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® Assistance Dogs for Hearing loss • Mobility challenges • Seizure disorders • Type 1 diabetes • Childhood autism

“Fiona has been my guardian angel since the day I got her.”

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Spring 2013

Volume 24 Issue 2


Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

From the Executive Director Strategic Planning

In 1988, Lucky, pictured above, was the first dog we adopted from an animal shelter. She was homeless and was scheduled to be euthanized that day. Lucky served as our demonstration dog for 11 years. She is symbolic of our commitment to save homeless dogs while fulfilling our mission to serve people with disabilities.

Tails From Minnesota

Published quarterly for friends and supporters of

Editor/Layout/Design Alan M. Peters Mary Decheine-Rhatigan Shelly Hiemer Can Do Canines is dedicated to enhancing the quality of life for people with disabilities by creating mutually beneficial partnerships with specially trained dogs. We envision a future in which every person who needs and wants an assistance dog can have one. Assistance dogs provide the gifts of freedom, independence, and peace of mind to our clients and their families. Our fully trained dogs, often adopted from local animal shelters, are provided to our clients who live with disabilities that involve mobility challenges, hearing loss or deafness, seizure disorders, autism, or diabetes complicated by hypoglycemia unawareness. Dogs, training and equipment are provided to each client free of charge. Board of Directors: MarySue Krueger President Len Washko Vice President Mike Branch Secretary Greg Stevens Treasurer Dianne Astry Kevin Florence Mary Decheine-Rhatigan Adrianna Shannon John Sturgess To reach a staff member via phone, dial 763-331-3000. When you hear the greeting, press the extension number you need or press 3 for an employee directory. Can Do Canines 9440 Science Center Drive New Hope, Minnesota 55428 e-mail info@can-do-canines.org website www.can-do-canines.org

The board and staff have been busy completing the strategic planning process that began in January of this year. We are fortunate to have partnered with Robert Sicora of Sicora Consulting and his associates, Jack Durand and Labarre Spence, who have provided pro bono planning consultation for the project. They have led us through an extensive process of data gathering from our various constituencies resulting in goal development for a new plan that will span the next three to five years. Hundreds of people participated in the process and provided us with invaluable information to help make accurate planning possible. The process is nearing completion. We have focused on five major goals that will be presented to board members shortly, and then will receive significant additional attention by the board and staff as we develop initiatives and tactics to achieve the stated goals. The strategic planning process was exciting and uplifting! It has created a roadmap for us to follow as we pursue our mission. Thank you to everyone who participated.

Capital Campaign The last step in the Campaign for Independence, our capital campaign, is to raise funds to put our wonderful new facility to its best use. The campaign will conclude on December 31, 2013. While we now have space to train twice as many dogs as we do today, we face many challenges. The vehicles we use to transport our dogs are old and unreliable. Some of our equipment is outdated. And we need to improve the ways that we communicate with clients, volunteers and donors. We must also rebuild our operating reserve to pre-recession levels so we can pay competitive wages and secure the future of Can Do Canines. Most importantly, we are missing opportunities because our staff is stretched to the maximum. So funds raised in this phase of the campaign will also be used to provide additional staff as well as to adjust staff wages to fair levels. Completing the campaign will mean that we can invest in our programs by adding more staff to assist with training, graduate services, and administrative support. It will mean that we can dedicate additional staff to evaluating more shelter dogs and

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expanding our dog breeding and purchasing programs. If we are able to achieve this significant goal, we will eventually double the number of assistance dogs that we graduate each year in order to better address the significant waiting list for our services. In order to fully implement this vision, our goal is to raise $625,000 in cash and firm pledges during the remainder of 2013. A successful campaign will allow us to achieve our goal of increasing assistance dog graduates at the rate of 10 additional teams per year between 2014 and 2017.

The Future The future is bright for Can Do Canines! By achieving our strategic and capital campaign goals, we will have eliminated all debt for the organization and will have nearly doubled the number of assistance dogs we place for people with disabilities by 2017. This is a big challenge and one that we do not take lightly. We can only achieve these specific goals with the support of people like you. We will be asking you for your help during the coming year. Please listen to our appeal with an open heart.

Annual Report It is my pleasure to announce that the 2011-2012 Can Do Canines Annual Report is complete! The report is filled with stories and pictures of our graduate teams and includes financial information and a long list of our dedicated volunteers and generous supporters. You may download a copy from our website at www.can-docanines.org/annualreport or we would be pleased to send you a printed copy at your request. Enjoy! Y


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things v

Canine Intuition

Don Hill and Mobility Assist Dog Ella

By Kelly Jackson

Don Hill of Plymouth, Minn. doesn’t use the word ‘intuitive’ lightly when describing Mobility Assist Dog, Ella. Before Don can process that he’s dropped something and call the two-year-old Yellow Labrador Retriever, she’s there looking at him and waiting for directions. She knows not to paw or jump on Don, a critical skill given his impaired balance and chronic pain. And sensing when Don can’t handle having her close due to increased pain or sensitivity, Ella jumps off the bed and goes into her kennel without direction.

Marky Thomas & Autism Assist Dog Miller

Fifteen years ago, at the age of 37, Don had an accident on the job which changed his life forever. He’d been working in Custodial Maintenance doing a job he loved when he fell over a retaining wall and suffered severe injuries to his back. After several surgeries and complications, Don ended up with a nerve disease called Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD). RSD makes it difficult for Don to walk long distances and requires him to use a cane most of the time. His balance and coordination are impaired by nerve damage and severe chronic pain, making it extremely difficult to bend, lift, or get off the floor. Don also has heightened sensitivity to touch in his legs and back and he sweats excessively. The only way Don has been able to manage his chronic pain is by swimming in the warm water pool at the Courage Center several times a week. Don’s doctor recommended he apply for an assistance dog through Can Do Canines. Even though he had seen assistance dogs in training while shopping at his local Costco, Don shared, “I had never thought of having a dog do things for me. I believed in doing things on my own.” The first time they met, Ella went to Don right away. She responded well to his voice and quickly started watching him, waiting for direction from him instead of the trainer. This was unique for a puppy raised in the prison program at the women’s prison in Waseca, as Ella was primarily used to taking direction from a female voice. Ella constantly looks up to Don and wants to know, “What can I do for you?” She retrieves dropped items for him, including his cane, and she helps sort the laundry by retrieving individual pieces for him.

New Teams

After just months of working with his new four-legged friend, Miller, everyone has noticed a significant difference in Marky.

Thank You Dog Source – The Salls Family Puppy Raiser – The Doyon Family See their full story on page 8

Don and Ella Additionally, in the event of a fall or other emergency while his wife isn’t home, Ella can retrieve the phone from the first floor or basement so Don can call for help. Don also attributes his weight loss and improved health to Ella. “Ella has pushed me to do what I need to do.” Even when he doesn’t feel well, Don makes sure Ella gets exercise every day. The two can be seen walking together around the neighborhood or at Ridgedale Mall. They also recently started joining other assistance dog teams at the Humane Society during open gym sessions, giving them a chance to play their favorite game of Frisbee. Don acknowledges, “Today I couldn’t live without her.” Y Would you like to help make dogs like Ella possible? Contact Al Peters at 763-331-3000 ext 116 to learn how.

Kris Vaske & Diabetes Assist Dog Fiona “Fiona has been my guardian angel since the day I got her.”

Thank You Dog Source – Can Do Canines Puppy Raiser – Laura & Adam Waudby Foster Home – The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault See their full story on page 6

www.can-do-canines.org

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Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

Meet Champ

Reprinted by permission of Anne Carlsen Center The Anne Carlsen Center offers a rich tradition of empowering individuals with disabilities and their families. Our experienced staff provides compassion, training, services and supports in homes and communities across North Dakota. On our Jamestown campus, we meet the educational, residential and therapeutic needs of children and young adults with autism, behavior disorders, medical fragility and other intellectual disabilities. Champ is a very special dog. From the moment he was born—one of eight pups in an elite training facility called Can Do Canines— he’s been working hard to acquire the skills and experience that help our students interact in healthy, positive ways. Champ was selected to work at the Anne Carlsen Center based on his distinguished pedigree and advanced training. As a Chocolate Lab, Champ is very smart. He is hardworking, people-oriented, and, even though Champ loves kids, he never gets too excited, so as to startle the students. Champ’s trainers recognized his laidback, good-tempered personality and trained him to learn an assortment of different service skills, beginning when he was just a puppy. In fact, Champ wasn’t allowed to leave his whelping box until he was trained to sit. That rigorous training has taken Champ across the Midwest, from his hometown of New Hope, Minnesota, where he cut his teeth on lessons about manners and obedience, to a minimum-security prison in Fairbault, where he modified those skills and provided comfort and companionship

What is a Facility Based Assistance Dog? Can Do Canines trains Facility Based Assistance Dogs to participate in canine assisted interventions at a hospital or other care facility. The dog is partnered with a working professional facilitator or therapist and is skilled at maintaining a calm manner and good social behavior in a variety of environments. He or she goes home with the facilitator at night and comes to the job each day. Accustomed to interacting with different types of people, including those with physical or developmental disabilities, Facility Based Assistance Dogs provide a calming influence and a non-judgmental way for clients to interact with the world around them. In all public and home environments the dog must respond to commands, both basic obedience and skilled tasks, given by the facilitator. Basic skills include sitting, staying

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to prisoners. And even though Champ now works a full school week here at the Anne Carlsen Center, his education is on-going, and merits periodic assessments from his primary trainer, Julianne Larsen. Unlike some of his brothers and sisters, who specialize in specific areas of assistance, Champ possesses a broader range of skills, which allow him to work with multiple students. In addition to understanding basic commands like retrieving and tugging, Champ can open doors, pull scooterboards, pick up and gather dropped items, and much more. But beyond the simple utility Champ brings with his assistance, it’s the intangible connection our students experience with him that make Champ such a beloved companion and an important asset here at the Anne Carlsen Center. Our students love to read to Champ, walk to class with Champ, and use Champ as a social bridge to help with transitions and interact with others.

Champ walking gently on lead...

initiating play...

He’s a very, very good dog. Y

in place, lying down, walking in a controlled position near the facilitator and coming to the facilitator when called. Skilled tasks vary with the type of intervention needed. They can include being groomed, retrieving objects, laying it’s head on a person’s lap (called “visiting”), walking gently on lead with someone other than the facilitator, and initiating play by rolling a ball to a person. Facility Based Assistance Dogs are individually trained to perform specific skills needed by the facilitator and clients of a particular facility. In the history of Can Do Canines, we have placed five Facility Based Assistance Dogs: “Dr. Jack” who works in the physical rehabilitation center at St. Mary’s Hospital and Mayo Clinic, “Marty” who worked as a patient advocate, “Molly”, “Claire”, and “BizKit” who work with children in special needs classrooms, and of course, Champ!

retrieving balls during Physical Therapy...

and creating special bonds with students.


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

Independence for a young, promising life Emma Carroll and Mobility Assist Dog Ole

by Bill Johnson

New Teams

Cerebral palsy has not stopped Emma Carroll of Osceola, Wis. from dreaming big and leading a full, active life. Like most young adults in their late teens and early 20s, she looks forward to the day when she’ll move into her own apartment and begin the journey toward a rewarding career. “I’m planning to move to the Twin Cities for housing and college. I hope to major in human services,” explains Emma. Providing support and companionship on her journey is Mobility Assist Dog Ole (pronounced “OH-lee”), a three-year-old Golden Retriever. For most of her life, Emma has relied on a wheelchair to get around, as well as assistance from family members and others with everyday needs. While she appreciates a helping hand, she says her biggest dream is to “get out in the world and be more independent.” It’s hard to be independent, she explains, when you need someone to perform seemingly simple tasks for you. “If I drop something, I can’t get out of my chair to pick it up. Also, sometimes I need help when I’m in the restroom. All of these little things are huge for someone with a disability.” Ole fills this void — without compromising Emma’s sense of independence. “Ole does so much for me. He picks up dropped stuff, including the phone, which I might need in case of an emergency.” He also opens doors and, in public places, presses the automatic door-opening button. “On top of it all, Ole is probably my best friend!” she exclaims. Another benefit of Ole’s presence is peace of mind. “Before Ole, when I was home alone, I felt so isolated. Now, even if he’s

Lions Corner

Tracy Schramm & Mobility Assist Dog Echo Emma and Ole just lying in his bed, I know he’s there for me. I have someone to talk to. Even if he doesn’t necessarily understand, I know he’s listening to me.” Did we mention that Ole likes to entertain? “Sometimes, if he gets really excited, he’ll pick up the pillow on his bed and spin around in circles,” says Emma. “You just can’t help but laugh. Oh, technically, he’s not supposed to do that, but it’s so cute, how can you say ‘no’ to him?”

“If I fall and can’t get back up, her ability to get the phone for me is a case of life-or-death. The fact that she can do that is extremely reassuring to know.”

Thank You Dog Source – Can Do Canines Field Trainer – Julia Breza Puppy Raiser – The Hollerud Family See their full story at www.can-do-canines.org/newsletter

To Can Co Canines and everyone involved in Ole’s development, Emma extends a big thanks. “I don’t think many people realize how important assistance dogs really are to people with disabilities. They have such a major impact on our lives. Even if you can give only five dollars to Can Do Canines, that would mean so much.” Y Ole was named through our name a puppy program by the Richardson Lakes Area Lions Club and Marian Veaasen in memory of Lion Ole Veaasen. Would you or your organization like to name a puppy? Contact Janet Cobus at 763-331-3000 ext, 153 or jcobus@can-docanines.org

Minneapolis Can Do Canines Lions Spring Eyeglass Drive Warmer weather is finally here and it’s time for spring cleaning! Do you have any eyeglasses that you would like to donate to the Lions? The Minneapolis Can Do Canines Lions club is holding a Spring Eyeglass Drive from April 15 through May 31. The drop off container is located at the Can Do Canines facility at 9440 Science Center Drive in New Hope. Please consider donating eyeglasses you no longer use and give others the chance for improved sight! Y

Don Hill & Mobility Assist Dog Ella “Today I couldn’t live without her.”

Thank You Dog Source – Can Do Canines Vet Services – Animal Wellness Center Puppy Raiser – Inmate Handlers at the Federal Correctional Facility at Waseca Foster Home – T he Sears Family, The Furlough Families at Waseca See their full story on page 3

www.can-do-canines.org

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Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

‘I can’t imagine my life without her’ Kris Vaske and Diabetes Assist Dog Fiona What is a Diabetes Assist Dog? We train Diabetes Assist Dogs to help people with Type 1 Diabetes. Diabetes Assist Dogs are trained to monitor smells in the air for a specific scent on the human breath that is related to rapidly dropping or low blood sugar levels. They are then trained to “alert” the person with diabetes, usually by touching them in a significant way such as pawing at them, licking their face, or nudging a hand. This alerts the person that their blood sugar may be low and they should check their blood sugar level or get something to eat to prevent their hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) from getting to a dangerous level. The canine partner can also be trained to retrieve juice or a snack, get an emergency phone, or get help from another person in the house. Diabetes Assist Dogs placed by Can Do Canines wear a backpack identifying them as an assistance dog. This backpack has pockets where medical information, instructions, a sugar source, and emergency contact information can be stored. This provides an extra safety net in case the person with diabetes is unable to get help in time. Anyone finding the person unconscious or acting strangely would know it may be a medical emergency and can get help.

How can a dog detect low blood sugar? The dogs are evaluated throughout puppy-hood for a willingness to work and a sensitive nose. Once we have identified their interest in smells, they begin scent training. A person experiencing hypoglycemia produces a particular scent, found on the breath, due to chemical changes in their body. All people produce the same scent when they have low blood sugar. Our training methods are similar to those used to train drug detection or search and rescue dogs trained to find people.

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Can Do Canines

By: Shelly Hiemer

Kris Vaske painfully recalls the night when extremely low blood sugar rendered her helpless as she sat in her car outside a Target store. She had just finished shopping and was walking through the parking lot when she “started feeling funny.” She decided to test her blood sugar when she got to the car. However, by that time, she couldn’t control her hands enough to do the test or to get sugar in her system. Four hours later, someone noticed Kris passed out with her leg hanging out the driver’s door. She awoke to paramedics trying to get fluids and sugar into her, followed by a trip to the hospital emergency room. This wasn’t the first such episode for the Isanti, Minn. resident and middle school math teacher, diagnosed with type I diabetes at age 17. “I had quite a few severe low blood sugar episodes that I wasn’t able to detect early enough to treat effectively,” explains Kris. “One evening, I was supervising an event in the gym, when I became totally disoriented and confused on my way to the office. I woke up to coworkers and students surrounding me.” A couple of years earlier, her mother showed Kris a newspaper story about a Buffalo, Minn. resident who was training a dog to become a Diabetes Assist Dog for Can Do Canines. “Mom suggested that I apply for a Diabetes Assist Dog, but I didn’t think I needed a dog — I felt I could stay ahead of things with the help of a continuous blood sugar monitoring system.” With each crisis, however, her thinking evolved. “Finally, I decided I had better do something about my unawareness of low blood sugar, or my next ride wouldn’t be in an ambulance; it would be in a hearse. I realized that an assistance dog would be a better way of telling me when my blood sugar is low, which would help me manage my blood sugar more consistently.”

Kris and Fiona In August 2012, Kris was teamed up with Diabetes Assist Dog Fiona, an 18-monthold black Labrador Retriever. Fiona uses her super-sensitive nose to detect blood sugar levels and alert Kris when it drops too far. She’s also trained to bring Kris a bottle of juice, if necessary. “Fiona has been my guardian angel since the day I got her. She’s impeccably trained and has alerted me to many low blood sugar incidents, both during my daily activities and at night when I’m sleeping.” At first, Kris was apprehensive about how Fiona would handle a classroom full of middle school students. However, those fears were quickly put to rest. Fiona not only fit in, she became a classroom celebrity. “Fiona is a favorite of all the kids and staff because she can do so many cool things that their pets at home don’t know how to do!” One day, for instance, Kris instructed a student to hide a juice bottle. “When I asked Fiona to go get the juice, she went right to it and brought it back to me.” While the kids were impressed, Fiona’s lifesaving work is far more impressive. “Before Fiona, I had no idea a dog could


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things do all the things she does. I’m amazed by her every day, and I can’t imagine my life without her. She’s been really awesome. Can Do Canines and Fiona have changed my life.”

New Teams

The bond between Kris and Fiona definitely extends past their working relationship. Kris treasures the constant companionship Fiona provides — and even her funny little quirks. “Fiona’s not much of a morning dog. While I’m getting ready for work, she just lies there with her puppy-dog eyes as if to say, ‘Do we have to go?’” laughs Kris. “But then she’s like, okay, we have to go to work, and by the time we get to school, she’s her happy-go-lucky self.” Kris appreciates the important role so many people played in bringing Fiona into her life, including donors, trainers and various Can Do Canines staff. She also has a special message for Fiona’s puppy raisers: “I thank you from the bottom of my heart. I know it’s hard to give up a puppy, but I want you to know what a blessing Fiona has been in my life. I’m totally in love with her.” Y

Mark Lukitsch & Mobility Assist Dog Avery “Thank you. Having Avery has given me more freedom and independence that I wanted so much.”

Thank You

Attend one of our Tails To Tell tours to learn what you can do to make more dogs available for people like Kris. RSVP at tours@can-docanines.org

Dog Source – Julie Mach Vet Services – Animal Wellness Center Puppy Raiser – Mary Nelson Foster Home – Kirsten Purvis, The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault Name A Puppy Sponsors – The Mike & Lynn Branch and Family See their full story at www.can-do-canines.org/newsletter

Gifts In Honor Of Gifts given in honor of have been received between January 1, 2013 to March 31, 2013 Donated By..............................................In Honor Of Aquinas Class of ‘61..................................... Verda Grabinski Kelly Brede.................................................................“Gibson” Cindy Herman............................................................“Yeager” Hazel Johnson........................................................... “Maggie” Sylvia Knazan................................................Aria Sol Knazan Julia Miller.........................................Mitch and Hannah Foss Marjorie and Bret Okerstrom................................“Truman” Dan Rutman................. Karen Kodzik and Marcia Ballinger Cindy Thoreson-Arnold................My beautiful boy “Blue” Naomi Wilkins.................................................... Cozy Dorton Kim Williams......................................................Kenzie Smith

Can Do Canines is pleased to have NutriSource Super Premium Pet Foods as our dog food sponsor Choice Dollars® grant funds can be directed to Can Do Canines to help provide assistance dogs for people with disabilities and children with autism.

Are you a member of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans? Are you eligible to participate in the Thrivent Choice Dollars program?

For more information or to direct your designated Choice Dollars, simply go to Thrivent.com/thriventchoice or call 800-THRIVENT and state “Thrivent Choice.”

Emma Carroll & Mobility Assist Dog Ole “I don’t think many people realize how important assistance dogs really are to people with disabilities. They have such a major impact on our lives.”

Thank You Dog Source – Sue Thomas Field Trainer – Claire Scriba Puppy Raiser – Kathy Grant & Bill Beddie Foster Home – Sarah Durant, The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault Name a Puppy Sponsors – Marian Veaasen and the Richardson Lakes Area Lions Club See their full story on page 5

www.can-do-canines.org

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Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

A Special Bond

Marky Thomas and Autism Assist Dog Miller Just months after Marky Thomas began working with his new four-legged friend, Miller, his family says that everyone has noticed a significant difference in Marky. “The other day, our friend that works at Rainbow came up to Errol, my husband, and gave him a giant hug. She said, ‘You used to have to have Marky in a cart or chase him around the store. Now he just walks around the store like every other seven-year-old boy.’ It’s just amazing,” says Marky’s mother, Angela. In 2010, Errol and Angela of Lakeville, Minn. applied for an Autism Assist Dog to comfort and calm their son, Marky. He had been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and would often run off or become overstimulated and have meltdowns. Angela recalls how the wait for a dog—which lasted more than two years—was difficult, but worth it. “I was obsessed at first, calling every month, seeing where we were on the waiting list, and then my husband and I decided we needed to stop thinking about it. That’s when we started getting all the paperwork and phone calls saying we were going to be matched,” Angela said. Ultimately Can Do Canines found the perfect dog for Marky. Miller, a sweet

tempered Golden Retriever, was donated to Can Do Canines by a local family. Miller had been adopted for their own child with autism. As many people discover, raising and training a young dog to be an assistance dog is a lot of work. The donor family decided to apply for a trained adult assistance dog, and felt that by donating Miller, he could finish his training and another family could benefit from the love and talent he had to give. Miller helps Marky stay calm during daily activities, such as staying seated throughout dinner and staying close to his mom at the grocery store. Angela recalls that the hardest part about training was creating a bond between Marky and Miller. She said that because of Marky’s tactile sensitivity, typical bonding activities were difficult. She also remembers he had a hard time adjusting to the family’s new routines when they first welcomed Miller into their home. With the expertise of Can Do Canines’ client service coordinators, those obstacles were quickly overcome. Now, Errol and Angela say they have a sense of relief because Marky and Miller have developed a very special relationship. “When they play outside I don’t have to worry that Marky will run into the streets. They just play together,” Angela

Success in a Small Package

Emily Lundberg and Hearing Assist Dog Simon Emily Lundberg was born and raised in rural Minnesota, and has always had pet dogs in her life. The challenge of not being able to hear sounds did not deter her from living life to the fullest and being proud of her deaf culture. Growing up, she attended deaf awareness fairs and learned early on about what Hearing Assist Dogs could do from the Can Do Canines booths she saw. She knew one day she would like to have a Hearing Assist Dog of her own. Emily met and married Dan, who is also deaf. She says, “When we bought our first house, I wanted to have a dog help us be aware of our surroundings.” In 2003, she applied to have their pet dog, Gracie, trained to become a Hearing Assist Dog. She and Emily were a team until Gracie passed away. While Emily grieved her loss, she says, “We now had young children and

by Elizabeth Erickson

Marky and Miller said, “When Marky gets excited and starts flapping his hands or jumping, Miller will just sit there. It doesn’t even faze him.” Angela said Miller helps her and her husband have peace of mind daily. She says she recommends the Can Do Canines program and is thankful for the work Can Do Canines put into training Miller. “They really did a great job,” she said. Y For information on helping to make other autism placements possible for those who are waiting, please contact Janet Cobus at 763-331-3000, ext. 153, or jcobus@can-do-canines.org.

by Laurie Carlson

felt that we would benefit from having another Hearing Assist Dog in our lives.” Stella and Boden (ages 5 and 2) can hear, and Emily proudly states they are bilingual (knowing both spoken English and American Sign Language), and bi-cultural. Which means they are comfortable with both hearing and deaf cultures. Living in Lake Shore, Minn. Emily works full time as the Camp Director for deaf and hard of hearing retreats at the Confidence Learning Center in Brainerd. She needed an assistance dog that could accompany her to work and travel with her. Can Do Canines matched her with Simon, a Cavalier/Poodle cross, and the training began. Simon had sound training prior to placement, and Emily had previously had a Hearing Assist Dog, but they had to learn

Emily and Simon to work together as a team. Simon had to learn to channel the excitement of alerting Emily to sounds into following through and showing her where the sound was happening. Continued on page 9

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Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

New Teams

Gifts In Memory Of Gifts given in memory of have been received between January 1, 2013 and March 31, 2013 Donated By.......................................... In Memory Of Mary Alexander..........................................“Hope’s” birthday Animal Wellness Center....................................“Ace” “Alice” Lerum, “Axel” Reda, “Bailey” Atkinson, “Bailey” Feddor, “Bailey” Pzynski, “Bandit” Olson, “Beulah” Olson, “Bootsie” Ziemke, “Champ” Adrian, “Chipper” Pahl, “Cosby” Reali, “Dixie” Moening, “Ella” MacCarthy, “Emmy” Yelich, “Howard” Foley, “Ivy” Musselman, “Izzie” Holsten, “Jake” Fritz, “Jasmine” Beggs, “Jazz” Glawe, “Keno” Goulson, “Kiki” Mings, “Kit Kat” Falbo, “Kody” Judkins, “Kota” Reisetter, “Lacey” Levandoski, “Lily” Druley, “Lucky” Mills, “Lucky” Vethe, “Maggie” Verkins, “Metro” Sharp, “Peg” Dahlstrom, “Poppy” Parker, “Puff ” Hoppe, “Rembrandt” Kissinger, “Roxy” Wirth, “Rudy” Borsch, “Sarah” Goergen, “Shep” Lodin, “Smokey” Caron, “Snoop” Eicher, “Sadie” Heine, “Scarlet” Walton, “Tatiana” Nelson, “Taz” Larsen,”Tommy” Cashman-Lessard, “Tuffy” Carroll, “Wilder” Peterson, “Zack” Summer Donna Applebaum........................................................Cuillen Terese Cress................................................................ “Buddy” Terry Danner................Michael Simpson in support of the Diabetes Assist Dog program Donna Dean.....................................................................“Mo” Eagan Police Department.................................... K9 “Kody” Marie Ehrenberg..............................................June Goodrich on the anniversary of her death Sara Elstad......................................................... Donald Elstad Linda Gavel.................................................................. “Bailey” Bonnie Genin............................................................ “Maggie” Bonnie Genin......................................... Dean Muehlenhardt Bonnie Genin.......District Governor Jim Arvidson’s Mom Bonnie Genin..................................... Linda Altergott’s sister In Memory Of Paul Knorr Braun Intertec Corporation, Barbara Cariolano, Mark Greninger, Karen Hoke, Lorraine Knorr, Elaine Libby, Joseph Zimmerman In Memory Of Evelyn Clark Henry Clark, David Collins, Bonnie Condit, Lisa Darling, Terri Hansen, Katheryn Holtz-Olson, Stacy Lueck, Joyce Riggle, Amy Ruzick, Crystal Ruzick-Friskney, Thomas Sontag, Lynnette Strong, William Williamson

Becky Groseth............................................................ “Buddy” Diana Grunloh....................Michael Simpson and “Goldie” Nancy Hall....................................................................... “Lily” Marie Hallett............................. Ardis Wells, a true dog lover Peggy Halvorson........................................... Rich Meuwissen Cindy Herman............................................................. “Sieger” Joan Johnson.............................................................Lee Perish Karen Kelly.....................................................Shirley Wanhala Pete Kleingartner.........................................................Joe Carl Pete Kleingartner..................................................Lynn Olson Eva Kripke............................................................Carol Kisker Martha Lantz........................................................................Tali Deenna Latus...................................................................Angus Mary Ledford............................................................... “Ringo” Lockwood and Darlene Carlson Fund.................Lee Perish Janice Loebel............................................................ “Bhreagh” Nora McGreevy................................................................Uday Rosemarie Merrigan........................................................... Max Kolleen Morgan....................................................Jean Nelson Pat Nimmerfroh............... Yukon from Altair Farm Friends Herb Olin...............................................................Jean Nelson Carol Pederson...............................................Robert Poupore Mary Pierce............................................................Jean Nelson Ardis Rieken.......................................................Lavilla Nelson Ardis Rieken...............................................Margaret Severson Pamela Schlagel.........................................Rebecca Holleman Stephanie Selbo...................................... Gary H. Hawkinson Robert and Jackie Singer.............................................“Bogie” Craig Steinmetz............................................Jerry Glen Tyson Twin Valley Lions Club............................................... “Ernie” Barb Verhage...............................................Mitchell Grierson Tammy Waibel...................................................................Rudy Melissa Ward...................... “Skeeter”, a very important part of a special family In Memory Of Irene Dybdal Jeanne Azzone, Kathy Borgman, Julianne Glesne, Joel Guscetti, Sarah Haverkamp, Julie Jackson, Janet Kuziej, Kolleen Morgan, Thomas Nentwig, Bernice Oestreich, Barbara Oestreich, Herb Olin, Mary Pierce, Jennifer Pothen, Tonya Reed, Margaret Reed, Karen Ricci, Richard Ruckmar, Jeanne Savitt, Debra Solmonson, Jill Steeves, Bradley Swanson, Elizabeth Urness, Jean Van Sickle, Charles Warnert

Betty Lokken & Mobility Assist Dog Toby Betty appreciates the Can Do Canines training that took Toby from just a companion to a certified Mobility Assist Dog. Those key skills have made a big difference in her life!

Thank You Dog Source – Pet Dog See their full story at www.can-do-canines.org/newsletter

In Memory Of Thomas Lund Robert Lund, Jan Lund, Donna Niggeler, Kirsten Purvis

Emily and Simon, con’t. continued from page 8

There were important sounds to learn: a door knock, a phone call, her children calling her for help and most importantly the smoke alarm. With the help of field trainer Brenda Robbins and the enthusiastic help of her daughter, Stella, the team practiced diligently and certified in early 2013. The day after their certification, the whole family went on a trip to Washington, DC! Emily reported that Simon was perfect both on the flights as well as touring the city. Now settled in at home, Emily reports “Simon is very enthusiastic about sounds and alerting me – much more than my first dog. He is great and I’m very thankful for him. The kids adore Simon and Dan loves him too.”

To the volunteers and staff who raised and trained Simon, she says “Thank you from the bottom of my heart for having Simon with you. I feel he is really the dog that he is because of the great care and love from you.” She also thanks Can Do Canines donors, “I definitely know how it feels to be part of a non profit as I work and run a non profit program as well. Donors are such an important asset. They have no idea how much they have given to people and dogs. Thank you so much!” Y Successor dogs (dogs who fill the shoes of previous assistance dogs) like Simon are critical to helping our clients maintain their independence and peace of mind. To learn how you can help us call 763-331-3000 or visit our website at www. can-do-canines.org

Adele Harrington and Eileen Herr & Facility Based Assistance Dog Champ Beyond the simple utility Champ brings with his assistance, it’s the intangible connection our students experience with him that make Champ such a beloved companion and an important asset here at the Anne Carlsen Center.

Thank You Dog Source – Can Do Canines Puppy Raisers – Jeremy Larsen and Scott Henley Foster Home – The Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault Name a Puppy Sponsors Henry Sibley Senior High School See their full story on page 4

www.can-do-canines.org

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Freedom

Independence

Peace of Mind

Wish List Dog Supplies Animated toys that sing and dance  Gift cards to pet supply stores  I.Click Training Clickers  Car Seat Belt Harnesses – All sizes  Halti Head Collars sizes 2 & 3  Martingale collars  Soft Treats (BilJac, Zukes)  Giant Nylabones and lg. Kongs  L or XL Vari-Kennels, new or gently used  Wire Dog Kennels  Large Vari Kennels, gently used  Frontline Flea and Tick Preventative  Easy Walk, Freedom or Halti Harnesses  Stuffing free toys, Chuck-It toys  Donated veterinary services  Purebred puppies  Large (2 qt.) stainless steel dishes Electronics  Laptops & Computers, Windows 7 and/or Mac 10.5 or newer  Licenses for Adobe CS4 or newer or InDesign 4 or newer  Wall mountable server rack 19U Automotive  Gasoline cards  Minivan  Auto repair/maintenance  Small Station wagon Equipment  Night stands and small dresser  Sheets sets, blanket, pillows for queen bed  Commercial elliptical exercise machine  Repairs for scooters and wheelchairs Miscellaneous  Coffee Maker 100 cup  Gift cards to grocery stores office supply stores Michael’s craft store Party City  Office supplies (paper, markers, stamps)  Bleach, glass cleaner  HE laundry detergent  Framed dog-related art  Nature’s Miracle Cleaner Building Materials  Bathroom storage cabinet, small  Gift certificates home improvement stores  Pipe and drape, black (6 - 8ft x 10 ft sections)  Stage skirting, black, (24 inch x 32 ft)

Items in bold are our most pressing needs! For more wish list items, please go to www.can-do-canines.org. A special thanks to all of you who previously supplied us with wish list items! You made our wishes come true! 

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Can Do Canines

Development News

To learn more about any Development News items, please contact Development Director Janet Cobus at 763-331-3000 ext. 153 or email jcobus@can-do-canines.org

Name a Puppy You can join the many individuals and organizations that name one of our puppiesin-training each year by raising a minimum of $1,500 for school groups or $2,500 for a service club or business or individual. We can help you get started today! For more information, contact Janet Cobus at jcobus@can-do-canines. org or 763-331-3000 x 153.

Recent Name-A-Puppy Participants Judith Christensen Fritz John F. Rooney Charitable Family Foundation Rooney James and Teresa Miller Family Gracie Mike and Lynn Branch Family Lilly Thrivent Employee Group Thor Paul Loken Reno HUD Employee Group Dyson St. Paul North Ramsey Lions Club Ginger Montevideo Leos Club Leo Steve and Caroline Melberg Family Crackers Fridley Lions Club Cookie

Huzzah, Huzzah! It’s Renaissance Festival Time

The Minnesota Renaissance Festival is coming up fast – August 17 through September 29th plus Labor Day and Festival Friday, September 27th We need 100 volunteers to work the Pet Gate this year. This is a very popular volunteer activity, so sign up now to get your spot. These positions fill up fast! Your time helps us earn a $2,500 contribution from The Renaissance Festival and you get in free the day you work, one free admission to come back another day, plus a $6.00 food coupon! Contact the project coordinator, Patty Wirz at: pattywirz@yahoo.com for more information.

IRA ROLLOVER EXTENDED!

Phone-A-Thon Callers Needed

Can Do Canines dogs love to roll over for a good belly rub when they are not working. If you are taking mandatory distributions from your IRA, you can rollover a distribution directly to Can Do Canines. As part of the tax bill passed by Congress at the beginning of 2013, the popular IRA Charitable Rollover was extended to December31, 2013. Your IRA plan administrator can facilitate the distribution.

Our annual Phone-A-Thon has a goal to raise more than $25,000 to help meet our goal to train and place 36 assistance dogs this year. You will be calling our current supporters only. Won’t you help? You can help on one shift or as many as you like! Email Laurie Carlson, lcarlson@can-do-canines.org, or call her at 763-331-3000 Ext, 113 to volunteer for the following dates:

For more information on this and other planned gifts, contact Janet Cobus at jcobus@can-do-canines.org.

May 19-23 Shift Hours: Sunday: 5:00 pm – 9:00 pm Monday-Thursday: 5:30 pm – 9:00 pm


Our Dogs Fetch Amazing Things

Volunteer Spotlight – Mark Falstad

New Teams

Mark Falstad first connected with Can Do Canines when his wife, Mary Kelley, received Mobility Assist Dog Brinks in 2009. Little did he know how busy he’d become! The couple wanted to help our organization in any way they could to show their appreciation for receiving Brinks, who helps Mary with physical tasks such as retrieving items, opening doors, carrying a laundry bag up and down stairs, and getting an emergency phone. Mark has a special talent – media. Can Do Canines needed help filming client interviews and action shots for our upcoming Tails to Tell fundraising luncheon, as well as the Fetching Ball gala. Mark was quick to offer his help with those as well as filming our corporate video. All of this takes a lot of time and patience and Mark provided that in abundance. In addition, he has videotaped graduation ceremonies and taken pictures of our puppy raisers and graduates during the holiday photo sessions.

Elizabeth Klingelhofer & Diabetes Assist Dog Faith “She is like an angel to me, she has made all the difference… she is truly a gift, and a blessing, and I am forever grateful.”

Thank You Dog Source – Can Do Canines Field Trainer – Robin Bengston Puppy Raiser – The Merkel Family Foster Home – T he Inmate Handlers at the Minnesota Correctional Facility at Faribault Name A Puppy Sponsors – The Minnesota Women of Today See their full story at www.can-do-canines.org/newsletter

The challenge was finding time in his busy schedule when he wasn’t traveling the world as a professional filmmaker. He is very much in demand! But Mark always made the time to help us. He and Mary have introduced many new people to Can Do Canines by hosting tables for the past three years at our Tails of Independence luncheon. They also have enjoyed staffing our informational booth at the MS Expo to educate attendees on how Mobility Assist Dogs help people living with the challenges of multiple sclerosis. We could not have found a more enthusiastic and talented filmmaker than Mark to further our mission and we are sincerely grateful that he is so willing to share his talents with us.

Mark Falstad

What about you?

Are you willing to give the gift of your time? We need help in the following areas: • Assistant for event planning • Puppy Raisers (14-16 months) • Foster families (2-4 weeks) • Receptionist • Marketing Assistant Contact Volunteer Coordinator Laurie Carlson at lcarlson@can-do-canines.org or 763-331-3000 ext. 113.

Thank you Mark! Y

Are You Signed Up?

Subscribe to our monthly eNews, The Howler, to read real Can Do Canines stories about our graduates, volunteers and latest events. You’ll get all the latest Can Do Canines news delivered straight to your inbox!

Sign up at can-do-canines.org

Emily Smith-Lundberg & Hearing Assist Dog Simon “Simon is very enthusiastic about sounds and alerting me. He is great and I’m very thankful for him.”

Thank You Dog Source – Denny Wiese Puppy Raiser- Karen & Ray Larsen Field Trainer – Brenda Robbins See their full story on pages 7 & 8

www.can-do-canines.org

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Annual Report

The 2011-2012 Can Do Canines Annual Report is complete! Download your copy from our website at www.can-do-canines. org/annualreport. To receive a printed copy, call Kathy 763-331-3000 ext. 152 or email us at info@can-do-canines.org.

Upcoming Events May 16 Tails To Tell Tour, 7:00 p.m. June 8 Tails To Tell Tour,10:00 a.m. July 9 Tails To Tell Tour, 10:00 a.m. September 7 Can Do Woofaroo October 12 Fall Graduation, 1:00 p.m. November 9 Fetching Ball * All Tails to Tell tours take place at our facility, located at 9440 Service Center Drive, New Hope, MN 55428 Please call our office at 763-331-3000 or email tour@can-do-canines.org to reserve your spot!

Learn more about Canines Do Canines by scanning the QR code with your smart phone

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Saturday September 7th Mark your calendars and gather your team to join us for a fun-filled day at the Can Do Woofaroo fundraising walk! Music, demonstrations, and exhibitor booths will make this a perfect day to spend with your fourlegged friend.

Saturday November 9th Get out your black tie and tails for this year’s Fetching Ball. Dinner and laughter are on the plate and waiting for you. You won’t want to miss this amazing evening featuring comedian Josh Blue and, of course, Can Do Canines!


Tails from Minnesota - Spring 2013