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VOLUME 99, ISSUE 5 919 530 7116/CAMPUSECHO@NCCU.EDU WWW.CAMPUSECHO.COM

1801 FAYETTEVILLE STREET DURHAM, NC 27707

Campus . . . . . . . . Q&A . . . . . . . . . . . Beyond . . . . . . . . A&E . . . . . . . . . . . Sports. . . . . . . . . . Sports Feature . . Classified . . . . . . . Opinion . . . . . . . .

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A&E

Beyond NCCU

Campus

Sports Feature

They’re passionate. They’re exceptional. They’re NCCU’s dance groups.

Are you left-handed? Here’s the most recent research on what that means.

Want to write a comment about your professor? Then go to Ratemyprofessor.com.

NCCU’s debut Division I basketball game against the Blue Devils

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Campus Echo MIA: black men Universities are attracting fewer and fewer male stu dents, but at HBCUs this disparity is critical BY TRAVIS D. RUFFIN ECHO STAFF REPORTER

Walk across any American university campus and you’ll notice something striking: There

are more women than men. According to the 2006 U.S. Census, 56 percent of all university undergraduates are women. At HBCUs the issue is even more pronounced. According to the N.C. Central University Office of Research, Evaluation and Planning, black undergraduate females outnumber black males nearly 2 to 1. In the fall of 2006, 3,732 black

undergraduate females and 1,911 black undergraduate males were enrolled at NCCU. These enrollment figures reflect the applicant pool. In 2005, 3,321 females and just 1,143 males applied to NCCU. Experts say there are a number of causes for the low number of black males in college. Low high school graduation rates for black males are a spe-

cial concern. According to the Department of Education, about 12 percent of black males drop out of high school. This contrasts with 7 percent for white males. Other related issues include a lack of role models, growing up in single-parent households, and

n See BLACK MEN Page 2

MFL Dept turmoil Classes teacherless well into fall BY NATALIA N. FARRER

SAME MAYOR| NEW TERM

ECHO STAFF REPORTER

For the first three weeks of the semester, several Spanish classes were left without instructors. The four classes in question – two level I courses, a level II and a level III class – were not assigned a professor when the fall semester began. “We would come to class, be there for five minutes and different professors would come in and tell us to sign the roll,” said psychology sophomore Candace Washington, a Spanish I student. Marco Polo Hernández Cuevas, an associate professor of Spanish, said the problem began with the decision by Minnie Sangster, interim chair of the department, to give teaching load reductions to three faculty members, Cristina Rodriguez Cabral, Horacio Xaubet and Lina Cofresi. The teaching load reductions were issued so that the professors would have time to ensure that the same

n See MFL Page 2

Durham Mayor Bill Bell prepares for his second term in his office in the UDI Business Park. SEBASTIAN FRANCES/Echo Staff Photographer

fter a long and grueling campaign, Mayor Bill Bell recently won a second term as the mayor of Durham. Bell, who was endorsed by presidential candidate Senator Barack Obama, beat candidate Thomas Stith by 16 percent of

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the vote. Bell says he is ready to build a better Durham, with initiatives focused on removing neighborhood blight and reducing crime. He also will continue to focus on downtown development.

INSIDE Question & Answer with Mayor Bill Bell.

SEATTLE TIMES (MCT)

SEATTLE — Speaking at Seattle’s Benaroya Hall, Former President Bill Clinton Thursday afternoon urged a gathering of more than 100 of the nation’s mayors to embrace climate change as an economic opportunity, saying that their involvement in fighting global warming is crucial to show the rest of the world that it can be done. “They (developing countries) won’t do it anywhere unless we can prove that we don’t have to become poorer for it,” Clinton told the audience, gathered for a climate summit by the United States Conference of Mayors. “This is an opportunity. It’s not a burden.” To help spur the movement, Clinton Thursday announced a new program between his private Clinton Foundation and the Conference of Mayors to make energy-efficient products more affordable for 1,100 U.S. cities by

Former President Bill Clinton addresses the U.S. Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Summit on Nov. 1, in Seattle. DEAN RUTZ/Seattle Times (MCT)

helping them buy as groups and get volume discounts. His Clinton Climate Initiative has already started a similar project with 40 of the world’s

largest cities, along with several major banks that help finance projects to increase energy efficiency. Clinton said energy-efficiency

BY KENALI BATTLE ECHO STAFF REPORTER

programs represent some of the easiest ways to reduce greenhouse emissions, by conserving energy in inefficient buildings and other infrastructure. A new emphasis on such “clean” technology is also a key to tapping into new industries with growth potential, which could help turn back a decline in real wages in the U.S., Clinton told audience, which greeted his talk with enthusiastic applause. Earlier today, Clinton’s former Vice President, Al Gore, told the mayors that the nations of the world should hasten negotiations on a new and ambitious treaty on global warming. Speaking via satellite from Nashville, Tenn., the recent winner of the Nobel Peace Prize also called for a halt to construction of all new coal-fired power plants unless they can be equipped to capture and store the climate-changing gas they spew.

Imagine a customer calling a company and receiving exceptional service. The phone rings two times. Forget about the holding music — a smiling voice answers, ready to help in any way. The customer is politely transferred to the appropriate department. Within five minutes, the problem is solved. The customer is happy, and, 24 hours later, a follow-up call from the company confirms the customer’s satisfaction. Students say this perJudith Bell fect scenario is not played out often enough at N.C. Central University, and that NCCU is known more for its slipping customer service than for its verdant, sloping hills. Judith Bell, director of staff training and development in human services, says that that will be changing soon. “For the past two years, I’ve been offering quality service classes,” said Bell. “It’s an initiative to improve customer service at NCCU.” The goal of the classes is to create a common set of values, attitudes and skills to create a service culture at NCCU. According to NCCU’s 2004-2009 Strategic Plan, one of the six core values is superb customer service. Object ive 8.4 is to provide timely, efficient, effective and customer-friendly services. The customer service workshops are required for all faculty and staff; a cus-

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Clinton, Gore tell mayors to lead fight against global warming BY WARREN CORNWALL

NCCU’s charm offensive


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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2007

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John Baker mourned NCCU football star, Wake Co. sheriff BY AKILAH MCMULLAN ECHO STAFF WRITER

On Nov. 5, hundreds gathered at St. Matthew’s AME Church in Raleigh to celebrate and h o n o r Sheriff John H. Baker Jr., w h o founded a l e g a c y built on John Baker firsts. Jr. Baker, who died a t 7 2 , b e g a n making history early in his life when he became the first player from N.C. Central University to be drafted to the National Football League in 1958. “He was proud of his school. He thought he was the greatest because he was an Eagle,” said Juanita Baker, John’s wife of 48 years.

“There was a continuous rivalry because I graduated from Shaw,” said Mrs. Baker. Over his 12-year career as a defensive lineman, Baker played for the Los Angeles Rams, Pittsburgh Steelers and Detroit Lions. Yet another first came in 1978 when Baker was elected the first AfricanAmerican sheriff of Raleigh since reconstruction. Baker served as Raleigh’s sheriff for 24 consecutive years. But his involvement in the community would continue. Baker was an advocate for educating inner-city youth. “He believed in education,” said Mrs. Baker. “He believed in our black colleges and universities and he felt that the greatest of the great could come from any HBCU in the system.” He founded the John

H. Baker Jr. Scholarship Fund to assist lowerincome students with the expenses of higher education. When asked how Baker should be remembered, Mrs. Baker said, “My husband was a religious man.” But to many people around the community and beyond, he was much more. “I never realized how many lives my husband had touched,” she said. “Can you believe I got a call all the way from Hawaii? “We just saw him as daddy and husband — just an ordinary man, and he wanted us to see him that way,” she said. Baker was an ordinary man with extraordinary firsts. “He was an individual who was down to earth and a person who never lost the common touch,” said Mrs. Baker.

College funds may ease costs at HBCUs BY NATALIA N. FARRER ECHO STAFF REPORTER

On Sept. 27, President Bush signed the College Cost Reduction and Access Act into law. The Act will boost financial aid by $20 billion over the next five years. Congress said that these increases will come at no cost to taxpayers. The legislation aims to slash interest rates on subsidized student loans, make student loan payments more manageable and provide loan forgiveness for public servants. The Act will increase the maximum Pell Grant scholarship by $1,350 to $5,400 over the next five years. School of Law professor Irving Joyner doubts that the Pell Grant increase will greatly impact N.C. Central University and other HBCUs. “The amount of money that you can get will increase, but tuition will also increase,” Joyner said. “So this will not get more students into the pot. It will give more money to the same number of students.” Political Science Chair Jeffrey Elliot argues that the legislation could benefit NCCU students, “depending on how significant you view a $490,

$690 and $1,090 increase.” “It’s not a bill to simply give money to HBCUs,” said Elliot. “It’s aimed at making college more accessible to students, ensuring increased tuition costs don’t prohibit students from attending college.” The Act also will give $510 million to HBCUs and other minority-serving schools. HBCUs are institutions established before 1964 with the mission of educating black Americans. The Bush administration has recognized HBCUs as deserving of legislative distinction and financial support. Yet black institutions have historically received less funding than their majority white counterparts, said Joyner. “From day one, the historically black campuses have been under-funded, while the big flagship schools have been favored because they have more political clout,” he said. From 1993–2002, federal support to HBCUs increased by 60 percent, while federal support for all institutions increased by 79 percent, Bush’s Board of Advisors on HBCUs noted in a 2005 report. Almost 30 percent of the 16-campus UNC sys-

tem are HBCUs, but they received just 10 percent of UNC-system state appropriation funds in 1997, according to the N.C. Common Sense Foundation. “There is a disparity in the formulas that they use and the decisions they make to grant money to historically black campuses,” said Joyner. “Consequently, we’re getting the crumbs from the table.” The passage of the College Cost Reduction and Access Act has overshadowed the earlier debate over a similar House plan. On July 19, the House approved an amendment to increase funding solely to HBCUs by $125 million, in addition to the amount proposed by the 2008 Education Department Appropriations Act. The amendment was an ambitious proposal, adding money to legislation that Bush threatened to veto if the funding levels exceeded his budget request. However, the amendment was shelved by the Senate and could remain inactive until Dec. 2008. The Senate can consider the amendment as part of the Act or as a standalone proposition — or completely disregard it.

MFL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 courses taught by different professors have the same curriculum, textbooks and activities. Two of the professors, Xaubet and Cofresi, taught at UNC-Chapel Hill prior to coming to NCCU just this year. Hernández said that favoritism played a role in the decision to hire the two and give them course reductions. He said that Sangster knew the professors beforehand because she studied at UNC. But Sangster tells a different story. She said, “the foreign language community is not that large around here. Both of them have experience coordinating at other universities. “It is the prerogative of the chair to make the decision that is the best for the department.” According to Sangster, the only reason classes went without teachers was that the University failed to get contracts completed before the semester began. But Hernández insists the decision to provide course releases to the faculty was what led to the teacherless classes. He also said that the amount of work involved in

coordinating the courses did not warrant the course reduction, especially when there were classes missing teachers. He said he had served as a coordinator and made curriculum revisions in spring 2006, and had not received similar course reductions. “I was teaching in France at the time through the Fulbright Exchange Program, so I can’t answer for that,” Sangster counters. “Until January of 2007, I was a regular professor.” Louise Maynor, chair of the English and mass communication department, said faculty in her department are given a one-course reduction “if they have a significant responsibility.” Hernández voiced his concern in a formal complaint to Provost Beverly Jones because, he claims, it led to overcrowded Spanish classes. In the complaint, he pointed out that Spanish I, II and III classes have 37.05, 30.6 and 29.7 students on average. The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages recommends 15 students as the ideal per class. But Sangster said the department is not at fault.

She said the decision to increase the course sizes from the initial caps of 25 and 28 students came from the University. Hernández said he is still waiting for his grievance to be addressed by the University. The faculty handbook mandates that a grievance committee, whose members are nominated by the faculty as a whole, decides whether to accept complaints from faculty and staff. George Wilson, chair of the Faculty Senate and criminal justice professor, said a formal grievance must go through the chair, then to the dean, and then to the provost. If the grievance is still not resolved, the provost must submit it to the grievance committee. Wilson said he did not receive Hernandez’ grievance, and that Hernandez did not submit it through the proper channels. There may not be an easy resolution in sight. Hernández insisted that the goings-on in the department have created tension. “As much outside pressures as the students have to handle, some stability in the school would be nice,” Hernandez said.

BLACK MEN CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 negative media images — all of which contribute to high imprisonment rates for young black males. According to a study conducted by the Justice Policy Institute in 1980, 143,000 African American men were behind bars while roughly 463,700 were in college. However, two decades later, more than 791,600 black men are behind bars and 603,032 are pursuing a college education. “Many of these [imprisoned] boys don’t have a father in their home because he is either dead or serving time in prison,” said Arnold Dennis, director of NCCU’s Juvenile Justice Institute. “Young black mothers are forced to work two jobs just to provide for their families, and they have no other choice but to leave their teenage sons unsupervised,” Dennis said. “This gives them the opportunity to skip school, hang out on the streets, and get into major trouble. It may be sad, but it happens every day.” NCCU history professor Jim Harper said that negative media images are a part of the problem. “If you turn on the TV, you

will see that young black men are not being portrayed in a positive manner,” he said. “They are shown as being ghetto, ignorant, uneducated and up to no good,” Harper said. “Even on a positive show like ‘My Wife and Kids,’ they have a son who is portrayed as dumb and stupid. That is sending the wrong message to our kids.” Some students even put some of the blame on hip hop culture. “Instead of looking up to lawyers and doctors, a lot of black guys want to be like 50 Cent or some other rapper,” political science senior Amy Askew said. “They are trying to get that fast money,” Askew said. “They don’t want to go to college and actually work for it.” A few NCCU faculty members say they take pride in knowing they can make a difference in the lives of their male students. “The fact that I can be a positive role model to these young men is one of the main reasons why I enjoy teaching here so much,” said English professor James Pearce.

“White society is not as anti-intellectual [as black society],” Pearce said. “For some reason, a lot of young black men think that it’s not cool to be smart, but that’s not true.” While statistics continue to show that more young black men are being incarcerated than educated, many people are hopeful that the problem can be resolved with the proper measures. “First of all, we need to stop pointing the finger at everyone else,” said Dennis. “Our churches, schools and civic groups need to come together and create programs that are geared toward helping our young black men cope with the problems that they are faced with in today’s society.” “That is the first step in getting these young men out of jail and back into school where they belong.” Harper agreed. “Our black lawyers, doctors, college professors and other professionals need to take time out of their busy schedules to be mentors to these troubled young men,” Harper said. “That would help tremendously.”

SERVICE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 tomer service component will be included on all University employee evaluations. The two- to four-hour classes will be offered continuously throughout the year. “If we want to train students to be the best, then we have to be the best,” said Bell. The classes will cover four common issues in public relations: how to deal with a difficult customer, quality service via the telephone and how to say “no” in a polite manner. The program will emphasized empathy. “It is very important to let the customer know that you are aware of their feelings, especially if you can’t give them what they want,” said Bell. Bell has worked in customer service in private businesses and state government for more than 20 years. “These programs work,

and I truly believe they make a better company,” said Bell. History senior Danielle McGowan said, “I’m a graduating senior and I’m still waiting on my financial aid phone call confirmation since freshman year. That’s a shame.” While they welcome the new initiative, some students are skeptical. “The faculty had to have some type of interview to get the job,” said biology senior Leigh Barnwell. “If good customer service wasn’t a test, then how do they expect to improve it now?” “It’s worth a try and it might work, but I doubt it,” she said. Bell encourages all faculty, students and staff to participate in this program. “It’s not mandatory for students. However, like our faculty, they have to work with the public as well, and it’s important to have the skills to do so,” said Bell.

When students were asked about customer service at NCCU, the most common complaints were: lack of returned phone calls, late checks, rude individuals and long lines. “If everyone attends these meetings and learns how to deal with each other, then maybe the customer response and service will be better,” said McGowan. “I may even go to one.” Bell said, “We are the University. Whatever an individual does, it reflects on NCCU.” “The telephone is the door to NCCU. Many customers won’t ever meet us in person, but the telephone conversation will have a lasting effect. “It is all about changing a culture,” she said. “If we learn to treat one another with dignity and respect, we will grow.” Bell is developing a calendar of events and course offerings.


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Student Health combats STDs Vaccination, tests made easy BY CANDICE MITCHELL

STD FACTS

ECHO STAFF WRITER

Take a look at North Carolina’s 2006 HIV/STD Surveillance Report and you’ll find some shocking statistics: 1,331 chlamydia and 770 gonorrhea cases were reported in Durham County alone and more than 20 million people in the U.S. are infected with the human papilloma virus, also known as HPV. N.C. Central University’s Student Health Center has taken the necessary steps to combat these rising numbers through education, awareness and services for the student body. Gardasil, a three-dose series, will help protect young women between the ages of 9-26 years of age from at least four types of HPV. Tanya Bass, health promotion coordinator, said the vaccination is beneficial to both men and women. “HPV is one of those things you get from skin-toskin contact.” Bass said “those that receive the shot are generally protected from those types of HPV, and they won’t pass the virus on to their male partner.” One of the newest initiatives coming to NCCU will be the HPV vaccination, Gardasil. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection. HPV can cause genital warts and cervical cancer. According to the American College Health Association, more than 20 million people in the U.S. are infected with HPV, and about 6.2 million more get infected each year. The Student Health Center recently joined a statewide campaign that tests for both chlamydia and gonorrhea using alternatives to traditional vaginal and urethral swabbing. A campaign called “Guess Who’s Got It,” funded by The North Carolina Infertility Prevention Project, included urine test for both Chlamydia and gonorrhea. On Sept. 17, NCCU was the first school in the state to administer this test. “The turnout was very good. We used 80 out of 100 tests,” said Bass. “This test is more malefriendly because it is less invasive,” she said. Bass said Student Health hopes to obtain funding to provide the tests at least once a semester.

n In 2006, there were 770 cases of gonorrhea in Durham County. n In 2006, there were 1,331 cases of chlamydia in Durham County. n In 2005, 15,072 cases of gonorrhea were reported in North Carolina. n In 2005, 31,183 cases of chlamydia were reported in North Carolina. n More than 20 million people in the U.S. are infected with HPV. n About 6.2 million people get infected with HPV each year.

Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted disease caused by the bacterium Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which can grow and multiply easily in the warm, moist areas of the reproductive tract, including the cervix, uterus and urethra. Chlamydia is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis, and can damage a woman’s reproductive organs. Many men and women do not experience symptoms from either of the sexually transmitted diseases. NCCU public health education junior Dominique Jones said it’s important to educate the community about sexual health. “It is vital for HBCU students to know their status in order to prevent the spread of disease and because of the increase of outbreaks in the AfricanAmerican community,” said Jones, a former intern with Partners in Caring at Duke University Medical Center. Bass agreed that students should be proactive to protect themselves. “I think this is the only time you should be selfish,” she said. Both Jones and Bass notice the changes occurring in Student Health. “The open-mindedness of the University itself is changing,” said Jones. “There are new initiatives for students to take advantage of on campus,” said Jones, remarking on the play “Lonely Words.” The play explores the impact of HIV on the African-American community. “Being proactive in sexual education is the most important thing,” said Bass.

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Cadets in the classroom Students get military training and a degree in ROTC program BY KENNETH FITZ ECHO STAFF WRITER

Students. Future military leaders. Warriors. These are a few of the words that describe the 15 cadets of N.C. Central University’s Army ROTC program. NCCU’s ROTC program operates jointly with Duke University to form the Blue Devil Battalion. “We are one program with two schools,” said military science professor Lt. Col. Mark Trivus. Trivus was assigned to the program in June and plans to double the number of cadets. “We have many incentives for those who are interested,” he said. Incentives such as paid tuition, scholarships, book allowances and monthly stipends help ease the financial burden of college. Those who receive incentives from ROTC agree to serve as commissioned officers on active duty or in the Army reserve upon graduating. ROTC will “test you mentally and physically with the goal of making you a leader,” said history and political science senior Gregory Maull. Maull is a cadet in the

ROTC program who hopes to work with tanks in the Armor division when he graduates and receives his commission as an Army officer. “ROTC also teaches you time management,” said Maull who balances his time between the ROTC program and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. “I love it,” said nursing sophomore and cadet Renita McCarter. “It builds character, increases self-esteem and makes you see things in a different way.” Maull and McCarter are not new to the military lifestyle. Both cadets were born in Germany at different military hospitals and have family members who served in the Armed Forces. Recently, Maull and McCarter were selected by their ROTC instructors to attend the National Ethics in America Conference at West Point Military Academy in New York, Oct. 21-25. NCCU’s ROTC department started in 1982. Ronald Bailey, an accounting junior and cadet, is the only cadet in the Blue Devil Battalion with active duty experience, and was selected for

NCCU ROTC cadets David Taylor, Shanea Carter, Marquita Washington, Tekita McNeil, Ronald Bailey. SAVIN JOSEPH/Echo Staff Photographer

the Army’s “Green to Gold” program, allowing him to attend school and become a commissioned officer. Bailey was on his second deployment in Iraq when he learned of his acceptance. “I wanted more out of my career in the Army,” said Bailey about why he applied to the program. “I wanted more responsibility in the decision-making process. “Being in this program also presented something new.” Bailey formerly worked on computer systems as an Information Technology Sergeant. He said ROTC “allows

me to do things that I wouldn’t normally do in my regular job.” Colette Thompson, administrative support associate for the ROTC department, said the provides camaraderie and is a must for “anyone with a deficiency in discipline.” ROTC “doesn’t automatically mean deployment or drill, either” she said, explaining that several areas of the Army don’t see combat. Those interested in the ROTC program may go to the Department of Military Science in the Taylor Education Building, Room 103 or call 530-7195.

My professor is: a) tight or b) wack BY MARQUITA MCALPINE ECHO STAFF WRITER

Many students may not know about it, but there’s a way to test-drive university professors. It’s called ratemyprofessors.com. This free website allows students to view other student comments about college professors. Students can rate their professors based on easiness, helpfulness, clarity, quality and whether they would recommend the professor. Family consumer science and child development senior Dwayne Gray heard about the website last year from one of his professors and thinks it is a good idea. “Students are spending more time online nowadays, and this website gives students easy access to give feedback about professors,” said Gray. “Although we submit surveys at the end of the semester, students never get to find out how other students rated their professors,” he said. Students also can comment on the cost of course

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textbooks, the amount of homework required, and whether attendance is mandatory. By incorporating all these factors, students can get insight into what is expected from a professor. Student comments can range from praise to disdain. One student says this about an N.C. Central University professor: “She is the best teacher! She is great at relating the material to real-life situations.” Another says this about a different NCCU professor: “Worse prof ever, worse then evil, he doesn't understand students and he is rude.” Currently, NCCU has 109 professors listed on the

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website. Students can add professors if they are not already listed. “I think the website is very beneficial because when I transferred to NCCU, I was very curious to find out the teaching styles of my future professors,” said Tracy Benjamin, a criminal justice junior. “So I logged onto the website.” However, Benjamin said students should still try to meet with professors to create their own opinions, rather than relying solely on someone else’s views. Students are not the only ones who have hooked into the online trend. Professors also log on to review comments and are spreading the word about

ratemyprofessors.com. Professors may add their rebuttal to posted comments. In fact, a link on the home page directs viewers to a section of mtvU.com called “Professors Strike Back.” Here, professors respond via video to comments made about them. Rebecca Soper, a speech and mass communication lecturer, said no student should take a course without knowing something about the professor. “It’s like playing Russian roulette if you don’t become familiar with your professors before registering, because no two students learn alike and no two professors teach alike,” said Soper.


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Job planning 101 The right career Career Services wants student to plan early BY RAENA BOSTON ECHO STAFF REPORTER

The phone in Tonya Winchester’s office is constantly abuzz. An appointment schedule lies open on her desk, while advertisements for an upcoming career fair and mock interview decorate the walls. From helping students tweak their resumes to posting six-figure job offerings, Winchester, associate director of University Career Services, is N.C. Central’s guru of all things internship and careerrelated. But for most students at NCCU, a trip to Career Services is not on the career path. “I don’t think it clicks with students to come and I don’t think it makes sense to them to come before their senior year,” said Winchester. The first step for students is registering with career services through the websites Optimal Resume and MonsterTRAK. After completing a resume with Optimal Resume, students upload it to MonsterTRAK, where they can begin their search for summer jobs, full-time jobs, and internships. Through MonserTRAK, Winchester can search the profiles and resumes of students alerting them to opportunities. Less than half of NCCU’s student population is registered on MonsterTRAK. Not being registered hurts students. They will miss out on oncampus interviews, as interviewing companies first advertise with MonsterTRAK. These companies then

sift through the pool of applicants from which they select the students they will interview on campus. After students register, the most important component in getting involved with Career Services is to go through one-on-one career counseling, during which students can begin to envision and develop a potential career. Advisers at Career Services help students put together a career plan with specific goals, as well as help them find a job. “One-on-one sessions delve deeper than a resume-building session,” said Winchester. “We discuss what your values and skills are, and how to find companies and organizations that match your value system,” she said. Career planning also helps students expand their network. “Eighty percent of jobs are acquired through networking,” Winchester said. Networking, however, is not synonymous with placement. Fortune 500 companies contact Career Services and specify what they want in job candidates. For example, when Wells Fargo contacted Career Services, Winchester contacted the School of Business, which sent student resumes to her. Winchester weeded through these resumes and sent them to Wells Fargo. Companies such as Wells Fargo are moving away from career placement, in search of applicants who want to work specifically for them. Career Services does not attribute the low number of student participants to lack

of visibility. Winchester said most students hear about their services through their Facebook accounts, which has all of their contact information. Career Services also advertises job postings on AudioNet. Career workshops are held Monday through Wednesday nights in residence halls and in the Alfonso Elder Student Union. Career Services will schedule programs on Saturday’s at the request of student groups. Career Services also offer career fairs in the spring and fall. The spring career fair will be held March 27. Wal-Mart sponsored the career fair last fall. This was the first time NCCU ever had a sponsor. Career Services will host mock interviews in association with the Environmental Protection Agency on Nov. 15. Mock interviews provide students the chance to practice their interviewing skills and get feedback from professionals. The interviews will be held on the grounds of the EPA in Research Triangle Park. Transportation will be provided by Career Services. To be eligible, students must be registered on Optimal Resume and must have attended the information session that was held on Nov. 8. Career Services is open Monday through Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. University Career Services can be reached at 530-6337.

Peace Corps deputy director to speak at NCCU Dr. Jody R. Olsen, deputy director of the Peace Corps, will speak at N.C. Central University on Thursday, Nov. 15, at 10:40 a.m., in the Miller-Morgan Building Auditorium. Her topic of discussion will be The Peace Corps Experience: An Exceptional Opportunity for Working Overseas. Since the founding of Peace Corps, thousands of African Americans have served as volunteers overseas and then brought the benefits of that experience back home. The session will give all interested individuals an opportunity to learn about the challenges, benefits and rewards of being a Peace Corps volunteer.

Olsen was nominated by President George W. Bush and confirmed by the United States Senate in 2002 to serve as the deputy director of the Peace Corps. Her distinguished career began in the Peace Corps' earliest years, when she served as a volunteer in Tunisia from 1966 to 1968, teaching English and developing community health programs. In 1979, she was the country director for the Peace Corps' mission in Togo. During her tenure, she managed all aspects of the agency's programs incountry, which focused on education, health, and agriculture. By 1981, Olsen was serving as regional director,

United Christian Campus Ministry 525 Nelson Street, NCCU Campus 8th Annual See and Taste Gala

BY AXUM ABEBE ECHO STAFF WRITER

People attend college to get broader exposure to different subjects, discover their interests and passions and begin to pursue their careers. Students and graduates of N.C. Central University are among the dreamers who are working hard toward their dream jobs. Carla Aaron-Lopez, a NCCU alumna, is a secondyear MFA student in photography at the Savannah College School of Arts. Aaron-Lopez’s dream job is working as a fine arts and commercial photographer. Lopez became interested in photography four years ago when she picked up a camera and found that she had a natural talent for taking pictures. She then started taking pictures for the Campus Echo. Besides pursuing her MFA, Aaron-Lopez is working toward her dream by networking with professionals in the field and working part -time with professional photographers, models and make-up artists. She also participates in group art exhibitions. Aaron-Lopez has been featured as an upcoming photographer in Tribe magazine, a North Carolina-based publication. While Aaron-Lopez is confident she will achieve her dream job, she is flexible and said she would be equally happy with any career that centers on photography. This may include teaching university students digital photography or working for an art gallery that hosts photography exhibits. Her back-up plan is to work as a journalist, a field in which she currently works as a commentator for the website allhiphop.com. Aaron-Lopez advises

N.C. Central University – LeRoy T. Walker Complex, 600 Nelson St., Durham, NC

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Musical Guest: Ad Lib

If so, find out about the N.C. Health Careers Access Program at NCCU.

Proceeds benefit ministries of United Christian Campus Ministry

Michael D. Page Campus Minister

January 19, 2008

For more information or to get involved in Campus Ministries contact us at 530-5263 or e-mail us at mpage@nccu.edu

an MBA from NCCU, is a resolution representative analyst for Fidelity Investments at Research Triangle Park. He said he began dreaming of being a businessman as a child. While attending high school in Ethiopia, he took physics, accounting, financing, bookkeeping, debits and credits, and math. Fidelity Investments is hired by companies like the Bank of America to handle 401K and pension plans for its customers. Egzi’s job entails working in a group to answer the questions that Fidelity’s phone center is not able to answer. Egzi discovered this job opportunity through NCCU’s Career Services office. He visited the office frequently while working on his MBA and attending career fairs. Egzi credits his father, who is Chief Finance Officer at the United Nations for encouraging him to pursue an MBA. “I idolize my dad because I saw him put in a lot of effort,” Egzi said. “He worked long hours and went to work on the weekends, and I see where that has gotten him today,” said Egzi. Aaron-Lopez, Durand and Egzi all have made progress toward fulfilling careers. Each of them have a clear understanding of what they want to do, while preparing to take the next step. The similarities among these three motivated students and alumnae suggest a formula for achieving one’s dream job: Have a clear idea of what you want to do,. search for opportunities,. and network. “Take the first step in faith,” said Martin Luther King Jr. “You don’t have to see the whole staircase, just take the first step.”

Upcoming Events

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Donations: $15 (Individual Tickets) $150 (Table of Ten)

other dreamers to set a plan to achieve their dream job. “You’ve got to make minigoals. It’s easier to make mini goals that all lead up to one big goal, rather than focusing on one big goal that seems unattainable,” said Aaron-Lopez. Carlitta Durand, a theatre major, has dreamt of becoming a professional vocalist since she was in preschool. In 11th grade, she wrote out her goals in life: “to put out an album, travel worldwide, get signed onto a record label, own a record label one day and help young kids achieve their dreams.” While most of these written goals remain distant, Durand has made significant progress towards achieving her dream job. Durand has partnered with the North Carolinabased hip hop duo Little Brother and has appeared on two songs for the group’s current album, “Getback.” Not surprisingly, Durand sees her chances of success as high. “Things are already happening for me and I can’t see myself doing anything else,” said Durand. However, Durand does have back-up plans. Alternative careers she envisions for herself are working in the music industry as a producer, disc jockey or video jockey. She pursues her primary goal of becoming an established vocalist by writing songs every day, working with other musicians and participating in live performances. Durand views her obstacles as occasional self-doubt and not fitting into the mold of physical beauty the entertainment industry has set for women vocalists. The difficult balance Durand seeks to strike is being unique while remaining marketable. Addis Gebre Egzi, who holds a BA in accounting and

Access Your Health Career Undecided about your major?

Saturday, Dec. 1, 2007 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Save this date: MAN UP Conference “Building the Inner Man”

managing operations in 17 countries throughout North Africa, the Near East, Asia, and the Pacific. From 1989 to 1992, Olsen was the chief of staff for the Peace Corps. During this time, the agency expanded into 25 new countries. Olsen has traveled to more than 80 countries around the world. Olsen holds a bachelor's degree in sociology with a teaching certification from the University of Utah, a master's degree in social work from the University of Maryland; and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland's College of Education. For more information, contact Dr. LaHoma Smith Romocki at (919) 530-7131.

Students reflect on their paths toward that dream job

Health Careers Center 521 Nelson Street Durham, NC 27707 919 530-7128 Barbara S. Moore, Director Alfreda D. Evans, Program Assistant

U S Representative David Price Semester Internship Program Friday, November 16 Wake County Public Safety Paid Internship Wednesday, November 21

The Washington Center Washington, DC-London Internship Program 2008 Friday, February 29

Interviews EPA Mock Interviews Thursday, November 15 9:00 am– 4:00 pm

Career Fairs Institute for Humane Studies Paid internship and scholarships Journalism/Public Administration Thursday, January 31

NCCU Spring Career Fair Thursday, March 27 10:00 am-1:00 pm

For More Information, Contact Career Services William Jones Building, Lower Level Hours of Operation Mon. - Fri. 8:00 am - 5:00 pm

Phone: 919-530-6337 Email: nccucareerservices@nccu.edu


Q&A

Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2007

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It’s a win for Mayor Bill Bell In a Nov. 9 interview with Campus Echo assistant editor, Gabi Clay-White, Mayor Bill Bell talks about his plans for building a better Durham, his working relationship with NCCU and how he got interested in politics.

Bell:

If you’re interested in politics you should do a couple of things: If you know someone serving in elected office, you should talk to them to get an idea of what’s really involved in the offices they held and what it took to get there. You should get involved in some type of community activity or get appointed to some board or commissions that the local government appoints people to. That gives you an idea of things that are happening at a local level.

Echo:

After graduating from Howard University and New York University, you started out in engineering. What turned you onto politics?

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Is there a working relationship between Chancellor Nelms and you?

Bell:

When I finished graduate school at NYU, I was offered a job at the IBM Corporation at Research Triangle Park here in Durham. I didn’t have any intentions at all of getting involved politically. I was president of my community association and at that time there was a re-zoning that was taking place that was close to our neighborhood and we were opposed to the proposed re-zoning. As president of the association, I went before the county commissioner because my community was outside the city and the zoning matter was covered by the board of county commissioners rather than the city council. Opposing the re-zoning took us almost a year and we ended up losing. The re-zoning was passed. I found out a little more about how things work in Durham. I decided if I couldn’t beat them, I’d try to join them. So I ran for the election Board of Durham County Commissioners in 1972. I was fortunate enough to be able to win. It started from there ...

Bell:

Well, we’re going to the basketball game tonight — Duke and NCCU. (Laughs) In fact, he came here to my office and we met and talked about how the city and the university can work together. I know he’s really concerned about how the image that the campus has physically. We are renovating the Durham Athletic Park ... part of that renovation is it will become the home for NCCU’s baseball team. It will be renovated sometime next year. .

Echo: What are your thoughts on the expansion of NCCU? What issues does that raise for neighborhoods around the campus of NCCU? Bell:

Echo:

How did attending an HBCU shape your views of politics?

Bell: What Howard did, it put me in the position to have a good career. It certainly provided me with the training that made me competitive with other employees that I worked with. It gave me an opportunity to see more of how the majority race focused on what they did, their thoughts, and helped me considerably as I became more involved politically here in Durham. Howard has a rich history of having brought well trained graduates into various aspects of our society. Echo:

You’ve been mayor for six years. What has been the toughest job while working for the city of Durham? faces?

Bell:

What I discovered as being mayor that its is a lot more time consuming that I anticipated. I guess the toughest part is managing my time.

SEBASTIAN FRANCES/Echo Staff Photographer

Mayor Bill Bell was interviewed by Echo assistant editor, Gabi Clay-White, at his office in Durham. Bell was re-elected for a second term on Nov. 6 after a heated campaign against Republican Thomas Stith. Bell has been the mayor of Durham since 2001. remove the crime, and you’ve provided the type of environment where people can focus their lives.

Echo: One of the main points you focused on was the reduction of crime? What strategies are you taking to make sure it happens? Bell:

It has to be a community effort. We have all got to accept some level of responsibility for reducing crime in our community. There are three areas that you can focus one in reducing crime. One is intervention ... becoming more involved in a young persons lives through families, through churches, through volunteers, through organizations, through mentoring and providing programs to allow them to have positive outlooks other than something negative. Then you focus on some prevention. Then the third piece is enforcement. It really has to be a community effort.

Echo:

What are the benefits of being mayor of Durham?

Bell:

I think it is a very distinct honor to be elected mayor and I’m very appreciative of that. Being able to help shape the community that you live in ... in positive ways.

Echo:

In February, you presented the state of the city address.Can you explain the theme of that address, “Re-building Inner City neighborhoods: A WinWin for Durham”?

Bell:

Very simple. I strongly believe that if you have strong communities you will have a strong economy, and if you have a strong economy you will have a strong city. We have spent a lot of time in a public private partnership in revitalizing the downtown area and you have seen the benefits of that. But, by the same token, it has been important to me that you also focus on your neighborhoods and try to revitalize those neighborhoods. We started with two neighborhoods in particular, Barnes Avenue ... and an area called Gattis Street. So that’s what I’m suggesting, we can do. Remove the plight,

Echo:

Echo

What is some other issues facing Durham?

Bell:

Well, Durham is a city that has a lot of diversity in it. We probably are one of the more diverse cities in North Carolina. We’re a city where there is no ethnic majority. We also have a community that has probably a higher level of poverty than we would like to see, but we are blessed we are in the Research Triangle Area and we have big universities and job opportunities. What we have to do is bring those things together to make it work for ... the community. So the answer to your question is whether there are some other things we have to work towards ; we have to have more training programs for people who are not at the educational level to take advantage of some of the jobs that are out there. We have got to continue to try to recruit companies to the area to bring in good paying jobs. We are in a drought right now and that is something that is unheard of until this year. So we have got to begin planning more effectively so we can address our water resources.

Echo

During the campaign, I think we all can agree that there was tension between you and Thomas Stith. Since you have won, do you feel there will be division among citizens?

Bell:

I don’t think so. That was a political campaign ... we just had different strategies of how we were going to conduct our campaign. I was pleased be able to win. I always felt that I would win and what was important to me was that we have a large victory... Because what was important to me was to be able to have the community send a message that the type of campaign tactics that my opponent used were the wrong type of campaign for a city like Durham.

Echo Tell me about the Mayors Against Illegal Gun Coalition and the strategies to get illegal weapons out of the neighborhood. Bell:

That tends to be more of a federal issue than a local issue and it gets to be a state issue also. We are limited in terms of how much as a city we can do in changing the gun laws but we try. We have a program called Project Safe Neighborhood and the focus of that is to get as many illegal guns off the streets and out the hands of people who shouldn’t possess them. The mayors are taking a position that they would like to see more done at the federal level.

Echo:

How does the reputation of Durham help attract students to college?

Bell:

I think if you look at Durham as a community and how its viewed by others outside of Durham, its viewed very favorably. When you have a magazine like Forbes Magazine saying that Durham is one of the top 10 places in the country for businesses and careers, that says an awful lot. When you have a national magazine like Black Enterprise saying Durham is one of the top 10 places for AfricanAmericans ... it speaks about how the community is viewed. Its viewed

as one of the top technology communities in the country. So what it says to me, if I am a student choosing to come to NCCU, I’m coming to an area that’s viewed very favorably by other parts of the country.

Echo:

What specifically can NCCU Students, staff and alumni make to help building a better Durham?

Bell:

I talked to you earlier about ... reducing crime with intervention. By mentoring youth or volunteering as tutors. Central is in a position, in my opinion, to do a lot of that. I think it’s great that part of the requirement of students is the community involvement. You established an on-campus high school, Josephine Clement Dobbs High School, which provides another alternative for young people to get involved. .

Echo:

Have you stated any official support of any presidential candidate and if so, why?

Bell:

When Barack was on Central’s campus, I introduced him and stated my support. Likewise he endorsed my candidacy for the mayor of the city of Durham. I think the young man has the opportunity to pull together many people across this country, both Republicans and Democrats and independents. I think he has made some very bold decisions. One being when he stood against the war in Iraq at the time. I think he will send a statement, not just to this country but to the world, about the United States and his ability as well as accepting African Americans in the top leadership positions. .

Echo:

What are some of your

hobbies?

Bell:

My hobbies are reading, listening to music, playing tennis, and jogging. .

Echo: Do you have any advice for students interested in politics?

Well, when you bring that many students into a University setting, there are a couple things to focus on. One is being able to have housing to accommodate the students. Nowadays, students have cars so you’ve got to find a way to accommodate parking. I constantly get comments from people who live in the neighborhood around NCCU about the parking. They find sometimes students are parking their cars and they can’t get access to their own homes. .

Echo: NCCU has a polling facility on campus that many students do not participate in when election times come around. What’s your response to low political activism on the campus of NCCU? Bell:

I was reading an article in the Herald-Sun and they were talking about the low turnout as far as the number of registered voters. That’s an on-going issue. The only way you can deal with that is to appeal to students. People tend to do things that are in their best interest. I’d be willing to bet that if the issue was “if you don’t vote in this election, it’s a possibility that the school is going to close down.” That’s something that students can relate to because they see self interest in that. When I first ran for mayor in 2001, between the primary and the general election, we had almost 500 NCCU students voting. Just coincidentally, I won the total election by less than one percent, almost 400 plus votes. , I can’t say that all students at Central voted for me, but I can say that if that was the case, then they made the difference in me being the mayor of Durham. .

Echo:

What’s your final message to the students of NCCU?

Bell:

You’ve come to a great university. I would take advantage of all the opportunities that the University affords to you as a student. Life is about choices. If you have a goal in mind, you should find someone who is doing what you want to be and ... ask them what it took for them to be where they are. If you have an opportunity to do intern work, take advantage of it.

Editor’s note: The transcript of this interview has been edited slightly to adjust for features that occur naturally in conversation, such as wordiness and repetition.


Beyond NCCU

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‘Handedness’ riddle yielding brain’s secrets

WARMING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

BY FLAY FLAM THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER (MCT)

Former Vice President Al Gore addresses the U.S. Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Summit via satellite on Nov. 1. DEAN RUTZ/Seattle Times (MCT)

Gore told the mayors that the threat of global warming is too big, and too urgent, to wait until the existing international Kyoto treaty expires in 2012 to begin negotiating a new one. Noting that some scientists have warned that in just a decade the world’s atmosphere could reach a tipping point, Gore said, “We don’t want to waste four, five of those 10 years just talking about it.” Gore praised the mayors for pushing to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions in their cities, and for pledging to meet the Kyoto treaty targets even though the federal government has refused to sign it. More than 700 cities have signed the pledge, a movement championed by Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels. Gore said that when he spoke to audiences in Europe recently, he confronted disillusion over the U.S. government’s opposition to the treaty. “It’s just great when I tell them, `Ladies and gentlemen, almost 700 cities have stepped up to the plate,’”

Town Home for Rent 2 Blocks from Campus

Gore said. “Don’t count the United States of America out. Our mayors are doing a fantastic job.” But Gore also reminded the crowd of recent findings that the polar ice cap this year had melted more than in any other year on record. He said it should serve as a wake-up call much like in the 1980s, when a giant ozone hole in the atmosphere eventually led to an international treaty that reversed the problem. “This is the alarm bell,” Gore said. “It’s time to act.” So he suggested halting new coal-fired power plants unless they are set up so that in the future they can quickly be adapted to capture and store greenhouse gas, Gore said. Coal power has long been a tricky issue for national politicians because they are leery of jeopardizing support from states in the Rocky Mountains, Midwest and East that have abundant coal supplies. “Coal is in many ways the biggest part of the problem,” Gore said. “We’ve got more than enough to completely incinerate the planet.”

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D A T A

PHILADELPHIA — Plato and Aristotle puzzled over lefthanders, as did Charles Darwin. What determines “handedness”? Why are only 10 percent of us lefthanded, and why did the ratio seem to change over the last century? Are lefties somehow different — less healthy, more creative? With brain scanning and the latest genetic technology, scientists are finally starting to crack the mysteries. Lefthanders really are special, and the ways they differ are yielding insight into human diversity — especially how one person’s brain differs from another’s. Searches for a lefthanded gene, meanwhile, are untangling the roles of nature and nurture in shaping our behavior, and revealing ever more subtle ways that DNA can influence but not determine who we are. “It’s a quirky phenomenon of humans, and people ask why it’s relevant,” says research geneticist Clyde Francks of Oxford University. “But this is taking us into a fundamental feature of the human brain.” “Lefthandedness is connected to a lot of neurodevelopmental disorders,” says Daniel Geschwind, a UCLA expert in what is known as neurobehavioral genetics. People with autism and schizophrenia are more likely to be lefthanded, he says. “But with that risk, there is also gain.” Look at MIT professors or musicians or architects, he suggests, and you’ll see a slightly higher percentage of lefthanders than in the general population. Neuroscientists are beginning to figure out why. The brains of lefthanded people develop more freely in utero, they say, allowing the organization to stray more from the standard design. In most people, experts say, the left hemisphere of the brain specializes in tasks that are performed in sequence, such as reading and speaking; the right does more holistic processing, like that needed for visual perception. Most people have a dominant left hemisphere, and since each hemisphere controls the opposite side of the body, most of the population is righthanded. For years, many psychologists assumed that lefties’ brains were reversed, with language capacity concentrated in the right side of the

A part of the "handedness" puzzle, these 13-month-olds are identical twins, yet one is left-handed, the other right-handed. HANDOUT

organ. Subsequent work shows that is sometimes the case — but not always. A large body of research shows the majority of righthanders follow the typical pattern, using the left hemisphere for language. Lefthanders’ brains appear less predictable: About half have language abilities concentrated in the left, 10 percent in the right, and 40 percent make use of various regions on both sides. Many animals are rightor left-pawed, or -footed or flippered. Mice, for example, will consistently use either the right or left paw to press a lever. Unlike humans, however, most species are divided 50-50. “Years ago geneticists tried to breed left- and righthanded mice,” says Chris Walsh, a neurologist at Harvard Medical School and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. The offspring were still evenly divided. In humans, handedness runs in families, though not in an easily predictable way. Lefthanders are about twice as likely as righties to produce lefthanded children, but most of their offspring will still be righthanded. A few years ago, UCLA’s Geschwind scanned the brains of identical twins, hoping to understand the connection between handedness, heredity and brain structure. He found that pairs of righthanded twins tended to share a more asymmetrical brain structure than did lefthanded pairs or mixed sets. The finding backed the idea that genes either drive the developing brain toward righthandedness or leave it

VIA

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to chance. No single righthandedness gene has turned up despite many efforts to find it. Three months ago, however, a team led by Oxford’s Francks discovered one that may at least play a role. They found that lefthanders tend to share a variant of the gene they named LRRTM1, but it appears to influence handedness only if it is inherited from the father. (Genes whose dominance is contingent upon which parent contributes them make up about 1 percent of the total in humans.) In either form, this gene is active in the developing brain. “It influences the way different regions wire up and find connections,” Francks says. Its effect on determining handedness is small, and the geneticist believes several yet-to-be discovered genes are also involved. Environmental factors — stigma, social pressure, possibly hormones – could nudge people one way or the other as well. Other scientists are examining how LRRTM1 and other genes might tie lefthandedness loosely with all sorts of characteristics. Various studies have found weak but statistically significant associations between lefthandedness and schizophrenia, autism and even homosexuality. A few scientists say their colleagues are looking at the mystery of handedness from the wrong perspective. University of Toledo psychologist Stephen Christman was trying to connect handedness with preference for types of musical instruments when he made

an unexpected finding: people who were very strongly right- or lefthanded preferred keyboards and drums, while those who were more ambidextrous gravitated toward strings. “I realized that maybe what’s important is not left or right but strongly onehanded or mixed,” he says. There is some evidence, he says, that mixed-handers have a wider connecting pathway _ called the corpus callosum _ between the right and left hemispheres. Having a wider connection seems to make it harder to do more than one thing at a time _ playing a different rhythm with each hand, for example. Christman has found that strong right- or lefthanders, on the other hand, are more likely to hold to set beliefs, such as creationism. He speculates that communication between hemispheres helps people revise beliefs. None of this suggests mixed-, right- or lefthanders have a corner on creativity or genius. Researching an essay on the lefty guitarist Jimi Hendrix, who famously played a righthanded guitar upside down, Christman made a shocking discovery: the much-photographed Hendrix held a pen with his right hand. It makes sense, says Christman, himself a lefthanded guitarist, if you consider that in “righthanded” guitars, the left-hand job of working the frets has grown increasingly difficult as both styles and design have evolved. So why not see how it works the other way around?

Scientists track early evolution of sight

T R A N S F E R

BY ROBERT S. BOYD MCCLATCHY NEWSPAPERS (MCT)

C E N T E R

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bus. bike. carpool. Learn how to use the Transit Trip Planner to plan a bus trip to anywhere in the Triangle, plus find a carpool partner, get biking tips, take fun quizzes, download puzzles, and more at

REDEFINETRAVEL.ORG/NCCU

WASHINGTON — Scientists have traced the origin of eyes back to a transparent blob of living jelly floating in the sea about 600 million years ago. That creature, the distant ancestor of a modern freshwater animal known as a hydra, could only distinguish light from dark. But that simple trick was such an advantage that it was passed on from generation to generation of the hydra’s cousins and their myriad descendants. It was the precursor of the wildly different, ever more complex eyes of fish, ants, flies, giraffes and people. The hydra work was reported last month in the journal PLoS One by biologists David Plachetzki and Todd Oakley of the University of California at

Santa Barbara. It helps solve one of the puzzles of Darwinian evolution, the process by which a complex organ such as an eye could arise by random genetic mutations and natural selection. “These results are significant in advancing our understanding of the early evolution of sight in animals,” said Jerry Cook, a program director at the National Science Foundation, which financed the work. The discovery also helps to counter one of the principal arguments used by antievolutionists to discredit Charles Darwin’s theory and to support their belief in “intelligent design.” The skeptics contend that it would have been impossible for an eye to form in a series of small steps, by a purely natural process, as Darwin suggested almost 150 years ago.

Therefore, they conclude that a supernatural “designer,” presumably God, must have done the job. Like most modern biologists, Oakley vigorously disagrees that a designer is necessary to explain evolution. “There is no doubt whatsoever in the ability of evolutionary processes to produce all the diversity of life we see,” he said in an email. In their research, Oakley and Plachetzki discovered that a gene called opsin — after the Greek word “ops,” meaning “eye” — exists in hydras but not in sponges, an even more primitive animal. The scientists calculated that opsin genes appeared about 600 million years ago, because that’s when the evolutionary branch that led to modern hydras split off from the line that led to

sponges. Opsin genes direct the production of light-sensitive proteins, also called opsins, that coat the surface of a hydra, especially around the mouth area. The opsin proteins would help these simple animals tell night from day and perhaps help them find food. “Hydra probably uses its light sensitivity to find prey,” Oakley said. According to Oakley, the opsin proteins must have evolved from earlier “signaling” proteins that send chemical messages to other proteins. Signaling proteins exist in all living creatures, from single-celled bacteria to humans. Cook, the NSF program director, said Oakley’s work “shows how simple genetic changes can produce visual pigments that begin the pathway to the evolution of sight.”


A&E

Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2007

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Artist conjures faces Alexander Brooks Jackson’s drawings and paintings on display at NCCU Art Museum BY KENICE MOBLEY ECHO STAFF WRITER

This fall, N. C. Central University’s Art Museum will host “Face Conjurer,” a collection of works by Alexander Brooks Jackson. The exhibit includes 40 pieces spanning the 30year career of this Connecticut native. This is the largest showing of Jackson’s work since his death in 1981. A. B. Jackson’s art is a study in contrast, including classic and modern themes, often shown within the same image. Many of Jackson’s works reflect his studies of Renaissance painters during his years at Yale University. Jackson’s skill is revealed in his ability to convey emotion and humanity in just a few lines. The sketches displayed in this collection are striking despite their simplicity. They show a wide range of facial types, angles and shadowing. While the sketches and studies draw the viewer’s attention, the abstract

expressionist oil paintings capture the imagination of the viewer. In several works, light and dark grays are contrasted to form powerful images that draw attention to the four corners of the frame. Other works use brilliant color to dramatic effect. Slashes of red intensify “Bus Stop” and “Autumn Place,” and encourage viewers to give the images more than just a passing glance. A. B. Jackson completed these and other award-winning works while working as a professor in Virginia and Louisiana. The current show includes works from several North Carolina collections, While the paintings and sketches are often abstract, museum patrons won’t leave this exhibit believing that these works could have been completed by any third grader with a paintbrush. Both new art fans and avid art lovers can find something enjoyable in Jackson’s work. The NCCU Art Museum will host “Face Conjurer” until Dec. 14.

“Sunday Gathering,” acrylic on canvas. SAVIN JOSEPH / ECHO STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Laughter and praise

Comedian Stephen Sheppard will perform in Durham Dec. 16. PHOTO

COURTESY OF

BY BROOKE SELLARS ECHO ASSISTANT A&E EDITOR

Growing up poor, in a two-bedroom shack in Snow Hill, North Carolina, the son of a strict preacher, comedian Stephen Sheppard had to do something to stand out from his five brothers and seven sisters when he was little. So Sheppard found praise and approval in laughter. “Laughter is a form of praise, spiritually and emotionally. Laughter heals people,” said Sheppard. Now 27, the former N.C. Central University student is on tour with the Soul Funny Family Comedy Show, created by Steffon Vann, host of BET’s Comic View. Sheppard believes the biggest chal-

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lenge with any art is being original. He describes his comedy as “something different.” He said he strives to provide wholesome comedy that the entire family can enjoy. Sheppard draws upon his Christianity to perform his comedy. He creates comedy by pretending to hold church services, imitating tambourine players and “saints,” giving praise to God by shouting. Sheppard believes that America is experiencing a reemergence of the Black Arts movement, the period from 1960-1975 when African-Americans expressed their oppression through art and drama. “Some of the music is being reproduced, duplicated,” Sheppard said.

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Alicia Keys As I Am Sony Records

3out of 5 on the black hand side

What do you say to a woman who kills herself giving one hundred percent all the time? Slow down. The first time I listened to “No One,” the first single from Ms. Keys’ new album, I cried. I could hear the strain she’s putting on her voice, and I felt that in five years, her voice might be completely gone. This is a woman who seems to give all she has in the studio, belting out a song with all the strength she can muster for one studio session. If she continues giving everything she has, she’s going to lose a part of herself as important as any one of her limbs. She’ll still be able to live freely, but that part of her-

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“Our culture is screaming for something different. I think that the next [Black Arts] movement will be more cohesive, with artistic expression from all cultures.” Sheppard said students who are inspired to find a career in the entertainment business should “follow your passion, give thanks to God, and always seek guidance from one you can trust.” Sheppard’s passion has taken him beyond just comedy. He has acted on stage in “The House that Joy Built” and “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” and has launched his own entertainment group, which bears his name. He also is working on a TV show, a comedy variety show. Sheppard said it would be similar to Mad TV and In Living Color. Future endeavors for Sheppard extend further than simply making audiences crack up with laughter — he has dreams of producing other television shows and even movies. But while he’s always looking forward, Durham is still calling him back. Sheppard will perform in Durham in December. He said he plans to return to NCCU sometime in the next five years, but not to perform. He left NCCU to follow his dream without graduating, something he wants to change. Sheppard plans to come to NCCU to receive his degree. “My biggest mistake in school was majoring in something that people chose for me,” Sheppard said.

Want to make a movie? BY JEREMIAH MCNEILL ECHO STAFF WRITER

N.C. Central University students interested in participating in a screenwriting contest have until Nov. 30 to submit their screenplays. The contest is sponsored by the Duke Center for Documentary Studies as part of its Movie Making Marathon competition. The event is geared to students who have not had prior filmmaking experience. It is designed help students learn more about the industry. All screenplays must be original work. They must be formatted in conventional screenplay form and not exceed eight pages. Up to three writers can collaborate on each screenplay. The idea of the Movie Making Marathon came from Annie Fleishman, a former Duke student, who was inspired by the 24-hour play in New York. For these events, actors, directors and playwrights create and perform a play in 24 hours. Fleishman thought something similar might be a great way to get students of all major involved in film-

making at Duke. Over the weekend of March 22-23, 2008, five student filmmaking teams will produce an eight- to tenminute screenplay written by Duke and NCCU students who were finalists in the fall screenwriting competition. “I think this event is a good opportunity for Duke and NCCU students to come together and work as a community,” said Christopher Williams, business management senior. The teams will have 24 hours to make their films, including pre-production, shooting, and editing. Completed films will premier the following day at a campus-wide screening, open to the community. “We’ve tried to design both the screenwriting competition and the marathon weekend as events that welcome first-time filmmakers from any background or major,” said Professor Elizabeth Benfey event coordinator. The competition is also sponsored by The Office of Information Technology, The Visual Studies Initiative, and The Department of Theatre Studies, all at Duke.

Fallen Diary You Dont Know My Name Unbreakable How Come You Dont Call Me

voice will always be missed. I had to strengthen my heart and remind myself that Alicia’s third album, “As I Am,” was going to touch me and speak to heart like her previous albums. On “Like You’ll Never See Me Again,” she warns her love to hold her like he’ll never see her again, to never take their love and relationship for granted. But on much of the song, she struggles to reach the notes in a fluid and effortless manner. She displays her waning range on “Teenage Love Affair,” and the song makes me reminisce about my first kiss. The rest of the album proves me right — my heart is heavy with sadness over the inevitable death of a shining star’s voice, but it makes my soul happy with music that I can enjoy forever. The songs are a melee of the upbeat happiness, loneliness and peace that comes from loving someone — and loving yourself. — Larisha J. Stone

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Dance culture thriving at NCCU Seven groups, seven dance styles, one passion BY LANCE DOWNS ECHO STAFF REPORTER

Dance means many things to many people, but for students in N.C. Central University’s dance organizations, it is a tool. Like a painter’s paintbrush, a dancer’s dance draws its vibrant colors of emotion on its canvas, the floor. Tiffani Floyd, mass communication junior and D3 vice president, said dance can be a true expression of feelings, not just something you do at a club. “Dance is my life. It is my passion. It’s my craft. And it’s my love,” said Floyd. “I express myself through dance. And after I dance it makes me feel better. Dance releases my stress, it’s my outlet,” said Floyd. Dyranden Neal, criminal justice sophomore and president of Da Naughty Boyz, said, “Dancing to me means expressing oneself and having fun while doing it. Dancing is something I do for fun. And what can I say? The females like it!” Dance brings a sense of belonging, personal recognition, and in some cases, alters identities, like transforming a civilian into a superhero. “I can be having the worst day go to practice and come out with a smile on my face and sometimes it’s because of the companionship of my friends on H.A. but sometimes it’s just strictly the dancing,” said Aaliyah Dillard, therapeutic recreation junior, Ms. House Arrest II and captain of House Arrest II Chapter 3 Inc. “Dancing also creates a confidence within me. I am not … and I repeat … am not the same person when I dance as I am when you see me on the yard. “I think that’s part of the reason why we have a second identity on House Arrest because if you know me personally then you know Aaliyah and Cleopatra are two totally different people,” said Dillard. Dance at NCCU dates back to 1968, when the NCCU Dance Group was founded. “It was started by students of NCCU who wanted to express themselves through dance,” said dance education sophomore M. Clayton Barrier, former president and director of NCCU Dance Group. “Modern dance had been on the rise since the turn of the century, and black dance was coming into prominence. “The main idea of the Group is to give anyone who wants to dance an opportunity to do so,” Barrier said. “Also, the group connects with the surrounding Durham community as well as a global dance community. It is a part of the development of the arts at NCCU.” Including the NCCU Dance Group, NCCU has seven official dance organizations: Da Naughty Boyz, which came from Atlanta in 1998; Lady Lyk, founded in 2002; House Arrest II Chapter 3 Dance Team Inc., founded in 2003; High Maintenance, founded 2006; Underground Legendz, founded in 2006; and D3, founded in 2007. Each organization has its own style. The NCCU Dance Group specializes in modern, contemporary, and ballet, but adds other elements. Da Naughty Boyz, founded in 2004 by mass communication alumnus Christopher Murphy, mod-

(from left to right) UNDERGROUND LEGENDZ Jasmine Hutchens, LaQuisha Baskerville, & Tishiya Hill performing at AudioNet’s Talent Showcase on November 8. RAY TYLER/Echo Staff Photographer

“Dance is my life. It is my passion. It’s my craft. And it’s my love. I express myself through dance. And after I dance it makes me feel better. Dance releases my stress, it’s my outlet.” TIFFANI FLOYD MASS COMMUNICATION JUNIOR AND D3 VICE PRESIDENT

(From left to right) Jessica Jones, Taylor Nelson, Brinita Hargett & Markus Moultrie practice during a Naughty Boyz and High Maintenance practice. LANCE DOWNS/Echo Staff Photographer

els itself after crunk dancing, a style developed in Atlanta and derived from early 90s New Jack swing. Tanae Jones, nursing sophomore and president of High Maintenance, said, “Our style of dancing is hip-hop with a king of laid back swagger. We have a lot of dance move that most teams don’t do like we have a move called ‘walk the dog’ and we ‘four-step.’” High Maintanance is a sister group created by Da Naughty Boyz. Lady Lyk, another group started by Da Naughty Boyz, also uses the Atlanta crunk style. Murphy said Lady Lyk merges elegance with attitude. “(It was) started to give young ladies confidence

and encouragement through dance,” said nursing junior Monchel Hester, a Lady Lyk member since 2005. “[It’s] not no 30-minute show of what looks like the A.M.C. [movie] thing over and over. We like to surprise our audience every time, making people who love to dance want to join our group.” House Arrest II Chapter 3 Championship Dance Team Inc. models its style on “foot-working,”a maneuvering, sliding and “whipping” style that emerged from Chicago. DaJuan Carlos Frazier founded House Arrest II in Chicago in 1994. There are now nine chapters in the United States.

“It was created to keep the youth involved in something productive and not negative,” said NCCU House Arrest II president Kenneth Tipton, an accounting junior. Tipton said Katrina Holmes founded the group in 2003 to bring unity to the campus by doing something she loved. Underground Legendz’ signature style dates to the 1980s. The style draws on two early hip hop dance movements — pop-locking, which originated in California, and break dancing, which started in New York. Along with its retro feel, the group incorporates modern/contemporary, jazz,

and “wu-tanging,” a hip hop dance spawned in New Jersey. “The name of the group is actually a play on the situation of the founders … it was like they had become “underground” dancers,” said Trenton Powell, art sophomore and Mr. Underground Legendz. Powell explained Underground Legendz creators [major, class.] Thomas Robinson, [major, class.] Spaanity Newton, and mass communication [class.] Lance Downs started dancing with House Arrest II and Da Naughty Boyz. D3, an acronym meaning Dance, Dedication, Determination, is the newest dance organization

on campus. D3’s founder and president, Markus Moultrie, an undecided sophomore, describes the group as “fresh and young.” Moultrie said the group aims to separate itself from other campus groups. “Our movements are more of a choreographed, slow movement. Instead of doing a lot of up-to-date dances we move not only to the music but also to the words. That’s what sets us apart from all the dance teams on campus,” he said. “It’s like you’re nurturing a baby and watching it grow.” Most of the dancers had warm regards for other dance groups. “I love the different structures that all the teams provide,” said High Maintenance president Tanae Jones. “I also like the fact that I can walk by a member on a different dance team and have a conversation with them with no problem.” House Arrest II president Kenneth Tipton said each group is unique in its own way. “I applaud the Naughty Boyz because they opened the gates for all the other dance teams.” That is not to say that the members of the groups don’t feel a sense of competition. “It is just people wanting to achieve greatness,” said Tipton. “Everything is a healthy competition ... if you do not have friendly competition then how will your dance team grow?” Thomas Robinson, criminal justice senior and president of Underground Legendz expresses a more competitive edge. “I’m not the type to brag, but no, I don’t see a threat anywhere. We don’t diss them, we dismiss them,” said Robinson. Others, like dancer Clayton Barrier, would like to see less competition and more unity. “I honestly wish that [the groups] could all come together and learn from one another,” he said. According to Barrier, increased unity brings respect and perhaps even more funding. “Dance doesn’t always have to be competitive, flashy, or for shock factor,” said Barrier. Despite the enthusiam shown by the individual dance groups, many dancers feel that dance doesn’t get the recognition it deserves at NCCU. They say the groups don’t get the practice space they need and don’t get the same treatment as other student organizations and the sports teams. “I think that they are and the recognition isn’t at the level it needs to be,” said Miss House Arrest Aaliyah Dillard. “No one knows how hard it is to dance, go to school, and work unless they do it. I feel like the administration -- including but not limited to the professors -don’t really give us the respect we deserve,” she said. But Tipton says the tide may be changing. “As each school year passes I believe the teams are slowly getting recognized,” he said. “With every new year, recognition is becoming easier.” University support or not, dance will thrive at NCCU. To many students, dancing is breathing. “Dance is a way of life,” said Robinson. “When the music is on, you have no choice but to move ... it’s born into your soul.”


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Dance culture thriving at NCCU Seven groups, seven dance styles, one passion BY LANCE DOWNS ECHO STAFF REPORTER

Dance means many things to many people, but for students in N.C. Central University’s dance organizations, it is a tool. Like a painter’s paintbrush, a dancer’s dance draws its vibrant colors of emotion on its canvas, the floor. Tiffani Floyd, mass communication junior and D3 vice president, said dance can be a true expression of feelings, not just something you do at a club. “Dance is my life. It is my passion. It’s my craft. And it’s my love,” said Floyd. “I express myself through dance. And after I dance it makes me feel better. Dance releases my stress, it’s my outlet,” said Floyd. Dyranden Neal, criminal justice sophomore and president of Da Naughty Boyz, said, “Dancing to me means expressing oneself and having fun while doing it. Dancing is something I do for fun. And what can I say? The females like it!” Dance brings a sense of belonging, personal recognition, and in some cases, alters identities, like transforming a civilian into a superhero. “I can be having the worst day go to practice and come out with a smile on my face and sometimes it’s because of the companionship of my friends on H.A. but sometimes it’s just strictly the dancing,” said Aaliyah Dillard, therapeutic recreation junior, Ms. House Arrest II and captain of House Arrest II Chapter 3 Inc. “Dancing also creates a confidence within me. I am not … and I repeat … am not the same person when I dance as I am when you see me on the yard. “I think that’s part of the reason why we have a second identity on House Arrest because if you know me personally then you know Aaliyah and Cleopatra are two totally different people,” said Dillard. Dance at NCCU dates back to 1968, when the NCCU Dance Group was founded. “It was started by students of NCCU who wanted to express themselves through dance,” said dance education sophomore M. Clayton Barrier, former president and director of NCCU Dance Group. “Modern dance had been on the rise since the turn of the century, and black dance was coming into prominence. “The main idea of the Group is to give anyone who wants to dance an opportunity to do so,” Barrier said. “Also, the group connects with the surrounding Durham community as well as a global dance community. It is a part of the development of the arts at NCCU.” Including the NCCU Dance Group, NCCU has seven official dance organizations: Da Naughty Boyz, which came from Atlanta in 1998; Lady Lyk, founded in 2002; House Arrest II Chapter 3 Dance Team Inc., founded in 2003; High Maintenance, founded 2006; Underground Legendz, founded in 2006; and D3, founded in 2007. Each organization has its own style. The NCCU Dance Group specializes in modern, contemporary, and ballet, but adds other elements. Da Naughty Boyz, founded in 2004 by mass communication alumnus Christopher Murphy, mod-

(from left to right) UNDERGROUND LEGENDZ Jasmine Hutchens, LaQuisha Baskerville, & Tishiya Hill performing at AudioNet’s Talent Showcase on November 8. RAY TYLER/Echo Staff Photographer

“Dance is my life. It is my passion. It’s my craft. And it’s my love. I express myself through dance. And after I dance it makes me feel better. Dance releases my stress, it’s my outlet.” TIFFANI FLOYD MASS COMMUNICATION JUNIOR AND D3 VICE PRESIDENT

(From left to right) Jessica Jones, Taylor Nelson, Brinita Hargett & Markus Moultrie practice during a Naughty Boyz and High Maintenance practice. LANCE DOWNS/Echo Staff Photographer

els itself after crunk dancing, a style developed in Atlanta and derived from early 90s New Jack swing. Tanae Jones, nursing sophomore and president of High Maintenance, said, “Our style of dancing is hip-hop with a king of laid back swagger. We have a lot of dance move that most teams don’t do like we have a move called ‘walk the dog’ and we ‘four-step.’” High Maintanance is a sister group created by Da Naughty Boyz. Lady Lyk, another group started by Da Naughty Boyz, also uses the Atlanta crunk style. Murphy said Lady Lyk merges elegance with attitude. “(It was) started to give young ladies confidence

and encouragement through dance,” said nursing junior Monchel Hester, a Lady Lyk member since 2005. “[It’s] not no 30-minute show of what looks like the A.M.C. [movie] thing over and over. We like to surprise our audience every time, making people who love to dance want to join our group.” House Arrest II Chapter 3 Championship Dance Team Inc. models its style on “foot-working,”a maneuvering, sliding and “whipping” style that emerged from Chicago. DaJuan Carlos Frazier founded House Arrest II in Chicago in 1994. There are now nine chapters in the United States.

“It was created to keep the youth involved in something productive and not negative,” said NCCU House Arrest II president Kenneth Tipton, an accounting junior. Tipton said Katrina Holmes founded the group in 2003 to bring unity to the campus by doing something she loved. Underground Legendz’ signature style dates to the 1980s. The style draws on two early hip hop dance movements — pop-locking, which originated in California, and break dancing, which started in New York. Along with its retro feel, the group incorporates modern/contemporary, jazz,

and “wu-tanging,” a hip hop dance spawned in New Jersey. “The name of the group is actually a play on the situation of the founders … it was like they had become “underground” dancers,” said Trenton Powell, art sophomore and Mr. Underground Legendz. Powell explained Underground Legendz creators [major, class.] Thomas Robinson, [major, class.] Spaanity Newton, and mass communication [class.] Lance Downs started dancing with House Arrest II and Da Naughty Boyz. D3, an acronym meaning Dance, Dedication, Determination, is the newest dance organization

on campus. D3’s founder and president, Markus Moultrie, an undecided sophomore, describes the group as “fresh and young.” Moultrie said the group aims to separate itself from other campus groups. “Our movements are more of a choreographed, slow movement. Instead of doing a lot of up-to-date dances we move not only to the music but also to the words. That’s what sets us apart from all the dance teams on campus,” he said. “It’s like you’re nurturing a baby and watching it grow.” Most of the dancers had warm regards for other dance groups. “I love the different structures that all the teams provide,” said High Maintenance president Tanae Jones. “I also like the fact that I can walk by a member on a different dance team and have a conversation with them with no problem.” House Arrest II president Kenneth Tipton said each group is unique in its own way. “I applaud the Naughty Boyz because they opened the gates for all the other dance teams.” That is not to say that the members of the groups don’t feel a sense of competition. “It is just people wanting to achieve greatness,” said Tipton. “Everything is a healthy competition ... if you do not have friendly competition then how will your dance team grow?” Thomas Robinson, criminal justice senior and president of Underground Legendz expresses a more competitive edge. “I’m not the type to brag, but no, I don’t see a threat anywhere. We don’t diss them, we dismiss them,” said Robinson. Others, like dancer Clayton Barrier, would like to see less competition and more unity. “I honestly wish that [the groups] could all come together and learn from one another,” he said. According to Barrier, increased unity brings respect and perhaps even more funding. “Dance doesn’t always have to be competitive, flashy, or for shock factor,” said Barrier. Despite the enthusiam shown by the individual dance groups, many dancers feel that dance doesn’t get the recognition it deserves at NCCU. They say the groups don’t get the practice space they need and don’t get the same treatment as other student organizations and the sports teams. “I think that they are and the recognition isn’t at the level it needs to be,” said Miss House Arrest Aaliyah Dillard. “No one knows how hard it is to dance, go to school, and work unless they do it. I feel like the administration -- including but not limited to the professors -don’t really give us the respect we deserve,” she said. But Tipton says the tide may be changing. “As each school year passes I believe the teams are slowly getting recognized,” he said. “With every new year, recognition is becoming easier.” University support or not, dance will thrive at NCCU. To many students, dancing is breathing. “Dance is a way of life,” said Robinson. “When the music is on, you have no choice but to move ... it’s born into your soul.”


Sports

Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2007

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Duke: NCC-U later Duke rolls over Eagles in their first Division I game BY TORRY BAILEY ECHO STAFF REPORTER

For years, the N.C. Central University men’s basketball program has held its own in NCAA Division II, even winning a championship. DUKE 121 It’s time for a NCCU 56 new challenge and a new division. Last Friday night, the Eagles played their firstever NCAA Division I game against cross-town rival Duke University. This game marked the first-ever regular season match-up between the two universities. Unfortunately for the Eagles, Duke, the 13th ranked team in the nation, opened the season with a 121-56 win over N.C. Central. Duke never trailed in the contest, jumping out to an 11-2 lead in the first four minutes of action. Eagle forward Calvin Wright’s bucket pulled NCCU to within seven points. The Blue Devils converted a 15-1 run to claim a 26-5 lead with 12:40 remain-

Duke’s Cameron Crazies hand NCCU’s Joshua Worthy (0) an earful at Cameron Friday Nov. 9. MITCHELL WEBSON/Echo Photographer

ing in the opening half. Duke made 16 threepoint baskets in 28 attempts that night, while NCCU shot a dismal one for seven from the arc. The Eagles shot a combined 29 percent from the field. “You can’t really simulate that (playing against Duke) in practice,” said NCCU junior guard Bryan Ayala.

“It’s not something we’re used to.” Duke freshman Taylor King led all scorers with 20 points. Duke’s 121 points equal the sixth-highest singlegame effort in team history. While leading 48-21 late in the first half, Duke further broke it open behind a pair of 3-pointers from King

in the final minute to start a 16-0 run that continued after halftime for a 64-21 cushion. NCCU played its best basketball in the next seven minutes, with Ayala finishing with 18 points and senior forward Charles Futrell with 17 points. Leading 83-43, the Blue Devils finished strong with 18 unanswered points,

capped by a dunk from freshman guard Nolan Smith with 6:09 left to put Duke over the century mark. NCCU head coach Henry Dickerson had mixed feelings about the historic night. “I’ve never been beat by 50 before and then they take your picture,” said Dickerson. “But that’s because Coach K is a good man, and that will be something to remember. “We appreciate Duke University and Coach K for giving us an opportunity to open our Division I schedule here, across town. “It was definitely a challenge. “It’s a historic moment for our University and for our players.” Post-game, the teams posed for a picture at midcourt to commemorate the moment. “Really it’s an honor for us to be in this game with them, for their first game in Division I,” said Krzyzewski. “We had more depth and height and talent, but we didn’t necessarily have more heart than they did. They played hard the whole time.”

NCCU slips in season ender Tough Rams defense holds Eagles to a single TD pass BY QUENTIN GARDNER ECHO SPORTS EDITOR

Last Saturday, N.C. Central University ended its season at 6-4 after suffering a devastating 35-10 loss from arch-rival Winston-Salem State University at Bowman Gray Stadium. This year’s game was the 41st time these former CIAA rivals have squared off. The historic rivalry between the two universities began in 1945. WSSU WSSU 35 leads the series by one game, 20 to 21. The victory NCCU 10 was also WSSU’s first win over NCCU since 2003. WSSU head coach Kermit Blount was impressed with the performance of his seniors on WSSU’s Senior Day. “This was a big win for us and our seniors,” said Blount. “We wanted to spread their defense out today, and we did a good job of that. We wanted to make them think we were doing one thing and then do something else.” This game serves as the first loss NCCU head coach Mose Rison has witnessed to an in-state opponent under his two-year tenure on the coaching staff. “We missed some things, and Stadford [Brown] did not have a good day,” said Rison. “And of course turnovers made a lot of difference in the game.” WSSU outnumbered NCCU in total offense 470 yards to 278. Eagle sophomore quarterback Brown completed 17 of 38 passes for 211 yards and a touchdown. However, Brown managed to set a career high with four interceptions. “The interceptions were all big plays,” Brown said. “I kind of put this loss on me, because I turned

Craig Amos (32) dives to block a Rams field goal attempt in Bowman Gray Stadium, Saturday. MITCHELL WEBSON/Echo Photographer

the ball over so much.” Receiver Wayne Blackwell led the Eagles with six receptions for 75 yards and a touchdown. On a positive note, the Eagles scored on their opening possession of the game. NCCU capped a seven-play, 43yard drive with a 33-yard field goal from kicker Taylor Gray. Gray’s field goal would give the Eagles their only lead of the game with 12:19 left in the first quarter. NCCU could not celebrate long, as WSSU quickly responded by driving the ball 67 yards in 11 plays. Rams senior tailback Jed Bines scampered past Eagle defenders for an 11-yard touchdown run, putting the Rams ahead 7-3 with 7:31 left in the opening quarter.

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WSSU opened the second period with a 13-play, 76-yard march, which ended with Bines scoring on a oneyard run. Bines’ second score increased the Rams’ lead to 14-3 with 12:24 remaining in the first half. WSSU continued its scoring assault with a one-yard touchdown run from junior tailback Roderick Fluellen. Fluellen’s score ended a six-play, 54-yard drive with 5:53 left in the first half. Rams senior quarterback Monte Purvis connected with Bryant Bayne for a 74-yard touchdown reception. Bayne’s reception increased the Ram lead 28-3 with 1:34 left in the first half. NCCU managed to sprinkle some offense in the closing moments of the opening half.

Brown tossed a pass to Blackwell for a 29-yard touchdown with :03 left in the half. Blackwell’s score cut the Ram lead to 28-10 at halftime. The only score of the second half came courtesy of Purvis’ 17-yard run with 3:30 left in the game. Senior defensive lineman Courtney Coard and senior linebacker Eric Ray both led the Eagles defense with 12 tackles. Rison is pleased with his first season as NCCU head coach. “It wasn’t a great day for us, but it was a good season. I learned a lot in my first year as a head coach”, said Rison. “Now we need to go out and recruit and get bigger on the offensive and defensive lines.”

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In their first meeting in Division I play the N.C Central Lady Eagles looked to gain much experience against the UNC Lady Tarheels. Much experience was gained in their 109-32 devastating defeat. UNC set a school record for the largest margin of victory over the Lady Eagles. Junior Lady Tarheel guard Rashanda McCants scored a career-high 17 points. McCants is the sister of former Tarheel 2005 NCAA national championship team member Rashad Mc Cants. The Lady Eagles did fight hard. Lady Eagles Tonia Roundtree, Latoya Bennet, and Lavonna Hailey contributed a total of 21 points. UNC forced 30 Lady Eagle turnovers. UNC had a total of 27 steals against NCCU. Turnovers and poor shooting contributed to the Eagles’ loss, but lack of experience played a major part. “We can learn a lot from playing a team like Carolina,” said NCCU Lady Eagle head coach Joli Robinson. “We have to make sure we do the thing we know how to do and not get away from it.” UNC shot 64 percent to the NCCU’s 19 percent from the field. The Lady Eagles were also out-rebounded 47-34. “Central played hard,” said Lady Tarheel coach Sylvia Hatchell. The Eagles fought hard to the end and didn’t give up until the time was up. Even down by double digits, the Lady Eagles fought hard as if it were a close game. This will be a difficult season for the Lady Eagles, who will be on the road for most games. One exception is their last game, against Norfolk State. NCCU will play such elite teams as Florida A&M, Tennessee State and Duke. New key players will have to step up this season after losing the Eagles lost all-time leading scorer Cassie King to graduation. LaQuanda Williams and Jasmine Newkirk also were lost for the season after being suspended for rules violation. After finishing last season with a 26-6 record and winning the CIAA championship, the Lady Eagles will have more difficult competition to face this year. Most importantly the Lady Eagles will have to avoid another blow-out like the UNC game.

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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2007

Soaring into Division I NO

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Top left: Both teams pose for a picture after the game to commemorate NCCU’s first Division I game. Top: Duke’s Kyle Singler attempts a jump shot over NCCU’s Calvin Wright. Bottom left: NCCU’s Charles Futrell snatches a rebound in the second half.

Duke University student fans, aka, “The Cameron Crazies,” in traditional fashion, taunt N.C Central University players during a time-out. Cameron Indoor Stadium was packed with 9,314 fans for the Blue Devils’ season opener against NCCU last Friday, Nov. 9.

Photos – Mitchell Webson l Text – Quentin Gardner

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ast Friday, the N.C. Central University men’s basketball team made their NCAA Division I debut against Duke University. The Eagles stepped into perhaps one of the most hostile college basketball arenas in the country, Cameron Indoor Stadium. As the Eagles took the court for pre-game warmups, a sea of royal blue and white slowly surrounded them. Over 9,000 fans rushed to witness the opening game of the 2007 season. The Cameron Crazies, the student supporters of Duke's basketball teams, stood courtside in a 1,500-seat student section and had begun cheering during warm-ups. The Crazies painted their faces and bodies and wore Duke paraphernalia to represent their team.

The Eagles witnessed the Crazies jump up and down when NCCU had possession of the ball and yell cheers in unison at focal points of the game. Throughout the course of the game remarks were made: “sit down,” “pull your shorts up,” and “air ball.” Two and a half hours later, the Cameron Indoor Stadium scoreboard displayed Duke's 121-56 rout over the NCCU, but one scene told the best story: Immediately after the game, both teams shook hands. Duke head coach Mike Krzyzewski got both teams together for a picture at mid-court to commemorate the moment. “It's an honor for us to be in this game with them, for their first game in Division I," Krzyzewski

said. "For me the best thing was after the game and us being able to take a picture together. That will stay there for the rest of time, just like the great relationship like Duke and North Carolina Central have.” Despite the loss, NCCU head coach Henry Dickerson said he looks forward to the season. "I've never been beat by 50 before and then they take your picture,” said Dickerson. “But that's because Coach K is a good man and that will be something to remember," said Dickerson. "We appreciate Duke University and Coach K for giving us an opportunity to open our Division I schedule here, across town. It's a historic moment for our University and for our players."


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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2007

NCCU WRITING STUDIO You wouldn’t wait until the night

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before to practice for the big game ...

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Having problems getting your thoughts down on paper? Do you have great ideas, but need help organizing and focusing your thoughts? Well, look no further for assistance! Help has arrived for those who need to write papers (dissertations, theses, research and term). Already have a paper that needs editing? Don’t procrastinate any longer! You deserve a BREAK!

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Student Coalition Against Tobacco (SCAT) A Petition Proposing Policy To Protect NCCU Students, Faculty, and Staff From Secondhand Smoke To the NCCU Board of Trustees: Because secondhand smoke is dangerous to NCCU Eagles, African Americans, and ALL people; Because secondhand smoke is a group A carcinogen containing the most powerful cancer-causing agents (EPA, 1993); Because exposure to secondhand smoke causes at least 50,000 deaths each year in the United States (CDC, 2006),

I support a tobacco policy at NCCU that will:

Move the Smoke So others don’t choke !



Provide students, faculty and staff the right to breathe clean air;



Reduce student, faculty, and staff exposure to secondhand smoke across campus.

Therefore, I urge the NCCU Board of Trustees to: Prohibit smoking within 25 feet of all campus building entrances. Name (Please Print) __________________________________ Signature___________________________________________

Support SCAT's campaign to move smoking 25 feet away from campus building entrances.

Address or Residence Hall_______________________________ Student On-Campus Staff Faculty

Student Off-Campus Other

Date________________________________________

Sign SCAT’s petition today.

S C A T tudent

oalition

gainst

obacco

Please Return Petition To: Rosalind C. Richardson, Miller-Morgan Building , Rm. 135 or Mail To: NCCU, The Department of Public Health Education, P.O. Box 19738 Durham, N.C. 27707


Opinions

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Black thought t is a shame and pity that my great race refuses to think for itself. As if we possess a nonendowed collection of genius and creative thinking, we sit while others think for us. For centuries we have allowed america to shape and define our culture, heritage, and destinations, Lamont dictatLilly ing what is acceptable or not within our own skin. However, it is our blind ignorance that keeps us in bondage, and the selling of our souls that breed complacency. Although valiant, many black leaders of the past sought “freedom, justice, and equality” through the misguided pursuit of integration, instead of fighting for independence and encouraging black selfreliance. Are we not capable to lead our own? Though a difficult task, if we desire to rise from our wretched american plight, we must go back, research and rediscover the cultural and spiritual foundations which brought us over to this land of Canaan. Only through each other and collaborative efforts will our people be able to progress, and bring forth the next generation of blackness that will have to be stronger and wiser than the previous in order to escape our extinction. The time is now to erect our minds and begin thinking for ourselves, that we ourselves, may bring about effective solutions to the many “Negro Problems!” America, in despite of the black struggle, is still

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the same as it was in 1865. Though we now attend their private schools and shop at their overpriced malls, the struggle has simply evolved. It is comical, yet tragic that most black folk actually believe we share full fledged citizenship here, only to be bamboozled through the dispersement of civic and social crumbs. The very existence of a civil rights act or governing amendments such as the 13th, 14th, and 15th, should only serve as reminders that within this land we will always be considered second-class, and never be true diners at the table of tangible equality. We certainly deserve reparations, since it was from the backs of our free labor by which this country was built. However, look not to the american government to do anything for us. We will have to do for ourselves!! Just examine the Asian, Arab, and Hispanic communities. All are minority groups which have suffered their share of persecution in america, yet have emerged to become active players within the economic structure of capitalism through their practices of cultural nationalism. Intelligently, the aforementioned groups also stick together, and passionately support those of their own. We should be taking notes! I write not to put down, but to inspire and ignite my race out of our lethargic state of mind. We are a nation of beauty, even admired by those who oppress us! It simply angers me that we refuse to think for ourselves, granting america the open opportunity to cast us as thugs and gangsters, niggas and coons, bitches and hoes!! “For this much all men know: despite compromise, war, and struggle, the Negro is notfree.” —W.E.B. Dubois

N ORTH C AROLINA C ENTRAL U NIVERSITY

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Letters & Editorials The Echo welcomes letters and editorials. Letters to the editor should be less than 350 words. Editorials should be about 575 words. Include contact information. The Echo reserves the right to edit contributions for clarity, vulgarity, typos and miscellaneous grammatical gaffs. Opinions published in the Echo do not necessarily reflect those of the Echo editorial staff. E-mail: CampusEcho@nccu.edu Web address: www.campusecho.com Phone: 919 530 7116Fax: 919 530 7991 Fall 2007 Publication dates: 9/5, 9/26, 10/10, 10/31, 11/14, 12/5 © NCCU Campus Echo/All rights reserved The Denita Monique Smith Newsroom Room 348, Farrison-Newton Communications Bldg. NCCU, Durham, NC 27707

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Letters Two students speak out on 25 foot smoking ban

Dear Editor:

As a proud member of the “Eagle Family” I am comforted by the fact that the university has banned smoking in all dormitories as a public recognition of the dangers of second- hand smoke. However, I feel it is time to echo the demands made in an article written by Ms. Erica Purkett called “Non-smokers at risk”, published in the Campus Echo on April 4, 2007. The Student Coalition Against Tobacco (SCAT) believes that smoking within 25 feet of all building entrances at NCCU should be banned by the Board of Trustees to protect the health of the entire campus community. This issue is very relevant to this campus, because each year 50,000 non-smokers lose their lives as a result of exposure to second-hand smoke. Many people make the assumption that second-hand smoke is only harmful in-doors and that simply smoking outside eliminates the adverse health effects of secondhand smoke. However, a new study on outdoor exposure to second-hand smoke shows that secondhand smoke does not just float away to some mystical wonderland. Second-hand smoke actually concentrates and forms a cloud over the smoker that can span several feet. Cigarette smoke is much heavier than normal breathing air because it contains 4,000 chemicals, 50 of which are carcinogens, so the particles of this smoke precipitate back down on the smoker and others in the vicinity. Campus Echo readers can assist SCAT’s campaign by signing our petition on campus at various major events or filling out and returning the petition in this issue of the Echo. A deep understanding of the dangers of second-smoke and how to protect oneself is one of those life skills.

It’s hard to believe that 10 years ago, when I was only 11, I could walk into any North Carolina store and purchase cigarettes and chewing tobacco without any delay or rejection. Today, however it is not as easy; tobacco laws are becoming more common than ever in states, cities, communities and campuses. Yes, campuses. Last semester, an article in the Echo about second-hand smoke made me realize the risks. Second hand smoke is deadly and it claimed 50,000 American lives last year. That statistic is heartbreaking. NCCU’s Student Coalition Against Tobacco has recognized its deadly presence on our campus and has decided to take action by working for a 25-foot smoking ban at all building entrances on our campus. Unknowingly, many of us discreetly roll our eyes, hold our breath, and power walk to the door at the Student Union or other campus buildings to get through the smoky entrances. I feel an effective policy is needed to address this cloudy dilemma at the Eagle’s nest. I believe that the Board of Trustees has the responsibility to protect its students, faculty, staff, and visitors from the harmful effects of secondhand smoke. Also, I’m a believer that smokers and non-smokers have the right to breathe toxin free air on our campus. The impact on public health is reason enough to reduce exposure to secondhand smoke whenever and wherever. The U.S. Surgeon General reported that “there is no safe level of secondhand smoke”. This is the highest ranked public health official in the nation who affirms that we need to push for the Board of Trustees to adopt this policy. My fellow Eagles please sign SCAT’s petition, locatedin this newspaper, to guarantee a fresher quality of life.

Emily I. Nwakpuda ewakpu1@nccu.edu

Amanda L. Elleby aelleby1@mail.nccu.edu

Dear Editor:

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drawing by Rashaun Rucker

Question: Do you think you are prepared to find a job after graduating? “I feel good about finding a job, but it’s so hard to find an internship while you are an undergraduate and harder to get it.” — Beza Tilahun

“That could go both ways. It all depends on your teacher or academic advisers.” —Robert Clark

“I’m plannng to go to graduate school, and with the education from here, I feel confident I could get into not only grad school but right into a job after getting my bachelor’s.” —Jim Ferrell


November 14, 2007