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APRIL 4, 2013 VOL. 35

ISS. 13

CAMPUSLEDGER

the

OFFICIAL STUDENT-RUN PUBLICATION OF JOHNSON COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, OVERLAND PARK, KS

KANSAS CITY’S SKATE SCENE EXAMINED P. 8-9 A BRIEF LOOK AT WORLD EVENTS

STUDENTS SHARE PASSION FOR MUSIC IN CHOIR

THE GROWING POPULARITY OF THRIFT SHOPS

P. 4

P. 7

P. 7


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NEWS

APRIL 4, 2013 VOL 35 

NEWS BRIEFS DEBATE TEAMS ADVANCED TO ELIMINATION ROUNDS Two debate teams from the college advanced to elimination rounds at the Cross-Examination Debate Association national tournament at Idaho State University on March 23 and 24. The novice team, Tabi Secor and Blaire Warren, advanced to the quarterfinals of the novice breakout, which is a separate elimination round for students in their first year of debate. They won several preliminary rounds against Sacramento State University, City University of New York and New School— New York City. Justin Stanley, coach of the debate team, called this “a very impressive accomplishment.” The second team, David Cuellar and Daniel Plott, made it to the elimination round after their 5-3 preliminary round record. The pair then lost in their first elimination round to

the University of Wyoming. David Cuellar was also selected to participate on the 2013 All-American Debate Team. Only 30 debaters in the United States are given this honor. These debaters are chosen based on academic success, competitive success and overall value to their squad. BOARD OF TRUSTEES MEETING TIME CHANGED The Johnson County Community College board of trustees will meet on April 18 at 4 p.m. instead of 5 p.m. The rescheduled meeting will take place in the Hugh Speer board room, GEB 137. TWO PARKING GARAGES TO BE CLOSED On Friday, April 5, two parking garages will be closed temporarily. The south half of the Regnier Center garage will close at 11 a.m. and reopen at

ISSUE 13

POLICEBRIEFS noon. The lower west garage by the Carlsen Center will close at 7 a.m. and will reopen at 9:45 a.m. THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES TO INTERVIEW PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES The trustees will interview Edward E. Raspiller on April 9 at 4 p.m., Joseph M. Sopcich on April 16 at 4 p.m., and Richard G. Shrubb on April 24 at 4 p.m. These meetings will take place in the Hugh Speer board room located in GEB 137. Each candidate will spend two days on the campus, meeting with students, faculty, staff, Johnson county residents and the college’s Foundation board. The presidential search committee, which was created to review the candidates’ applications, intends to bring a recommendation to the trustees by May.

ANGRY STUDENT IN THE ATB Campus police were called on March 26 when a student became upset with his instructor. The instructor told the officers the student, in a rage, made statements about her and her job, and then left the classroom as soon as she called the police. Several students witnessed the altercation, and the enraged student was identified. The instructor was advised to contact the police department if she had further problems with the individual.

WALLET THEFT A second theft was reported in the gym fitness center on March 27. The victim reported that his wallet was missing. The wallet contained numerous credit cards, a debit card and documents from his home country. The investigation is ongoing.

SUSPICIOUS SKI MASK Campus police were contacted for a suspicious party call on March 28. It was reported that an individual, wearing a full ski mask, appeared to be meditating on the THEFT IN FITNESS CENTER top of the hill next to the COM The victim of a theft contacted building. Upon contacting the police on March 27. She stated she individual, the officer recognized left her car keys, yellow leather him. This individual was dressed in purse, Apple headphones wrapped a similar manner last semester, and around an iPhone, and $4 in a the police had been called then. storage bin in the gym fitness At that time, and on this contact, center. When she returned twenty the individual was advised that minutes later, everything except her both his actions and the manner in iPhone was gone. The investigation which he dressed may cause further is ongoing. police dispatches. The individual apologized for the inconvenience. Compiled by Hannah Davis, news editor, at hdavis18@jccc.edu

EARN A KU BACHELOR’S DEGREE AT KU IN OVERLAND PARK. ROCK CHALK, JAYHAWK UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS IN OVERLAND PARK: Business Information Technology Literature, Language and Writing Molecular Biosciences Psychology Public Administration Social Work

WHY KU EDWARDS CAMPUS?

A KU degree is synonymous with success wherever your career takes you, nationally or internationally.

Scholarships for JCCC students. On-site advisers and student services. Late-afternoon and evening classes. Located two miles south of JCCC.

INFO SESSION - THURSDAY, APRIL 25

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NEWS 3

College seeks replacement system for ANGEL By Sara Maleki The college is investigating proposals for a new Learning Management System (LMS) which would gradually phase out the current system, ANGEL. Procurement Services is one of the departments involved in the process of finding a new LMS. “JCCC Procurement Services facilitates the expenditure of college funds in a manner that maximizes the ultimate value and meets the college’s needs, consistent with Board of Trustee’s policies as well as statutes and other guidelines,” said Gary Cromer, senior buyer. The process of finding a new LMS system involves inviting various companies, such as Blackboard, to submit proposals to the college. At the end of February, a request for proposals (RFP) was

released, with a deadline of March 7. Procurement Services at the college provide open opportunities for companies to make proposals and defines the terms and conditions of the proposal. The RFP contains basic ‘yes and no’ questions for companies to answer in order to identify a suitable LMS for the college. Questions for companies include ‘Does the LMS support mobile learning?’ and ‘Can students create their own portfolio?’ Prior to using ANGEL, the college used the Web CT system. The ANGEL system was developed in 2002 by the University of Indiana, and has been used by the college since 2008. In 2009, ANGEL was acquired by Blackboard, which has also acquired other competitor learning systems, such as Prometheus.

An updated LMS is needed to fit the needs of students and faculty. The options for mobile technology, sending texts to students and the use of ANGEL on iPads, are not available under the current system. “ANGEL has worked well,” said Ed Lovitt, director for distance learning. “[There is] the option of staying with Blackboard, but [we] owe it to students and faculty to see what changes are available.” On March 27, a Student Senate Town Hall meeting sought student opinions on what features were important in an LMS. The current system has received some positive feedback from students, such as Ben Anderson. “I think ANGEL is a pretty efficient way of checking my grades and homework”, Anderson said.

Board approves raising student tuition By David Hurtado The Board of Trustees voted to increase tuition for the next academic year by $1 per credit hour at their March 14 meeting. “Through the fiscal year 2013-2014 budget process, a need was identified for additional funding for the Student Activities Fund,” said Jerry Cook, trustee. “The primary purpose of the fund is to provide scholarships, and we all know there’s a need for that out there. As tuition has increased in the

past few years, the credit hour fee for scholarships has not increased.” The Board of Trustees last voted to raise student tuition at their Feb. 16 meeting during the spring 2012 semester. The increase went toward classroom furniture and equipment. Prior to the Board’s decision, tuition for Johnson County residents cost $81 per credit hour.

Contact David Hurtado, staff reporter, at dhurtado@jccc.edu

JCCC Trustee Election Results

TOTAL

Number of Precincts

502

Precincts Reporting

502

Vote For Total Votes

%

STEPHANIE SHARP

100.0 %

TOTAL %

14889 20.03%

LEE CROSS

14058 18.91%

4

JERRY COOK

13066 17.57%

74347

MELODY L RAYL

11960 16.09%

Times Blank Voted

3563

ROBERT K DRUMMOND

10746 14.45%

Times Over Voted

23

RICHARD L SCHRODER

9488 12.76%

Write-in Votes

140

0.19%

However, other students think there is room for improvement. “I’m not a huge fan of ANGEL,” said Kelsey Sparrow. “I think it’s too hard to get to see your grades[...] a good change would be to make grades easier to see and have them automatically update.” In April, three companies will be invited to the campus to demonstrate the features and functionality of their systems. Students and faculty will have the opportunity to fill out survey sheets to provide feedback on how well these companies answered their questions. “The first priority is to meet student and faculty needs,” Lovitt said. In making a decision about the potential choices, the college will look at whether other schools are currently using the system, and whether

the LMS can be customized to the college. The final decision will be made in May, taking into account feedback from faculty and students. If a new LMS is adopted by the college, it will be run parallel alongside ANGEL over the course of one year, with spring 2014 being the final semester with ANGEL. Washburn University, which also used ANGEL, has now switched to another LMS, and will phase out ANGEL by the fall 2013 semester. The final decision about a new LMS will be approved by the Board of Trustees, and students will be informed of any changes to the LMS by August.

Contact Sara Maleki, reporting correspondent, at smaleki@jccc.edu


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NEWS

APRIL 4, 2013  VOL 35 

WORLD EVENTS

ISSUE 13

Ascendancy to the Papacy

His Holiness, Pope Francis I, was selected on March 13, 2013 as the 266th Pope of the Catholic Church. Formerly the archbishop of Buenos Aires in Argentina, Pope Francis has already made a name for himself despite being relatively new to the Papacy. On Holy Thursday, March 28, the Pope broke with tradition for the foot-washing ceremony, when he washed and kissed the feet of two young women in a detention center. The ceremony traditionally only involves washing the feet of men, signifying when Jesus washed the feet of his disciples. Pope Francis is the first non-European Pope and Jesuit to assume the mantle of the Papacy.

Tensions continue to rise along the 38th Parallel

In response to the United States flying stealth bombers over South Korea, Kim Jong-Un’s government issued a fresh barrage of threats on March 29. According to the Korean Central News Agency (KCNA), North Korea declared it was “entering a state of war” with South Korea. Despite the continuing threats, defense officials at the Pentagon believe the threats to be little more than warmongering rhetoric designed to solidify Kim Jong-Un’s place among his people. The two Koreas have been in a technical state of war since the Korean War ended in 1953 with an armistice.

Miners trapped after Tibet landslide

Despite ongoing efforts to recover 83 miners from a landslide in a Tibetan gold mine, rescuers have yet to find any survivors or bodies. The incident occurred on March 29, at about 6 a.m. in Maizhokunggar County, east of Lhasa, the regional capital. The landslide extended nearly two miles and was composed of 2.6 million cubic yards of mud, rock and other debris. According to Xinhua, the Chinese state run news agency, temperatures fell to 26 degrees Fahrenheit, lowering the miners’ likelihood of survival.

Illustrations by Sara Scherba

Congo war crimes suspect surrenders to US Embassy in Rwanda Bosco Ntaganda, a fugitive Congolese warlord, surrendered to the United States embassy in Rwanda on March 18, asking to be transferred to the International Criminal Court (ICC). Ntaganda faces charges of conscripting child soldiers, murder, ethnic persecution, sexual slavery and rape during the 2002-2003 conflict in the Ituri district of northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. Embassy officials were “shocked” by his arrival, and do not know why the warlord decided to surrender so suddenly.

Battle-hardened US soldier charged with aiding Al-Qaeda group in Syria Eric Harroun, a former U.S. army soldier and native of Phoenix, was arrested on March 26 for allegedly aiding Al-Qaeda in Syria against Bashar Al-Asad’s regime. According to the FBI, Harroun fought with the al-Nursa front, which claims responsibility for nearly 600 terrorist attacks in Syria. Harroun served with the U.S. Army from 2000 to 2003 and is not charged with targeting U.S. troops in Iraq. The Pentagon declined to comment on Harroun’s arrest.

Compiled by David Hurtado, staff reporter, at dhurtado@jccc.edu

What do you think about the liquor bill (that is currently in Kansas legislature) on the MANSTREET: that would allow grocery stores and convenience stores to sell full-strength alcohol and hard liquor?

Brett Scherer

Codi Willard

Fatima Bello

Jacob Wright

Megan Hollingsworth

“I’m all about it—it would drop prices.”

“I would support it—then everything would be in one place. People would still go to liquor stores anyway.”

“If they pass the bill it would just encourage underage people to go crazy, because alcohol would be promoted everywhere.”

“I would support local [businesses] over convenience. You don’t want to throw out family businesses.”

“I’m all for it, I go to Walmart and then the liquor store anyway, it would be convenient.”

STUDENT

STUDENT

STUDENT

STUDENT

STUDENT

Compiled by Olivia Fox, staff reporter, at ofox@jccc.edu.


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Son of HeLa cell donor visits the college

NEWS 5

By Michael Fancella Immortality means many things to different people. In the case of a young black woman named Henrietta Lacks, immortality means to truly live forever, biologically speaking. In 1951, Lacks went to John Hopkins Hospital with concerns about a tumor. That tumor ended her life, but some samples of the cells in and around the tumor were extracted. The cells were hearty and grew at an amazing rate, even taking over cells around them. These cells have become famous in medical science, referred to as HeLa cells after the deceased donor. They were most famously used in the experiments that led to the polio vaccine. In 2009, Rebecca Sloots authored the book “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,” detailing the situation surrounding her story. This book has been discussed in many classes at the college, including nursing, dental hygiene and English classes. Lacks’ son David and his wife Shirley are touring colleges and answering questions students have about the information Sloots presented in her book. On March 28, English professor Danny Alexander moderated an open

discussion with David “Sonny” Lacks and his wife in the Polsky Theatre. “David and Shirley Lacks have been touring schools for months,” Alexander said. “There were some health issues that might have caused concern, but I feel the interview went well and we are definitely glad to have them here.” David Lacks was four years old when his mother Henrietta passed. His only memory of his mother is the funeral, “Something I will always treasure,” David said. Deborah, David’s deceased sister, was the family member from which Sloots drew most of her information. Both Shirley and David recounted anecdotes of Deborah, calling her quite the family character. Perhaps the best description given of her was the hamster story, in which she performed mouth to mouth on a dying hamster. “Who does that?” David said. “I’m going to put a straightjacket on her.” The issues of racism and cultural differences came up during the discussions. Alexander said he was “schooled on the racial and cultural issues” presented in the book.

Sonny Lacks, son of Henrietta Lacks speaks about his life and the book written by Rebecca Sloots. Photo by Esaul Flores

In response, Shirley said, “Times have changed, but the older generation keep [racial issues] in the forefront.” David expressed a great deal of admiration for his mother. He felt she would be proud of her legacy, and he expressed pride in his family for donating tissue and cell samples during the 1950s. During the discussion, David also told of his experience when he visited John Hopkins Hospital, and how it was fascinating to “see the [HeLa] cells divide, multiply, and take over other cells.” Henrietta Lacks has supplied science with a series of experiments with her HeLa cells. Modern ethical code no longer allows for cells to be

taken without the consent of the donor. David feels the good the cells have done are adequate compensation. Shirley would like to see the profits from the research used to provide healthcare for those who cannot afford it. While a great deal of attention is given to the medical advancements the HeLa cells facilitated, David has a different view of his mother. To him she is a hero, but most importantly, “She was a mother, she was a wife, she was a person,” he said.

Contact Michael “Bernie” Fancella, special to the Ledger, at mfancell@jccc.edu

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6 FEATURES

APRIL 4, 2013  VOL 35 

ISSUE 13

FEATURES CALENDAR MOMIX BOTANICA

8 p.m. Friday, April 5 and 8 p.m. Saturday, April 6, Yardley Hall in Carlsen Center The internationally known dance troupe Momix will be performing their Botanica show, where they will recreate nature through special effects, costumes, and choreography.

Cost: $40, $50 or $5 with student ID (limit two)

Photo courtesy JCCC

MCHORSE AND FAULWELL ART LECTURES 6 p.m., Friday, April 12, Hudson Auditorium in Nerman Art Museum Artists Christine McHorse and Asad Faulwell, whose art is currently on display in the Nerman’s Dark Horse and Pins and Needles exhibits, will be attending a reception and delivering lectures about their work.

Cost: free Photo courtesy JCCC

COMEDY CENTRAL ON CAMPUS

7:30 p.m., Friday, April 12, Yardley Hall in Carlsen Center Three young upcoming comedians will be performing a variety of hilarious, albeit mature comedic sketches. The show will feature Nikki Glaser, who has performed on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno and co-hosts a show on MTV; Nick Vatterott, seen on both Conan and the Late Night Show with Jimmy Fallon; and Sheng Wang, winner of a number of comedic performance awards.

Photo courtesy Comedy Central

Cost: $20 or $10 for students of the college

Compiled by Gabrielle Fitzgerald, gfitzge1@jccc.edu

Bar Trek: The search for mom and pop By Jon Parton There’s a corporate formula for everything. From where the products in a grocery store are located to the amount of lighting filling the store. Howl at the Moon feels like it was built by test groups. Howl at the Moon, located at 1334 Grand Blvd. within the Power and Light district, is part of a chain of dueling piano bars. It features a stage with two baby grand pianos and two or more entertainers who take song requests from the audience. The concept hearkens back to American cabaret shows of the Roaring Twenties, when

restaurants and bars featured live jazz music and dance. They charge a ten dollar cover to get in on a Saturday night. This is one of the worst complaints I could ever have for any bar. In addition to spending money on drinks, you’re forced to spend money just to get in the door. This wasn’t an amusement park. The place wasn’t big enough to house an indoor roller coaster. The idea of paying money for the privilege of paying even more money is ludicrous. SEE ‘BAR TREK’ ON PAGE 7


the CAMPUSLEDGER ‘BAR TREK’ CONT. FROM PAGE 6 Back to the formula, there is some things every corporate establishment needs. First, they need a lot of neon signs. Check. Second, they need the female wait staff to wear skimpy outfits. Check. Third, they have to offer weird or unique drinks. Check. A waitress approached us shortly after we got in, offering us some weird drink served from a huge fake syringe. We passed on her offer. Instead, like any classy bar patron would, we ordered a “bucket of booze” called the Hurricane. It was a combination of rum, dark rum, grenadine, orange and pineapple syrup, Bacardi 151 and cola. Although I’m not much of a mixed drink type of guy, I have to admit the combination of fruity flavors mixed well with the cola. Unfortunately, the bucket wasn’t stirred very well, leaving most of the bottom of the bucket with a strong taste of rum. That’s not something you want to drink out of a straw. It definitely wasn’t worth the 35 dollars I paid for it. The entertainers were the best part of our experience. They kept the atmosphere lively with covers of famous pop, rock, country and even rap songs. Another positive aspect was the people watching experience of our visit. A man was celebrating his 50th birthday that night and brought his friends with him. It’s always fun to watch people try their best to dance. We were less than impressed with the level of noise in the bar. Although it’s expected to run into loud volumes at most bars, it’s downright annoying when you have to shout to the person next to you in order to communicate. We cut out of the place after about 40 minutes. The quality of the show wasn’t worth the quality of the booze and the noise of the place. Although I wouldn’t completely write the bar off, I probably wouldn’t go again unless I was with a large group of people.

Contact Jon Parton, managing editor, at jparton@jccc.edu.

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FEATURES 7

Students share passion for singing

The chamber choir practices during class on Monday April 1. Photo by Daniel De Zamacona

College’s choirs work towards musical excellence By Stephen Cook Although the college’s choirs only meet for three hours a week, they are closely united by one thing: a shared passion for music. The college has two choirs: the Chamber Choir, made up of anywhere from 20 to 40 students with varying skill levels, and MadRegalia, which is a group of eight of the most talented singers. Nick Chance, student, sings in both the Chamber Choir and MadRegalia. He received a scholarship for singing in the choir after coming here from KU. Chance, a multiinstrumentalist and drummer for the Kansas City Chiefs drumline, said he finds the human voice unique and special to hear. “Part of what I really enjoy is hearing the human voice without the technological

touch ‘cause most of our world today is technological sound and we kind of lose musicality in that,” Chance said. Although Chance does not plan on going into a career in music, it is still a passion. For him, it’s something fun that keeps him going. “[Students in choir are] all going their separate ways for majors, not everyone in choir here is a music major,” Chance said. “It’s a lot of fun to see how far people can progress toward a similar goal from such different backgrounds.” The choir comes together under the direction of Dr. Terri Teal, professor of vocal music, who is the leader of the two choirs at the college. The choirs put on approximately two concerts a semester, in addition to participating in special events around and off campus. Although the choirs work hard, Teal said her biggest obstacle as a teacher is getting students up to speed in their sight reading.

“I think life is too short to learn everything by rote. We could do more music and go faster [with better sight reading].” With this in mind, Teal said she tries to choose “good choral literature” that is appropriate for her choirs. “I do not want to give them something they will lose at, I will give them as challenging as I think they can win and sing well and learn from,” Teal said. “We usually pull ‘em off and I think part of that’s because I think I choose well for my students.” One of Teal’s favorite parts about the choirs at the college is the learning process, being able to push her students and hold them to a “pretty high standard.” “I feel like I really can help people wherever they are become better, get more skilled, get more choral skills learn more music, learn how to sing more musically,” Teal said. “I find that my students ... really love music and that love for music and the passion for it and the passion for singing and the choral arts ... makes them more open to making mistakes and learning and trying to improve and trying to get better and that is really, really fun. I love thinking about where we start and where we end up and how far it goes.” This journey has helped student Alex Velasquez improve his conducting skills as well. Velasquez is another one of the eight students who sings in the MadRegalia choir. Velasquez was able to work with Teal to take a private conducting course which allowed him to conduct and rehearse with the chamber group for a piece in time for their concert. Velasquez described this as his “favorite experience with the choir.” “It’s like I got to experience both sides of music, both being in charge of making it happen and then actually doing the playing,” Velasquez said. “If it weren’t for my time here at the choir, I would have never gotten to do something that neat before.” SEE ‘CHOIR’ ON PAGE 10

Thrift stores recycled back into popularity

Used clothing hangs at the Salvation Army thrift store in Lawrence. Photo by Esaul Flores

By Sydney Studer Either people are taking Macklemore’s “Thrift Shop” literally, or people are recognizing they can get popular brands at a next to nothing price. One of many shops in the area, Savers is a chain of thrift stores that was started

in 1954 by a man named William O. Ellison. The first store to open was in San Francisco, California and the chain has expanded to include stores in other parts of the U.S., Canada and Australia. Each store is privately owned and has a local charity where it donates funds. The customers who come into the stores have been changing in recent years, including the Savers on 95th Street and Nall Avenue in Overland Park. “We have definitely seen an increase in both sales and traffic, especially among college and high school kids,” Steve Stark, store manager, said. The cycle of Savers thrift stores begins with who their nonprofit alliance is. In Kansas City, that alliance is Big Brothers Big Sisters. Each time a donation is made to Savers, they pay Big Brothers Big Sisters. After that, the team of workers at

each store sorts the donations. Then, the highest quality donations are priced and placed in the store according to the type of merchandise. Anna Tucker, student, said she shops in thrift stores that are in higher income areas. “If you live in areas that have higher income brackets, you can get brand name things for really cheap,” Tucker said. “Here in Overland Park, when you walk into their thrift store, they have silver platters up front and things like that. I can get Talbots and Cold Water Creek and all kinds of brand names for really cheap.” Even with the increase in traffic and sales, they don’t sell everything they receive. Savers has a recycling program for extra merchandise. This program prevented 600 million pounds of unsold items from being thrown into landfills,

according to its website (www.savers.com). “Whatever items we do not use on our floor does not go into the landfill,” Erika Hopkins, a manager of the Overland Park store, said. “We actually recycle them over to developing countries.” Besides helping to create a cleaner environment and contributing to helping to fund Big Brothers Big Sisters, Hopkins said there are additional perks to shopping at Savers stores. “If they come here to the Savers and donate, they receive a 20 percent off coupon,” Hopkins said. Since the company’s birth, they have opened more than 315 stores and in the last 10 years have paid over $1.5 billion to local non-profits. Contact Sydney Studer, reporting correspondent, at sstuder1@jccc.edu


8

IN FOCUS

APRIL 4, 2013  VOL 35 

A BOARD BELOW

ISSUE 13

AND

THE SKY ABOVE

NAVIGATING THE URBAN LIFE OF SKATERS By Jon Parton As the snow starts to break, more souls emerge from the shadows, ready to explore Kansas City on top of a skateboard. It was a lazy Sunday afternoon at Penn Valley Park where local skateboarder Dan Gibbons was practicing kickflips, a move where the skater jumps and flips the board into a spin before landing down again. “You just need a board and a city,” Gibbons said. He’s just one of a growing number of skaters in the Kansas City area. There are now more than two dozen skate parks in the region. Skateboarding is a relatively new sport, having been invented in the 1950s by surfers who wanted a way to practice surfing on land. Skateboarding was originally called “sidewalk surfing” and used long wooden boards with roller skate wheels attached. There have been a lot of changes in skating, according to Ben Hlavacek, an employee at Escapist Skateboarding. “It seems like it’s always progressing as far as what people are doing, I guess,” Hlavacek said. “Since I started it’s definitely grown financially. Nike and Adidas were not present in skating. It’s maybe a little less flavorful that it used to be. It’s turning a little less fringe-y and a little more athletic.” Skaters have traditionally been associated with rebelliousness, as they were first lumped in with surfers. However, with the popularity of the Tony Hawk and video games like Jet Set Radio and Tony Hawk Pro Skater in

the late 1990s, skateboarding has seen a turnaround in both popularity and image. “I think skating is so attractive to a lot of people because it’s really more of an allencompassing activity,” Hlavacek said. “It crosses all of those lines. It can be a hobby and that’s okay. You don’t have to be on a team. And there’s a culture behind it. People are generating more art from it.” “There are a lot of different branches of it,” Hlavacek continued, “You could be a more technical skateboarder if you’re interested in learning every single trick. Or you could just be someone who’s really into a feeling of doing a motion over and over again. You can find your own niche in it.” Skateboarding originally picked up in popularity during the early to mid-60s but almost fell into obscurity. It wasn’t until technological advances to wheels in the early 70s made skateboarding popular again. Instead of making skateboards out of wood, manufacturers began using materials like fiberglass. Skaters began featuring artwork on their boards to help promote individuality. Even local police have become more accepting of skaters, according to Hlavacek. “More kids skate than play baseball now,” Hlavacek said. “So it’s like everyone has a kid that skates or a neighbor or a nephew. They’re more understanding, but I definitely understand them getting bummed out and getting called all the time. Barney Allis is pretty much designed to be a

Local skater, Mitchell Markt, performs tricks at the skate park located on Ridgeview Avenue in Olathe. Photo by Esaul Flores

skate park but they don’t let you skate there.” Skaters have quite a few places to skate, whether it be a skate park or just the streets. Adam Litchkowski, employee of Studio Skate Supply, said that Kansas City is a decent area for skaters. “There are some decent skate parks in Johnson County,” Litchkowski said. “Anywhere downtown in the city, the plaza, just anywhere.” Another factor pushing skating’s popularity is the recently formed Street League Skateboarding (SLS). Although it was formed in 2010, the league is already finding an audience. Its tournaments have been broadcast on networks like ESPN and although it makes very few

stops, it has always made an appearance in Kansas City. A growing trend with skaters is the do-it-yourself movement. Rather than wait for skate parks to be built, skaters will clean up an area and build their own. “If you want something to happen, you have to do it yourself,” Hlavacek said. “And that’s a thing I think is really neat about skating. There’s the Burnside park in Portland [Oregon]. It was like, ‘We don’t have anywhere to skate. We’re going to find a bad area with a bunch of homeless people and we’re going to build a ramp because no one will care.’ That’s since blossomed into this amazing skate park.” Skateboarding isn’t just limited to kids either, Hlavacek said.

“People say that they love football, but they stop playing it after high school and they just watch it,” Hlavacek said. “With skating, it’s not something you ever have to quit. You can do it casually. You don’t have to sign up for a league.” The true culture of skating is having a hobby you can share with others, according to Hlavacek. “It’s really about camaraderie and hanging out with your friends,” Hlavacek said. “You can have a good time in the middle of the street. You can have a good time at the park. You can find the perfect spot and that’s really exciting.”

Contact Jon Parton, managing editor, at jparton@jccc.edu

SKATER SLANG: A SHORT PRIMER TO SKATING LINGO KINKED A rail with bumps in it.

DIAMONDZ VERT A super smooth or perfectly Type of skating involving PUSHER executed trick. A kid that talks about skating and how half-pipes. MOBBED good he is, but won’t go skating with A not so great trick. you or your friends.

SMOOTH A trick that is performed above normal standards, but not quite diamondz.


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IN FOCUS 9

Q & A with Rob Fulton Local student and skater shares his views on skating

Q: How did you first get involved in skating? My older cousin skated when I was a kid. I saw him do it and thought that was really cool back in the day. I used to rollerblade when I was a real little kid. I just kind of naturally progressed from there. I’ve been skating for 13 years probably and I’m 25 now. Q: Where are some of your favorite places to skate? You can’t really be pushing around downtown and moving through a crowd of people. There’s a lot of freedom in just exploring the open city, but skate parks are always fun. I don’t know if I have an overall spot, just really like to move around the city.

ESCAPIST SKATEBOARDING

Kansas City shop provides skateboarding necessities

Q: Have you ever had police stop you while skating? Oh yeah, tons of times. I had to go to court in Nashville for my last skate trip down there to deal with a bunch of charges we got pressed on us when we went on a road trip through there. If it’s your hometown, you know where you’re going to get in trouble. If you’re a total stranger from out of town, there’s a lot more leeway what you can get away with sometimes. Obviously, it didn’t work out for us down south. [Although] it seems within the past ten years, it’s gotten a little more relaxed. Barney Allis Plaza is still a big deal if you get caught down there. I remember when I was a kid; it was a flat 500 bucks [fine]. Q: What is the most difficult trick you have pulled off? I’m not a big handrail skater, so any handrail I’ve ever hit up were like, “I can’t believe I did that.” I know guys that strictly just skate big, gnarly stuff. That’s pretty much all they do. They don’t get the same rise just cruising around the city. It’s not like that for everyone. Q: What is the worst injury you have gotten? I have never broken a bone yet, but I’ve fractured several. I’d say probably the worst is when I fractured my heel, which doesn’t happen easily or often. When I was a kid, and long before I should have had anything to do with trying it, I tried to Ollie off the Rose Hill Park bathroom roof. I popped and just kicked my board out instantly, so I’m just free-falling for 15 feet, landed on the sidewalk and took it all on my heel. Q: Has skating changed since you started? Oh yeah, for sure. It’s weird because I come right on the brink of the Tony Hawk Pro Skater generation when it really started to pick up in the mid-90s. It always goes through its waves of ups and downs and everything as far as popularity. It’s definitely at a peak right now. The things people are doing now are phenomenal. They’re different than what they were doing when I started, which wasn’t, in retrospect, all that long ago. But then again, skateboarding isn’t that old. There’s still a lot of leg room to keep growing. It’s not going to stop. Contact Jon Parton, managing editor, at jparton@jccc.edu

(TOP) Escapist Skateboarding employee Austin Cosler works on a skateboard for a customer. (ABOVE) Found on Southwest Boulevard in Kansas City, Miss., Escapist Skateboarding is one of two locations. (ABOVE RIGHT AND RIGHT) The store sells boards, parts, apparel, shoes and more. Photos by Stephen Cook

OLD SCHOOL Ancient art of skateboarding using fishtail boards and lots of grab tricks.

CRAZY TEXAN A person that goes psycho on their board and throws it around a lot.

BAIL The act of falling off your board.

LOCALS The kids that frequently session an area that you’re in.

YOINKER Someone that steals other peoples stuff and has no original ideas.

SESSION A time that you go out and skate.

SET A set of stairs.

Compiled by David Hurtado, staff reporter, at dhurtado@jccc.edu. Information courtesy of punkskateboarders.tripod.com


10 ETC

APRIL 4, 2013  VOL 35 

ISSUE 13

CAMPUSLEDGER

the

STAFF

OFFICIAL STUDENT-RUN PUBLICATION OF JOHNSON COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE, OVERLAND PARK, KS

EDITORIAL BOARD Stephen Cook Editor-in-chief scook35@jccc.edu 913-469-8500 ext. 4297 Jon Parton Managing editor jparton@jccc.edu

PRODUCTION Gabrielle Fitzgerald Advertising manager gfitzge1@jccc.edu 913-469-8500 ext. 3193 Tabitha Feaker Marketing manager tfeaker@jccc.edu Aaron Fitzgerald Circulation manager afitzg10@jccc.edu

Hannah Davis News editor hdavis18@jccc.edu

Daniel De Zamacona Photo editor ddezamac@jccc.edu

Gabrielle Fitzgerald Features editor gfitzge1@jccc.edu

Ashley Lane Production designer alane15@jccc.edu

Mac Moore Sports editor mmoore82@jccc.edu Shawn Gelushia Circulation assistant sgelushi@jccc.edu

Edem Elessesso Web manager eelesses@jccc.edu

Erica Aldridge Design assistant ealdridg@jccc.edu

Sara Scherba Illustrator correspondent sscherba@jccc.edu

Kelly Daniels Design assistant kdanie19@jccc.edu

REPORTERS AND PHOTOGRAPHERS David Hurtado Staff reporter dhurtado@jccc.edu Olivia Fox Staff reporter ofox@jccc.edu Sara Maleki Reporting correspondent smaleki@jccc.edu

Joe Hofbauer Reporting correspondent jhofbaue@jccc.edu Sydney Studer Reporting correspondent sstuder1@jccc.edu

Andrew Shepherd Staff photographer ashephe5@jccc.edu Esaul Flores Staff photographer eflores3@jccc.edu Mackenzie Gripe Photo correspondent mgripe1@jccc.edu

ADVISER Corbin Crable Faculty adviser ccrable@jccc.edu Copyright © 2013 The Campus Ledger and/or its freelance contributors. All rights reserved. Content appearing in The Ledger’s print or electronic media may not be reproduced, published, broadcasted or redistributed without The Ledger’s prior written permission. The Ledger publishes biweekly during the fall and spring semesters. Issues are free and available campus-wide. Additional copies, including back issues, can be obtained from the Student News Center (COM 260) while supplies last. Online-exclusive content is published at http://www.campusledger.com.

‘CHOIR’ CONT. FROM PAGE 7 Velasquez said with each semester he feels more and more at home in the choir, growing to become friends with other members. “My favorite aspect about the choir is probably still the feeling I have for everyone there, my strong friendship ties with the members in the choir,” Velasquez said. “It would not be the same choir without those people and the relationship among members of the ensemble is one of the key elements to a great ensemble.” That sense of relationship rings true for Chance as well. He said although members come and go from the choir, they have still been able to bond and sustain a friendship. “The MadRegalia choir has really become a very

close knit second family to me,” Chance said. “The other part of what makes this so great is that we get to share it with people … and show people how much it means to us, and hopefully to them.” From group to group, Teal said it is the students that make the choirs special. They let their love of singing and music be the final thing when it comes to how they approach what they do together. “I actually think choirs are one of our last communities, we can’t do it technologically, we can’t do it online,” Teal said, “We have to come together and make a community and we have to live together and we have to work together, despite our differences.”

Contact Stephen Cook, editor-in-chief, at scook35@jccc.edu

The Campus Ledger welcomes all readers to submit letters to the editor, which can be sent via email to Stephen Cook, editor-in-chief, at scook35@jccc.edu. Letters for print publication may not exceed 250 words. Guest columns for print publication may not exceed 450 words. Letters are selected for print publication at the discretion of the editorial board. The Ledger reserves the right to request revisions or clarifications. Contributors may not submit more than two letters or one guest column per academic semester and must include the writer’s name, title and contact information with each submission. Valid photo ID must be presented upon request in COM 260. No libelous content will be accepted, and letters are not edited for length or grammar. The Ledger accepts advertisements suitable for its student body. Contact Gabrielle Fitzgerald, advertising manager, at gfitzge1@jccc.edu. The Campus Ledger is a member of the Associated Collegiate Press, College Media Advisers, the Kansas Press Association and the Kansas Associated Collegiate Press. The Ledger endorses the Associated Press Stylebook.

SUMMER HELP WANTED – Tall Oaks Christian Camp – Linwood, KS. Seeking 8-10 summer staff. Requires at least good basic skills, and college age or older. Lifeguards, challenge course, equestrian, & food service. Good salary, full training, meals, housing (if needed), and Christian work environment. Info & forms at www.talloaks.org or call 913-301-3004


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ETC 11


12

OPINION

APRIL 4, 2013  VOL 35 

ISSUE 13

STAFF EDITORIAL

The future of the college and your ability to affect it The elections are over and the votes have been cast for the open Board of Trustees positions. The true power of democracy is evident in local elections when elected officials have a more direct effect on what happens to the region. In the case of this election, it affects your experience at the college. The Board of Trustees has a hand in some of the most important decisions, including the selection of a new college president, increasing tuition fees and cutting academic and extracurricular programs. The education you get at

the school largely depends upon the people in charge of it. Back in 2006, former college president Charles Carlsen resigned after The Campus Ledger reported that a female employee claimed he unlawfully harassed her. It was the Board of Trustees that held a number of emergency meetings during this period to discern the truth of the matter. If they had uncovered any wrongdoing, they could have potentially taken action. That’s why it’s so important to have the right people on

the board. This is where you come in. It’s your decision or indecision that decides the future of the school. The leaders of this school are chosen by the people. It’s important to make sure the people representing you share the same values that you hold in esteem. Just as important as choosing leaders is making sure their actions are transparent to all. That’s where The Campus Ledger comes in. There have been many evenings when our reporters have covered the monthly

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Jack [Van Kirk], You wrote to the editors of The Ledger about the stigmas of pro-life and pro-marriage supporters in a letter laden with conspiratorial accusations characteristic of a fourteen-year-old boy. I would like to redress your petty arguments. You made an accurate point that pro-life supporters are often grouped with Todd “legitimate rape” Akin, and that the political beliefs of this movement should be judged without accreditation to refutable individuals that may be involved. However, you countered this argument in your next paragraph addressing LGBT activists and gay marriage. You suggest in your open letter that LGBT activists, “just want to reduce everybody to their sexual orientation.” I found this belligerent generalization the oration of a “stupid, brainwashed bigot.” LGBT activists seek to discredit notions sexuality and gender identity impact moral fiber, and as this is their specific purpose, they speak almost exclusively on this subject. LGBT activists do not seek to “reduce everybody to their [sexuality],” they hope to bring equality people of different sexualities, as other movements sought equality in race and ethnicity. Though open-mindedness in an important utility in grappling with our amorphous times, there are moral high- and low-grounds. Many haunted beings have committed atrocious acts believing their actions were righteous and the common assumption otherwise was evidence of a conspiracy. And as a transgender student of JCCC, I do not reduce anybody to their sexuality, I judge the aptitude of others by their sensibility and fallibility.

Jessie Jacob JCCC student

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SCOOK35@JCCC.EDU

board meetings. Though they are relatively straightforward and include matters such as budget reports and progress updates, The Campus Ledger has and will always continue to be a presence there. Regardless of who holds a seat on the board after the election this year or any year, it’s our job to report on their activity. In the coming months, the presidential selection process will progress and we will be there every step of the way to keep the public informed. The Board of Trustees have stated their intent to have a

new college president selected before the end of the spring semester. Like the board, the new president will have a lot of power concerning the direction of the school. In the face of budget cuts ordered by lawmakers in Topeka, the new president will have quite a challenge ahead of them. It is during these times of uncertainty that the press is made even more necessary in order to relay information to the public which might not otherwise be seen.

COLUMN

The robot invasion has arrived

They always say if science fiction can think it up, it will happen. So where is the robot invasion? Well, it’s already here – just look around. According to a report released by the International Data Corporation (IDC), 79 percent of smartphone users reach for their devices within 15 minutes of waking up. Then throughout the day, they will go on to check Facebook an average of 14 times from their phone. And that’s just Facebook – Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest and all the others just add on to that! Now tell me that doesn’t sound robotic. I’m not saying that checking your Facebook is wrong, I’m just saying that too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. We are becoming gluttonous with the interwebz. That, in turn, is morphing us into creatures who would rather spend time with a computer or a phone chatting with one of our 2,000 “friends” than with actual, 3-D, living, breathing friends. I know, unfortunately, we are a campus where folks would rather look at their phone in order to avoid eye contact with the person next to them; it’s an easy way out. But look at it this way, what are you missing by always staring at a tiny screen? I’ll be honest and admit I often check Facebook or Twitter before classes, but it’s good to put away the phone and look up, look around and talk to people. It’s refreshing to stop and think without the distraction of the

blue glow. Also, even if you are checking your phone, you can still be aware of your surroundings and be courteous to others. By Stephen Cook Besides, hunching over and holding your phone three inches away from your face is bad on your eyes and your neck. The modern smartphone may be an amazing invention, but it is obviously both a blessing and a curse. On one hand, it allows us to communicate with anyone in the world in a matter of seconds. On the other hand, it’s turning us from compassionate human beings into computerized machines. Instead of verbally socializing with others face to face, we thrive through faceless, emotionless, often poorly-spelled words on a screen. As we go into spring, nicer weather should hopefully arrive soon. Try to spend time outside, meet with others face to face or take up a new hobby or interest. Slow down, relax and take some time to think about what matters in life. After all, what will you look back on? The cat memes that you posted on your friends’ walls or the actual time you spent together with your friends? Contact Stephen Cook, editorin-chief, at scook35@jccc.edu


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OPINION 13

COLUMN

Fighting the war on weight O n e out of t h r e e people reading this are o b e s e , according to the Centers f o r Disease By Jon Parton Control and Prevention. Approximately 35 percent of American adults are classified as obese, so overweight that it has an adverse effect on personal health. I should know because I am one of them. It can be easy to pack on extra pounds in this country. Fast food restaurants

are located on nearly every city block. In July of 2012, a Gallup poll found that nearly half of Americans drink sugary sweet sodas on a daily basis. The odds are stacked against us, but they’re not impossible to overcome. When I was at my heaviest, I weighed 280 pounds. For a guy who is only five feet and seven inches tall, that’s quite a bit of weight to carry around. The worst part of it was the ambivalence I had concerning my weight and overall health. I grew up fat throughout junior high and high school. It was something I learned to accept, even if I wasn’t happy with it. It’s that same ambivalence I think affects a lot of overweight

Americans now. Some people eat when they’re bored, some eat to alleviate stress, and others eat as a way to reward themselves. No matter what the reason, everyone has a chance to fight their way back to good health. You have to have a catalyst, a reason to change. For me, it was the realization I couldn’t tie my shoes without having to catch my breath. That prompted me to switch from sodas to diet sodas. I started walking 30 minutes three times a week in the evenings. I started small with two little changes. After a couple of months, I went from walking three times a week to five times a week. I also switched over to a

vegetarian diet, even though I wasn’t completely sure if I could pull it off. One year later, I had gone from 280 pounds to 200. My doctor was astounded by the amount of weight I had lost. He didn’t believe me when I told him I achieved it by limiting my food and walking more. When I spoke to him the year before, he wanted to prescribe high blood pressure medication for me. It’s not too late. You don’t need to devote your entire life to the gym or go on some crazy crash diet. It’s just a matter of finding what works best for you; maybe it’s going for a walk once in a while or substituting fruit for dessert. A lot of people are afraid to try because it means stepping outside of their

comfort zone. Regardless of what holds you back, there will always be a personal reason for you to push forward. Perhaps it’s your children or your significant other. Find the catalyst for change and let that motivate you. Never accept who you are, but rather who you want to be. Today, I weigh 190 pounds. I’m still not where I want to be, but I’m a lot closer. You don’t have to sprint to your goal; sometimes walking there works just as well. Contact Jon Parton, managing editor, at jparton@ jccc.edu

COLUMN

The merit of modern memes

I recently took my car in for its routine c h e c k up to my dealership full of m i d d l e aged male By Gabrielle mechanics. IFitzgerald I handed my key ring to my attendant, who looked a little in awe of how many key chains I had squeezed onto my key ring. It wasn’t the Lego mini-figures of Severus Snape or Elizabeth Swan, the light-up Darth Maul, or the Scottish crest bearing my last name that caught his attention. It was the life-sized plastic moustache that says, in a pedophile-like voice,”Well, hello there” that really got him. My attendant looked at me and

said, “I just don’t get it! Why on earth are moustaches so popular?!” I suppose I should have looked at him and said,” I’d love to tell you, but I’m ‘shavin’’ it for later.” But my pun filter was working and instead I just shrugged and went on with life. But it left me thinking about all the memes and internet sensations we love so much. Why did I buy a moustache key chain? Why do I have this insane, childlike obsession with all things Grumpy Cat? Why do I dislike cats in real life but go crazy for memes involving cats who tell me ‘hi’ using the worst grammar possible?! And why do I get so much pleasure out of sitting alone reading Forever Alone memes? These are the questions that really haunt me and leave me sleepless at night. So, let’s begin our “hairy” ride into uncovering the why

behind the icons. To start with, moustaches: those furry little devils that sit so seductively on the top lip. (I still don’t know why my friend stopped talking to me after I complimented the beauty of hers.) The popularity of the moustache corresponds with the popularity of hipsters. Most male hipsters combine the tattoo-covered street boy look with the suave 80s look. And by 80s, I mean the 1880s, when moustaches and lamb chop sideburns were the epitome of high fashion. With the rise in popularity of hipsters, so must the popularity of moustaches also rise. Chances are these woolly monsters won’t be hanging around for long, since fads rarely last. Until then, enjoy your moustache jewelry, moustache mugs, moustache shirts and moustache keychains. As for cats…the truth is

I have no idea why cats are popular. People make fun of cats all the time because they are so carefree and don’t give a crap about anyone but themselves. Maybe the reason our culture has an obsession with cats is that we all secretly wish we could care as little as cats do. This is obviously the case with the most famous cat meme of all: Grumpy Cat. On March 12, Tardar Sauce (Grumpy Cat’s real name) made an appearance in Texas where people lined up for hours in the rain just to get a picture with the kitten. What is it about this adorably crabby cat that people love? The owners speculate that it’s just that. The sour mood of the cat expresses how most people feel about situations. While for politeness sake we may not be able to say biting things to our coworkers and family, Grumpy Cat can and that’s almost as good.

As to Forever Alone, Overly Attached Girlfriend, Socially Awkward Penguin, or Philosoraptor, I don’t know why they are so popular. All I know is the immense joy they bring me and so many others. Thanks to the internet and social media, random weird things can now be shared a variety of ways and go viral quickly. Some people complain that our generation, the Now Generation, is too obsessed with technology and digital media. I don’t know about you, but to that I’d have to frown and say,” Nope.”

Contact Gabrielle Fitzgerald, features editor, at gfitzge1@jccc.edu

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14 SPORTS

SPORTS BRIEFS TENNIS Both teams faced the top competition in the country over spring break. The Men’s team pulled away from the five day stretch of duels with a 4-3 team record. The Women’s team is still undefeated, with a 8-0 team record after beating three different squads by 5-4. Sophomores Shannon Beckett and Erika Castillo-Lopez have yet to drop a match.

TRACK Both Men’s and Women’s track teams had strong finishes at the Razorback Invitational hosted by the University of Arkansas. National qualifiers include Sophomore Mark Sitek in the 200m, Sophomore Hayes Grissom and Freshman Derek Webb in the javelin, and sophomore Caniggia Raynor in the hammer and discus. The women’s team had freshmen Maddi Osmundson qualify for javelin, freshman Jalisa Brice qualify for the triple jump and sophomores Monet Jackson and Mikayla Vette qualify in the hammer.

BASEBALL The Cavs split doubleheaders with both Highland CC and Neosho County, on March 20 and March 29 respectively. Their season record stands at 12-11 while the team is 8-6 in conference play. If the weather cooperates, the squad will host five of their next six doubleheaders.

SOFTBALL The Lady Cavs have started the season strong with a 15-9 record. The squad is also hoping home field will help them continue to improve on their 8-4 conference record. The team will host their next eight games.

Compiled By Mac Moore, sports editor, at mmoore82@jccc.edu

APRIL 4, 2013  VOL 35 

A missed opportunity By Mac Moore There was a chance. A chance to put a face on a disorder that is rarely talked about and usually overlooked as shyness. He had all the tools to become that face. Now Royce White is telling the Rio Grande Valley Vipers that he does not want to play for them in the postseason. “Good,” the D-League team says, “he isn’t worth it.” Royce White has made it clear from the get-go that his anxiety disorder would always be a factor in his game. Considering the pressure of being a basketball player, having a disorder that strikes you the hardest when stress is placed on you cannot be good. While playing for the Cyclones, White led the team in all five major statistical categories. According to ESPN, White is 6’8” and 270 lbs yet has amazing ball handling skills and athleticism. This led the Rockets to select White 16th overall in the 2012 draft. His potential outweighed the negatives his anxiety disorder brought with it. It is too bad the anxiety is not the only baggage that White carries. White was suspended for his freshman season at Minnesota for attempting to steal $100 worth of merchandise and running over a security guard. I just don’t get it. One moment I see White as the possibility that we can teach the masses about anxiety disorder. His first year in the NBA, he held the Rockets accountable for providing the necessary support for mental health issues.

When everything seems to be resolved and White is scheduled to start practicing with the team, the Rockets report that White didn’t show up for practices. After getting the D-League assignment, White refuses to play, saying in a statement that the playing environment was “unsafe”. Yet, without a notable change to the situation, White starts to play for the D-League squad. I don’t want to speculate, but his mind seemed to change once the Rockets suspended him without pay. Maybe the fight against the bad ole NBA that doesn’t have the correct protocols for dealing with mental health issues is only worth fighting when you can still cash their checks. The point is all but moot if White doesn’t get on the court. I don’t see a possibility for increasing awareness on the subject if White doesn’t start to become that superstar player that he has the potential to become. I remember reading the Myron Medcalf article on ESPN.com, right after White put up 18 points and 17 rebounds against my Jayhawks. His anxiety and fear of flying caused him to cancel his visit to Kentucky. This was his life. Nobody can guarantee you a second chance at D-I basketball. White nearly gave up his for a mental health issue that few people even know about. The debilitating effects of White’s general anxiety disorder took my breath away. I just watched White dominate a college basketball game like few people ever can. Yet his Superman performance doesn’t make him invincible. I know the feeling White felt as he asked his mother to cancel his flight to Lexington. My first day of classes at JCCC, I sat at the K-10 connector bus stop in Lawrence waiting for the 6:30am bus. Then the 7 o’clock. Then the 7:30. Finally the 8am

ISSUE 13

SPORTS COLUMN bus. I couldn’t make myself get on. A cloud covered over my thoughts and emotions. I had an unnecessary fear of something that had been done for the last 12 years. Sure it’s college. There is an expected level of anxiousness involved with this “new” thing. This is something totally different. As I awaited the bus that would get me to class on time, I threw up. Twice. A feeling overtook me that day. It’s the same feeling I get when I walk into a room full of strangers. It’s the same feeling I get when I send a text message that I really need a response to. It’s the same feeling I got when I got suspended in junior high for skipping class. It’s a chill down my spine. It’s tunnel vision. It’s a shaking that takes over my whole body. It is an anti-adrenaline that zaps all your energy. It’s a sick feeling in the pit of your stomach. It’s an extreme fear that should be reserved for victims in the Saw franchise. It’s an overload of the brain, worrying about everything and nothing all at the same time. Like White, I suffer from anxiety. When people joke around about being creatures of habit, I chuckle. If I’m not doing the exact same thing, if I’m introduced to something new, I immediately tense up. My eyes find a spot on the ground so that I can entertain only my thoughts in an effort to calm myself down. When I first found out that White suffered from anxiety, I assumed this was the chance for people to truly understand. He seemed liked the perfect candidate. Now he’s not even important to a semi-pro team as they enter the post-season. What could have been?

Contact Mac Moore, sports editor, at mmoore82@jccc.edu

The college’s golf team starts spring season By Joe Hofbauer After a break during the winter months, the Men’s golf team is back and ready to get into full swing. The first half of the season was played in fall where the college’s golf team played in Hesston, Wichita and Manhattan - earning first place in all three matches. Now that the break is over, the team is ready to start right where they left off. “Our work ethic is very good,” said coach Lafayette Norwood. “Even during the winter months and early spring, we are out there on the driving ranges. My main goals are kind of basic. The first thing I’m trying to do is make sure we win our conference. We win that, solidify that, that gives us a lot of confidence.” The team has one thing on their minds: winning. This team is chipping, putting and driving their way to the top. “We all just wanted to win individually, really badly,” said Freshman Trevor Tannahill. “When you have people wanting

to win individually, you bring it together and take each score and add them together. We still want to win, we’re not done yet. We’re trying to win every one until [Nationals].” Not only is the golf team as a whole successful, but their individual results have been impressive as well. Freshman Trevor Tannahill is tied with sophomore Mario Funcic for second place, freshman Alex Forristal third place, freshman Gage Scheer fifth place, and sophomore Joey Morrissey eleventh place. These individuals who share a love for the sport of golf have come together to form a winning, cohesive unit who know how to have a good time while keeping the lead. “It’s not like a couple of guys like each other and the other couple of guys don’t,” said freshman Alex Forristal. “We all get along, we all have fun at practice and that helps a lot.”

Contact Joe Hofbauer, reporting correspondent, at jhofbaue@jccc.edu

After patiently waiting for the snow to melt, Mario Funcic practiced with the Men’s Golf Team on the greens on March 29. Photo by Mackenzie Gripe


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SPORTS CALENDAR BASEBALL

SPORTS 15

Javelin thrower eyes national championship

6 p.m. Wednesday, April 3 v. Baker University (doubleheader) 4 p.m. Friday, April 5 v. Cowley CC (doubleheader) 1 p.m. Saturday, April 6 v. Cowley CC (doubleheader) 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 10 v. MCC - Maple Woods

By Mac Moore

Sophomore Hayes Grissom is a javelin thrower for the Men’s Outdoor Track and Field team. Last year at the National Junior College Athletics Association (NJCAA) National Championships, Grissom placed second with his top throw of 63.74 meters. Grissom placed fourth at the Arkansas Spring Invitational on March 29-30 with a throw of 64.01 meters.

SOFTBALL 2 p.m. Friday, April 5 v. Cloud County CC (doubleheader) 2 p.m. Saturday, April 6 v. Brown Mackie (doubleheader) 2 p.m. Monday, April 8 v. Fort Scott CC (doubleheader)

TENNIS 4 p.m. Thursday, April 4 v. Missouri Valley College (Men’s and Women’s) 2 p.m. Friday, April 5 v. Lewis & Clark (Men’s) 9 a.m. Saturday, April 6 v. Lewis & Clark (Men’s) 3 p.m. Monday, April 8 v. William Jewell (Men’s) 12 p.m. Wednesday, April 10 v. Seward County CC (Men’s and Women’s 1:30 p.m. Thursday, April 11 v. Barton CC (Men’s and Women’s) 1 p.m. Saturday, April 13 v. Southwest Baptist (Men’s and Women’s)

Compiled by Mac Moore, sports editor, at mmoore82@jccc.edu

THE INDOOR TEAM FINISHED THEIR SEASON ON A STRONG NOTE, DO YOU THINK THAT THERE WILL BE ANY DROP OFF BETWEEN THEN AND THE START OF THE OUTDOOR SEASON? Not really. Our coach keeps us pretty busy. If anything, I’d say we took advantage of that time off to continue to improve and get stronger. WHAT ARE YOUR EXPECTATIONS FOR THE SEASON, BOTH PERSONALLY AND AS A TEAM?

I expect my teammates to set new personal records. I’ve seen all the countless hours and hard work they’ve put in. I’ve been right there with them. There’s no reason they can’t be some of the best competitors in their events. As for myself, I expect nothing less than a national championship. I’ve sacrificed a lot to get where I am and I honestly believe I cannot fail in achieving the success I desire. WHAT WILL BE THE BIGGEST OBSTACLE IN THE WAY OF A NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIP? The biggest obstacle I face is a probably how excited and psyched I get right before I compete. I usually harness it pretty well but I definitely over think my goals and let the excitement get to me in some of the bigger meets, like Arkansas or KU Relays. FAVORITE MOVIE? Pulp Fiction or Cool Runnings. FAVORITE ARTIST?

Sophomore Hays Grissom attempts to surpass his personal record of 222 feet during practice on April 1, 2013. Photo by Daniel De Zamacona

These days it’s Ellie Goulding. The Bassnectar remix of her song “Lights” gets me pretty pumped to throw.

Contact Mac Moore, sports editor, at mmoore82@jccc.edu

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2012 SEPT 06,

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The Campus Ledger - Vol. 35 Issue 13  

The official student-run publication of Johnson County Communtiy College, Overland Park, Kansas

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