. The castle was beautiful (!) and it was crazy the amount of money that was Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


The day that we spent in Venice could not have been more perfect. The weather was gorgeous and we took a boat in. First of all we went on a relaxing Gondola ride through the canals and waterways. There are no streets in Venice for cars, so you can only get around by boat or on foot through the tiny side streets. We visited Doge’s Palace, St. Mark’s Square. and saw a glass blowing demo. Very Interesting! The city is amazing, but our days were limited so we moved on.

where my friends and I would eat it three times a day. Travelling with Mary, Marina and Sara really made my trip, as there was barely a moment’s time when we were not laughing. In Florence, we explored the city for the first time at night. We familiarized ourselves and then had a guided tour the next day. Something that I really loved about this trip was the free time that we had; every day we had at least a few hours and sometimes we had a whole day. This time allowed us to experience the way that the people in the areas lived. You could take the time to sit on bench and relax and not just be a tourist, but someone who knew the cities. In Florence we saw Ponte Vecchio, a leather demonstration, and we climbed the Duomo for a view of the entire city. Europe is just so awesome and completely different from Canada with its architecture and cultures. It is something that you must experience for yourself.

International Language Schools

On the way to Florence we stopped in Verona, the city setting for Shakespeare’s famous Romeo and Juliet. We stopped by Juliet`s balcony and wrote on the canvas walls for memories. Of course, because we were in Italy, gelato became one of our favourite foods. It came to a point

In our final city, Rome, we spent three days. We did so many things and had a full day of free time. On our last morning, we were given a day pass for the metro and we were told where to

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meet for dinner. How amazing! Rome showed us so many things. We went to the Pantheon, Piazza Navona, the Colosseum, and Vatican City. In the Vatican we saw the Swiss Guards in their colourful uniforms, the Sistine Chapel and St. Peter`s Basilica. Also in Rome we ran down the Spanish steps, threw a coin in the Trevi Fountain and so much more. Our Europe trip was an unforgettable, exciting, and laughter-filled adventure. The experiences that we had were truly great! I cherish the memories that I have from my trips that I have taken. Travelling is definitely one of my favourite things and if you can, I recommend going on a school trip. Who knows? Maybe once you get back you will be inspired to go travelling on your own and create your own personal journeys. Contributed by: Ava Vanderstarren. Ava is in her final year of high school in Chilliwack, BC.

INSPIRATION

spent on it at the time. We took the afternoon viewing the rooms and going for a walk. When it was time to leave Germany we packed up our things and headed to Italy on an overnight train. What an experience that was!! We slept six in a cabin and when we woke up and did some train hopping, we found ourselves near Venice.


PROFILE

DEVRY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY School/Institution Name: DeVry Institute of Technology Founded in U.S. in 1931 Founded in Calgary in 1982

Institution Type(s): Post Secondary Degree Granting Institution Public / Private: Private

DeVry Calgary DeVry is one of the largest degreegranting higher education systems in North America, comprised of nearly 70,000 students enrolled in Canada and the U.S. at its 94 locations, as well as online. DeVry Calgary offers bachelor’s degree programs in business and technology both on-site at its campus and through DeVry Calgary’s online delivery. In Canada, the government of Alberta, through Alberta Advanced Education and Technology, grants accreditation for baccalaureate degrees awarded by DeVry Institute of Technology, Calgary. A degree that works At DeVry, your education is about more than memorizing facts. You learn the skills you need from faculty with realworld experience. Then you’ll practice what you learn. A DeVry degree offers the education and confidence you need to succeed. Trusted by top employers Gain the skills and information employers want. Since 1975, 237,957 undergraduate students system-wide have graduated from DeVry, and 90% of those in the active job market were employed in career-related positions within six months of graduation. Convenience to fit your lifestyle – on-site or online Earn your DeVry degree full time, part time, days, nights or weekends. Whatever suits your schedule. To make higher education accessible for a greater population of Albertans, DeVry Calgary also offers some of its bachelor’s degree programs online. Programs offered through DeVry Calgary’s online delivery include Business Operations (with 10 concentrations), Electronics Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

Engineering Technology and Computer Information Systems (with seven concentrations). Small classes, integrated education We keep our class sizes small so you get the attention you need and deserve. You’ll learn from industry experts in a business-model environment where critical thinking, problem solving, communication and teamwork are taught hand-in-hand with technical, business and general education. In other words, you do as you learn. Earn your education sooner with DeVry’s year-round classes Start the career you’ve dreamed of in no time. And start earning a salary to match. With DeVry’s year-round semester system you can earn your bachelor’s degree in as few as three years. Your Quality Higher Education is within reach To help make a college education affordable, DeVry’s Student Finance Advisors provide students with the information they need about financial aid options, such as grants, loans and work programs. DeVry also offers scholarships to qualifying students. DeVry’s scholarship program consists of awards ranging in value from $1,000 to $1,500 per semester. DeVry Calgary students are also eligible to apply for the Canada Student Loan (CSL) and various types of student aid from their province of residence. Contact or visit a DeVry advisor to see if you qualify. DeVry Calgary is located at 2700 3rd Ave. SE, a short distance from downtown, just off Barlow Trail, with easy access to the Franklin C-Train Station. For more information, visit www.DeVry.ca or call 1-800-363-5558.

Programs Offered: Business Operations (BSOP) with emphasis in: • Accounting • Business Information Systems • Finance • Hospitality Management • Production Management • Project Management • Sales and Marketing • Security Management • Small Business Management and Entrepreneurship • Technical Communication Computer Engineering Technology (CET) Computer Information Systems (CIS) with tracks in: • Business/Management • Computer Forensics • Database Management • Information Systems Security • Systems Analysis and Integration • Web Development and Administration • Flex Option Electronics Engineering Technology (EET) Network and Communications Management (NCM)

Student Life: Students can work on groundbreaking projects as well as compete internationally by participating in one of the business or technology-oriented organizations on campus. At DeVry Calgary, these include Advancing Canadian Entrepreneurship (ACE), Institute of Electrical Engineers (IEEE), Unmanned Vehicle Systems (UVS), Aerospace and Electronics Systems (AESS - IEEE), Computer Systems IEEE (CS - IEEE), and extensive robotics teams through DeVry Advanced Robotics Enterprise (DARE - IEEE).

Contact Details: DeVry Institute of Technology 2700 3rd Ave. SE Calgary, Alberta T2A 7W4 Telephone: +1 (800) 363-5558 Web site: www.devrynow.ca

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INFORMATION

Glossary of Terms in Canadian Education Academic year: the time during which classes are taught. In most Canadian universities, the university year starts in September and ends in May. It is normally divided into three terms or two semesters and concludes with a long vacation. Some universities operate on the semester or trimester system and admit students in January and/or May as well as September. Many institutions also offer a limited number of courses and special programs during the summer session. See also intersession. Bachelors degree: first degree awarded by a university after three or four years of full-time study. See also general, honours. Bursary: a non-repayable cash award to help students pay for their university education. Bursaries are awarded on the basis of financial need and academic achievement. Calendar: annual university publication listing key dates in the academic year, admission requirements, program requirements, rules and regulations, and course descriptions. The undergraduate calendar can be obtained from the university registrar; the graduate studies office distributes the graduate calendar. Certificate: a qualification awarded upon successful completion of a university program which is usually one year in duration. College: a college may be a universitylevel institution with the power to grant degrees. In some cases a college is a part of a university; either a residence or an academic entity in its own right, with the power to grant degrees, or a combination of the two. To differentiate between such institutions and community colleges, colleges that 30

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

are part of the university system are sometimes called university colleges. See also university and community college. Community college: a non-degreegranting institution which offers technical or vocational postsecondary courses leading to a diploma or certificate, or courses that can be transferred to a university. Co-op program: allows a student to combine academic study with work experience by spending one term on campus followed by another term working full-time at a job related to their field of study. Credit: the certification that a student has passed a particular course. Students can obtain one or more credits for each course taken and have to obtain a given number and type of credits to qualify for the award of a degree. Credit course: a course which is considered toward the completion of a particular program. A student can obtain one or more credits for each course taken. Curriculum: contents of a course or program. Degree: a qualification awarded to a student by a university. A first degree (usually a bachelor’s degree) signifies the successful completion of three or four years of successful studies. A graduate (master’s or doctorate) degree is awarded after further years of study. Diploma: a qualification awarded on the basis of one or two years’ successful study. Usually it is at less than degree level, but some diplomas are at the graduate level.

Distance education: involves the physical separation of teacher and student. Students and teachers communicate with each other by such means as correspondence courses, audiotapes, computer links, cable television broadcasts or satellite hookups. Doctorate: a degree ranking above the master’s degree and normally awarded after two or three years’ study, although most students need more time to finish; the average for many is four to five years. The most common doctorate is the PhD (Doctor of Philosophy) which can be awarded for research in any subject (not just philosophy). Doctoral degrees usually involve researching, writing, presenting and defending a thesis, in addition to course work. Faculty: this word is used to indicate the teaching staff of a university as well as an academic subdivision of a university which is normally a larger unit than a department. For example, a faculty of science might include the departments of physics, chemistry and biology. Fellowship: a non-repayable financial award to assist a graduate student with the costs of study. General, honours: these terms are used primarily with reference to first (bachelor’s) degree programs in arts and science. The general degree (also called a pass degree) is without a concentration in a particular field. The honours program is often a year longer, requires a higher standing for admission and for the maintenance of honours status and the student specializes in a particular field. See also bachelor’s degree. Graduate/postgraduate: graduate, sometimes called postgraduate, Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Internship: supervised practical training period for a student or recent graduate. Intersession: a break between terms which generally serves as a vacation but in which courses may also be offered. Lecture: teaching method in which the teacher or professor presents information orally to the students who take notes and ask questions. Major/minor: type of degree program; a major indicates specialization with a number of courses drawn from one particular subject area; a minor indicates a lesser degree of specialization, with only a few courses drawn from one particular area. Masters degree: a degree sought after the student has received a bachelor’s degree which may be

achieved by taking courses and examinations and in some cases by conducting research and presenting a thesis. Ombudsman/person: a university official empowered to investigate grievances. Orientation: a program offered at the beginning of the academic year to new students to familiarize them with the campus. Prerequisites: courses necessary to successfully complete before taking specific higher level courses. Registrar: a university official concerned with keeping academic records, approving course selections, and sometimes, counselling. The registrar’s office is responsible for student admissions, records and the university timetable.

University: an educational institution attended after secondary school for studies leading to a degree (e.g. bachelor’s, master’s, doctorate). Several of these institutions are called colleges, a few are called institutes or schools.

Scholarship: a non-repayable financial award to students to help finance their studies. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of outstanding academic achievement.

Source:

At NYIT - Vancouver, you take the same classes and receive the same degree as your classmates at NYIT in New York – a unique difference that will make you stand out in today’s competitive marketplace. Flexible class schedules ■ English language courses Practicum and internship opportunities ■

For more information or to register, call 888.242.3563 or e-mail vancouverinfo@nyit.edu or visit www.nyit.edu/Vancouver

NYIT has 15,000 students, 100 courses of study, 81,500 alumni, campuses in New York, Vancouver and around the globe, and operates with the consent of the Minister of Advanced Education, Province of British Columbia

Trimester: a few universities in Canada operate on a formal trimester system, with three terms of equal length and admission to any of the three terms. Undergraduate: undergraduate programs of study include those leading to a bachelors or first professional degree as well as to diplomas and certificates below degree level.

Earn Your M.B.A. at NYIT’s Vancouver campus

Study permit: a document giving an international student permission to reside in Canada for the purpose of study at the indicated institution therein.

http://www.aucc.ca/can_uni/student_info/ can_student/glossary_e.html

INFORMATION

programs lead to advanced degrees, diplomas and certificates for which a first degree is a prerequisite. Students in graduate programs are called graduate students.


CANADA

Collège privé d’enseignement professionnel inscrit ou de suivre un programme non approuvé, vous ne serez pas couverts par les protections prévues par le gouvernement en vertu de la Loi de 2005 sur les collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel. Vous pensez poursuivre vos études dans un collège privé d’enseignement professionnel? Renseignez-vous en premier! Vérifiez les points suivants :

• Le programme est approuvé en

L’Ontario compte plus de 400 collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel inscrits. Ce sont des entreprises indépendantes ou des établissements à but non lucratif réglementés par le gouvernement de l’Ontario. Les collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel attirent souvent des gens qui ont besoin de compétences professionnelles spécifiques pour entrer sur le marché du travail ou qui cherchent à parfaire leurs compétences pour être plus concurrentiels sur le marché de l’emploi. Ces collèges acceptent de nouveaux étudiants tout au long de l’année. Ils offrent des programmes d’apprentissage souples et fournissent une formation dans un délai court. Ces collèges offrent une formation professionnelle ciblée dans une vaste gamme de secteurs allant de l’hygiène dentaire à l’informatique, et de la construction au soudage. Aux termes de la Loi de 2005 sur les collèges privés d’enseignement 32

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

professionnel, les collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel doivent être inscrits et leurs programmes doivent être approuvés par le ministère de la Formation et des Collèges et Universités. La loi vise à protéger les étudiantes et étudiants et à s’assurer qu’ils reçoivent l’éducation et la formation qui leur sont promises. Elle veille à ce que les collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel respectent certaines normes en matière de programmes, de publicité, de politique de remboursement et de qualifications du personnel enseignant. Protégez votre investissement. Avant de présenter une demande d’admission à un collège privé d’enseignement professionnel, assurez-vous qu’il est inscrit; consultez notre registre en ligne à ontario.ca/ mfcu. Si le collège ou le programme d’enseignement professionnel ne figure pas sur la liste, cela signifie qu’il n’est pas approuvé par le gouvernement. Si vous décidez d’étudier dans un collège non

vertu de la Loi de 2005 sur les collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel. • Le collège est inscrit en vertu de la Loi de 2005 sur les collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel. • Le programme répond aux exigences de la profession que vous envisagez d’exercer. • Le programme et le collège privé d’enseignement professionnel sont reconnus par les employeurs et les autres établissements d’enseignement. • Vous (ou quelqu’un à qui vous pouvez vous fier) avez visité le collège pour voir les installations et l’équipement. • Vous remplissez les conditions d’admission au programme. • Vous ainsi qu’un représentant du collège avez signé un contrat d’inscription. Pour plus de renseignements sur les collèges privés d’enseignement professionnel et sur vos droits et responsabilités en tant qu’étudiant d’un collège privé d’enseignement professionnel, visitez ontario.ca/mfcu. Contribué par: ontario.ca/mfcu

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


These colleges are independent businesses and not-for-profit institutions that are regulated by the Ontario government. Private career colleges often appeal to people who need specific job skills to join the work force or who want to upgrade their skills to be more competitive in the job market. Private career colleges offer enrolment throughout the year. They also offer flexible learning schedules and deliver training over a short period of time. These colleges offer career-specific training in a wide range of fields, from dental hygiene and computer science, to construction and welding. Under the law – the Private Career Colleges Act, 2005 – private career colleges must be registered and have their programs approved by the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities. The law is in place to protect students and to make sure you receive the education and training you are promised. It ensures that private career colleges meet certain standards for their programs, advertising, refund policies and instructor qualifications. Protect your investment. Check to make sure your program is approved before you enrol by checking out our online registry at ontario.ca/tcu. If a private career college or program is not listed there, then it is not approved by the government. If you enrol in an unregistered college or an unapproved program, you will not be covered by the protection provided by the government under the Private Career Colleges Act, 2005.

Thinking about a private career college education? Do your homework first! Make sure:

• The program is approved under the Private Career Colleges Act, 2005.

• The PCC is registered under the

Private Career Colleges Act, 2005.

• The program meets the

requirements of the profession you want to work in.

• The program and the private

career college are recognized by employers or other educational institutions.

• You (or someone you know and

trust) have visited the college to see the facilities and equipment.

• You know the total cost of enrolling in the program, including the application fee, tuition, books, equipment, transportation, and room and board.

• You meet the

admission requirements for the program.

• Both you and a representative of the college have signed an enrolment contract.

For more information about private career colleges and your rights and responsibilities as a private career college student, visit ontario.ca/tcu. Contributed by: ontario.ca/tcu

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

© RTimages - Istockphoto.com

Ontario is home to more than 400 registered private career colleges.

CANADA

Private Career Colleges


Teach English in

JAPAN

Japan

© Neale Cousland - Dreamstime.com

Do you enjoy the challenge of working with others? Are you excited by the idea of being immersed in a foreign culture? Have you ever wanted to visit Japan?

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Each year this initiative of the Government of Japan recruits university graduates from nearly 40 countries around the world to spend a year (or more) living and working in Japanese communities. Since its inception in 1987, the JET Programme has arranged for the placement of over 50 000 participants throughout the Japanese islands, from the tropical archipelago of Okinawa to the snowy tips of Hokkaido. JET Programme participants are employed by local Contracting Organizations (C/O) primarily as Assistant Language Teachers (ALT) working in the Japanese public school system to help deliver the English language curriculum. Participants with significant Japanese language ability may be employed as Coordinators for International Relations (CIR), whose primary duties are to support international exchange and cooperation at the local level. JET Programme participants receive a guaranteed gross annual salary of 3 600 000 JPN yen (approx. $40,000), which is quite sufficient for living comfortably in Japan, even with the mandatory deductions for national health, employment and pension insurance totalling approximately 450 000 (approx. $5,000) a year, some of which is refundable. Participants are flown to Japan and, upon the successful completion of their contracts, receive airfare to return home. As an added bonus, Canadian participants pay no Canadian taxes on JET income. Additionally, all participants have access to a comprehensive support network, including Japanese language training. Successful applicants to the JET Programme are matched with Contracting Organizations (public schools, school boards and government offices) who then become their employers for the duration of their contract. Contracts are one year in length and may be renewed up to four times with the agreement of both the participant and the employer. Participants are assisted in finding housing and may, at the discretion of the C/O, receive rental subsidies. Generally speaking, contracts stipulate

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

a 35-40 hour / five-day week and include a number of paid vacation and sick-leave days.

language education and cross-cultural understanding, then JET would like to hear from you.

In order to apply, it is necessary to have completed, or be in the final year of completing, a Bachelors degree (in any subject) and, as this is considered a youth program, to be under 40 years of age. Other specific eligibility requirements are listed on the JET Canada website.

The JET Programme recruits each year in the fall. Visit the JET Canada website: www.ca.emb-japan.go.jp/ jetcanada.html in order to find out more about the programme and the application process for Canadian citizens.

While there are many options for teaching English in Japan, the JET Programme’s emphasis on cultural immersion and public service makes it not just a job, but an unique opportunity to:

• expand your life experience • acquire valuable work and people skills

• be a positive role model for youth • enhance your intercultural proficiency

• explore Japanese culture and society in depth

• promote international

understanding at a grass-roots level • build a network of friends and contacts from around the world • become familiar with themes in Asian culture • learn Japanese in an immersive environment • challenge yourself and grow as a person! The JET Programme is not for everybody. The challenges of adapting to a very different work and cultural environment can be significant. But if you are an adventurous, adaptable, and responsible individual with a strong desire to explore Japan and to contribute positively to

Contributed by: Chris Browne, JET Coordinator – Embassy of Japan, Ottawa. www.ca.emb-japan.go.jp/jetcanada.html

JAPAN

If you answer yes to any or all of these questions then the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme may be for you.


INSPIRATION

Masters of th

Studying for your Masters is going to mean another two years at university; studying for your PhD could mean another five. It’s going to cost you more money, and you’ll be a few years away from scoring that job. So it all better be worth it!

Research by QS involving more than 450 international employers shows the difference in salary between an employee with a first degree and a graduate qualification can be as much as 71%. Nunzio Quacquarelli, Managing Director of QS says: “During the last five years or so there has been a fundamental shift in attitude on the part of recruiters to encourage candidates with more qualifications to apply for positions in their companies. Global employers now use graduate degrees as key points of differentiation between candidates seeking employment.”

Well, according to many graduate students from all corners of the globe it is. Graduate study is providing them with additional skills and knowledge they didn’t get during their undergraduate years; they’re gaining in confidence, developing an international network of contacts, and what’s more – job prospects and salaries are looking promising.

With almost every industry giving more prominence to niche, specialised knowledge, a Masters degree has become essential for one’s professional capacity. “In fact, in some specialized areas where technical skills are particularly significant, the benefit of a Masters degree can also outweigh that of up to four years work experience,” says Quacquarelli.

You’ve already survived three, possibly four years of undergraduate study, you’ve most likely got a student debt against your name, and by now you’re probably wishing for a regular pay cheque to be coming your way. So why then, would you be considering graduate study?

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So whether it is updating your skill set, or securing that job you’ve always wanted with lucrative benefits, more and more graduates worldwide are finding that a Masters degree is like the icing on the cake as far as your CV is concerned. It’s a stamp of credibility, reliability, and efficiency, and can facilitate a rapid and significant upswing in one’s professional career development. Staying on to further your education, especially in the current job market, might be a very smart move. Ann Graham talks to three Masters students about their experiences

Carrie Bee Hao

Masters of Business Law Hitotsubashi University, Tokyo, Japan “Studying is never a waste of time,” says Carrie Bee Hao, a FilipinoChinese student currently studying in Japan. “If you’re at a point in your

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


INSPIRATION © memo - Fotolia.com

heir Universe life when you are tired of working, you think there is little or no room for advancement at your current job and you want to experience student life once again, I think taking up a Masters degree is a good solution.” Carrie Bee has taken leave from her law firm in Manila for at least three years, while she studies for an LLM. “My main speciality in my law firm is intellectual property law and getting an LLM after a few years of practice is the usual career path for most lawyers in the Philippines – 90% go to the US for their LLM but I wanted to go somewhere rather unusual. I also wanted a program that is really specialized and has a more practical and business-wise approach. Japan is very advanced with respect to intellectual property law – likewise, it has a very complicated yet challenging corporate law structure in place, which is something I would like to study as well.”

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

Studying for her graduate degree in Japan has allowed Carrie Bee to become fluent in advanced Japanese – the level of Japanese required for law. She is confident this will make her more desirable for employment as she is now multilingual in English, Chinese, Japanese, Spanish and Tagalog.

“I believe that the point of graduate study is two things: a) to further deepen your knowledge and skills on a specific field of study in relation to your profession, which will more likely lead to better career opportunities, and b) to create or increase your network all around the world that might lead you to your dream job sooner.’’ “Most importantly, you will gain a lot with the connections you will make during your program so your networking skills will also improve during that time. The experience alone of applying [for your graduate degree], waiting for the results and knowing that you have been accepted is an experience by itself!” she says.

Stephanie Chow

Masters in Negotiation and Conflict Resolution Columbia University, USA “Conflict resolution is fascinating to me. The same cooperation and conflict theories apply for interpersonal relationships as well as international conflicts,” says Stephanie Chow, a Masters student at Columbia University in New York. “I like the versatility of the degree as conflict resolution professionals work in a myriad of fields – law, business, education, health care and government.” Originally from Long Island and with an undergraduate degree from Boston, Stephanie chose Columbia University as it offered her the opportunity to live in the city, close to home. To fund her grad study she has a combination of scholarships, student loans and parental support.

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INSPIRATION

“A graduate degree is another credential so it opens up more opportunities – a greater network of professionals and job opportunities,” says Stephanie. “It has also become a standard. Most people now possess a Bachelors degree, so a graduate degree is a leg up.” Stephanie has acquired a number of skills while studying for her Masters: strong analytical thinking, the ability to adapt in a variety of settings (be it international, cultural, office dynamics), and an ability to apply theory and other things learned in class to daily life. “I have also fine-tuned my time management skills and detail-oriented nature,” she says. However, she does wish she’d known more about the program options, curriculum and classes for her concentration before she began her Masters program. “My advice to others considering graduate study would be to make sure you love the location, the school and the culture because you have to spend a few years studying there. Not enjoying where you live and where you go to school will almost certainly affect your grades.”

Karol Kaczmarczyk

Masters in Economics and Management of Innovation and Technologies Bocconi University, Milan, Italy Karol Kaczmarczyk had to decide early on where he wanted to study for his Masters degree – selection was taking place before he graduated with his Bachelors. “I decided to stay at Bocconi for my Masters because I knew the school and I liked the Masters program. The MSc in Economics and Management of Innovation and Technologies was an innovative program,” he says.

“A Masters helps your preferences and interests mature so that you do not need to make things up during an interview when asked for motivation. It also gives you more specific and practical tools to do the job you’re looking for.” His advice for anyone considering a graduate degree is to know exactly what the courses are before choosing a program. “Many students make a choice based on assumptions and find out that it is far from what they expected when it is too late,” Karol says. “Remember that a good graduate program at a top school justifies a premium on the job market and eases the entry-level competition. A sole reputation however, is insufficient. Although entry-level implies little or no experience, the competition has made some well-defined practical skills indispensable for a successful job interview.” Printed with permission from The QS World Grad School Tour. Now in its ninth-year, the Tour will be visiting 50 cities in 36 different countries in 2009. See www.topgradschool.com for the 2009/2010 tour schedule.

Originally from Poland, Karol says his Masters program has prepared him for positions such as a business analyst, researcher or consultant. “I’ve acquired international experience, learnt statistical multivariate analysis using SAS software, gained a profound understanding of innovation processes, and realised the importance of it for sustainable growth quest. I’ve also developed entrepreneurial skills and financial analysis.’’

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Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


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© Omegh - Dreamstime.com

FRANCE

Destination

France with CampusFrance

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Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


In today’s globalized higher education, France is one of the most attractive countries for foreign students, it being the ideal place from which to discover Europe. Students in France enjoy lower tuition fees, equal to those paid by the French, and can obtain the same degrees; the health care system is modern and accessible; public transportation is easy and affordable; financial assistance for housing is available; books, films, museums, theatres, cafés and the much appreciated French food are part of everyday life; and local and international cultural events are celebrated everywhere in the cities and in the countryside.

The Right Choice Bordered by eight other European countries, France is at the crossroads of the continent: A weekend or a break during the academic year allows you to visit Amsterdam, Brussels, London, Barcelona, Rome or Munich, or around France to broaden your French experience. The world’s sixth largest economy, France owes much of its success to its research capabilities and achievements, notably in Aerospace, Transportation, Electronics, Telecommunications, Chemistry, Biotechnology, Health, and Mathematics. The recent development of a network of research and higher education clusters reaffirms France’s determination to maintain a strong

position as a knowledge economy. Known under the acronym PRES (pôles de recherche et d’enseignement supérieur), the clusters offer France’s academic and scientific communities new ways to co-operate and share knowledge.

Francophonie French is spoken as an official or common language on five continents, in 47 countries, and by 200 million people. It is the working language of the European Union’s institutions, one of the two working languages of the United Nations, the principal language of the African Union, and, of course, one of Canada’s official languages.

A Wide Choice of Programs France has always welcomed foreign students to share its success. Centuries of academic tradition have shaped a diversified and internationally-renowned education network in France: 83 universities operate on French soil, along with 240 engineering schools and special programs, over 200 schools of business and management, 120 public art schools, and 20 schools of architecture. In addition, more than 3,000 specialized schools and institutes provide instruction or training in specific fields such as social and paramedical work, tourism, sports, and fashion and design. Learning or improving your French language skills is easy in any of the 86 FLE “Qualité français langue étrangère” centres in France, certified by the French government

and offering high-quality French language programs.

FRANCE

Still Wondering “Why France”?

High-Quality Education at a Low Cost More than 260,000 international students – 12% of France’s postsecondary enrolment – currently attend universities and other institutions of higher education in France. France hosts more international students than any other country (except the United States and the United Kingdom). International students in France appreciate the quality of education, as well as the low tuition fees, which are guaranteed by the French Ministry of Education. As a result, students – French or international – pay only a fraction of the real cost of the education. In France, the actual cost of tuition and other fees per year and per student varies between €6,000 and €15,000 (€1=CAD1.60), yet the final cost for a student enrolled in a public institution in France – whether at the undergraduate or graduate level – varies from €170 to €540. Fees are higher at private institutions, however, where tuition costing several thousands Euros is often the norm.

Where to Start? Choosing France for your higher education or for shorter study projects can be pre-arranged from Canada. Basic knowledge of the French education system and programs, as well as additional advice and support, are crucial to selecting the right program and make an informed decision. The Paris-based CampusFrance agency, created ten years ago, provides international students with an array of services, from information to online admission process to logistical planning. Placed under the joint responsibility of the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs and the French Ministry of Education, the CampusFrance agency, and its online services available at www.campusfrance.org, give you access to information on universities, specialized schools, and vocational institutes all over France. CampusFrance is also the coordinator of a network of 100 offices around the world, which are placed under the authority of French Embassies and consulates. In Canada, CampusFrance offices are based in Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, and Montreal

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

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41


FRANCE

CampusFrance Website – a Potent Online Tool The www.canada.campusfrance.org website is a great source of information at any stage and level of your academic project, whether you are interested in a general degree program, professional training, language school, program taught in English, or short summer programs. The online catalogue includes 35,000 programs offered at 6,000 postsecondary institutions in France. The homepage provides essential multilingual information on the education system in France (types of institutions, degrees, fields of study) and the possibility to select a program according to your specific study project. Shortcuts are provided for quick searches, with programs grouped by sections, such as programs taught in English (550 programs designed for English-speaking students), French as a foreign language, MBA programs, Erasmus Mundus Master’s programs, short summer/winter specialized training, etc.

Transferable Degrees Degrees conferred by French universities and other academic institutions are accredited by the French government or certified by the French ministry of Education. The system of degrees in France reflects a common European architecture based on the LMD system. LMD stands for licence (L), master (M), and doctorate (D) and is based on the number of semesters completed according to the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS). Credits may be transferable to Canadian universities depending on the policies and regulations in place in each Province and/or institution in Canada.

A Great Experience Studying in France also means living in France and discovering the French lifestyle. A simple click on the CampusFrance website’s home page provides a wealth of information about daily life in France, how to plan your

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stay, and how to make France your home away from home. Students, whether international or French, benefit from special arrangements, making it possible to live in France on a relatively modest budget. A system of student restaurants, housing subsidies, health insurance, student clubs and associations, and discounts on public transportation, movies, museums, libraries, and sporting events, all contribute to making your experience in France more enjoyable and affordable.

Personalized Service Before you go to France Planning to study abroad involves several steps – from selecting the appropriate program to tips on daily life in France – and Canadian students can access dedicated services at www.canada.campusfrance.org. A CampusFrance advisor can help you with your selection of programs in France, your online application process and follow-up with the French institution, and provide you with information about daily life in France.

The CEF/CampusFrance section of the site facilitates the administrative processing of your file, provides a platform for personalized advice on your study project in France, and creates a connection with your target institutions in France. For More Information Students are encouraged to contact the nearest CampusFrance office in Canada. In addition, information about study opportunities in France is available at most student fairs and/or thematic events attended by CampusFrance advisors. Studying in France starts in Canada! Bienvenue en France! Contributed by: Marta Maftei of the CampusFrance Canadian team; CampusFrance/CEF Vancouver. campusfrance@uniserve.com, www.canada.campusfrance.org Note currency exchange rates (at time of printing): €1=CAD$1.60

The recent development of the CEF/CampusFrance section of the CampusFrance website offers an improved point of contact with the French institution(s) you have selected.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


THE HEC MBA: Build confidence, inspire trust FORTY YEARS FOSTERING TOMORROW’S BUSINESS LEADERS

Valérie Gauthier, Associate Dean, HEC MBA Program

As the HEC MBA Program celebrates its 40th anniversary, it continues to strengthen its reputation for academic excellence, innovative research and strong ties to the corporate world.

Alors que le Programme MBA HEC fête son quarantième anniversaire, il confirme sa réputation en termes d’excellence, d’innovation et ses liens étroits avec le monde de l’entreprise.

The program strikes a careful balance between theoretical training and practical application to help participants develop responsible, sustainable solutions to tomorrow’s business challenges.

L’équilibre entre la théorie et la pratique dispensées au MBA aide les participants à devenir les responsables de demain et à répondre aux défis futurs des entreprises.

To complement its well-established full-time program, the HEC MBA recently launched a part-time program for managers who wish to earn the esteemed qualification without putting their careers on hold. The new format, delivered over 24 months, is geared to high-potential managers aged 25-35, reflecting the needs and realities of a new generation of business leaders.

Pour compléter son programme « full time », le MBA HEC vient de lancer un programme à temps partiel pour les managers qui souhaitent obtenir ce prestigieux diplôme sans mettre leur carrière entre parenthèses. Cette nouvelle formule, dispensée sur 24 mois, est destinée aux managers de 25 à 35 ans à fort potentiel. Elle est le reflet des besoins et des réalités d’une nouvelle génération de dirigeants.

A tradition of leadership Established in 1881, HEC Paris has long been a magnet for top managerial talent from all over the world, and its MBA program ranks among the best in Europe and worldwide.

Le leadership : une tradition à HEC Depuis sa création en 1881, HEC Paris attire les futurs dirigeants les plus talentueux de toutes les régions du globe. Son programme MBA fait partie des meilleurs d’Europe et du monde.

With a strong emphasis on positive management practices, the program offers: • hands-on leadership training, • decision-making workshops, • off-campus leadership seminars.

Ce programme met l’accent sur les meilleures pratiques du management. Il offre ainsi : • une formation pratique au leadership, • des ateliers de prise de décision, • des séminaires de leadership hors campus.

The HEC MBA draws on a longstanding partnership with Apple to ensure that it remains on the cutting edge of technological and business innovation. The program fully integrates Apple podcast and pedagogical technology, including the pioneering iTunes University platform.

Par ailleurs, le MBA HEC s’appuie sur un partenariat de longue date avec Apple afin de rester à la pointe de l’innovation technologique et managériale. Le programme intègre ainsi la technologie podcast et les outils pédagogiques d’Apple, comme la plate-forme avant-gardiste iTunes University.

A multicultural learning environment Over 85% of participants hail from outside France, representing more than 40 nations and professions that range from finance to publishing. The teaching staff includes over 100 full-time professors with doctorates from the world's top research universities and 50 visiting professors from partner institutions around the globe.

Un environnement multiculturel Plus de 85 % des participants viennent de l’étranger. Ils sont issus de plus de 40 nations et de secteurs qui vont de la finance à l’édition. La faculté compte plus de 100 professeurs permanents titulaires d’un doctorat des meilleures universités au monde et 50 professeurs invités, venant d’établissements partenaires répartis à travers toute la planète.

HEC MBA Associate Dean Valérie Gauthier says that enhancing its international diversity enables the program to offer a truly global education. “The HEC MBA Program brings together the best and brightest candidates from around the world, providing them with the training and opportunities to help companies grow internationally.”

Selon Valérie Gauthier, Directeur Délégué du MBA HEC, le programme mise sur la diversité culturelle de ses promotions pour offrir un enseignement de portée mondiale. « Le Programme MBA HEC réunit les meilleurs candidats au monde. Il leur fournit une formation et des opportunités incomparables, qui leur permettront de contribuer au développement international des entreprises. »

www.mba.hec.edu


INFORMATION

Earn a Masters Degree in Europe

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Language is no longer a barrier, and new opportunities for students in Canada to earn a top-quality degree while living abroad abound.

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INFORMATION © tomazl - Istockphoto.com

Tapping into some of the world’s best universities while experiencing the rich cultural life in Europe has never been as easy as it is today. Where once international students faced the challenges presented by the differing degree programmes, language barriers, and opaque information sources, the newly-created European Higher Education Area opens the higher education systems of 46 countries across the continent to top students from around the world. Nowhere is this more evident than at the level of the Masters degree, now a one- or two-year degree offered in these countries. There are over 10,000 European Masters programmes listed at Mastersportal.eu and this only represents a fraction of the total. Drill down and you will find programmes in nearly every subject area, offered in national languages as well as English and French. Keep researching and you’ll find joint and dual-degree programmes where students gain a global perspective by spending time in multiple countries with an international group of faculty and professors. Scratch the surface just a bit more and Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

you’ll find the average annual tuition at Masters programmes on Continental Europe is EUR 4,000 (roughly 6400 Canadian dollars) versus up to EUR 7,000 (CAD 11,200) in Canada or up to a whopping EUR 22,000 (CAD 35,200) in the United States – plus, there are thousands of merit-based scholarships to defray living expenses, and several countries charge no tuition at all for qualified international students.

A good place to start any search for graduate school is by speaking to friends, family, co-workers, and current or past professors. They may have heard of programmes of particular interest, although keep in mind that the landscape has changed dramatically in even the past five years in Europe and sometimes their information may not be up to date. It is always best to take these leads and verity the information that is important to you yourself.

Finding a Course

When exploring programmes across Europe, it is worth noting that there are some key differences between Continental Europe and the United Kingdom, not the least of which is price.

The sheer magnitude of choice can be daunting, so start by making a list of your priorities. You may want to finish the programme with the additional benefit of having mastered a foreign language. The presence of well-known faculty or the ability to continue on with a PhD may be critical for you. You may want to be tied into an international network of alumni in your field. Price may be a major factor. And, of course, the old real estate adage of “location, location, location” certainly holds true when students can choose between similar programmes taught in settings that reflect the full diversity of Europe’s cultures and geography.

The average tuition in the UK is EUR 14,000 (CAD 22,400) and international students pay significantly higher rates than domestic students. The upside, for some, to study in the UK – aside from their high-quality programmes and institutions – is that it is the only European country where the majority of Masters programmes can be completed in one year instead of two. So while some tuitions may be higher, your living costs and overall costs can be the same or lower, since you will be spending less time to complete your degree. Study In Canada • Study Abroad

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INFORMATION

Types of Degrees Although the credit system and the length of study have mostly been standardized in Europe, there is still, as in Canada, a wide variety of types of Masters programmes. Knowing what your eventual goal is with the degree (particularly if you hope to qualify for entrance into a doctoral programme) will help you choose between programmes that are more practice- or research-based, ones that focus entirely on one subject versus interdisciplinary programmes, etc. There are also, increasingly, professional Masters degrees such as the MBA or LLM, some of which are taught at the new private universities being created across Europe. Check to make sure that programs are accredited and ask to speak with alumni to get a better sense of the legitimacy of the degree and the reputation. A major trend in Masters education is the creation of new joint or dual-

degree programmes, where students may study in multiple countries and even earn more than one degree. This was spurred on, at least in part, by the European Union’s massive funding program “Erasmus Mundus,” which gave financial support to programmes offered by partners in several European countries and, in a second phase, European countries plus “third-party” countries outside the EU. These programmes provide generous scholarships for international students. The full list of Erasmus Mundus programmes can be found here: http:// ec.europa.eu/education/programmes/ mundus/projects/index_en.html

Language Most of Continental Europe was offlimits to students who didn’t have a mastery of the native language: Not anymore. Francophone students from Canada can take advantage of programmes primarily located in France and Belgium, while students looking for programmes taught in English will find an evergrowing offering, particularly in Germany, The Netherlands, and the Scandinavian countries. And, of course, the UK!

Hessen International Summer Universities Welcome to your summer in the heart of Germany! English-taught programs with German lectures and German language classes. Four week sessions at universities in Frankfurt, Fulda, Giessen, Kassel and Marburg on: European Integration Financial Markets Biotech Ethics Environmental Engineering Global Management Health and Nutrition European Culture, Economics and Politics and many more... Earn credits, build your resume, make life-long friends from around the world, and get a German and European perspective on your field. Details about 2010 classes online now!

Germany: June-August 2010

www.isu-hessen.de info@isu-hessen.de

Many Masters courses provide students with intensive language training before the program begins as well as ongoing language courses throughout the degree; everyone would agree that learning enough of the language to communicate with the locals on at least a rudimentary basis is a key part of making the most of the experience abroad.

Funding Tuition and fee structures vary across countries and visa requirements may stipulate that incoming students have enough money in the bank to cover their living expenses for a certain number of months upon arrival. In many countries, international students can work a certain number of hours to defray their living expenses, although employment is not guaranteed. Individual countries and institutions may offer scholarships for international students as well.

Online Resources Universities across Europe have websites with information in their local language as well as English and several countries have set up online resources to help students find the right program. Some useful web resources include:

Study in Europe Information about scholarships, European higher education, life as a student in Europe, etc. Website: http://www.study-in-europe.org/ MastersPortal.eu Originally set up by student groups, this is the most comprehensive source for information and programmes across Europe. Website: http://www.mastersportal.eu

Many European countries have agencies to help international students find their way. Some, such as the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD) or British Council, have offices around the world to counsel potential students. Almost all of them have websites with information about living in the county, scholarships, visas, and databases of master’s or postgraduate degree programmes. Most of these agencies are members of the Academic Cooperation Association (ACA), which means their websites are listed here: http://www.aca-secretariat. be/03membership/member_list.htm Contributed by: Megan Brenn-White. Megan is the Executive Director of the Hessen Universities Consortium New York Office and can help Canadian students find suitable Masters degree programmes in a wide variety of subjects at universities in Hessen, a vibrant region in the center of Germany (www.hessen-universities.org).

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STUDY INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY & TOURISM MANAGEMENT OR EUROPEAN CULINARY ARTS IN A TRULY INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENT! Lynn University US Bachelor's Degree in Hospitality Management

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USA

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USA

Discover Your Potential

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Traditionally, a concern for Canadians interested in studying in the United States was cost. Today, many U.S. States extend their domestic tuition fee to Canadian students in an effort to eliminate the international student tuition barrier experienced by many international students. Furthermore, the availability of athletic and academic scholarships, as well as financial aid, has made study for Canadian students in the United States more attractive and viable than ever before. An unknown fact for Canadian students is the availability of Canadian provincial funding when enrolling at a U.S. postsecondary program. Canadian students can qualify for provincial funding if attending a U.S. postsecondary school, as long as the U.S. school appears as a designated school for the purposes of student loans under the Canada Student Loans Program (CSLP) master list. To confirm your eligibility for student financial assistance visit www.canlearn.ca.

of opportunities for students to interact with professors, both in and out of the classroom, because the variety and number of academic institutions in the United States often allows for a smaller student-to-teacher ratio. Students are encouraged to participate in classroom discussions and challenge their fellow students’ as well as their professors’ arguments. This student-faculty openness is particularly beneficial, and many professors act as mentors to their students. Designated faculty advisors and international student advisors are also common, and provide additional guidance. The transition from Canada to the United States for college or university is relatively painless with no language barriers to overcome, modern campuses and surrounding cities, and relatively modest travel costs. Similar customs and values minimize culture shock and potential feelings of uncertainty while still allowing for exploration and discovery in the differences that do exist between Americans and Canadians. Local

customs, foods, celebrations and a wide variety of regional differences provide opportunities to expand a student’s knowledge of the United States.

USA

An increasing number of Canadian students are exploring opportunities to further their education in the United States. In fact, approximately 29,000 Canadian students enrolled in U.S. post-secondary institutions during 2007-2008, making Canadians the fifth largest group of international students attending post-secondary schools in the United States.

The U.S. and Canadian education systems share similar structures. As a high school student applying for undergraduate programs, a student will likely need to complete the SATs, ACTs, and school-specific application forms. Fortunately, an increasing number of schools accept the Common Application, which makes it easier to apply to multiple U.S. schools. The Common Application Form is similar to the provincial application centers in Canada, but schools across the country use it to facilitate the application process. For a graduate program, the GRE, GMAT, MCAT, or LSAT exam may need to be completed and supplemental information such as personal activities, educational plan, essays, and letters of recommendation may be necessary. As daunting as this may sound, it is

The environment in the U.S. – both on and off campus – can offer Canadian students a highly diverse, rich and memorable educational experience. Colleges and universities in the northern states can provide familiar climate conditions and easy access to home for those that want it, whereas institutions in the southern states can offer warmer climates and more independence from parents if that is the desire. Whether a student is looking for artistic and cultural centers, the fast-paced life of a major city or something in between, the United States has something for everyone. The campus experience at a U.S. college or university offers students access to up-to-date technology, small or large classes, and housing on or near campus with fellow students. The teaching style is similar to that offered in Canada with quizzes, midterms, essays, assignments, labs, exams, seminars, and tutorials used as evaluation methods. There are plenty

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USA

entirely manageable for a student who is well organized and communicates with the institutions that he or she will be considering for admission.

or a community college and then transferring to a larger public or private institution for their final undergraduate years.

The academic environment in the United States offers many options: In addition to colleges and universities, either state or privately run, there are two-year colleges, community colleges, professional schools, technical institutes, and religiouslyaffiliated schools. In the United States, the terms “college” and “university” are largely synonymous and interchangeable, and a school’s merit comes from its programs rather than its official title. Generally, the only substantive difference between a college and a university is that universities offer graduate programs while colleges do not, although there are many exceptions to this pattern.

Typically, during the first two years as an undergraduate in the United States, a student takes a variety of courses from different disciplines and the student specifies a major to make up the bulk of the later portion of his or her studies, although there is still leeway for electives. At the graduate level (Masters and Doctorates), the programs are similar between Canada and the United States; however, in Canada the majority of Ph.D. programs require a Master’s prior to admittance, while in the United States there are more Ph.D. programs that accept students directly from the undergraduate level.

A common option in the United States is a “2 + 2” course of study. This allows students to save money while still earning a degree from a well-known institution. Many students choose this course by spending their first two years at a two-year college

A common question asked by Canadians considering studying abroad is the recognition of their degrees once they return to Canada. As part of the evaluation process of potential schools, students should contact the Canadian Information Centre for International Credentials

(www.cicic.ca) and request information on the status and acceptability of the program, institution, and credentials. Organizations such as College Board, Education USA, NAFSA, StudyUSA, and Think Education USA can be of assistance to students planning their education at a U.S. institution. For more information on U.S. education and assistance in finding out more about the variety of options available in the United States, contact Education Specialist, Luz Betancur of the U.S. Commercial Service in Ottawa at 613.688.5216. Contributed by: Luz E. Betancur, National Coordinator, Education & Training Initiatives US Commercial Service – US Embassy Ottawa Luz.betancur@mail.doc.gov

Master of science Degree with Specialization in Policy econoMics The Program in Policy Economics is a specially designed, intensive program of study leading to a Master of Science Degree in Economics from the University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign. With a wealth of resources at the University and personal help from advisors, students are able to customize their program to fit their needs. • Promising, young administrators in government and private institutions, in both developing and advanced industrial countries, can gain additional training in the areas of economic analysis and quantitative techniques.

• Students who wish to take advantage of the extensive course offerings at Illinois and study in additional areas or fields may remain up to two years to complete their program of study. • This is the largest and most successful program of its kind in the United States with nearly 1,000 graduates in more than 95 countries. • Required coursework is enriched with personal academic counseling, tutorials, additional computer training, field trips, seminars led by internationally-known scholars, and friendly staff members to help students settle into Illinois.

• Research oriented students can acquire the necessary background to pursue a doctorate in economics. • The minimum required coursework allows specialization in as many as 3 fields of study beyond the core courses. • The program offers 40 courses and 12 fields of specialization. • Students with an excellent background in economics and quantitative methods, and a high level of proficiency in English, can complete the program in one year.

For further details, contact: Master of Science in Policy Economics Program 313 David Kinley Hall, 1407 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, Illinois 61801 USA Fax: 1-217-244-7368 mspe@illinois.edu www.mspe.illinois.edu


Assistive Learning Technologies   Exhibition and Seminar  U.S. Embassy   January 19, 2010   Ottawa, Canada

Explore Canada's Assistive Technologies Market  Benefits of Exhibiting    •

Interact with procurement officials of AT solutions  for use by pre‐elementary, elementary, secondary  and post secondary educational institutions.   

Meet with local distributors, and Government  procurement officials of AT products.   

Mobility 

Deliver a presentation and demonstration of your  AT technology to a targeted audience. 

Communication Hearing

 

Receive market intelligence on the Canadian  assistive learning technology market, and learn  about industry trends from a Canadian keynote  speaker. 

Participate in a networking function attended by  public and private officials within the AT sector. 

Receive full logistical support from the U.S.  Commercial Service in Canada including  preferential U.S. Embassy hotel rates. 

 

Learning & Studying

 

Vision

Facts on the Canadian Assistive Learning Technology Market   •

• •

In 2006, 2.7 million Canadians used or needed technical aids or specialized equipment to help them perform one or  more daily activities  LEARNING & STUDYING => 20.6% of people with a learning condition reported using at least one aid to help them with  their limitation including home computers (83.2%), printers and scanners (66%), and spelling & grammar checkers (61%)   HEARING => Most commonly used assistive devices for people with a hearing limitation were hearing aids (79.7%) and  volume control telephones (35.5%), followed by computers to communicate (13.1%), closed caption televisions or  decoders (10.3%), and visual or vibrating alarms  VISION => Aids most frequently used by people with mild seeing conditions included magnifiers (94.7%) and large print  reading materials (40.6%) 

Exhibition space for this event is limited!  For information and to register, please complete the interest form at  http://www.buyusa.gov/canada/en/altes.html     BUILDING BRIDGES TO PROSPERITY WITH CANADA FIRST       


USA

Requirements for Assistive Technology for Students with Special Needs in Canada

Assistive technology (AT) is a generic term that includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices for people with disabilities, and includes the process used in selecting, locating, and using them.

There is a clear and growing need for Assistive Technology (AT) to help address the special needs of students in Canada, as an ever increasing number of impaired students seek to realize their full potential through education. 52

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AT promotes greater independence by enabling people to perform tasks that they were formerly unable to accomplish, or had great difficulty accomplishing, by providing enhancements to or changed methods of interacting with the technology needed to accomplish such tasks.

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Mobility Students with mobility challenges, and especially those with limited hand movement, experience various restrictions depending on their specific case. AT in the form of switch activation and scanning software, controlling devices in a home by spoken commands, speech recognition software, touch pads and touch screens, onscreen and alternative keyboards, adapted head mouse, foot mouse, joystick, and sip and puff activation technologies.

On December 3, 2007, Statistics Canada released its updated Participation and Activity Limitation Survey (PALS), which highlighted that in 2006 the total number of people with disabilities in Canada reached approximately 4.4 million, representing 14.3 percent of Canada’s population. As the number of physical and nonphysical impairments increase among the Canadian population, there are concerns that educational institutions across Canada are not well equipped to provide the unique technology solutions required by students with special needs.

Hearing Although students with hearing impairments can benefit from the use of interpreters, preferential seating, and visual cues, the remaining population, depending on the severity of their condition, will require listening assistive technology such as hearing aids, personal FM systems, and speech recognition programs to translate an instructor’s voice to text and sign language on a computer screen.

It has become quite apparent from several studies that students with disabilities in Canada need technologies that will allow them to prepare and participate in the knowledge-based economy of tomorrow. The availability of such AT in Canada’s schools will provide special needs students with increased access to education at all levels and enable them to interact in the classroom environment.

Opportunities for U.S. Companies There is excellent potential for U.S. service providers and developers of AT to help meet the interests and needs of Canada’s assistive technology market. These needs are particularly acute in helping to address the needs of vision, hearing, mobility, and communication and learning of impaired children in Canada’s educational institutions.

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surveyed population of 48,000 (9,000 children and 39,000 adults):

USA

Canadian provinces in general have well funded and up to date educational programs for students at the elementary, secondary and post-secondary level, which make use of appropriate material, programs, and technology. However, when it comes to special need students there is often a lack of sufficient funding to cover costs beyond basic tuition and textbooks. Therefore, there is a strong and growing interest among special needs students and school administrators to identify new, affordable and effective assistive technologies such as: sign language interpretation software, alternative format course materials, hardware to facilitate physical mobility, etc., to help meet the educational needs of these students.

Common limitations paired with learning limitations, 2006

Communication Students with speech disabilities may use low-tech symbol and picture boards, electronic pocket wallets, and high-tech handheld devices equipped with augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) software to facilitate interaction.

Vision Text-to-speech software (also known as enhanced voice recognition software), screen magnification software (or augmentative communication software), or other magnification technology such as closed circuit television (CCTV) for students with low vision conditions. Severely blind students require computer-based screen reading technologies and Braille output technologies to allow access to digital text resources. Learning Students with learning disabilities and academic skills disorders are strong candidates for AT support. Requirements exist for developmental speech and articulation expressive language software, as well as academic programs to address reading, writing and/or arithmetic disorders. The requirement for these technologies is based on results of the PALS’ survey which also identified the following categories as the most common types of disabilities, among a

World Health Organization (WHO) defines the term “disability” as the unsuccessful interaction between a person with impairment and an unsupportive environment.

Accessing the Assistive Technology Canadian Market The U.S. Commercial Service offers U.S. exporters a wide range of cost effective business facilitation services in Canada, including: business matchmaking, agent and distributor searches, single company promotions, and specially designed trade events such as the Assistive Learning Technologies Exhibition and Seminar to take place in Ottawa, Canada on January 19, 2010. To obtain information on exhibiting opportunities in the Assistive Learning Technologies Exhibition and Seminar contact Commercial Specialist, Luz Betancur at 613 688-5216 or visit www.buyusa.gov/canada and www.buyusa.gov/canada/en/altes.html Contributed by: Luz E. Betancur, U.S. Commercial Service U.S. Embassy, Ottawa Luz.betancur@mail.doc.gov Disclaimer: The information provided in this article is intended to be of assistance to U.S. exporters. While we make every effort to ensure its accuracy, neither the United States Government nor any of its employees make any representation as to the accuracy or completeness of information in this or any other United States Government document. Readers are advised to independently verify any information prior to reliance thereon. The information provided in this report does not constitute legal advice. International copyright, U.S. Department of Commerce, 2008. All rights reserved outside of the United States.

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INFORMATION

Who’s in Your Seat?

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Increased competition leads to greater opportunities in postgraduate education

Times of economic downturn usually spark an increase in university applications as people utilise their time on skills upgrades and to retrain before re-entering the workforce. QS looks at the implications of increased competition for postgraduate programmes. Don’t Despair Competition for university places at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels is fierce - but don’t despair! Increased competition means more universities are entering the fray, hoping to recruit multi-lingual, highpotential students. The result? More choice, better quality programmes, and increased return in terms of personal, professional and cultural development. 54

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This applies to universities both at home and abroad. Peter MacDonald, Director of the QS World Grad School Tour, says every year the number of universities travelling with the QS World Grad School Tour is growing. “Students are offered a more diverse choice of taught and research based programmes at both the Masters and PhD level in a widening choice of countries and locations. It is definitely worth investigating all of your options when it comes to studying, either at home or abroad.’’ “The benefits of a postgraduate qualification in and of itself are undeniable,” adds MacDonald. “The addition of overseas study brings new qualities to the table, which is not only appreciated on a personal level, but also by employers.”

Lauren Welch, Head of Advising for the US-UK Fulbright Commission in London, says studying abroad adds weight to a student’s future job prospects. “Employers are looking to graduates to have international experience either by studying or working abroad. Now there are many more opportunities to study and work abroad, or stay on and work afterwards.” Another major benefit of a graduate qualification is an increase in salary. According to the QS International Recruiter Survey 2008, an annual survey involving 498 international employers in North America and Asia, the difference between an employee with a first degree and a graduate qualification can be as much as 71%. In financial terms, the premium Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


paid to those entering employment with a Masters or PhD qualification was greater in all sectors than those entering employment with only an undergraduate degree. Employers within the pharmaceutical and healthcare professions rewarded their Masters employees better than any other sector. There are added bonuses to studying abroad for your graduate degree as well. Not only will you add to your professional qualifications by studying for a Masters or PhD abroad, you’ll be able to immerse yourself in a new culture and possibly learn a new language – extra skills that are going to make you stand out from the crowd when potential employers begin looking at your résumé. So, despite tough economic times and increased competition for postgraduate programmes, the outlook is not all doom and gloom. Once upon a time students only had a select few graduate schools to choose from. Now the internationalization of graduate study means greater opportunities both at home and abroad. Contributed by:

With the numbers of internationally mobile students seeking educational opportunities away from their home countries reaching the 2.6 million mark, the QS World Grad School Tour offers a unique opportunity for potential graduate candidates to meet admissions officers of the world’s top universities face-to-face at venues around the world. Candidates can register for free at www.topgradschool.com.

LEADING THINKERS

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The QS World Grad School Tour

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Make your first visit without leaving home using the virtual tour on www.pti.edu. If you like what you see, set up a phone visit with admissions.

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MEXICO

Sultan of the North:

Monterrey

México

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Monterrey, Mexico’s third largest city and the socalled “Sultan of the North” is, in fact, a truly surprising city. A powerhouse of business and industry, this city is one of the most important production and trade centers in the country. But there is much more to Monterrey than just business and industry.

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In the city and its surrounds, you can find all of the amenities that are associated with the convenience that a large city offers. Quality restaurants, modern shopping malls, numerous museums, social opportunties, educational facilities, and cultural attractions abound here. Monterrey has enough attractions to keep its visitors on a busy schedule. There are bullfights and rodeos at various locations and times throughout the year. Soccer is big in Monterrey and the city has several large stadiums, where you can catch a professional soccer match. Scattered around the countryside that surrounds Monterrey are various rivers, some with spectacular waterfalls and several natural hot springs. The surrounding mountains offer attractions, too numerous to list. There are cultural activities of different types in different venues being presented almost every day, all year long. Live concerts, from classical to rock featuring big name performers, are a regular occurrence in Monterrey. The mountains, canyons and desert that surround the city offer pleasant diversion and a wide variety of

MEXICO

A modern, well-planned city that is easy to navigate and full of cultural offerings, Monterrey is populated by friendly and helpful people, who are eager to present their city as the most advanced city in Mexico. Monterrey’s population of over one million (three million in the urban area) is the most educated in México and the city on a per capita basis has more colleges, universities and institutes of technology, than any other Mexican city. An example of this city’s progressive stature is the fact that over twenty per cent of México’s computers are said to be located in Monterrey.

activities, many of which are not readily available anywhere else in México. Some of the México’s best hiking, mountain biking, cave exploring and nature areas are located within fairly close proximity to the city.

restaurant that offers some pretty fantastic views. A log cabin-style complex, near the entrance of the park, features a restaurant and a convenience store, which sells picnic supplies and souvenirs.

Two parks stand out as excellent places to spend some of your leisure time. Parque Fundidora is a giant park adjacent to the city’s modern Expo and Convention Center. Located close to the physical center of the city, this is a great place to relax, get some exercise or to just get away from it all.

The nightlife in Monterrey is somewhat different than visitors might expect in a town of this size. The nightlife is certainly plentiful and varied enough, although the closing hours seem to be somewhat subdued compared with many Mexican cities. Opera, ballet and theatre seem to be as common as the high-energy disco and drinking establishments. Piano bars, jazz and blues seem to be every bit as available as rock and disco.

There are large green areas along with historical remnants, a museum and various other entertainment venues. Bicycles are available for rent within the park and there are miles of trails. While you are in the park, take the time to visit the ultra modern Expo Center, which is open to the public if there are no exposition taking place. Chipinque National Park offers a very pleasant location for many outdoor activities and is very close (15 minutes) to the city center. Jogging, hiking, mountain biking and just plain walking along the roadway or the well-kept trails within the park are very popular with the locals. There is a nice hotel, high in the mountains, with a great

In Barrio Antiguo there are numerous small clubs, intimate cafes and upscale discos. Live concerts, featuring international names as well as Mexican entertainers, are very popular in Monterrey. Rodeo style “theme nightclubs” are very popular here as well, featuring live entertainment or “Norteno” disco style music. In Monterrey you are spoilt for options on how to spend your spare time with your friends and classmates. Source: www.allaboutmonterrey.com


© VANOC

CANADA

VANOC Calls to Students

Across Canada to 58

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Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


In the middle of this international maelstrom will be 25,000 unsung heroes – the volunteers – who will help the 2010 Winter Games go off without a hitch in Vancouver and Whistler. The members of this small army come from every walk of life, all adult age groups, speak such languages as Mandarin, French and Polish, and will groom ski hills, provide first aid, and chauffeur dignitaries and athletes to and from Olympic and Paralympic venues. “Next to the athletes, volunteers are perhaps the most important participants in the 2010 Winter Games. They will welcome the world, set lasting impressions and play the largest role in actually staging the Games,” John Furlong, Chief Executive Officer of the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Games (VANOC), has said. The call for volunteers by VANOC, issued worldwide on February 12, 2008, is quite possibly the largest call up for volunteers during peace time in Canada. In comparison, the 1988 Calgary Winter Olympics relied on an estimated 10,000 volunteers and the 1976 Montreal Summer Olympics had a total personnel number (likely staff and volunteers included) of around 23,000.

thrills and results at the click of a button online. And the biggest change of all is the addition of the Paralympic Winter Games, a totally separate international sporting event that runs for nine days, just two weeks after the Olympics are completed. Since Vancouver won the bid to host the 2010 Winter Games in 2003, experts in workforce planning have been refining the numbers of volunteers needed for the event, which is split between British Columbia’s Lower Mainland and the scenic mountain resort of Whistler, located about two hours away from Vancouver. The 25,000 figure is based on volunteer numbers used at past winter Olympics in Italy and the United States, as well as the unique needs for hosting Canada’s Games, explains Nanine Artup, VANOC’s manager of volunteer recruitment. “We’re looking for enthusiastic, dedicated and committed people who will uphold our values of team, trust, excellence, sustainability, and creativity. People who want to welcome the world and be a part of Canadian history,” she says, adding, “We have thousands of roles to fill, some general and some that require specific knowledge and technical skills.”

CANADA

Imagine almost 7,000 athletes and team officials from over 80 countries around the world; 27 days of intense competition with 150 medals awarded; 10,000 international media clamouring for stories; and three billion TV viewers worldwide!

So far, VANOC has received applications from hopeful volunteers in every Canadian province and territory and from 144 different countries, including Lithuania, Barbados, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. After applying, candidates are invited to one-hour interview sessions in person and asked to attend three to four training sessions covering areas such as: general orientation, service excellence, event leadership, and venue specific training. These programs are complemented by e-learning materials offered through VANOC’s volunteer web portal. Contributed by: Jennifer Robinson, VANOC Communications. For more information on volunteering at the 2010 Winter Games in Vancouver, see www.vancouver2010.com

Quite a lot has changed since Canada last hosted the Games. The number of sports included on the Winter Olympics roster has grown, more athletes are participating, and technology has dramatically altered the pace of just about everything that happens, from the fastest times recorded in bobsleigh and luge, to the millions worldwide who have access to the latest spills,

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© Veni - Istockphoto.com

UNITED KINGDOM

UCAS Welcomes Canadian Students

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UK qualifications are respected and recognised around the globe. Britain has some of the oldest universities in the world and a tradition of teaching that goes back nearly a thousand years. Today, higher education in the UK is incredibly diverse, combining the ancient and the modern, the established and the innovative.

figures, released by the University and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS), showed the number of international students who’d been accepted for a full-time degree course had gone up by 10% over the past 12 months.

This is a feature not lost on international students. With a population of over 61 million, the UK has around 1.6 million full-time undergraduates in higher education and out of these, more than 99,000 are international students. The numbers are growing, too: The latest

An increasing number of these are Canadian students. According to UCAS figures, there were 18% more applicants from Canada, compared with the previous year. The most popular courses that Canadian students apply for are Law and Medicine.

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Increase in Canadian Students

The job of handling applications from all these students falls to UCAS, the organisation that deals with applicants for higher education in the UK. More than half a million people wanting to study at university or college have already used the services of the charity this year. UCAS, which is based in Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, recruited a dedicated team to further its international work around two years ago. These executives travel the world, talking to schools and colleges, advising students, giving presentations and holding workshops and training sessions.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Kristine Murray from the UCAS International Team is travelling to Canada shortly to make a series of school visits in Vancouver and Toronto. She said: ‘’UCAS has been participating in events and school visits in Canada for the past few years due to the increase in applicants. In Vancouver and Victoria, I will be conducting a number of presentations and school visits with colleagues from Welsh institutions. I’ll also be going to Toronto with colleagues from Scotland.’’ She added: ‘’We have a jam-packed schedule to try and ensure all schools sending applications to the UK have an opportunity to learn more about the invaluable resources available to them when researching UK higher education courses as well as the details of the UCAS application. If anyone would like to contact us, please call our Customer Service Unit who will put the call through to the International Team.’’

Applying to the UK The UK system is unique because students only need to fill out one UCAS form for all their applications. Irene Finlayson, an International Executive with UCAS who’s worked in higher education for 20 years, said: ‘’Students are often amazed when they come to the UK because they only have to make one application and they can have five different choices on it.’’ She added: ‘’This makes our system so much easier than many other countries where applications have to be completed individually for different universities. Counsellors in North America have often told me how helpful they think our system is and that they wished a similar one existed in their own country.’’

How to Apply UCAS is there to help anyone who wants to enter higher education in the UK. A good starting point is the UCAS website www.ucas.com. Students can research the kind of course they are interested in, watch video guides, check entry requirements and find out about the whole application process.

Qualifications One of the first steps for international students is to check that their

qualifications are recognised in the UK and that they will be accepted by higher education institutions here. UCAS provides a qualifications hotline too. Prospective students can email their questions to: qualsenquiries@ ucas.ac.uk Higher education institutions have a good understanding of the large range of qualifications offered by applicants from different parts of the world. Some have specific sections on their websites, outlining the qualifications they will accept from each country and the sort of grades they expect.

Course Requirements Each course has minimum entry requirements. Colleges and universities will look at a candidate’s qualifications to see if they meet those standards, but they will also be looking at a student’s overall suitability for the course. Students can find out what’s needed by using the Course Search feature on the UCAS website. The prospectus or website of their chosen university or college will have that information too. Once they have decided what to study and where, students need to complete their application online using the Apply section of the UCAS website. The process is straightforward and UCAS provides assistance throughout, guiding applicants through the choices available and helping them make their decisions.

Deadlines If you are applying from outside the UK or EU, whatever your nationality, you need to be aware of the three application deadlines but

many universities and colleges will consider your application up until June 30, 2010. This does not apply to applications for the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, courses in medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine or veterinary science. For all of these, you must apply by October 15, 2009. Universities and colleges do not guarantee to consider applications they receive after January 15, 2010, and some popular courses may not have vacancies after that date. Please check with individual universities and colleges if you are not sure. You are advised to apply as early as possible. Remember to allow enough time for entry clearance or immigration; also travel and accommodation arrangements, which can take longer during the summer when immigration departments are busy. Contributed by: James Durant, Communications Officer, UCAS. Tel: +44 1242 544619 j.durant@ucas.ac.uk, www.ucas.ac.uk

OXFORD UNIVERSITY INTERNATIONAL SUMMER SCHOOLS 2010 Your opportunity to live and study at Oxford University Our summer schools welcome an informed international audience for • concentrated study in small seminar groups with specialist tutors • plenary lectures given by leading scholars and distinguished speakers • a programme of special events The following summer schools run during July and August • Creative Writing • English Literature • History, Politics & Society • International Human Rights Law • International Politics • Theology For further details of these and our other summer schools please • email ip@conted.ox.ac.uk (quoting ref CS)

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

UNITED KINGDOM

UCAS visits Canada

• visit our website

http://international.conted.ox.ac.uk


INFORMATION

Professional Degree

Accreditation ACCREDITATION

John G. Kelly

Definition: To officially recognize the degree designation from an educational institution or professional body in accordance with a prescribed level of competency associated with performing a function or job associated with the degree on the basis of objective standards that are fairly applied.

Law, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, accounting, engineering and teaching; just to name a few of what are now at least 38 self-regulated professions in Canada. These represent the coveted careers. The question is, how to gain entry to them? Accreditation is the key that unlocks the door to self-regulated professions

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and the concept isn’t new. The ancient medieval guilds with their apprenticeship system that was the key to opening the door to master craftsman/journeyman, laid the foundation for the modern-day, self-regulated professions and their accreditation systems. However, what may have been relatively straightforward in the days of the guilds has evolved into an educational labyrinth that students need to be brought up to speed on prior to embarking on the professional career path.

Self-Regulated Professions are Self-Governing Self-regulated refers to the class of professions that are permitted by governments to set their own

standards for eligibility for membership and to exercise a control over the marketplace for those services to the public. Every self-regulated profession’s powers can be linked to a government statute. In Canada, most self-regulated professions are under the control of provincial governments. For example, the self-regulated legal profession in Ontario derives its powers from the provincial Law Society of Upper Canada Act. Lawyers in every other province derive their powers from their own legislation, as do doctors, dentists, pharmacists, engineers and teachers. As with anything that is law-related, there are exceptions to the rule. Some self-regulated professions do derive their powers from the federal government. For example, the federal government has authority

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


What are the Self Regulated Professions? How do the uninitiated find out what the self-regulated professions are? A quick guide can be found by checking the Province of Ontario’s Fair Regulated Professions Act (www. citizenship.gov.on.ca/english/news) and the corresponding Regulated Health Professions Act (www.health. gov.on.ca/english/public/). You may well be surprised to find that there are actually 23 self-regulated health professions, three self-regulated accounting professions, several selfregulated engineering professions, as well as one legal profession. Once you’ve identified the professions of interest to you, you will find links to profession-specific web sites that will explain its parameters; they will outline the list of qualifications, the accreditation process and procedure. In the alternative, you can contact a member of that profession, such as a lawyer or doctor, and ask them about their professional parameters. This should be a last resort. Many practicing members of a profession, once admitted, are content to pay their dues and get on with their careers. Their knowledge of accreditation is minimal at best, often particularly so when you inquire about anything outside the envelope, such as abroad degree accreditation. Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

A Professional Degree and Accreditation Are Different

Accreditation Reform Makes Abroad Degrees Attractive

When you link into the self-regulated profession that is aligned with your career aspirations, take note of how accreditation is administered. You’ll note that a post-secondary college diploma or university degree, depending on the profession, isn’t synonymous with accreditation even though it might bear the same name as the profession. It merely makes you eligible to apply for accreditation. For example, a Bachelor of Legal Laws (LLB) and/or Juris Doctorate (JD) doesn’t entitle one to practice law. It merely qualifies the holder of that degree to apply for admission to a provincial bar admissions/articled clerkship program that must be successfully completed to qualify a person for admission to a provincial law society and the right to practice law in that province. It’s estimated that 40% -50% of law degree holders either don’t pursue accreditation or let their accreditation status lapse once they realize that their professional legal career aspirations don’t fit within the scope of the practice of law.

An attractive alternative for an increasing number of Canadian students is to pursue professional degree education abroad, particularly in the UK, where the opportunity to attend world-class universities and obtain an internationally-recognized degree in substantially less time than in Canada is certainly attractive. Oxford, Cambridge (Oxbridge), the birthplace of the LLB degree, and University of Edinburgh, the birthplace of so many of the royal colleges in the health professions, welcome applications from Canadians for their professional degree programs, with high school diplomas.

The Ins and Outs of Accreditation Self-regulated professions take one of two routes in managing accreditation. Some, particularly in the health professions, are linked to national certification programs. Even though you obtain a valid medical degree from an Ontario or BC university and are regulated by that provincial college of physicians and surgeons, you must pass a uniform national accreditation examination before being eligible to practice medicine in a province. The second route is province-specific accreditation. Public school teachers must apply for accreditation in each province they wish to teach in and every province has its own variation of accreditation standards. If you choose to pursue a career in a self-regulated profession that sets its own provincial accreditation standards, make certain you study in a college or university that is approved for accreditation in the province where you intend to work.

INFORMATION

over immigration and refugees. Immigration Consultants are a self-regulated profession whose powers are derived from regulations contained in the federal Immigration and Refugee Protection Act. Other professions, many of them in lucrative careers, are either regulated directly by the government or unregulated. Real estate appraisers and brokers, financial planners, and mutual fund representatives are regulated directly by provincial government agencies. Management consultants as well are unregulated. Anyone can label themselves as a management consultant and provide a wide range of sophisticated professional services to the public, often for lucrative fees, so long as they don’t intrude into the legislative space controlled by selfregulated or regulated professions.

Aside from tuitions costs abroad – which are now quite in line with those in many Canadian schools – the other formidable barrier has been abroad degree accreditation. Canadian self-regulated professions have been accused of erecting artificial barriers in accrediting abroad degrees. In other words, there was a double standard that made it more difficult for a graduate with an abroad professional degree that was equivalent to a domestic degree, to have it accredited. Ontario, the dominant province for professional degree accreditation in Canada, and which tends to set the national standard, has taken a leadership role in enacting the Fair Access to Regulated Professions Act (FARPA). All self-regulated professions must approve abroad professional degrees applying the same objective criteria utilized in accrediting domestic degrees. There is now a level playing field and abroad degree accreditation will become a routine process. Contributed by: John G. Kelly, a Canadian law professor, is president of Canada Law From Abroad and a registered UCAS representative. www.canadalawfromabroad.com You can contact Professor Kelly at johng@canadalawfromabroad.com

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UNITED KINGDOM

Law School The UK Edge Law has gone global. A recent survey by legal services consulting strategist Adam Smith Esq. (www.bmacewen. com) reveals that nine of the top ten international law firms in the world are headquartered in London. All of the major Canadian “Bay Street” law firms recognize the importance of having a London connection if they want to be players in the corporate/ commercial legal field and have established offices in “the City.” This shouldn’t be surprising. The UK is the birthplace of the common law system, LLB degree and LLM education, and the corresponding practice of law by barristers and solicitors. For example, City University Law School is aligned with the centuries old Inns of Court (hiding place for the Da Vinci Code) Law School, the locus of the chambers for the elite English Barristers. However, the UK is also on the leading edge of innovative legal education. Ironically, it’s been UK law schools that have been at the forefront in establishing linkages between English common law and French civil law education with their combined LLB/Civil Law Licensure degrees. If you want to look into a dual career as a business manager and lawyer Birmingham has a customized LLB/ Business degree. Or if it’s a toss up between accounting and law, Kent has an LLB/Accounting degree program accredited by both professions. Queen Mary has established a unique clinical education program that integrates students into immigration and refugee practice with its own dedicated law school team of experienced practicing immigration lawyers. However, the most significant innovation for applicants who already have university degrees has been the introduction of “accelerated” two year LLB degree programs in select UK law schools. They contain the same core law curriculum as the conventional three year Canadian law school program, which is completed by the second year, but eliminate the 64

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need to spend a third year taking optional (liberal studies) courses in recognition of their previous degree. They’ve done away with the “dreaded dead third year,” the frequent lament of students who just want to get on with their professional careers once they complete the core law degree curriculum by their second year. The time and cost savings speak for themselves.

The LLM (Masters of Legal Laws – Legal Expert): New Professional Services Careers in the Legal Profession Many of the most exciting careers in the legal profession are combining law with other disciplines at the graduate studies level. Legal experts, policy advisors and consultants with multi-disciplinary professional services capabilities are needed to resolve complex issues beyond the narrow scope of the practice of law. Since the LLB is in reality an undergraduate vocational degree – no commonwealth law country requires an undergraduate degree for admission – the LLM degree is considered to be a true graduate degree in the UK. Like North American MBAs, they are open to Canadian students with degrees from various disciplines. UK universities recognize that law now permeates business, financial services and commerce, particularly at the international level. They have developed innovative LLM and MSc Law programs that leverage law with another discipline. Queen Mary University is the location of the world renowned Centre for Commercial Law Studies. It has a full menu of LLM programs that span business and commerce such as an MSc Law and Finance program that integrates law, economic regulation and finance. University of Sussex has an LLM in

international business law and the University of Stirling has an LLM Commercial Law degree that matches law and MBA courses into a unique graduate professional degree. However, LLM and MA Law programs aren’t restricted to business. They span diverse multidisciplinary areas such as medical law and ethics, and law and social work. The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) is the repository of the largest collection of African and Islamic legal materials in the world. Its MA Law programs in every aspect of international law are a magnet for aspiring diplomats who gain access to a learning environment and career network. At University of Kent you can develop your own customized LLM program, which can include study at their Brussels campus, the headquarters of the European Union. University of Sussex has an international reputation as a key source for war crimes research with its LLM International Criminal Law, with research placements in The Hague and developing countries where its teams literally rewrite criminal codes. Not surprisingly, UK law schools are the first choice of approximately 35% of Canadian law school faculty to obtain their graduate teaching credential. Canadians who attend UK law schools will, in some instances, be taught by the same faculty who taught the law professors teaching students at Canadian law schools.

UK Law School Tuition Competitive with Canada The traditional barriers that deterred Canadian students from making UK law schools their first choice the have disappeared. Canadians are required to pay international tuition fees of approximately $19,000 per year which in the past were significantly higher than domestic law school fees of approximately $5,000. But in the meantime, Canadian law schools have been gravitating towards higher fees, Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


www.qmul.ac.uk

and students accustomed to paying normal undergraduate tuition are often shocked to discover that tuition for some domestic law schools can now exceed $20,000 per year. The top-tier UK law school prices are indeed competitive with many of their Canadian counterparts.

Study in London, England

Make Use of UCAS Admissions to UK universities are administered through a centralized University and Colleges Applications Service (UCAS: www.ucas.ac.uk). UCAS enables students to apply to five law schools of their choice through a onestep process for a minimum flat fee of approximately $55. The application advantage is a marked improvement over a system where students must complete multiple applications and continue to call on teachers for academic references time and again, with a substantial fee for every law school. It costs $500-$700 for a Canadian student just to apply to all six Ontario law schools. The cost can easily exceed $1,000 should they decide to submit applications across the country. More law schools create healthy competition and diversity among the UK universities. Students opting for the UK route have the advantage of choosing the schools that respond to their preferred career route within the profession. Virtually every UK student utilizes the service of a registered UCAS representative to advise them on the best university fit and facilitate their application. Canadian applicants to law schools in the UK are well advised to procure the services of a Canadian registered UCAS advisor that has specific expertise in counseling on abroad degree accreditation and career opportunities open to students with LLB and LLM legal expert degree designations. This is especially important for LLM candidates where there is potential for research partnerships with Canadian organizations and scholarship links. Registered UCAS representatives affiliated with universities all have handy guides on how to apply for your student visa. They can refer you to banks that can provide you with the verification of financing that needs to be included in the application. Finally, a registered UCAS representative will be able to advise you on scholarships available for Canadians in their law school network, and refer you to the student services office who will assist you regarding part-time employment opportunities and student visa requirements.

• Queen Mary • We offer three year • We are at the is one of the largest undergraduate cutting edge colleges of the programs (including of knowledge due world-famous the LLB), one-year to our outstanding University graduate programs, research, teaching of London and doctoral and study facilities programs • We have a • We have a truly integrated • We are top-ranked welcoming, campus, including with a worldwide cosmopolitan accommodation reputation for environment with set in the heart excellence extensive social and of London sporting activities

studyinlondon@qmul.ac.uk 14/8/09 10:20 Page 1

OS_Ad_1_4p_09_v4:105x148mm

Arts • Business • Law • Medicine • Dentistry • Engineering • Sciences

UNDERGRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE STUDY IN

LONDON,UK

Once you get there what’s it like? The good news is that you’re in an English-speaking country on the doorstep of Europe. You have the advantage over your friends and colleagues back home of combining a world-class legal education at a top-tier law school with personal living and travelling experiences throughout Europe that are guaranteed memory keepers. Contributed by: John G. Kelly, a Canadian law professor, is president of Canada Law From Abroad and a registered UCAS representative. www.canadalawfromabroad.com You can contact Professor Kelly at johng@canadalawfromabroad.com

MAKE MIDDLESEX YOUR FIRST CHOICE FOR UK STUDY

NUMBER ONE IN LONDON FOR: LIVING COSTS AND FINANCIAL SUPPORT LEARNING SPACES • PERFORMANCE FEEDBACK TECHNOLOGY • ASSESSMENT* PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL ADVICE OFFERED FOR ALL PROGRAMMES EMAIL TODAY: info@mdxna.com +1 480-471-5966

www.mdx.ac.uk

MIDDLESEX IS LONDON

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

* ISB Research Autumn 2007


Distinguish yourself

International King’s has more than 21,000 students from some 150 countries. Currently over 100 Canadian students are studying at King’s. Areas of study include forensic science, law, international relations, medicine and business management.

Location King’s is a research-led university located in the very heart of London.

Investing King’s is in the second phase of a £1 billion redevelopment programme; transforming its estate and upgrading social and academic spaces.

Vibrant International events and activities offer Canadian students the opportunity to fully integrate in King’s student life and make the most out of their time in London.

King’s is ranked in the top 25 universities worldwide* and based in the heart of London. With nine Schools and six Medical Research Council centres, King’s offers world-class teaching and research. Our extensive range of subjects includes arts and humanities, law, science and technology, health, biomedical, social and management sciences. *Times Higher-QS World University Rankings, 2008

www.kcl.ac.uk/canada

Scholarships King’s awards the annual F. Kenneth Hare Memorial Scholarship to a Canadian student. The King’s International Graduate Scholarships to the value of £10,000 each are also open to Canadian students. Further information for Canadian students is available at www.kcl.ac.uk/canada


INSPIRATION

An Intellectual

Challenge

Reputation and research were key for Rasmus Valanko when he began looking for a university at which to study his Masters degree. Six months later, the Finnish student had enrolled in a postgrad qualification at King’s College London. He speaks with Topgradschool.com about the value of his degree. “Two things prompted me to apply for a Masters degree. Firstly, in Finland, they are the norm, so I needed one to be on the same level as other applicants in the job market.’’ “Secondly, my Bachelors degree was only a first step in helping me understand what I had a keen interest in. By continuing my studies, I was able to shift the focus to an area of more interest, while still maintaining the relevance of my previous studies.” Rasmus’ area of interest is the environment, politics and globalisation, and thanks to his Masters degree, he’s now earning money as a Climate Change Regulation Analyst for Royal Dutch Shell. “My position requires me to understand the political arena and the decision-making processes that lead to regulatory regimes with an impact on greenhouse gas emissions. With this understanding, I provide insights which help the company plan, prepare, and prosper in a carbon-constrained world.” Another focus of Rasmus’ work is Shell’s advocacy in the climate change arena. “This involves coordinating Shell’s policies and positions on topics such as emissions trading system design or carbon capture and storage demonstration programs,” he says. A major highlight of Rasmus’ job is his access to information and experts in a field that is of personal Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

and professional interest to him – he even works with a Nobel peace prize winner. “My employer is fantastic. I am challenged to take responsibility and am also provided with support when I need it. You learn a lot by being constantly challenged to perform at a level slightly above your comfort zone.” Rasmus believes that the experience he had as an intern during his Masters program has helped him acquire the job he’s currently in. But his internships with the Commission on Sustainable Development in the UK and in Finland also proved to be financially beneficial. “I was able to secure funding for my Masters thesis by choosing a topic that was relevant to an employer with which I wanted to carry out an internship. My advice for students is to do internships with prospective employers, even though it’s not a course requirement. Funding avenues aren’t always immediately apparent.” Rasmus first began researching universities six months before the autumn start date for Masters courses. His main criteria for choosing universities to apply to were the reputation, research agendas, staff biographies and publications, and the amount of lecture/student interaction. “It was really important to me to get the most out of the university’s intellectual capital, and so a degree based on frequent interaction with lecturers and

a structured lecture schedule was key.’’ “University life was rewarding for a number of reasons: Firstly, the possibility for interaction with people who share similar interests; secondly, the intellectual challenge and associated resources available to pursue knowledge; and finally, the autonomy.’’ Rasmus would encourage others to study for a Masters to further their career options as well as exploring a related but new area of knowledge, in addition to their Bachelors degree. And he may be biased, but he’d also encourage others to work in the same area as he does. “It’s a growing field that has already expanded to offer multiple and varied opportunities in both the public and private sectors. The topics have a high degree of public relevance and interest, they’re complex, they’re challenging, and this will only increase.” “Lastly, the work has an idealist component which gives you the satisfaction of going home at the end of the day, knowing you are doing something to improve the future prospects of the generations that will follow.” Printed with permission from The QS World Grad School Tour. See www.topgradschool.com for the 2009/2010 tour schedule.

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Kingston University London www.kingston.ac.uk/canada

“[Kingston’s] record on teaching quality puts it in the vanguard of the modern university sector and is a match for many older institutions.” Sunday Times University Guide 2008

email: canada@kingston.ac.uk

Kingston University London has high quality teaching and excellent employment links to businesses and institutions located in London, England, a city recognised as one of the world’s most vibrant, historic, and culturally rich capitals. We have a commitment to quality teaching and strong links with industry so that our courses are designed to give you the skills and knowledge to enhance your career opportunities. The University is located in the historic market town of Kingston upon Thames, a Royal Borough within greater London. In 2007 the London Metropolitan Police stated ‘Kingston is among the most affluent boroughs in London with one of the lowest crime rates in the capital.’ Students can access the attractions of the capital very easily (25 minutes by train), but escape its hustle and bustle to live in the leafy suburbs with easy access to parks and outdoor activities. Kingston’s café culture provides plenty of choice for meeting friends. Lively trendy bars, traditional pubs, restaurants, gyms, a 14-screen cinema, 16-lane bowling alley, a fantastic array of shops including a large indoor mall featuring the UK’s top retailers makes the Kingston area particularly appealing to students.

The University has a strong reputation across a wide range of disciplines and comprises seven faculties: Business and Law; Art and Design and Architecture; Arts and Social Sciences; Science; Engineering; Computing, Information Systems and Mathematics; Health and Social Care Sciences.

Short Duration: Bachelor’s degrees are 3 years long and Masters Degrees are 1 year long.

London Location: a world famous capital city, with good travel connections to the rest of UK and Europe.

Good Employment prospects: strong teaching and employment links with London’s businesses and institutions. Opportunity to extend student visa after graduation to work in the UK full time for up to 2 years.

• •

Student Population: 19,900+ Diverse Student Body: overseas students represent over 133 different nations.

Students like you: We currently have 31 Canadian students and 65 American students pursuing a degree at Kingston.

Typical Course Fees: range based on course from £9,000 to £16,000 for the MBA.

Popular Courses (UG and PG) • Creative Economies • Sustainable Communities • Environmental and Earth • • • • • • • • • • •

Resources management International Finance Business and MBA Pharmaceutical Science Biotechnology Cell Biology and Cancer Biology Law (LLB and LLM) Law Senior Status (2 year UG conversion degree) Education and Teaching Human Rights and Genocide Studies Political Campaign Management Drama and Theatre

Scholarships and Financial Aid are available for Canadian Students


UNITED KINGDOM © Arkadiusz Latko - Dreamstime.com

UK

Postgraduate Study in the

We cannot escape the fact that our global economy has become, emphatically, a knowledge economy: to secure the most glittering of career prizes it is now essential not only to be an excellent graduate of a respected bachelor’s programme, but also to enhance your skills and extend your understanding in a period of postgraduate study. Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

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UNITED KINGDOM

Why the UK? As providers of postgraduate education, UK universities share the key features of the leading global institutions. They offer a dedicated infrastructure, supportive funding schemes, a variety of programmes and modes of study to meet individual needs, and a common aim to integrate their students into their research enterprise at the highest level. What sets them apart from their peers is their unique cultural, historical and social environment, and their centuries-old reputation for intellectual excellence: in short, the very reasons that bring so many visiting students to Britain each year.

Types of Programmes There are some basic differences in the naming of postgraduate programmes in the UK, but these do not signify any difference in the level – i.e., intellectual depth, significance or status within academia, or amongst employers – of the qualification itself.

There are three forms of higher research programme in the UK: the Master of Letters, the research doctorate and a taught doctorate. The M.Litt. is a two-year programme that requires an independent research project of a scale and significance equivalent to a work of 50,000 words. It is generally regarded in the UK as representing a mid-point between a master’s programme and a doctorate. The research doctorate Ph.D. or D.Phil. requires a substantial project of independent research – usually

expected to be equivalent to a work of 80-100,000 words – undertaken with the guidance of a research supervisor (or plural). The taught doctorate variant offers candidates the opportunity to research their field at the highest level builds towards this goal through a sequence of taught courses. Currently it is most common in applied disciplines, such as Education and Engineering.

Advantages The structural differences in UK postgraduate programmes present a positive advantage to the prospective postgraduate from overseas. An obvious and immediate benefit is the duration of the programmes: the British taught and research master’s (MA, MSc, MPhil) are one-year programmes, generally undertaken in an academic year from October to June, although where the programme requires a research dissertation it commonly continues to September (i.e. a total study- period of 11 months); the British doctorate (D.Phil., Ph.D.) is a three-year programme with the expectation that the majority of candidates will continue for +1 year to complete – ‘write-up’ – their dissertation.

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In the UK, the master’s programme takes two complementary forms: the taught master’s (titled MA,

MSc, depending on the discipline), which comprises a sequence of taught courses for which assessed coursework and (sometimes) an examination is required, and, generally, a project of independent research; and the research master’s (titled MPhil., MRes.), which is conceived at the same academic level as the taught master’s and is usually undertaken over the same period, but requires the candidate to devote themselves exclusively to the completion of an independent research project. It should be noted that certain UK universities offer an MPhil that comprises both taught units and a project of independent research.

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The reputation of the UK’s research intensive universities also ensures that their successful postgraduates attract the attention, and investment, of the world’s leading employers in business, industry, media and, of course, academia.

Another significant advantage to the British approach is the mode of teaching: the guiding principle of postgraduate teachers in Britain has always been to foster independent and original enquiry, and to this end, the emphasis has always been placed upon very small and interactive classes. Indeed in the Arts and Humanities disciplines, much teaching is undertaken 1:1. It should also be underlined that British universities place their postgraduates in the pedagogic care of their leading professors: graduate teaching assistants do not instruct postgraduates on either master’s or doctoral programmes.

Support The bespoken and highly specialised support for postgraduates is the hallmark of the British experience, and it reflects the status of UK universities as global research centres. The majority of UK universities are ‘research intensive’ institutions, which means they invest heavily to ensure their academic staff and students work at the cutting edge of a wide range of research fields. This brings many benefits to the postgraduate: in the first place, taught (MA, MSc) and research (DPhil., Ph.D.) programmes reflect – and shape – discoveries and innovations in a given field; instructors on taught programmes and doctoral supervisors are among the global

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The individual approach to teaching and supervision is matched in Britain by a powerful sense of community, which underpins the postgraduate experience. Many UK universities have Graduate Schools that offer an infrastructure and an intellectual and social focus for their postgraduate students. A Graduate School can simplify the administrative requirements of registering for a programme of study, which often appear formidable, and they ensure continuing advice and support for the duration of the programme. Graduate Schools generally serve also as training centres, offering opportunities to develop, or extend, your capability in a variety of generic and field-specific skills.

Funding Each year UK universities award millions of pounds sterling in scholarships for overseas postgraduates. Many universities offer alumni-related schemes, and a growing number of global companies also provide postgraduate scholarships for international students. It is worth noting that UK scholarships for international students can take many forms: a reduction on the programme fees, payment of the tuition fees only, or a full scholarship to cover both programme fees and the costs of subsistence (accommodation, etc.) expenses. Funding deadlines tend to appear between January and May, so early preparation for applying to programmes and seeking funding is advised.

UNITED KINGDOM

leaders in their field; and there are rich research resources, from laboratories to libraries, that support the work of leading researchers, which are also made accessible to students.

Contributed by: Dr James Clark, Reader in History, Head of the Graduate School of Arts and Humanities at the University of Bristol. Contact: artf-gradschool@bristol.ac.uk

As one of the UK’s leading research universities, the University of Bristol is the first choice for many British and international students. We offer a wide range of programmes in the Faculties of Arts, Science, Medicine and Dentistry, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, Engineering, Science and Social Sciences and Law. In addition to our three, four and five year Bachelor degrees, we also offer taught Masters, Masters by Research, Postgraduate Diploma programmes, Doctoral Research and the taught Doctor of Education. Set in the heart of a beautiful, historic yet vibrant and cosmopolitan city, the University of Bristol is an outstanding study destination. For more details please visit our website www.bristol.ac.uk or send an email to iro@bristol.ac.uk to request one of our CDs for international students.


PROFILE

STELLENBOSCH UNIVERSITY School/Institution Name:

Western Cape, South Africa, est. 1918

Stellenbosch University, Western Cape, South Africa, est. 1918.

country’s research output and profile internationally. Stellenbosch University is currently home to ten Research Chairs in the fields of: Functional Nanostructured Materials; Experimental Petrology; Advanced Macromolecular Architectures; Genetic Tailoring of Biopolymers; Post-Harvest Technology; Photonics, Ultrafast and Ultra-Intense Laser Science; Post-traumatic Stress Syndrome; Economics of Social Policy; and Property Law.

Institution Type: University Public / Private: Public Special Features of the Location: Stellenbosch University is a town University located in the heart of the Cape Winelands and surrounded by beautiful mountains.

In addition to the Research Chairs, Stellenbosch University is also endowed with a significant number of rated researchers indicating the level, recognition, and quality of the scholars in all fields.

Programs Offered: Stellenbosch University aims to expand its postgraduate student body. Across its nine faculties, a comprehensive range of postgraduate programmes (Diplomas, Honours, Masters and PhD) is offered. All postgraduate programmes are offered in English. A range of undergraduate (Bachelors) programmes, many of which are taught in Afrikaans, is also offered. Participation at the undergraduate level requires a working knowledge of Afrikaans. Total Number of Students: 24686 Total Number of International Students: 2650 from 92 countries Accommodation Options: University residences and houses as well as private accommodation are located on and around the campus, mostly within walking distance of the majority of the academic buildings. Other private accommodation options are available in and around town. Student Life: The University has a vibrant, multilingual campus (English, Afrikaans and Xhosa) with fantastic sporting and recreational facilities and access to excellent services on and around campus. Town and campus life are closely interwoven, which gives rise to a high degree of interaction and integration. Contact Details: Stellenbosch University International Office Tel: +27 21 808 4628 Fax: +27 21 808 3799 Email: interoff@sun.ac.za Web: www.sun.ac.za/international

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Stellenbosch University is a mediumsized, research-focused institution situated in the classic university town of Stellenbosch, a place of great natural beauty, in the heart of the Cape winelands. We strive to be an excellent international university focused on research, a national asset in the development of intellectual capital, and a driving force for regional development – within the context of the Western Cape, greater South Africa, and the African continent. The University has undergone broad transformation in the last decade, by adopting a research focus, a more learning-centered approach and pursuing strategies which foster innovation. Stellenbosch University engages in basic and applied research and through partnering with industry and government has become a benchmark for research excellence. The university has established itself as one of the leading research universities in South Africa and Africa. Similar to Canada’s Research Chairs Programme, South Africa has launched a national initiative of appointing Research Chairs in different fields in order to elevate the

Three of the prestigious Department of Science and Technology (DST) Centres of Excellence are housed at Stellenbosch University as well as other important national centres. DST-NRF Centre for Invasion Biology - www.sun.ac.za/cib This Centre is concerned with the biology of invasive species. Special attention is paid to the impact that invasive species have on southern Africa’s biodiversity, agriculture, and ecotourism. DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Epidemiological Modelling and Analysis - www.sun.ac.za/sacema/ Research at this Centre is dedicated to modelling of disease transmission and progression, focusing on South Africa’s major health challenges. DST-NRF Centre of Excellence for Biomedical Tuberculosis (TB) Research Solutions are sought to one of the continent’s most threatening diseases. Co-hosted by Stellenbosch University (Biomedical Sciences – Division of Molecular Biology and Human Genetics) and the University of the Witwatersrand, the research laboratories at the two institutions combine their efforts to understand Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, the bacterium causing tuberculosis in humans. Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


who require it are met at Cape Town International Airport upon first arrival, and are supplied with comprehensive orientation information. They may also participate in the International Office’s Bi-Annual Welcoming Programme before the start of their studies. This is what some of our international students have to say about studying at Stellenbosch University:

surrounding community. Staff and students readily answer questions and make you feel welcome. The University is not only very stimulating academically but offers many opportunities to be involved which are not afforded at many Canadian institutions. I am constantly challenged in and outside of the classroom and am very happy with my choice of postgraduate institution.

PROFILE

With the Centre in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies, Stellenbosch University has been awarded the responsibility to act as the hub of a Postgraduate Programme in Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies by the South African National Energy Research Institute (SANERI), a division of the Central Energy Fund (CEF). The overall objective of this initiative is to develop and enhance national capacity in renewable and sustainable energy in support of accelerated and shared economic growth within the area of sustainable energy.

Alice BOTHWELL, Queen’s University ’08, current MA International Studies student

The National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP) aims to promote research and training in Theoretical Physics at all tertiary institutions in South Africa. The hub of this institute is also located at Stellenbosch University. Prospective students have a wide range of programmes to choose from when applying to study at Stellenbosch University. The faculties at Stellenbosch University are: Arts (humanities & social sciences); Science; Education; AgriSciences; Law; Theology; Economic & Management Sciences; Engineering; and Health Sciences. Bursaries for international students from central university funds are very limited. However, funding opportunities for postgraduate projects vary between individual researchers and across the faculties. Prospective students should thus address this question as part of the application process and compete for any available opportunities.

Studying for my PhD in Geology at Stellenbosch University is a wonderful human and professional experience for me! The University is a lovely place to study, and the constant development of the research facilities does not only attract international students but also well-known international professors. The beauty of its scenery as well as its richness and diversity of cultures make South Africa a country you want to come to and stay for a while. Cynthia SANCHEZ-GARRIDO, PhD student, originally from Taverny, France.

Stellenbosch University is also part of a well-established and active network of international partners (e.g. Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen; Leiden University; the Catholic University Leuven; St. Andrews University; Northwestern University; Chinese University of Hong Kong; Peking University; etc.). We also have established partnerships with ISEP, CIEE, and the AIFS. It is thus possible for students to consider Stellenbosch University as a semester abroad destination either as a “free mover” or via one of the organizations like ISEP, CIEE or the AIFS. The needs of all international students are the responsibility of the International Office. It creates a platform from the first enquiry to application, admission, and assistance in obtaining visas, registration and throughout the stay on campus. All new international students Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

As a student, Stellenbosch University has provided me with a vibrant environment, flooded with knowledge and most importantly, gelled together by the highest calibre of lecturers and researchers. I joined the Department of Conservation Ecology from Gabon. The whole atmosphere was incredibly supportive which made it easier to adapt and my advisor was particularly helpful and approachable. This support, together with the excellent library, computer services and research facilities, allowed me to work to my full potential. These factors also influenced my decision to complete both my MSc and PhD here. Donald MIDOKO IPONGA, post-doctoral research fellow, Centre for Invasion Biology.

After completing my degree in Canada I chose to go abroad for my masters. My curiosity and love of learning has brought me to Stellenbosch University. Upon arrival in Stellenbosch I was blown away by the absolute beauty and friendliness of the campus and

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© Alexandre Fagundes De Fagundes - Dreamstime.com

ARGENTINA

Buenos Aires: Ideal Location for the Student Traveler Buenos Aires, Argentina, is a tourist destination which has exploded with popularity in recent years – and it’s not difficult to understand why. Imagine a combination of South American culture with a strong European heritage within the context of a multicultural, cosmopolitan city. Buenos Aires is more than just tango or soccer; it is a city with many

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years of history, a history whose story is told through each of its neighborhoods’ unique architecture. From the very colonial feel of San Telmo and the majestic French air of Recoleta, to the impressive modern skyscrapers of Puerto Madero, Buenos Aires welcomes you to explore this history with its pleasant climate and proud residents, always

happy to show you their personal Argentina. In addition, Buenos Aires serves as the perfect starting point and home base for your South American travels throughout the vast and varied landscapes and peoples of Argentina, as well as neighboring Chile, Brazil, Paraguay, and even Bolivia.

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Soccer culture in Argentina will prove to be a shock to any student not accustomed to such die-hard commitment on behalf of the fans; the barra brava sections of the stadiums ooze intense devotion from start to finish of every game.

What makes Buenos Aires truly special is that more than just a destination for tourists, it is an ideal city for students as well. For the student of the Spanish language or literature, or Latin American culture and politics, there is no better place to experience full immersion than in Buenos Aires. Apart from the traditional university semester and year-long programs that are both widely available and highly accessible, through intense Spanish language studies you can get a good grasp on the Spanish language quickly and put it to use outside of the traditional classroom environment. In Buenos Aires, the city is your most valuable classroom, allowing you to attain real hands-on experience practicing all the material typically taught in a language course. You will be motivated to integrate yourself into city life. For a deeper perspective on Buenos Aires and its culture, a multitude of hands-on experiences are available. Those with a vocation for service will enjoy the opportunities within needy communities, while business-minded students will thrive on the internship options with Argentine companies, allowing them important international business and work experience. These opportunities provide invaluable experience actually using the language, rather than just simply studying it, all the while remaining fully immersed in the Argentine community and its customs. For the persistent traveler, schools and institutes all over Buenos Aires offer TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) certification courses which Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

enable students to finance a prolonged stay either in Argentina or worldwide as a certified English teacher. The doors that such a certification can open to the internationally-minded individual are endless. This is a wonderful way to supplement the costs of living in a big city while working with locals and putting native speaking skills to use. A dynamic, multi-layered city, Buenos Aires is full of culture. Students will find it is easy to supplement any academic schedule with a well-rounded agenda full of Porteño cultural activities. What better way to practice your newfound Spanish skills with some bartering at a local artisan fair? It seems as though every day of the week there is a concert to attend, futból (soccer) game to watch, a new museum exhibit to visit or national film to see. Tourists will never lack for opportunities to experience these local flavors.

Fans of music and theater will love the continuous flow of new shows and productions taking place throughout the city: Avenue Corrientes is considered the Broadway of Buenos Aires and is not to be missed. A growing number of artisan fairs have popped up all over the city’s tourist-friendly and leafy-green neighborhoods, offering visitors a place to find that sought-after handmade or antique souvenir for family or friends.

ARGENTINA

The birthplace of its iconic tango, Buenos Aires is an ideal setting for studying this national dance style. Whether it be in a formal dance studio environment or a more authentic milonga, where locals dance until the wee hours of the morning, a tourist in Buenos Aires will be engrossed by this romantic and enchanting culture.


ARGENTINA

In the neighborhoods of Palermo, Recoleta and Retiro, it seems as though there is a museum or art gallery on every block. In fact, every Friday night on Arroyo street in Retiro, the art galleries open up their doors and welcome in visitors and locals alike. These “gallery nights” are a wonderful way to experience a more authentic side of Buenos Aires. No overview of Buenos Aires would be complete without a nod to its incredible restaurants, bars and nightlife. In recent years, the gastronomic culture of the city has

exploded, giving foodies a chance to dive in and sample some of the best food that Buenos Aires has to offer. In trendy neighborhoods such as Palermo and Las Cañitas, there are infinite options for those hoping to get a real taste of local flavor. Much like in any big city, there are more restaurants than days in the year, which is great news for those eager to get out and sample the local cuisine. Nightlife in Buenos Aires starts late and ends even later. There truly is something for everyone in the noche Porteña, from jazz clubs and salsa dancing to all-night dance parties and local rock concerts. Hip lounges reminiscent of those in Manhattan are host to chic locals who dress to impress, and massive clubs such as Crobar and Pacha often have world renowned DJs such as Tiesto, Paul van Dyk and Armin Van Buuren spinning until the sun comes up. These parties border on the edge of hedonistic, and it’s no wonder why people show up in droves. It is a unique blend of Latin essence combined with the sophisticated and cosmopolitan spirit that embodies the heart and soul of Buenos Aires.

It’s easy to assume that the trip of a lifetime to Argentina would be anything but budget-friendly. However, Buenos Aires is a great student destination for those who are budget-conscious. It is one of the more affordable large cities in the world, and the exchange rate is quite favourable for the Canadian traveler; it is a realistic Spanish immersion and travel opportunity for all. A testament to this is the increasing number of expatriates currently traveling, studying, or working in Buenos Aires. In fact, you will not only learn about Buenos Aires and the Argentine people, but also open doors to the world by way of the different international travelers and students you will surely meet during your stay. Whether you decide to study Spanish, volunteer, intern, teach English, or simply travel to Buenos Aires, it will be an unforgettable experience. Contributed by: Katharine Cuffari and Paige Nichols, Program Coordinators at Road2Argentina, a study abroad organization based in Argentina that specializes in Spanish immersion programs in Buenos Aires. www.road2argentina.com


DON’T LET BITE. THE BUGS

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1 NET. 10 BUCKS EMPOWERED

BY YOU, ME &

UNICEF


© fleaz - Istockphoto.com

INSPIRATION

Students building a world fit for children with UNICEF Canada UNICEF Canada is calling out to all high school, college and university students to lend a hand in saving children’s lives around the world. You can join UNICEF’s work to help the world’s most vulnerable children by uniting for one of the following campaigns:

Almost one child out of two grows up behind an invisible wall of poverty and discrimination and is not able to attend elementary school. The Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF campaign helps to give the lifechanging gift of education to thousands of children in Malawi and Rwanda through the Schools for Africa programme. For over 50 years, Canadian children and young people have supported their peers in developing countries by participating in Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF. This year we would like you to help us reach the campaign’s $100-million mark! Important date: National UNICEF Day, October 31

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Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF – Help us reach $100 million this year!

You can: Organize a Halloween fundraiser for the Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF campaign

In sub-Saharan Africa alone, more than 40 million children do not go to school.

Visit: www.TrickorTreatforUNICEF.ca

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Spread the Net Student Challenge “If you think that you’re too small to make a difference, try sleeping in a room with a mosquito.” ~ African proverb For many people in Canada, mosquitoes are a symbol of summer, an itchy nuisance at the park or around the camp fire. But for millions of people around the world, mosquitoes carry malaria, a dreaded disease responsible for nearly one million deaths each year. Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


UNICEF Canada is encouraging Canadians to walk for water to raise money for water and sanitation facilities. Each dollar raised can provide dozens of children in developing countries with clean, safe drinking water.

The Spread the Net campaign raises funds and awareness to help prevent children from dying of malaria. Its goal is to raise funds to provide 500,000 long-lasting, insecticide-treated bed nets for children and families in Liberia and Rwanda. One Net. Ten Bucks. Save Lives.

Important date: World Water Day, March 22 You can: Organize a Walk for Water with your friends and family on World Water Day Visit: www.UNICEF.ca/WalkForWater

Important date: World Malaria Day, April 25 You can: Join the Spread the Net Student Challenge and raise funds with your school and community to help prevent malaria and save children’s lives. Visit: www.SpreadtheNet.org

Important date: Universal Children’s Day, November 20

INSPIRATION

With their small bodies and weaker immune systems, children are particularly vulnerable to severe illness and death. Malaria is a leading killer of African children under the age of five and accounts for almost one in five of all childhood deaths in Africa.

You can: Find out more. Read the report at www.unicef.ca/ leavingnochildbehind. Written by Canadian experts on Aboriginal children’s health, it offers insights and more detailed actions for improving the lives of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children. Register your individual or organizational support for Jordan’s Principle, a child-first principle to resolve inter-governmental jurisdictional disputes affecting the lives and health of Aboriginal children. Contact your elected federal and provincial representatives and ask them to put legislation in place to enact Jordan’s Principle, work to ensure a seamless delivery of health services for Aboriginal children, and make the Health Canada Non-Insured Health Benefits Program accessible for Métis children. Visit: www.unicef.ca/LeavingNoChildBehind

Leaving No Child Behind

Walk for Water More than a third of the world’s population lack basic sanitation facilities, and almost 890 million people still use unsafe drinking water sources. Every day thousands of children die because they do not have access to clean drinking water and basic sanitation. Women and children are especially at risk when clean water supplies are not available. In many households, women and girls are responsible for getting water for the family, which means they might walk all day just to reach the nearest water source. Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

This year, UNICEF Canada published a report entitled Aboriginal children’s health: Leaving no child behind. The report finds that Aboriginal children are among the most marginalized children in Canadian society. Despite some advances, in almost any measure of health and well-being, Aboriginal children – including First Nations, Inuit and Métis – are at least two or three times worse off than other Canadian children. As children, they are less likely to see a doctor. As teens, they are more likely to become pregnant. And in many communities, they are more likely to commit suicide. This disparity is the greatest children’s rights challenge facing our country. The report calls for action to ensure that Aboriginal children have the same services and chances for fulfilling lives as other Canadians, and for the full implementation of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, which celebrates its 20th anniversary on November 20, 2009.

Want to be Creative? If you are passionate about a cause that UNICEF works on, why not start your own fundraising campaign! Visit: www.UNICEF.ca/Fundraise Did you read this entire article? Email us at youthuniting@unicef.ca for your chance to win a prize. Contributed by: Muneeb Syed, UNICEF Canada Coordinator, Community Involvement. www.unicef.ca

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© Nico Smit Photography - Istockphoto.com

IRELAND

The Emerald Isle Education in Ireland For over 40 years, the Irish government has invested heavily in Education as a key element in its economic development. Having educated Irish people at home was seen as a key factor in attracting multinational investment into Ireland: Educated Irish who emigrated to major economic centres were not only well-positioned to get rewarding jobs, but also often became key influencers in promoting Ireland as an excellent destination for incoming corporate investment.

Under the National Development Programme (NDP) [2007-13], the Irish government has committed €6 billion (CAD$10 billion) to develop research capacity in key areas – and much of that funding is allocated to education institutions. This plan envisages the recruitment of top-notch international researchers into Irish programmes, as well as the doubling of PhD output of the higher education colleges.

Ireland’s economic success since the 1980’s has been based primarily on such inbound investment, particularly from large American corporations. The main factors influencing this investment were seen as Ireland haveing a young, English-speaking, educated population; large European market; pro-business fiscal policies; and an attractive location for expatriate staff.

The higher education system in Ireland is also referred to as tertiary or thirdlevel education. This encompasses qualifications offered by universities, institutes of technology, and colleges.

As Irish policy-makers developed economic growth plans for the 21st century, they focused on education and research as key areas for investment. They also realised the need to develop new links and networks with the growing economies in Asia.

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Higher Education System

The qualification system in Ireland fits into the National Framework of Qualifications. This is a system of ten levels incorporationg all the recognized Irish awards available at each level. Students can use the system to compare the qualifications on offer at their level and choose the best route of educaion. For more information on this, visit www.nfq.ie/nfq/en.

Awarding Bodies Some institutions, including a growing number of institutes of technology, are

authorized to grant their own awards. Institutes of technology and colleges are subjected to quality assurance reviews by The Higher Education Authority and Training Awards Council (HETAC). HETAC makes awards and monitors standards of higher education up to the doctorate level.

Universities Irish universities offer internationallyrecognized qualifications. Bachelors: these are higher education qualifications that lead to degrees such as BA (Arts), BSc (Science), or MB (Bachelor of Medicine). They are usually three-year programs combining lectures, tutorials, and practical demonstrations. The grading system is as follows: First Upper Second (2:1) Lower Second (2:2) Third Pass Fail Masters: these can be research-based or taught, or a combination of both. They take a minimum of 12 months to complete and grades are awarded as distinction, merit, pass, and fail.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Institutes of Technology There are 14 institutes of technology in the Republic of Ireland. They offer a variety of programs that are validated by the individual institutions and quality-assured by HETAC. The qualifications offered include bachelor’s degrees, honours bachelor’s degrees, and post-graduate awards. The programs on offer have a more practical and technological focus and usually include subjects such as Science, Engineering, Technology, and Business, with some offering programs in areas such as Art and Design, Humanities and Languages, Healthcare, and Tourism.

Colleges of Education There are several colleges of education dedicated to the training of primary school teachers. These offer three-year degrees leading to a Bachelor’s of Eduation. Teachers at the secondary school level tend to study at university degree, followed by a Higher Diploma in Education

Why Ireland?

• Ireland is recognized as an

international location for highquality scientific research

• Ireland is an English-speaking

country, yet continues to celebrate its rich linguistic heritage with its own distinctive language – Gaelic – officially recognized as an EU language

• Irish people are renowned for their friendliness and hospitality, which greatly contributes to the ease with which overseas students adapt to student life in Ireland

• With 40% of the population being

under the age of 25, Ireland is one

of the more exciting places in the world to be a student

• Ireland is beautiful: Its unspoilt

landscape provides a rich environment for the many outdoor leisure pursuits for which it is famous, like watersports, hill walking, rocking climbing and caving

• Ireland is a highly-developed

democracy with a modern economy that is particularly strong in software development, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing and international services

• The number of international

students visiting Ireland is increasing each year, as students from all over the world are taking advantage of the high standard of education in Ireland, the unique cultural experience, and the outstanding friendliness of the Irish people.

Sources: www.i-studentadvisor.com/studying-inireland.html, www.studyinbritain.com/ireland/

IRELAND

Doctorate: qualifications offer you the opportunity to complete an original piece of research, usually in the form of a dissertation. This takes a minimum of three years and requires full time work at it and a lot of independent study. Doctorates are usually awarded as a pass or fail, with distinction in rate cases.


INFORMATION

World University Rankings 2008 The Times Higher Education-QS World University Rankings identified these to be the world’s top 100 universities in 2008. For a complete list of the top 500+, visit www. topuniversities.com and click on ‘University Rankings’ on the top menu bar. Methodology: The THE-QS World University Rankings were conceived to present a multi-faceted view of the relative strengths of the world’s leading universities. The research yields results on 600 “in the round” and 300 in each of five broad faculty areas. The overall rankings are compiled based on six distinct indicators: Indicator

Explanation

Academic Peer Review

Composite score drawn from peer review survey (which is divided into five subject areas). 6,354 responses in 2008.

40%

Score based on responses to employer survey. 2,339 responses in 2008.

10%

Faculty Student Ratio

Score based on student faculty ratio

20%

Citations per Faculty

Score based on research performance factored against the size of the research body

Employer Review

International Faculty

International Students

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Weighting

Score based on proportion of international faculty Score based on proportion of international students

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

20%

5%

5%

2008 Rank

2007 Rank

School Name

Country

1

1

HARVARD University

2

2=

YALE University

United States

3

2=

University of CAMBRIDGE

United Kingdom

4

2=

University of OXFORD

United Kingdom

5

7=

CALIFORNIA Institute of Technology (Calt...

6

5

IMPERIAL College London

United Kingdom

7

9

UCL (University College London)

United Kingdom

8

7=

University of CHICAGO

United States

9

10

MASSACHUSETTS Institute of Technology (M...

United States

10

11

COLUMBIA University

United States

11

14

University of PENNSYLVANIA

United States

12

6

PRINCETON University

United States

13=

13

DUKE University

United States

13=

15

JOHNS HOPKINS University

United States

15

20=

CORNELL University

United States

16

16

AUSTRALIAN National University

17

19

STANFORD University

United States

18

38=

University of MICHIGAN

United States

19

17

University of TOKYO

20

12

MCGILL University

21

20=

CARNEGIE MELLON University

22

24

KING'S College London

United Kingdom

23

23

University of EDINBURGH

United Kingdom

24

42

ETH Zurich (Swiss Federal Institute of T...

25

25

KYOTO University

26

18

University of HONG KONG

27

32

BROWN University

28

26

École Normale Supérieure, PARIS

29

30

University of MANCHESTER

30=

33=

National University of SINGAPORE(NUS)

30=

41

University of CALIFORNIA, Los Angeles (U...

32

37

University of BRISTOL

33

29

NORTHWESTERN University

34=

28

ÉCOLE POLYTECHNIQUE

34=

33=

University of BRITISH COLUMBIA

Canada

36

22

University of California, BERKELEY

United States

37

31

The University of SYDNEY

38

27

The University of MELBOURNE

39

53=

HONG KONG University of Science & Techno...

40

49

NEW YORK University (NYU)

41

45

University of TORONTO

42

38=

The CHINESE University of Hong Kong

43

33=

University of QUEENSLAND

44

46

OSAKA University

45

44

University of NEW SOUTH WALES

46

47

BOSTON University

47

43

MONASH University

Australia

48

93=

University of COPENHAGEN

Denmark

49

53=

TRINITY College Dublin

50=

117=

Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de LAUSANNE...

United States

United States

Australia

Japan Canada United States

Switzerland Japan Hong Kong United States France United Kingdom Singapore United States United Kingdom United States France

Australia Australia Hong Kong United States Canada Hong Kong Australia Japan Australia United States

Ireland Switzerland

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


School Name

Country

China

2008 Rank

82

School Name

Country

50=

36

PEKING University

VANDERBILT University

United States

50=

51=

SEOUL National University

Korea, South

102= 151=

University of NORTH CAROLINA*

United States

53

48

University of AMSTERDAM

Netherlands

102= 119

University of SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA

United States

54

71=

DARTMOUTH College

United States

104

80=

University of LEEDS

55

55=

University of WISCONSIN-Madison

United States

105

90=

PENNSYLVANIA STATE University

56

40

TSINGHUA University

57

60

HEIDELBERG Universität

58

58

University of CALIFORNIA, San Diego

United States

59

55=

University of WASHINGTON

60

161=

WASHINGTON University in St. Louis

61

90=

TOKYO Institute of Technology

62

74=

EMORY University

63

71=

UPPSALA University

64

84

65

50

66

59

LONDON School of Economics and Political...

67

89

UTRECHT University

Netherlands

68

105

University of GENEVA

Switzerland

69

57

University of WARWICK

70

51=

71

73

72

61

Katholieke Universiteit LEUVEN

73

83

74

97=

75

65=

76 77

China

101

2007 Rank

United Kingdom United States

106= 62

University of ADELAIDE

106= 140=

University of ZURICH

108

177=

University College DUBLIN

United States

109

231=

TECHNION - Israel Institute of Technolog...

United States

110

102=

GEORGETOWN University

United States Netherlands

Germany

Australia Switzerland Ireland Israel

Japan

111

111

MAASTRICHT University

United States

112

102=

TOHOKU University

Japan

Sweden

113

85=

FUDAN University

China

LEIDEN University

Netherlands

114

151=

TEL AVIV University

Israel

The University of AUCKLAND

New Zealand

115

85=

University of VIENNA

Austria

United Kingdom

116

123

Université catholique de LOUVAIN (UCL)

Belgium

117= 108

MCMASTER University

Canada

117= 88

QUEEN'S University

United Kingdom

119

95

University of ROCHESTER

University of TEXAS at Austin

United States

120

112=

NAGOYA University

University of ILLINOIS

United States

121

120

OHIO STATE University

Canada United States Japan United States

Belgium

122= 109

DURHAM University

University of GLASGOW

United Kingdom

122= 79

University of MARYLAND

University of ALBERTA

Canada

124= 102=

National TAIWAN University

University of BIRMINGHAM

United Kingdom

124= 114=

University of OTAGO

68

University of SHEFFIELD

United Kingdom

126

163=

ERASMUS University Rotterdam

Netherlands

69

NANYANG Technological University

Singapore

127

224

STONY BROOK University

United States

78=

63

DELFT University of Technology

Netherlands

128

130=

EINDHOVEN University of Technology

Netherlands

78=

92

RICE University

United States

129

112=

University of WATERLOO

78=

67

Technische Universität MÜNCHEN

Germany

130

121

University of SUSSEX

United Kingdom

81=

114=

University of AARHUS

Denmark

131

114=

University of BASEL

Switzerland

81=

74=

University of YORK

United Kingdom

132

140=

University of CALIFORNIA, Irvine

83=

97=

GEORGIA Institute of Technology

83=

64

The University of WESTERN AUSTRALIA

83=

76

University of ST ANDREWS

86

70

University of NOTTINGHAM

87

142=

University of MINNESOTA

88

106

LUND University

89

96

University of CALIFORNIA, Davis

United States

90

85=

CASE WESTERN RESERVE University

91=

93=

91=

100

93=

128

Hebrew University of JERUSALEM

93=

65=

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München

Germany

144= 163=

SHANGHAI JIAO TONG University

95

132=

KAIST - Korea Advanced Institute of Scie...

Korea, South

144= 173=

University of GRONINGEN

Netherlands

96

110

University of VIRGINIA

United States

146

University of ARIZONA

United States

97

77=

University of PITTSBURGH

United States

147= 149=

CITY University of Hong Kong

98

117=

University of CALIFORNIA, Santa Barbara

United States

147= 144

Universität FREIBURG

99=

77=

PURDUE University

United States

149

132=

Université Pierre-et-Marie-Curie PARIS V...

France

99=

80=

University of SOUTHAMPTON

United Kingdom

150

192=

Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México ...

Mexico

United States

United Kingdom United States Taiwan New Zealand

Canada

United States

133= 99

CARDIFF University

133= 130=

Technical University of DENMARK

United Kingdom

133= 101

University of LIVERPOOL

United Kingdom

136

University of GHENT

Belgium

Australia

124

United Kingdom Denmark United Kingdom

United States

137= 146

Freie Universität BERLIN

Germany

Sweden

137= 122

TEXAS A&M University

United States

139

126=

HUMBOLDT-Universität zu Berlin

United States

140

157

Ecole normale supérieure de LYON

Université de Montréal

Canada

141

155=

University of Science and Technology of ...

University of HELSINKI

Finland

142

148

WAGENINGEN University

Israel

143

125

NANJING University

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

134

INFORMATION

2007 Rank

Germany France China Netherlands China China

Hong Kong Germany

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Source: QS Quacquarelli Symonds (www.topuniversities.com) Copyright © 2004-2008 QS Quacquarelli Symonds Ltd.

2008 Rank

83


© pixcatcher - Istockphoto.com

INFORMATION

Big Universities:

Daunting or Delightful? 84

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Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Before beginning university, as a high school grad you may envision university classes as big, daunting lecture halls, where together with hundreds of students you will watch power-point presentations being delivered by a professor that will never even know your name or your face. In some cases, this is an accurate description of classes at the postsecondary level (here’s to all of us who have taken Psych 100!), especially if you have chosen to attend one of the larger schools. However, as I have come to realize after spending four years in an undergraduate program at Canada’s largest postsecondary institution, a big school is not synonymous with an impersonal experience. In fact, it can be quite comfortable. We have all heard the same spiel about becoming “just a number” when enrolling at a big school. This notion definitely crossed my mind as I chose to attend a university with a student population roughly the size of a small city. Such fears, along with memories of a difficult transition between my comfortably-small elementary school and a seemingly large high school, caused my nerves to run wild in the summer leading up to my first year. Was I making a terrible mistake by choosing to attend a big school? Four whole years later, as I look back on my academic career at the University of Toronto, I am able to say with certainty that no, choosing a big school was not a mistake on my part, and that it was in fact the best choice for me: My experience at a large academic institution was a very positive one indeed. From the beginning of my first year at university, I was able to find welcoming communities within the larger institution. Be it within my faculty, my college, or my program of study; or

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

Given the size of the university population, there was always a wealth of student groups to choose from, which meant more opportunities to meet people who shared my interests, and therefore more opportunities to find that sense of belonging I was looking for. The large campus offered a variety of facilities and resources, all accessible to me. I was free to study at the library in which I felt most comfortable and work out at the gym I liked best. Having such a wide range of options – academically, recreationally, and socially – proved to be very convenient, especially as a commuter student bound by subway and bus schedules. I should point out that my program of study was fairly specialized and small, which definitely made it easier to achieve that personal experience I was hoping for. My class sizes were small, and by my fourth year I knew almost all of the professors (and the other students) in the department. This is not to say, though, that I never had the university lecture hall experience that I mentioned earlier: I did, in my first and second year, take a few introductorylevel courses in such domains as psychology and anthropology, some of the most popular courses at the university. Though I may have been “just a number” in these classes theoretically, I still found that I was able to make personal connections through study groups and through online discussion forums being lead by TAs. In the interest of being a responsible journalist, I have conducted some field research on the topic of “finding one’s place” in a large university. Namely, I asked a few upper-year friends of mine who are enrolled in different programs what they had to say about their experience at the university thus far. I also talked to a few friends in graduate programs. It would seem that many students, even those enrolled in programs with class sizes much larger than mine, agree that attending a larger school has had more advantages than drawbacks, citing examples such as a wider variety of program and course options; a broader network of academic and non-academic

resources; and greater recognition of their degree (being from a large institution) by post-graduate program providers and future employers. And more specifically on the topic of “finding one’s place,” most students said that they have developed a sense of belonging and attachment to their alma mater and to the communities that they, like me, have found within.

INFORMATION

Joanna Sharp

through involvement in sports, student politics, or the arts – I never had to look too far to find a group into which I could fit.

Evidently, there are students who have not enjoyed their university career at a big school as much as some of their peers have. By the same token, I am certain that there are students at smaller universities who have similar complaints. My objective in sharing my experience is not to insinuate that attending a big post-secondary institution is the right choice for everyone; rather, through talking about my own experience, I hope to show students that there is more to big schools than the “just a number” stereotype would suggest.

I am a firm believer in getting involved wherever and whenever you can. Regardless of the size of the school, getting involved in student groups and extra-curricular activities can only enhance a student’s experience. Not only is it a great way to meet people, but it helps one become a more wellrounded young adult, in preparation for going out into the working world and/or continuing an academic career. At the risk of sounding like my mother, “You’ll only get out of it what you put into it.” A big school will provide you with the opportunities, but it remains up to you to make the most of them. Contributed by: Joanna Sharp, a French Literature student at the University of Toronto who enjoys journalistic writing in French and in English.

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INSPIRATION

Experience Volunteering at

an Orphanage in

Tanzania

86

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Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Since there are many orphans and neglected children in this area, a much-needed orphan center was founded here a couple of years ago. Not only has life expectancy in Tanzania currently decreased to 45 years as a consequence of the growing HIV epidemic, but parents’ unemployment or substance abuse is also forcing an increasing amount of unattended children into exploitative or dangerous situations as a way of survival. In 2005, the current director of the centre, Jane Sanare, and her husband James decided – after unsuccessfully trying to conceive children themselves – to help the many needy children around them. They were able to raise enough money to build a oneclassroom facility and successively initiated the realization of their calling: Keeping young, unattended tribe members off the street, providing them with nutritious meals, and offering them proper education.

INSPIRATION

When my taxi comes to a halt at the dusty playground of the orphan center in Ngaramtoni, many excited kids swarm around the car to meet and greet their new teacher. Enthusiastically they shout “karibu!” (“welcome” in Swahili) and stretch out their little hands through the open window. I have arrived in the land of the Masai tribe, once semi-nomadic throughout Kenya and Northern Tanzania and famous for their success as warriors and their vast herds of cattle. They are also widely known for their distinct appearance as lean, long bodies wrapped in red and purple robes, as well as for their facial decorations, such as cut ears and burn marks on their cheeks. Nowadays, some of the Masai have permanently settled in the foothills of Tanzania’s Mount Meru, about 60 miles from Africa’s highest mountain Kilimanjaro, where they co-exist with other tribes and make a living tending small farms.

For the time being, most of the students still spend the night at home, in the care of older siblings, a grandmother, or others close to them. Six small children sleep in one of the director’s chicken coops, as there is simply no other place for them to go. They are all anxiously waiting for the completion of a larger building with dormitories, which is currently under

construction. With each new donation, the center is coming closer and closer to its goal. Needless to say, the Jane Olevolos Centre lacks proper and regular funding, like so many other orphan centers in Africa, and therefore relies heavily on support from national and international NGOs, churches,

Today, the school teaches 67 pupils in the 5 to 8 year age group and provides them with two hot meals every day. During the weekends, many more children from nearby elementary and secondary schools also come to participate in recreational activities and to be fed as well. Some of the children are infected with the HIV virus themselves.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

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INSPIRATION missionaries, visitors, and other interested parties who are eager to sponsor a child, perform fundraising in their own communities, or donate clothes, educational materials, and know-how. That is why they also gladly welcome English-speaking volunteers to assist and inspire their own grosslyunderpaid teachers. The volunteers are recruited directly or channeled through the various volunteer organizations in Europe and North America. Placements range from 2 weeks to 6 months, and sometimes even longer. As the center is clearly still in survival mode, and thus needs to focus first and foremost on getting food on the table, there is unfortunately not much organized training or briefing for newlyarrived volunteers at present. For a relatively unprepared candidate like me (the original project I signed up for – working with Masai women – fell through at the last moment), the experience was, although very rewarding, at times also quite challenging. The teaching methods currently in use are still very traditional 88

Study In Canada • Study Abroad

(memorizing and drilling are favoured), and the curriculum is much too vague, often forcing teachers and volunteers alike to fly by the seat of their pants. Books and visual aids other than the blackboard are few and far between, and opportunities for physical education or creative expression are scarce. However, for volunteers who would make the effort to prepare themselves in their home country prior to leaving for Tanzania by collecting educational materials and soliciting creative teaching ideas or ways to introduce sports, arts, or other stimulating activities from their local primary schools, this welcoming orphanage center, with its eager-to-learn students, certainly provides fertile ground for lots of new initiatives. Also, a commitment of a couple of months would definitely do far more good than a stay of a few weeks. First of all, the volunteer would get more satisfaction from an extended stay. Secondly, a longer period of time spent with the children would also

benefit the orphans who – already scarred by the loss of one or both parents – experience a high turn-over of teachers and volunteers. For now, the young students of the Jane Olevolos Centre spend most of their days learning to read, write, and count, by obediently copying words and numbers from the blackboard into their worn-out workbooks, while teachers keep them in check and sharpen their pencil stumps with old razor blades. They write with the tip of their tongue sticking out of their mouth, hunched over simple wooden benches that serve as chair, table, or even bed. At the end of each exercise, the colorful stickers I happen to carry with me are a much-desired reward for a job well-done. When singing time arrives, the whole class comes suddenly to life. The kids are absolutely adorable when they all shout from the top of their lungs, clap fervently with their hands, and move their hips and heads rhythmically to the tunes of their favorite songs.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


For More Information The Jane Olevolos Centre in Ngaramtoni (Arusha), welcomes volunteers to teach boys and girls age 5 -8. Contact: tel.255 732 929 667 or janeorphans@yahoo.com.

After their starchy lunches (mainly ugali, a stiff cornmeal porridge, with an additional heap of spinach), eaten with their hands according to Tanzanian customs, it is time to rest for an hour or so. That is pure luxury for them these days, as a generous volunteer recently donated a dozen mattresses to cover the wooden benches on which they quietly lie down like sardines in a can. For as long as my placement lasts, I live in the house of Grace, the congenial grandmother of one of my pupils. In the rural enclave of Ngaramtoni, her home is considered one of the more luxurious places to rent a room, as it is made of stone, has concrete floors, and already receives electricity for part of the day. Grace cooks our dinners of rice, beans, and ugali over charcoal on the floor of her small kitchen shed. The toilet is an outhouse, and next to it I shower and shampoo with cold water, fetched in buckets and jerry cans from a nearby well. The rainy season – starting in March – suddenly brings a welcome change to otherwise dry Ngaramtoni. The farmers cannot be happier with the steady downpour, as it helps the crops grow and the fields to become

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

INSPIRATION

once, with all her available buckets and bowls spread out over the open courtyard, Grace does not have to walk towards the water, as the water now readily flows towards her.

Come break time, they cannot run fast enough back and forth around the playground to unleash their pentup energy. Invariably, they also fight with each other for a chance to hold hands with their teachers, eager to feel special and noticed, if only for some precious moments.

If interested in teaching chemistry, physics, math, biology, geography, or subjects such as sewing, horticulture or sports to girls age 12-17, the well-organized Olof Palme Orphans Educational Centre, close to DarEs-Salaam, is a great option. A contribution of about US$200 per week is required to support the school and finance volunteers’ room and board. Contact: tel. 255 784 782 547/ 255 732928020, or info@oloforphans.org.

greener for their cattle. The children at the orphanage center must keep their jackets on or have to cover their shoulders with old blankets because of the cold and dampness creeping through the windows, which lack glass. But now they at least have puddles on the playground to run through, and plenty of mud with which to dirty themselves. And my hostess finally gets a break from the tedious task of fetching water at the well. For

Selous Adventures also arrange volunteer placements all over Tanzania. Contact: tel. 255 713 301 915/ 255 713 479 772, or info@ selousadventures.com. Contributed by: Lies Ouwerkerk, who is originally from The Netherlands, and currently resides in North Hatley, Québ��c. She works as a columnist for The Sherbrooke Record, and is a freelance writer and photographer for various travel magazines. All photos are also contributed by Lies.

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© Yuri Arcurs - Dreamstime.com

INFORMATION 90

Debunking the Myths About

How Young Professionals Find International Jobs Study In Canada • Study Abroad

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


Jean Marc Hachey

INFORMATION

Students always ask a standard set of questions about international job hunting: How do I find a job in a specific country? How do I get a visa to work in that country? How do I write a country-specific resume? Where can I find a list of employers in a specific country who hire international staff ? What should I study to better my chances of finding an international job?

All of these questions point to major myths about the international job hunt. What are the Myths? This guide lays bare many of the following myths about how young professionals find international jobs:

• A country-specific job search is

the most effective strategy to go about finding professional work abroad.

• Domestic employers in foreign

countries often hire young professionals just graduating from university or college.

• There are a limited number

jobs in specific locations tend to be low-skilled, in retail or service sectors, and are often seasonal and/or touristoriented (working in a pub, hotel, or picking grapes). Teaching English abroad also falls into this category. These experiences are great for building global perspective and cross-cultural skills, but are most often not career track experiences. A job seeker’s main goal in scoring this type of work is to understand the domestic job market and how to write a résumé geared to the norms of that country.

Low-Skilled, CountrySpecific Work for the World Traveler

As an outsider you have many challenges to overcome, and the traditional approaches to job hunting, such as communicating with employers via e-mail, are generally not effective. Impress employers directly with your charm, personality, and an in-person sales pitch. Note that legal work permits can be a challenge to obtain, and travelers sometimes end up working under the table for local firms.

A country-specific job search is most appropriate for backpacking world travelers looking for low-skilled temporary work in their country of choice. Short-term or short-notice

There are, however, many organizations (e.g. BUNAC in the US and SWAP in Canada) that can help secure working-holiday type visas for many of the most popular countries.

of fields in which a young professional can find international work.

Read on and put yourself on the path toward a more effective international job search.

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3

International Work for the Young Professional When a young professional attempts to get a job with a domestic firm in a foreign country, they must find a local employer and convince them to sponsor their visa application; the local employer then has to prove to their government that no other native citizen is qualified to do the work. This is a very high hurdle to jump over and therefore makes the country-specific job search difficult, if not entirely impossible. So how do young professionals find international work? We can debunk the myths surrounding international job hunting when we identify who the key international employers are. It may come as a surprise, but young professionals almost never work abroad directly with domestic foreign firms. The great majority of young professionals in North America work internationally with US/Canadian-based firms, US/Canadian-based NGOs (nongovernmental organizations), the US/ Canadian government, and, to a lesser extent, international organizations. It is very rare for a North American Study In Canada • Study Abroad

91


INFORMATION

professional to work abroad with a local firm unless they are wellestablished in their careers. Most international employers are based right here in North America. Eighty percent of people who go abroad do so with a US or Canadianbased employer. As job seekers (rather than lowskilled workers) you will not be doing a country-specific job search, researching visa requirements, or writing country-specific resumes. When you are going abroad with a home organization, it is the employer who arranges the visa and, in most cases, designates the country in which you will be working.

research and consulting firms. Don’t ignore small and medium-size firms, since they often send junior workers abroad.

Where to Start To begin your search, decide what type of organization you wish to work for: private firm, NGO, government, or international organization. Once you have identified your target field and the type of organization

Invite them to speak at your school, organize a networking visit to their office, or offer to volunteer your services.

Carry out a sectorspecific rather than a countryspecific job search. With a sector-based job search, you target your search and find out who the international players are within your field.

You must identify employers who regularly send employees abroad. Contrary to conventional thinking, large multinationals like Pepsi or General Motors rarely send people abroad, and, if they do, they tend to send only senior or long-term employees. You need to identify organizations whose mandate is international, such as international engineering, health, finance, disaster relief, teaching,

92

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You will find lists of member organizations that are active internationally along with lists and descriptions of their current international projects. Industry web sites and trade journals will also point directly to internationally active organizations in your discipline. These leads also point you to opportunities for internships, scholarships, research opportunities, professional courses, and international conferences. And, just as important, you will find names of international experts in your field who can provide career advice and networking opportunities. You will be surprised to find that some of the international experts live within a 200 km radius of your home town.

So how do you find an international job when the employer is based in your home country?

It’s important to note that you don’t have to study a particular field in order to find success abroad. Every field has an international component, and you can research companies and organizations operating at that level.

potential employers. This research will uncover a wealth of information.

These are the resources required for scoring big in the international job search process.

And Now...Go That Extra Mile! you wish to work for, your goal is to uncover the “international hierarchy of organizations” within your area of professional interest. Begin by identifying the world umbrella organizations representing your field and the international organizations regulating your industry. These organizations will have regional bodies, national associations and, most importantly, institutional members (private sector firms, NGOs, government departments, and universities) that are located in your home country. At each level in this hierarchy, there is a rich layer of

With your abundant research material, you must now apply extra entrepreneurial zeal to your job search. Be bold and forthright when contacting employers. Entry-level job seekers are most successful when they do a series of small extraordinary things during the job search process, finding jobs using alternative or back-door strategies. Contributed by: Jean-Marc Hachey, Author and Online Publisher: The BIG Guide to Living and Working Overseas. www.WorkingOverseas.com

Fall/Winter 2009 • Issue: 3


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