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FEBRUARY 16, 2005

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Campus . . . . . . . . Beyond NCCU . . Feature . . . . . . . . A&E . . . . . . . . . . . Classifieds. . . Sports. . . . . . . . . . Opinions . . . . . . .

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VOLUME 96, ISSUE 8

Campus

A&E

Features

Sports

Three speakers explore the African-American experience

NCCU alumnus launches clothing line for Eagle pride

Charmelle Smith heads downtown to capture its revitalization

Our 4th annual CIAA preview is here. Games begin on Feb. 28

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Page 7

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–Section insert

Campus Echo Limited faculty affects studies Teacher shortage in NCCU’s nursing program linked to Ph.D. requirement, nurses opting to teach at retirement BY STEPHANIE CARR ECHO STAFF WRITER

Project winner set in the fictional town of Hicksville, Ala. in 1965, showcases two families. One family believes in the cause and aids those fighting for the cause. The other family believes that the voter drive will be the death knell for the black community. “Craft did it again,” said Gil Faison, who plays the role of Silas Jackson. “This play really captured the times.” The Graham family, made up of Ozelle Graham, played by JuQuarry Armstrong, and Betty Graham, played by Lauren Turner, houses and

Like most nursing programs across the nation, N.C. Central University's department of nursing is facing a crisis – there are not enough nursing teachers to go around. This spring, over 200 juniors and seniors applied to the program, but only 40 will be admitted. “It's most unfortunate, but it happens all over,” said Fannie July, interim chair of the nursing department. “We’re doing the best with what we have.” Only juniors and seniors with a 2.5 GPA or higher can apply to the program. The North Carolina Board of Nursing has set a cap at 125 students for NCCU’s nursing program, based on faculty and program size. Students can only apply in the spring. Nationally, over 25,000 nursing applications have been denied due to university faculty and resource constraints, according to a study from the American Association of Colleges of Nursing. The U.S. is likely to have a shortage of 800,000 nurses by 2020, the study reports. According to July, the nursing faculty shortage is linked to teachers joining the faculty close to retirement. The average age of the nursing faculty is between 50 and 52. July said the shortage also is related to the requirements for becoming an instructor. NCCU requires that all nursing faculty have a Ph.D., while the minimum requirement to teach is a master’s degree. She also said with increased funds the department would be able to assist potential faculty with sabbaticals and scholarships to help them earn a Ph.D. Some students say that the teacher shortage causes them to graduate late, change their majors or transfer to other schools. Other students say the teacher shortage

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Betty Graham (Lauren Turner) nurses her husband Ozelle Graham (JuQuarry Armstrong) as Wesley Green (Brandon McEachern) makes a point. CARLA AARON-LOPEZ/Staff Photographer

‘THE WISE ONES’ Play showcases experience of two black families during the 1960s BY JULIUS JONES ECHO STAFF WRITER

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hen Ruth Jackson is mourning the death of her husband, the lustful, racist — and white — Sheriff Bixby starts groping her. “Let me go check on my baby. She’s been sick,” said Ruth. She then goes into another room and comes back with a revolver and shoots the sheriff dead. Relax. It’s only a play in the N.C. Central University Theatre — Howard Craft’s “The Wise Ones.” The play, presented by the NCCU theatre department from Feb. 11-13, is a vivid exploration of the complex consequences for two families during the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee’s education and voter reg-

Ruth Jackson (Pamela McGill) and Sheriff Bixby (Daniel Neil) CARLA AARON-LOPEZ/Staff Photographer

istration drive in the 1960s. “The Wise Ones,” a New Play

$300 hike likely for out-of-staters BY DENEESHA EDWARDS ASSISTANT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

There may not be a tuition increase for in-state students after the University of North Carolina Board of Governors f r o z e increases for next year. But there is likely to be a $300 Gaines, vice hike in outchancellor for of-state and student affairs g r a d u a t e tuition next school year. N.C. Central University vice chancellor for student affairs Roland Gaines confirmed the freezing of in-

state tuition and also explained the need to increase tuition at a Feb. 11 student forum hosted by the SGA in the Alfonso Student Union at 7 p.m. UNC institutions made presentations to the Board of Governors Feb. 10 and NCCU asked the board to increase yearly tuition for the 2005-2006 school year by $225 for in-state undergraduates and $300 for out-ofstate students. NCCU in-state tuition for this year is $3,891, while out-of-state is $15,751. Gaines said he understands that students have financial difficulties, but there is need for a tuition increase to enable the University to retain and

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NCCU hosts musicians IMA brings schools together to enhance music performance BY EDGAR GAISIE ECHO STAFF WRITER

Workshops, performance clinics and concerts were featured at the 45th Annual Conference for the Intercollegiate Music Association at N.C. Central University’s Feb. 10-12 at B.N. Duke Auditorium. This year’s conference was hosted by NCCU and Benedict College. The IMA, which was formed in 1962 at Elizabeth City State University, brings together 13 universities to enhance music performance and education among regional black colleges and universities. “The purpose of this program is to give students

in the band a chance to rub elbows with musicians who match their caliber and talent,” said Timothy Holley, an assistant professor in NCCU’s music department. “It gives the students a chance to meet other students and faculty members they wouldn’t normally have the chance to meet.” Holly said the conference is dedicated to making great music and celebrating African American history. Saxophonist Charles Franklin II, a computer science junior, has enjoyed the event. “It’s a good opportunity to see and learn,” he said. In all 171 students attended the conference.

Darryl Dillard leads the IMA Concert Choir during the 45th annual conference in B.N. Duke Auditorium. AARON DAYE/Echo Photo Editor


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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2005

IVERSITY

THREE SPEAKERS EXPLORE AFRICAN-A AMERICAN EXPERIENCE I BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENTS

Equal rights, identity studied Prof seeks distinction BY TRACY MOSLEY ECHO STAFF WRITER

A clear distinction needs to be made between integration and assimilation when thinking about the experience of African Americans in the 20th century, according to Perry Hall, professor of African and AfroAmerican Studies at U N C Chapel Hill. In his talk “Niagara, Brown, and T o d a y : Perry Hall, Reflections UNC-C Chapel on a Century Hill professor in Pursuit of Integration,” at N.C. Central University on Feb. 9 in the Alfonso Elder Student Union, Hall surveyed the historical struggle for integration, which he defined as “gaining access to institutions, opportunities, levels of power, in the mainstream economics, social, and political structures.” Hall defined assimilation differently. He said assimilation has to do with the “loss of cultural distinctiveness.” The distinction between the two “is more and more important to consider,” said Hall. Hall’s point: Being integrated doesn’t mean you have to assimilate, or lose your cultural identity, and integration, while politically important, doesn’t necessarily provide cultural validation. Both Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois sought integration, but DuBois and others wanted to take a more activist stand for civil and political rights. This led DuBois to form the “Niagara Movement” in 1905. The movement was short lived, but it shaped the formation of the NAACP in 1909 and the Brown vs. the Board of Education decision. But throughout, according to Hall, integration and assimilation have been confused. The Harlem Renaissance and jazz are examples of the way blacks have refused to culturally assimilate. Hall said cultural resistance to assimilation is often seen as a rejection of claims to integration.

Sylvia Jacobs, a professor in NCCU’s department of history, explains the role religion played in political leadership in Africa over 500 years ago. RODERICK HEATH/Staff Photographer

Speaker links politics, faith Religion as a basis of leadership has long history that began in Africa BY IHUOMA EZEH ECHO STAFF WRITER

When reflecting the role of religion and leadership in the African-American society, one would probably not look for an explanation in African history more than 500 years ago. But a specialist in African history in N.C. Central University’s history department, Sylvia Jacobs told listeners at the Alfonso Elder Student Union Feb. 10 that understanding the role of religion and leadership in pre-colonial Africa can help

people comprehend how African-American leaders, such as Martin Luther King, Jr. and others relied on religion as a basis of their political leadership. In her lecture, “Religion and Kingship in Africa Before the Sixteenth Century,” which was part of the University’s black history month events, Jacobs argued that the spheres of “religious leadership and political leadership were often intertwined” in Africa before the 16th century. And this connection played a critical role in the

African-American experience, especially in the civil rights struggle. Jacobs said during the 16th century, “religion and leadership worked hand in hand” in Africa. Kings and other political figures in the Savannah, south of the Zaire forest, traced their origins of authority to some religious practices or the possession of superior religious knowledge, which set them apart from the masses. “They usually justified their right to rule through their role as mediators in traditional religion or their

ancestral links with the spirit world,” said Jacobs. Nationally acclaimed civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. is a typical example of religion playing a vital role in leadership. King and other political leaders emerged from diverse religious backgrounds and took active political roles in AfricanAmerican society. “Religion is so important in African-American community,” Jacobs said. “It was the only way of escape from intolerable suffering and served as a training

ground for AfricanAmerican leaders.” It was the foundation of African-American tenacity, which led to the opposition of slavery and the fight for liberty in 1950. Jacobs’ fascination about the history of Africa grew when she decided to pursue a doctorate in African history at Howard University. She has been teaching African history for 29 years at NCCU. “It enlightened me about the historical relationship that Africans shared with African-Americans,” said Jacobs.

Internship turns into historic journey BY ALEXIS CRUMEL AND ROSLAND HOLDEN ECHO STAFF WRITERS

SGA president D’Weston Haywood turned an internship into an opportunity to study the gentrification and destruction of the community he grew up in. Haywood, a history senior, researched South Park, a historically black community in downtown Raleigh, for 10 weeks while in the Minority Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program at UNCChapel Hill. Haywood said he got the

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idea of researching South Park from his paternal and maternal grandfathers Jessie Wright and David Haywood Sr., long-time residents of South Park. Wright owned a cab company and Haywood owned a funeral home. Haywood said communities like South Park were important because blacks owned their business and had strong support networks, such as fraternal organizations like the The Knights of Tabor and the Order of the Eastern Star. The church, too, was a vital institution in the community.

In the report, “In Its Heyday: A Social, Economic and Political Analysis of Raleigh’s South Park Community, 1900-1930,” Haywood argued that what’s happened in South Park has also hapHaywood pened to black urban communities across the country. He said the destruction of Durham’s Hayti community reflects the same process.

“Blacks have been pushed aside to bring rich white people in,” said Haywood when he presented his research on Feb. 8 in the Alfonso Elder Student Union as part of the University’s Black History Month Events. Haywood said he knows firsthand the “extreme disappointment and hurt” caused when gentrification overruns a community. He said has friends who lived in a section of South Park called Chavis Heights, a neighborhood destroyed for upper middle-class housing.

Blacks were relocated to apartments worse than Chavis Heights. Haywood said he wants to write a book to capture the history of communities like South Park before they disappear. According to Haywood it’s important that blacks realize the impact that history has on our future and that it is up to us to change it. “In order for black people to restore our communities, we have to return our resources back to the community — which is us,” said Haywood.

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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2005

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Free AIDS tests offered

Few enroll in ROTC

Health center urges testing BY MALANTHA MURPHY ECHO STAFF WRITER

When it comes to getting a free HIV/AIDS test the best option for N.C. Central University students may be on campus. NCCU’s Student Health Center in the Old Health Building offers a confidential blood test for free, no insurance required. To be tested, students simply go to the receptionist desk and check a box on the center’s visit sheet. The receptionist then helps the Bowen, s t u d e n t health select a condirector venient time for the test, usually within a couple days. “Each student is required to have pre- and post-test counseling for HIV/AIDS testing. It is a universal precaution,” says Charles Bowen, director of NCCU’s Student Health Center. The Student Health Center is staffed with one family nurse practitioner certified to counsel students on HIV/AIDS before and after their blood test. According to Bowen two more staff members will be certified for counseling in two weeks. “Counseling reduces the chances of diseases spreading,” said Bowen. “I recommend anyone who has a positive test result to see a psychologist or a counselor.” If the individual does not have HIV/AIDS, a letter is mailed stating that the test was negative. If the results are positive a health center physician will immediately call the individual for an appointment. “There are very few tests that come back positive,” said Bowen. “In the event that they do, the students are referred to a doctor at Duke Medical Center for further treat-

ment.” Treatment for HIV/AIDS is not given on NCCU’s campus. During the test, a vein is found on the arm or hand and a vial of blood is drawn. The blood is then sent to the Durham County Health Department to be examined. The Black AIDS Institute recommends that individuals engaging in unprotected sexual activity or using unsterilized needles for injecting drugs get tested. It can take HIV/AIDS symptoms anywhere from six months to 10 years to appear. There are two groups of tests for HIV/AIDS: one set tests for the presence of antibodies, the other tests for the HIV virus directly. The blood test at the Student Health Center finds antibodies in the blood, which are the body’s attempt to combat diseases or poisons. Other tests that seek antibodies are an oral swabbing test and a finger pricking test that provide results in 10-20 minutes. “The blood test is the most reliable form of accurate results,” said Bowen. “The other forms of testing are pretty accurate, I’m sure, but we believe the blood test is the best.” The results of blood tests given at the Student Health Center come back in 3-5 days. Student health insurance does not cover HIV/AIDS treatment or medication. “We are trying to keep the student insurance at an affordable cost,” said Bowen, who explained that HIV/AIDS coverage would make the cost of insurance premiums unaffordable. African Americans make up over 50 percent of new HIV/AIDS cases. It is the number one killer among men. Women account for 68 percent. Pediatric AIDS cases account for 59 percent.

Saunders’ mold effort honored BY JOANNA HERNANDEZ ECHO STAFF WRITER

Sharon Saunders’ work in public relations has paid off. Saunders, special assistant to the chancellor for public relations, has won a special merit award in a competition sponsored by District III of the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, in the public affairs category. “I feel honored especially being nominated in the company of the top institutions,” said Saunders, who developed and implemented a marketing plan to reduce the negative impact of the mold crisis. In a plan she titled “From Mold to Gold,” she said “the chancellor felt a plan was needed to ensure that the university did not lose students.” One of the most successful elements to the marketing plan was a statewide tour of North Carolina by Chancellor James H. Ammons and the NCCU Spirit performers that took place in the spring of 2004. The weeklong tour took Ammons along with a team of administrators, recruiters, and students including the NCCU Spirit team, which performed a song and dance show filled with information about the University. Saunders said people enjoyed the tour so much the University is doing it

again this year. “It was a great trip and I’m looking forward to my 2005 tour,” said Ammons in a March 2004 editorial featured in The Herald-Sun. Many believe that it was a long time coming for Saunders to be honored for her work in public relations. “She is the epitome of public relations and I think its about time someone recognized her efforts,” said Tyesha Ellerbe, a Spanish and marketing junior. According to Saunders, public relations is responsible for informing NCCU’s constituents about the university so it can be seen in a positive light. Since the success of Saunders marketing plan, enrollment at NCCU has increased by seven and a half percent from 2003 to 2004. “Her love for NCCU is shown through her diligence to promote the University, and make us look good in every aspect,” said Ellerbe. CASE District III also awarded Susan Hester, interim vice chancellor for institutional advancement, a special merit award for NCCU for her success in fund-raising through the Tom Joyner School of the Month Campaign.

NCCU has six in program BY TIFFANY ELBERT ECHO STAFF WRITER

Some tired, but smiling, Campus Echo staffers, 3 a.m., Feb. 16, after working today’s issue. BRUCE

DEPYSSLER/Echo

Adviser

Continuing tradition Campus Echo wins 13 journalism awards BY RONY CAMILLE ECHO STAFF WRITER

It’s business as usual at the Campus Echo. The N.C. Central University’s student newspaper brought home a record eight first place awards from the 7th Annual HBCU Newspaper Conference and Job Fair held in Baton Rouge, La., Feb. 2-5. The newspaper won a total of 13 HBCU Excellence in Journalism awards. Last year the paper won 10 awards—four of them for first place. This year’s contest coordinator Jean Thompson, an editorial consultant for Black College Wire and former associate editor at the Baltimore Sun, said 825 individual entries were submitted by schools in 25 categories. Judges came from newspapers and agencies that included, the Associated Press, the Los Angeles Times, BET/Esquire, the Baltimore Sun, the Chicago Tribune, and The Philadelphia Inquirer.

“[The Campus Echo] stood out because its editors and reporters challenged themselves to use the time they have between editions,” said Thompson in her contest comments. “More than once, and especially with the coverage of the tenure issue, reporters were striving to go beyond basic reporting and examine issues in depth.” Thompson also said the “judges praised the Campus Echo for photography and clean line design.” The first place awards won by Campus Echo were: General Excellence Award (non-weekly), Best News Coverage, Best Spot News Story, Best News Story, Best Photography, Best Individual Photo, Best Feature/A&E Page Design, and Best Individual Sports Page Design. Nine Campus Echo staffers and their adviser, Bruce dePyssler, attended the conference, which was hosted by Southern University and sponsored by the Black College C o m m u n i c a t i o n

Association. The conference included workshops on news reporting, photography and newspaper design. DePyssler, five-year Campus Echo advisor, said he was impressed with Campus Echo’s staff. “I’m not surprised. I know how hard everyone works to produce a quality student newspaper,” said dePyssler. “The competition among the HBCU papers is getting tougher. Of course, I’m proud of the general excellence award, but I’m especially proud of the fact that we won in the news coverage category,” said dePyssler. Editor-in-Chief Lovemore Masakadza said the awards were not only won by Campus Echo, but by the entire NCCU community. “This is good news for the University, it shows they have a newspaper to trust,” Masakadza said. “But it should not end here. We still have to learn more things,” Masakadza said.

NURSING CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 affects the quality of the program. “The program is unorganized,” said junior Brittany Rueben, a former nursing student who has changed her major to health education. “[The program] is not sincere when it comes to the wellbeing of the students.”

NCCU’s nursing department is accredited by the National League of Nursing. NCCU is one of few HBCUs with a nursing program. “The program has a lot of potential,” said Marion Gooding, a 17-year health education professor at NCCU. “All it needs is a sta-

ble faculty that is committed to teaching minorities.” July hopes students will stay patient. “NCCU’s nursing department is alive and well,” said July. “We’re accredited and will remain accredited. We’re working with our small staff.”

TUITION CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 recruit competent faculty. “Why would we increase [tuition] and we know students can’t afford it?” asked Gaines. He said half of the money from the increase will go to financial aid and half to faculty salaries. Beverly Washington Jones, interim provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, said the faculty raises will be mainly based on their evaluation. “If we go after quality professors, we will have to pay more,” said Jones. Simaya Kelly, an English sophomore from northern Virginia, said she dreads the increase in out-of-state tuition. “If tuition increases

again, that’s more loans I have to take out, and more money I have to pay back,” Kelly said. Another student who pays out-of-state tuition, psychology junior Candice Harding, said she will not be to upset with the increase. “Half of the money is going to financial aid,” said Harding. “I understand why they would increase tuition.” NCCU students have faced several tuition increases in the past. Only last year tuition was increased by $300. The UNC Board of Governors approved a 4 percent increase while the state legislature

added an additional 5 percent for the 2000-01 school year. This raised NCCU instate undergraduate tuition by 9 percent to $1,272 per semester. Outof-state tuition increased by 14 percent to $9,194 per year. The board also approved an 8 percent increase in tuition for instate students in March 2002, while out-of-state tuition increased by 12 percent. This brought NCCU instate tuition up by 24 percent to $3,148 per year, and out-of-state tuition rose from $9,194 to $10,497 per year, an increase of 14 percent.

There are many benefits of joining the Duke University-N.C. Central University battalion of the Reserve Officer Training Corp. There’s the possibility to get a full scholarship, $400 per month, a book allowance and a guaranteed job after graduation. LaQuisha Douglas, a history senior at Duke University, enrolled right before the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001, for two “tuition, exercise, tuition, and tuition again.” Overall, the ROTC battalion has 28 cadets, down from 52 three years ago. NCCU has just six students in the program. Lieutenant Colonel Todd Sherrill, program director said having fewer students in the program allows him to focus on battalion quality. Duke University established its ROTC program in 1982 and NCCU followed in 1985. The programs merged because both schools are relatively small. Ask different people why so few NCCU students are joining the ROTC program and you will get many different answers. One reason given is that classes are divided between Duke and NCCU campuses. Although transportation is provided for students when class is away, there is simply not enough staff in the battalion for NCCU to have a daily Army presence. The main office is on Duke’s campus, while the NCCU office, located on George Street next to Baynes Residential Hall, is not permanently staffed. According to the battalion’s head officer Colonel Steven Scott the officers sometimes visit, but “without someone to talk to everyday it’s kind of hard.” Douglas says race might also be a factor. Of this year’s 28 cadets, eight are African American. “Regardless of what school you go to, black people identify with black people and white people identify with white people,” said Douglas, an African American. “It’s not Duke vs. Central, but white vs. black,” said Douglas, adding that the battalion would be more unified if there were a larger minority presence from NCCU. The strict discipline of the military also comes into play when students decide whether or not to join the ROTC program. NCCU English senior Brandon McEachern said he respects the cadets who have joined the program, but it’s not for him. “If you ain’t my momma and if you ain’t my daddy you don’t put your hands in my face,” said McEachern. But cadets appreciate the discipline and training they gain in the ROTC program. According to NCCU accounting sophomore, Shawn Cureton, who joined right out of high school, the program leads to success. “In today’s world there are two ways to be successful: either join the military or go to college,” said Cureton. “I decided to do both.” The deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq are on the minds of many. “I’m not an advocate of the war in Iraq,” said Douglas. “However, I am a soldier in the United States Army and if I am called to duty, I will do my duty. I pledged an oath.”


Beyond NCCU

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reporter with TIME magazine recently asked Libyan president, Colonel Muammar Gaddafi, the question: What made Libya decide to dismantle its WMD [Weapons of Mass Destruction]? His answer: We started to ask ourselves, “By GLOBAL manufacOUTLOOK t u r i n g nuclear weapons, against whom are we going to use them?” World alliances h a v e LOVEMORE MASAKADZA changed. We had no target. And then we started thinking about the cost. If someone attacks you and you use a nuclear bomb, you are in effect using it against yourself. What an answer! The question to those countries which are spending billions of dollars on nuclear weapons projects is, “against whom are you going to use them?” Last Thursday, North Korea came out in the open and declared that they have nuclear weapons. In a statement run by the Korean Central News Agency, the North Korean foreign ministry said they “have manufactured nukes for self defense, to cope with the Bush administration’s ever-more undisguised policy to isolate and stifle the (North).” In other words, the weapons are there to be used to kill millions of people when the opportunity

arises. They are there to instill fear in other governments and force them to submit to North Korea’s demands. Nuclear weapons are very dangerous when used; they can kill millions of people and adversely affect the environment. One wonders what the world will be like when one country decides it’s time to use them. Unfortunately, in this world, people have differences which they deem too big to be settled through peaceful means. Hence, they stockpile weapons which can destroy the human race to scare other countries into submission. With the secrecy involved in the business of nuclear weapons, who knows who has them? Britain, China, France, India, Pakistan, Russia and the United States are known to have them, but who knows if Iran has them? Since World War I and II, several countries have acquired weapons. Because of this, a World War III will completely wipe out the human race. Other countries should take Libya’s lead and dismantle the weapons of mass destruction because the world does not need them. With the possession of these weapons, there is always the temptation of using them. The problem with one country acquiring them is that its enemies would feel threatened, and also work on getting them too. As a result of feeling threatened, one country may attack another for fear of being attacked first.

Campus Echo • Sports reporting • Campus news reporting •Photojournalism • Copyediting • Desktop publishing • Advertising/marketing • Online/web production • Graphic design • Be a part of it as a Campus Echo staff member. Drop by 319 Farrison-N Newton Communication

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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2005

IVER SITY

Tsunami survivors look forward, pick up pieces BY BRIAN NEWSOME THE GAZETTE (KRT)

PERALYA, Sri Lanka — A man walks through a roofless house stripped bare of its furnishings. In one room, he’s piled salvaged tiles in tidy stacks. In another, he’s propped unbroken beams against a wall. Whether he knows how to roof a home or whether there are enough tiles or beams to do the job is almost irrelevant. He’s trying. Sri Lanka is a country broken by disaster. Bodies are still unburied, rotting in the heat and humidity. Boats line the roads and poke out of the sea like man-made islands. Amid the aftermath of the Dec. 26 tsunami, people are starting to pick up the pieces. They cling to friends and relatives who survived. They work side-by-side with relief workers to rebuild their communities. “After all they’ve been through, they’re still smiling,” said Kevin Donaldson, president of Colorado Springs, Colo.-based Mission of Mercy. “They’re still hopeful.” Donaldson of Monument, Colo., toured the devastated village of Hambantota last month and handed out school supplies to children. Their resiliency surprised him. Children sponsored by Mission of Mercy were killed in the tsunami. Schools that the organization supported financially were destroyed. In Peralya, on the southwest coast, volunteers arrived in early January to find people perched on stoops with vacant stares. Now, like the man preparing for home repairs, those people pile loads of bricks as part of a general cleanup effort. Children play volleyball — the court has a single string for a net — and run around. The camp hums with activity. Down the road, Kulawadhi Antony points out the dirty brown waterline above her home’s doorways. She lost her husband, a daughter and two granddaughters in the tsunami. Two of her surviving daughters lost their homes, and now all live in her home. They sleep on the floor. Still, they tell their stories without tears. They don’t wear the haunted

Bruce French of Telluride, Colorado, (right) greets tsunami survivor Lal Padmasiri in the village of Peralya on the southwest coast of Sri Lanka on January 28, 2005. The roof of the man's home was ripped off by the tsunami in late December 2004. French hopes to help him replace it. MARK REIS/Colorado Springs Gazette (KRT)

faces of shock seen by television-watchers around the world in the days immediately after the disaster. In Dodanduwa, a fishing village south of here, fishermen put out their boats at sunset. A few boats remain broken, but many more have been repaired and returned to service. As boats leave the cove, one man puts finishing touches on his vessel’s repair. When it joins the others, more men will return to work. These are small things for an island where more than 31,000 died and as many as half a million are homeless. The rebuilding — and emotional healing — will take years. At some survivor camps, such as Panichanganei in rebel-controlled land on the east coast, there are no tiles or beams to collect. Everything is gone. The people sit in the heat and wait. But the small things are glimpses of what’s to come. Even as the media and some of the early relief workers pull out, entrenched organizations settle in for a lengthy rebuilding process. Asiana Education Development, which runs schools partly funded by Mission of Mercy, recently opened a school at Panichanganei. Meeting under a tent, four teachers worked with children to pick up lessons where they left off when the tsunami hit. Colorado Springs-based

Bruce French of Telluride, Colorado, (left) poses with the village chief of Peralya, Sri Lanka, on January 28, 2005. French arrived in Sri Lanka in early January and plans to stay until May as a volunteer to help with the relief efforts. MARK REIS/Colorado Springs Gazette (KRT)

Global Action is working with a business that is donating 10 modular homes, said Lal Withanage, the group’s director for Sri Lanka. Global Action is hiring carpenters to repair and build others. These groups and others like them are arranging for counseling for the survivors, especially children. Some volunteers are there simply to entertain. At a camp in Moratuwa, Global Action volunteers lead children in song and dance. Most children laugh and smile as much as U.S. children, even if those laughs become cries in the night. Uncertainty abounds, to be sure. Will the cease-fire hold in a two-decade civil war

between the rebel separatist Tamil Tigers and the government? Will a country that traditionally has forbidden foreign adoptions reconsider with its swell of new orphans? Will relief organizations deliver on their promises? Wayne Francis of San Diego is a Mission of Mercy minister who raises money for the organization as a guest speaker at churches. He visited Sri Lanka to get a look at the devastation. He said the message he’ll take back to the pulpit will be one of hope. And he plans to urge people to help the country recover. “God is not interested in arm’s length compassion,” he said.

Recycle


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THE DORMS ARE NOW SMOKE FREE BUT OUR WORK IS NOT DONE!

SCAT

NCCU Student Coalition Against Tobacco

Last spring the Student Coalition Against Tobacco (SCAT) mounted a successful campaign to ban smoking in NCCU dorms. Now we're working to clear the air around building entrances. If you'd like to join SCAT in this effort, come to our next meeting: Wednesday, February 23, 2005 1:30-2:30 p.m. Rm. 149, Miller Morgan Health Sciences Building REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED

Our Vision Eagles soaring above & beyond tobacco use at NCCU.

Help us create campus tobacco policies that protect all members of the NCCU community.

For more information contact Rosalind C. Richardson at 530-7548 or e-mail rrichardson@wpo.nccu.edu

In a fast-paced series of interconnected, dead-on character sketches,

playwright/ poet/actor/ activist Sarah Jones brings passion, humor, and warmth to her one-woman dissection of prejudice, serving up America's soul and revealing us to ourselves.

THE

R E’S

GH ART IN OUR S NOT ENOU CHO

O L S.

NO WONDER PEOPLE THINK

LOUIS ARMSTRONG WA S

THE

WA L K

FIRST

ON

MAN

THE

TO

M O O N.

Sarah Jones presents

“Waking the American Dream”

It’s a long way from the Apollo Theatre to

well-being. Virtually every study shows that

the Apollo program. And while his playing

moms and dads like the effects the arts have on

may have been “as lofty as a moon flight,” as

their children. They like that dance and music

Time magazine once suggested, that would be

and painting and drama teach kids to be more

as close as Louis Daniel Armstrong would

tolerant and open. They like that they allow

ever get to taking “one small step for man.”

boys and girls to express themselves creatively.

But as the premier jazz musician of the 20th

And they appreciate that the arts help promote

century, giant leaps were a

individuality, bolster self-confidence while also

matter of course for Satchmo.

improving overall academic performance.

Armstrong left his footprints all over the jazz world. And he usually did it in lace-up oxfords.

No person before or since

Which makes it so surprising that the arts

has ever embodied — and

have been allowed to virtually disappear from

Louis Armstrong did.

became the last jazz musician to hit #1 on the

Take solos, for instance. It’s impossible to

Monday, February 28 at 8 pm Reynolds Theater, Bryan Center Duke University West Campus Tickets $5 general seating, Free to Duke Students and employees. Box Office: 684-4444 or online at tickets.duke.edu

Instead of a giant leap, Louis Armstrong delivered one giant free-form crazy jazz groove for mankind.

revolutionized — jazz the way

A little art is not enough. If you think the

Billboard pop chart, he beat the Beatles to do it.

imagine jazz without them. But they actually

Not bad for a kid whose first

didn’t become an established part of the jazz

experience with a trumpet was

vocabulary until Armstrong helped popularize

as a guest in a New Orleans

them. Seventy years later, his solos are still

correction home for wayward

revered for their audacity and virtuosity.

boys. If only today’s schools

In the 1950s, when his popularity became

our schools. And our children’s lives. T H I S I S W H AT H O R N S A R E F O R .

were as enlightened as that

hour or so of art your kids are READIN’

getting each week isn’t nearly ART

some noise. To find out just how to get involved or for more ’RITING

information on the ways your ’RITHMETIC

too big to be contained within our borders,

reformatory was.

he accepted an invitation from the State

L O U I S T H E F I R S T.

There’s plenty of brain to go around. Give more to art.

child can benefit from arts education, please visit us on

Department to act as an American goodwill

Ask almost any parent, and they’ll say arts

the web at AmericansForTheArts.org. Just like

ambassador around the world. And when he

education is very important to their child’s

the great Satchmo, all you need is a little brass.

A R T.

ASK

FOR

M O R E.

Photo used with permission, Louis Armstrong Educational Foundation.

For more information about the importance of arts education, please contact

www.AmericansForTheArts.org.

Presented by Duke Performances with support from the Office of the Provost.

their fair share, it’s time to make


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Downtown, downtown

Photos and story by Charmelle Smith

The Liggett Myers project will create up to 800,000 square feet of residential, office and retail space. In all, $12 million in public and $60 million in private funds will be spent on the renovation.

A street sign marks the Liggett Myers district. A fire escape on a warehouse building will be converted into the second phase of West Village. The condominium complex will have up to 100 condos.

A mural above Durham Central Park promotes the new look that is on its way. In all, $1.4 million in public and $4 million in private funds will be invested in Durham Central Park.

L

ike many downtowns across the nation, downtown Durham was once a vibrant cultural and business center. Tobacco processing and cigarette production was at the core of this activity . But like many downtowns, downtown Durham has fallen dormant because of the rise of the suburbs and malls. A reinvention of d o w n t o w n Durham is in the works. Brightleaf Square and the Bulls Athletic Park were early steps in this reinvention. Now attention in downtown is turning to Durham’s historic tobacco district. Capitol Broadcasting Company

has formed an entity called American Campus to develop the historic American Tobacco property. Charlotte-based Keith Corporation will handle the real estate and business park development. Other downtown projects include Durham Central Park, which will provide an arts pavilion and an ampitheatre; the $75 million Liggett Myers Project, which will provide residential and commericial spaces; and the $200 million American Tobacco Re d e v e l o p m e n t Project, which will develop office, residential and retail space. Welcome back downtown. We missed you.


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CHANGE CLOTHES ‘Subject 2 Change’ brings taste BY CARLA AARON-LOPEZ ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR

When Jay-Z said to “change clothes and go,” I didn’t think that would be taken so literally when I met Jaime Patterson, owner of Subject 2 Change apparel. Anything can happen and anything can be put on a T-shirt according to Patterson. Patterson is a former Sports Management major and Business minor undergraduate of N.C. Central. After he graduated in 1998, he came back later for his Master’s degree in Athlete Administration and Business. Not a bad start for a bright young man. However, his job at Durham Parks and Recreation really needed to change as it became a dead end job for him. Patterson thinks everything is subject to change, even his job. He left his job and began to pursue is passion for clothes. Hence the company name, Subject 2 Change. Partnering up with two graduate students at Duke University, Patterson began to create identities for Duke and other neighboring HBCUs from their school spirit onto T-shirts. “No one has taken the opportunity to take advantage of Central’s capabilities,” said Patterson. He thinks everything is about school spirit in the Triangle area and I agree with him. “It’s us. It’s ours. It’s that simple,” he said. Patterson wants to give

Central’s campus its own identity. Central’s maroon and grey can be drab and he makes a successful transition of allowing color and school slogans like “Chicken Day Wednesdays” to appear on bright yellow shirts with cursive text in navy blue reminiscent of baseball shirts. Starting the business wasn’t hard, finding resources to fund the business and make it official were difficult for Patterson. “Central teaches you how to work for someone and not yourself,” he said. That’s a very strong statement from a former student, especially for one that jumped into the apparel business as a way to make extra cash. Subject 2 Change has customers everywhere in the Triangle, including middle schools, hair salons like VSOP, campus organizations like AudioNet, and various fraternities and sororities. “People need to see where you’re coming from without you even telling them,” said Patterson. Campus Originals, a website geared towards college campus apparel, currently links all HBCUs together as the place to buy school Tshirts. Patterson is currently working on getting Central onto the site as well as have his own Subject 2 Change stores open across the Southeast in the next five years. For more information about Subject 2 Change visit their carrier website: www.personalbuy.com for Tshirt options and prices.

Judah Jackson (Justin Weeks) slowly and quietly sobs after a gruesome whipping from his father, Silas Jackson (Gil Faison). CARLA AARON-LOPEZ/ Arts and Entertainment Editor

WISE ONES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 supports SNCC. The Jackson family has a “business operation” with the sheriff by the way of the stepfather, Silas, played by Gil Faison. The rebellious stepson, Judah, played by Justin Weeks, shows a boy growing into a man while Ruth, played by Pamela McGill, portrays an independent yet boisterous woman. In 90 minutes, she cooked, cleaned, was smacked by her husband, thrown down, cried, and even shot the sheriff, twice. Bravo. With great characters and excellent sound effects and lighting, Craft, a native of Goldsboro, N.C. and an NCCU graduate said he wanted to explore the pain and conflict blacks faced

Hall of Justus/ Six Hole Records out of on the black hand side

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With a delivery reminiscent of Pete Rock and beats described as Kanye West meets DJ Premier, this 14track LP from Rapper Big Pooh is sure to satisfy true hip-hop heads. When listening to this

“That story and those of my family and elders make up the fabric of what is ‘The Wise Ones,’” said Craft. SNCC was formed in 1960 at Shaw University in Raleigh. It was created after North Carolina A&T State University students were refused service at a Woolworth’s lunch counter in Greensboro. NCCU associate professor Karen Dacons-Brock directed “The Wise Ones.” It is Craft’s second play to win the NCCU New Play Project. “The House of George” won in 2001. It premiered in 2002 when NCCU chose it for the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival.

Just Blaze The Neptunes Jazze Pha P. Diddy

Beat Jacker #1

Sleepers

ents. Craft recalled watching the Civil Rights Movement in movies and TV specials and said that the media never seemed to match the stories he heard as a child. According to Craft, the portrayal of the civil rights struggle was watered down. “I wanted to write something that would capture not only the complexity of the times, but the complexities of the people and the strategies and philosophies the people used to struggle for the basic human rights denied to them,” said Craft. Craft said that a friend, Husan Kwame Jeffries, came across the story of the Alabama families and the SNCC organizers.

Grammy award winner Kanye West

12345 1234 123 12

Big Pooh

when struggling for their rights in the Jim Crow South. “I never knew what it was like to drive from North Carolina to Newark, New Jersey and not be able to stop to get a bite to eat or use the bathroom until you got out the south, but I remember the stories,” said Craft. “I remember the story about the bullet hole in the window of my grandparents’ den window, the result of someone shooting into the house because of my grandfather’s involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.” He remembers the horrifying tale of the cross burning in Mrs. Hamilton’s yard who lived three doors down from his grandpar-

album do not expect to hear the average tale of a thug’s rise from the gutter to rubbing shoulders with the rich and don’t expect to hear clever punchlines either. This is pure hip-hop along iwth classic drums riffs, soulful grooves, and lyrical deliveries carried straight from your lunchtable cipher. Don’t sleep on Sleepers, trust me. Rashad Freeman

United Christian Campus Ministry 525 Nelson Street, NCCU Campus Join us for Sunday Worship Services in the Alfonso Elder Student Union, Upper Level. Call for details.

CATCH THE BUS Michael D. Page Campus Minister TO Atlanta for the National Student Baptist Student Union, March 31-April 3. For more information or to get involved in Campus Ministries contact us at 530-5263 or e-mail us at mpage@nccu.edu

Slim Thug Already Platinum Geffen/ Star Trak Records out of on the black hand side

2

5

Does a shout-out on BET or MTV make you the boss? Well according to Slim Thug’s sophomore release, Already Platinum, yes. Tracks from the original album were leaked thus Slim thought he could redeem himself. It didn’t

work. The track “Like a Boss” has a hood-chick screaming “Slim, you the mutha*** boss.” Why? “3 Kings” shows his arroganance by conjuring a potion of conceited lyrics and pouring them on a hot beat. Few words of advice: leave the magic to Cher. This album has hot beats, crazy collaborations but no core. TRY AGAIN. Julius Jones

“Harlem shake, naw/ I’m in Harlem shaking awake/ Shaking to bake/ Shaking the Jakes/ Kill you shoot the funeral up/ And harlem shake at your wake.” — Cam’ron from “Down and Out” with Kanye West and Syleena Johnson. Hell naw. There need not be that much shaking and baking when making references towards the dead and talking about Harlem. But then again, I think Cam’ron is a horrible lyricist with dope beats to back him. Uh, great job on chorus, Kanye! electric barbarella, the A&E editor

We’ve moved to Room 005 in the William Jones Building.

Mark you calendar CIAA Career Expo March 2

Education Fair March 10, 9:30 am - Noon Leroy T. Walker Complex

Spring Career Fair March 22 10 am - 1 pm Leroy T. Walker Complex University Career Services is the student’s focal point for career planning. We offer career counseling, part-time job placements, internships, and cooperative education Itt’s time to start preparing for the world of work.” placements in both the private and public sectors. We offer workshops on resume writing, interviewing, cover letter writing, and stress management. Plus, in our Glaxo Career Library, you’ll find career-related videos, brochures, pamphlets, and magazines, as well as graduate school catalogs and annual reports — all there for you to review. Call for an appointment or drop by to meet with one of our counselors.

University Career Services William Jones Building, Room 005 530-6337 ~ www.nccu.edu/careerservices


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Classified Advertising EARN EXTRA MONEY College & University Students Business Opportunity - Excellent Compensation Work around your class & study schedule! Continue as your Summer Work! A Great Career after Graduation too! For complete information, log onto

www.ustaxcourt.com

and complete our contact form. An Independent Associate will call you for an Appointment when visiting your campus.Complete information will be provided at your appointment by our Independent Associate.

#1 Spring Break Website!

North Carolina Central University Residential Life

AVAILABLE POSITIONS: GRADUATE RESIDENT DIRECTOR ASSISTANT RESIDENT DIRECTOR ARD POSITION GRD POSITION • Support the Graduate • Supervise and train Director or Resident undergraduate staff Director • Assist residents in devel• Recruit, develop, and oping personal, academic, supervise House • and social skills Council and Resident • Promote the concept of Assistant programming community living throughgroups out the residence hall

REMUNERATION • GRD Position$10,000 Stipend • ARD Position$4,000-$5,500 Stipend • Furnished Apartment • Local Phone Service • Free Cable • Meal Plan while classes are in session

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS • Enrolled in Graduate School Program at NCCU • Must be enrolled in a minimum of 9 hours • Must maintain at least a 3.0 overall average ADDITIONAL INFORMATION • To retrieve the application go to www.nccu.edu and click on Residential Life • For any other questions or concerns, call (919) 530-6227

Lowest prices guaranteed. Free Meals & Free Drinks. Book 11 people, get 12th trip free! Group discounts for 6+ www.SpringBreakDiscounts.c om or 800-8 838-8 8202.

Campus Echo Classifieds Run a classified ad this size for just $10

SOARING FAR AND BEYOND YOUR EXPECTATIONS

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$600 Group Fundraising Scheduling Bonus 4 hours of your group’s time PLUS our free (yes, free) fundraising solutions EQUALS $1,000-$2,000 in earnings for your group. Call TODAY for a $600 bonus. When you schedule your non-sales fundraiser with CampusFundraiser. Contact CampusFundraiser, (888) 923-3238, or visit www.campusfundraiser.com

Work Hard, Play Hard, Change Lives! Girls resident camp looking for counselors, wranglers, lifeguards, boating staff, crafts, nature, unit leaders, business managers, and health supervisor. $200-340/week! May 28Aug 7. Free Housing! www.keyauwee.com Contact (336) 861-1198 or keyauwee@aol.com

Money for College The Army is currently offering sizeable bonuses of up to $20,000. In addition to the cash bonuses, you may qualify for up to $70,000 for college through the Montgomery GI Bill and Army College Fund. Or you could pay back up to $65,000 of qualifying sutdent loans through the Army’s Loan repayment Program. To find out more, call 919-490-6671.

FIRST GENERAL EXCELLENCE AWARD, NON-WEEKLY u BEST NEWS COVERAGE u BEST PHOTOGRAPHY u BEST SPOT NEWS STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “NCCU STUDENTS GIVE VIEWS ON DEBATE” u BEST NEWS STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “STOMPIN’ OUT HIV” u BEST INDIVIDUAL PHOTO, AARON DAYE, “SOUND MACHINE” u BEST FEATURE/A&E PAGE DESIGN, AARON DAYE, “SOUND MACHINE FEATURE” u BEST INDIVIDUAL SPORTS PAGE DESIGN, SHEENA JOHNSON, AGGIEEAGLE CLASSIC” u

IS. . . THE JUDGES:

Johnathon Briggs, Chicago Tribune u Sam Davis, The Baltimore Sun u Michelle DealZimmerman, The Baltimore Sun u Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun u Sherry Howard, The Philadelphia Inquirer u Joseph Hutchinson, The Los Angeles Times u Alva James-Johnson, SunSentinel u Ambre Brown Morley, Bloomberg News u Donna Owens, Essence & BET u Kathy Pellegrino, Sun-Sentinel u Hillery Smith Shay, Associated Press u Sheila Solomon, Chicago Tribune u Karla Shores, Sun-Sentinel u Jean Thompson, Black College Wire u M. Dion Thompson, The Baltimore Sun u Mitchell Vantrease, Daily News-Sun u Rufus Young, Sun-Sentinel

2005 HBCU EXCELLENCE

SECOND

u

u

u

BEST EDITORIAL CARTOON, KALEN DAVIS, “UNDERCOVER BUSH STEAL ING VOTES AGAIN” BEST FEATURE STORY, IHUOMA EZEH, “SINGLE MOMS WORK HARD” THIRD BEST FRONT PAGE DESIGN

HONORABLE MENTION

BEST INVESTIGATIVE STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “PROVOST/TENURE PROCESS” (MULTI-PART STORY) (ONLY AWARD GIVEN IN THIS CATEGORY) u BEST NEWS STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “TENURE PROCESS REVEALS KINKS” u

Campus Echo

IN

JOURNALISM CONTEST


Sports

Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2005

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He gave us some Moore Jonathan Moore leads Eagles to victory, Lady Eagles fall short BY MARCUS SMITH ECHO STAFF WRITER

The crowd rose to their feet. Chants of defense and ‘go Eagles’ resounded last night in McLendonMcDougald NCCU 65 Gymnasium as N.C. ECSU 63 Central University battled for victory against Elizabeth City State University. With eight seconds left on the clock, Jonathan Moore came through for the Eagles once again, scoring the game winning basket and securing the 65-63 win for NCCU. At halftime, the Eagles were down 22-31. “When we went into the locker room, Coach challenged us, so we had to come out change things,” said guard Markael Brace. “We had to break their will to win.” The Eagles did just that down the stretch. With 3:50 left in regulation, the Eagles trailed 55-57 after a big three-point field goal by Brace. The Eagles continued to battle to the finish. Brace had the hot hand, shooting five of six from the field including going two for two from beyond the arc. With one minute left in regulation, Brace shot his second critical threepointer to bring the Eagles within one point. With less than a minute left in regulation, the ball ended up in Moore’s hands. “I didn’t want to go into overtime,” said Moore. “That was my only concern.” Moore scored a crucial basket to put the Eagles up by one. Moore hit one of his two free throws to put the Eagles up by two with 8.8 seconds left in the

game. The Vikings where unable to put together an answer the Eagle’s comeback effort The Eagles played without their starting center, Jason Hervey who is suffering from a leg injury. “[Without Jason] we had to have a bigger defensive presence on the court,” said Moore. “Offensively, I had to play a bigger role and take more shots.” Moore recorded his 10th double-double of the season. NCCU’s Lady Eagles fell to the Lady Vikings with a final score of 57-75. The Lady NCCU 57 E a g l e s were lead ECSU 75 with a valiant second half effort by Cassie King who scored 20 of her 25 points in the second half. At half time, the Lady Eagles brought the score to a 33-33 tie after trailing by as much as six early in the half. That’s the closest the Lady Eagles ever were. “It was a bad night all over,” said King. “We’re just going to take this game as motivation.” Natasha Bailey scored a career high 13 points, all of which came in the first half. “They were an OK team, but we should have beat them,” said Bailey who went six for eight from the field. The Lady Eagles are now 12-12 overall with an 8-5 record in the CIAA West. Other game notables include Porschia Holmes who pulled in seven rebounds and Alisha Battle was the third leading Lady Eagle scorer with seven points. The men and women will play Virginia Union this Saturday at home. The game will be televised on ESPN.

IN BRIEF NCCU retires 15 basketball jerseys

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. C. Central University retired 15 basketball jerseys on Feb. 5 during halftime of the men's basketball game against Winston-Salem State University inside McLendon-McDougald Gym. Twelve men and three women are the first to have their jerseys hung in NCCU's historic McLendonMcDougald Gym. The honorees are: Sam Jones (1951-54/56-57), Charles "Tex" Harrison (1950-54), Ted Manning (1962-66), LeVelle Moton (1992-96), Reginald "Hawk" Ennis, Harold Hunter, Rudolph "Rocky" Roberson, John Brown, Ernest "Hands" Warlick (1948-51), Harvey Heartley (1951-55), Troy Weaver (1949-52), Aubrey Stanley (1943-47), Amba Kongolo (1999-2002), Von Fulmore (1984-87), and Michelle Harrison (1993-97). – NCCU Athletics

Lady Eagles win sprint medley

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. C. Central University won the women's sprint medley at the 2005 HBCU Indoor Track & Field Invitational at the Prince George Sports Complex in Landover, Maryland. The Lady Eagle foursome of Tiffany Mitchell, Kay Louis, Yolanda Barber and Aisha Brown posted a winning time of 4:17.47 to defeat second place BethuneCookman and third place Claflin, who were the leaders of the seven-team event. The men's team of Rashaad Lee, Austin-Lamar Hogan, Robert Curington and Eric Speer provisionally-qualified for the NCAA Division II Indoor Track & Field Championships in the distance medley by placing fourth with a time of 10:28.56. Individually, Speer, who lost one of his shoes at the start of the 800-meter run, placed seventh overall with a time of 1:58.03.

Jonathan Moore goes up for a basket in last night’s 2-p point victory. JOSEPH COLEMAN/Staff Photographer

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Classified Advertising EARN EXTRA MONEY College & University Students Business Opportunity - Excellent Compensation Work around your class & study schedule! Continue as your Summer Work! A Great Career after Graduation too! For complete information, log onto

www.ustaxcourt.com

and complete our contact form. An Independent Associate will call you for an Appointment when visiting your campus.Complete information will be provided at your appointment by our Independent Associate.

#1 Spring Break Website!

North Carolina Central University Residential Life

AVAILABLE POSITIONS: GRADUATE RESIDENT DIRECTOR ASSISTANT RESIDENT DIRECTOR ARD POSITION GRD POSITION • Support the Graduate • Supervise and train Director or Resident undergraduate staff Director • Assist residents in devel• Recruit, develop, and oping personal, academic, supervise House • and social skills Council and Resident • Promote the concept of Assistant programming community living throughgroups out the residence hall

REMUNERATION • GRD Position$10,000 Stipend • ARD Position$4,000-$5,500 Stipend • Furnished Apartment • Local Phone Service • Free Cable • Meal Plan while classes are in session

ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS • Enrolled in Graduate School Program at NCCU • Must be enrolled in a minimum of 9 hours • Must maintain at least a 3.0 overall average ADDITIONAL INFORMATION • To retrieve the application go to www.nccu.edu and click on Residential Life • For any other questions or concerns, call (919) 530-6227

Lowest prices guaranteed. Free Meals & Free Drinks. Book 11 people, get 12th trip free! Group discounts for 6+ www.SpringBreakDiscounts.c om or 800-8 838-8 8202.

Campus Echo Classifieds Run a classified ad this size for just $10

SOARING FAR AND BEYOND YOUR EXPECTATIONS

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FIRST GENERAL EXCELLENCE AWARD, NON-WEEKLY u BEST NEWS COVERAGE u BEST PHOTOGRAPHY u BEST SPOT NEWS STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “NCCU STUDENTS GIVE VIEWS ON DEBATE” u BEST NEWS STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “STOMPIN’ OUT HIV” u BEST INDIVIDUAL PHOTO, AARON DAYE, “SOUND MACHINE” u BEST FEATURE/A&E PAGE DESIGN, AARON DAYE, “SOUND MACHINE FEATURE” u BEST INDIVIDUAL SPORTS PAGE DESIGN, SHEENA JOHNSON, AGGIEEAGLE CLASSIC” u

IS. . . THE JUDGES:

Johnathon Briggs, Chicago Tribune u Sam Davis, The Baltimore Sun u Michelle DealZimmerman, The Baltimore Sun u Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun u Sherry Howard, The Philadelphia Inquirer u Joseph Hutchinson, The Los Angeles Times u Alva James-Johnson, SunSentinel u Ambre Brown Morley, Bloomberg News u Donna Owens, Essence & BET u Kathy Pellegrino, Sun-Sentinel u Hillery Smith Shay, Associated Press u Sheila Solomon, Chicago Tribune u Karla Shores, Sun-Sentinel u Jean Thompson, Black College Wire u M. Dion Thompson, The Baltimore Sun u Mitchell Vantrease, Daily News-Sun u Rufus Young, Sun-Sentinel

2005 HBCU EXCELLENCE

SECOND

u

u

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BEST EDITORIAL CARTOON, KALEN DAVIS, “UNDERCOVER BUSH STEAL ING VOTES AGAIN” BEST FEATURE STORY, IHUOMA EZEH, “SINGLE MOMS WORK HARD” THIRD BEST FRONT PAGE DESIGN

HONORABLE MENTION

BEST INVESTIGATIVE STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “PROVOST/TENURE PROCESS” (MULTI-PART STORY) (ONLY AWARD GIVEN IN THIS CATEGORY) u BEST NEWS STORY, LOVEMORE MASAKADZA, “TENURE PROCESS REVEALS KINKS” u

Campus Echo

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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2005

IVER SITY

What’s in store for America? I

n the election of 2004, an about-face occurred. What George Bush was unable to do in the election of 2000, he did handily in 2004. His numbers were down in the polls taken just before the 2004 election. The country was divided over the war in Iraq. CNN reported that Rochelle the unemployNewton-B Brown ment rate was 5.4 percent in August 2004 — the highest it had been since September 2001. Kerry did not take a strong position on many of the issues. Some said that Americans were afraid to change presidents in the middle of war. In my opinion, several factors influenced the election outcome — religion, actions by the Republican party, a subtle voting change by African- Americans

and married Americans. women. The party After the 2000 worked to abolIn my opinion, several election, some ish slavery and factors influenced the states started ensure the right allowing the stanto free speech. election outcome — dard of marriage It also fought religion, actions by the to change. to give women Republican party, and When some states the right to vote. began marrying The a subtle voting change same-sex couples, Republicans by African Americans conservatives felt passed the 1866 this threatened Civil Rights Act, the very fiber of recognizing our country. African-Americans as citizens. Candidate John Kerry did not They also proposed the 14th establish a definite position on Amendment, which became a this issue. part of the Constitution in 1868. The conservative groups gathThese actions garnered the supered momentum and quietly regport of African-American and istered their like-minded allies. women voters. The turnout of Republicans At that time, many said the equaled that of Democrats in the Republicans may have granted 2004 election. such rights to African-Americans President Bush received 11 to weaken the South. The percent of both the AfricanDemocrats, who were called American and married women Dixiecrats, were made up of indivote, an increase from the previviduals who were Klan members ous election. and were in favor of keeping the When the Republican party South segregated. was founded, it supported issues Beginning with FDR’s New Deal, that were important to AfricanAfrican-Americans turned away

from the Republican Party and began to vote Democratic. Bush put minorities in significant positions and Clinton created a few programs. But what has really changed for everyday people? What has changed for you and me? Dr. Mizelle stressed operant conditioning in the Psychology of Learning. Operant conditioning theory says for every action there is a consequence. This theory can be used in all segments of life, but it certainly applies to politics. The conservatives are preparing for 2008. They are preparing mailing lists as the rest of America sleeps. They are developing strategies to register 10 million new “Evangelical Christians.” They want to ensure Mrs. Clinton will never be President. They also want to protect the sanctity of marriage with a new amendment. So, is this possibly the new face of America? Are you going to do something?

drawing by Rashaun Rucker

Question: Do exams actually test your knowledge? Or simply how much you can memorize? “I think it depends on the teacher some test for the sake of knowlege ...” – Jamia Green

Playing for my education A

t first glance, someone reading this article may have believed there was a misspelling in the title. Indeed, we should all know about paying for our education, but how many of us have been playing for our education? ...After registering for the first summer session of the Erica 2003-2004 Purkett school year, I expected to learn about what the course and the teacher had to offer. Instead, I found myself amongst a class of 30 or more students that never came prepared, save three or four of us.

The students blatantly cheated on the weekend, or just weren't on exams, and determined the "lively" or as "passionate about length of time we would remain life" as she was, you were headed in class, based for trouble. on their plans At the end of the for the day. session, I was Yet, the one confident I was I found myself amongst going to get an A. thing we all a class of 30 or more learned was I actually came to that there was a class prepared, students that never game being did well on my came prepared, save played. In order assignments- or so three or four of us. to make the I thought, and grade, you had showed respect to play the for the teacher. game. Boy was I wrong. There were those in class who Despite my great efforts to could not have cared less about achieve an A, I ended up with a learning anything. Then there B. Anyone working towards acawere those like me, who paid for demic perfection knows that a class and expected to get our even a B is unacceptable. So who money's worth of instruction. actually got better grades? You However, in the end, we guessed it — the ones who didn’t learned that if you didn't become study for exams or rarely came buddy-buddy with the teacher, to class. They were the ones who make plans to hang out with her learned to play the game.

So what does this mean for the future of education? Recently, the UNC system was considering a tuition increase to provide our professors with a more decent salary. Now, for the two years I have been here, I can honestly say there are some deserving professors whose work merits such a reward. On the other hand, there are those few who deserve nothing more than a pink slip. I have come to accept apathy among the students, but I refuse to pay the salary of an apathetic professor. I had to learn the hard way that doing what is right doesn't always guarantee you the grade you deserve. Some say this may be , but so goes life. Well then, have you decided whether you are playing for your education? If so, have you learned how to play the game?

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Letters & Editorials The Echo welcomes letters and editorials. Letters to the editor should be less than 350 words. Editorials should be less than 450 words. Include contact information. The Echo reserves the right to edit contributions for clarity, vulgarity, typos and miscellaneous grammatical gaffs. Opinions published in the Echo do not necessarily reflect those of the Echo editorial staff. E-mail: CampusEcho@nccu.edu Web address: www.campusecho.com Phone: 919 530 7116Fax: 919 530 7991 Fall 2004 Publication dates: 9/8, 9/22, 10/6, 10/27, 11/17, 12/1 Spring 2005 Publication dates: 1/26, 2/9, 2/23, 3/9, 4/6, 4/27 © NCCU Campus Echo/All rights reserved Room 319, Farrison-Newton Communications Bldg. NCCU, Durham, NC 27707

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“It’s a memory game. I think people usually only retain 30 percent of what they are tested.” – Stephanie Carr

“I feel most students only study for the short term. They forget most of it soon after.” —Alonzo McMullen


FEBRUARY 16, 2005

A CAMPUS ECHO PUBLICATION

2005 CIAA SPECIAL

it’s ...

GAME TIME INSIDE Tournament quotables Pages 4

Team previews Pages 2, 3

Photo by Aaron Daye


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Men’s Basketball

Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2005

Eagles 2004-2005

0 Mintrel Abney 1 Derik Stephens 2 Vince Manning 3 Will Price 4 Markael Brace 5 Chris Tyrance 12 Steve Randolph 14 O.J. Smith 20 Curtis Knight 24 Quentin Fairman 25 Jonathan Moore 32 Jason Hervey 40 Travis Rogers 42 Ron Stokes 50 Cliff Robinson Guard Markael Brace jumps over Duke’s J.J. Redick a basket in the Eagles exhibition game against the Blue Devils. JOSEPH COLEMAN/Staff Photographer

Ready to make a stand NCCU’s Eagles enter the CIAA Tournament in good standings

Guard Will Price sets up the play for the Eagles’ offense. NCCU is currently 14-9 9 overall and 8-5 5 in the CIAA. AARON DAYE/Echo Photo Editor

On April 28, 2004, Henry Dickerson became the Head Men’s basketball coach, which ushered in a new era of men’s basketball for N.C. Central University. With a new coach and new attitude, what would lie ahead for the 2004-2005 season for NCCU’s Men’s basketball team? Currently, the men are in fourth place of the Western Division with a 8-5 record, but they have a notable record of 149 overall. The team has an 9-2 overall record at home which is impressive when compared to their 4-5 overall record away. The team has one returning starter from last season, senior forward Jonathan Moore. This season, Moore is averaging 19 points per game and 8.8 rebounds. Senior guard Curtis Knight, who has been an integral part of NCCU’s basketball team since his arrival in 2001, is having another stellar season averaging 16.7 points and 3.9 rebounds while averaging 34.6 minutes a night. The Eagles have encountered a lot of close games this season; some of the games lost could have easily ended in victory. On the season, the point differential in loses on average is 4.8 which shows that some nights the Eagles were so close to victory. The men’s teams is ranked ninth in the South Atlantic Division in the Division II Regional rankings. At this time last year, the men’s team had an overall record of 10-10 and a conference record of 6-5. With three games remaining before the CIAA tournament, NCCU has played and beaten only one of the teams left on the schedule. Let’s hope the team plays hard, especially the televised Virginia Union match up on Feb. 19, and enters the tournament with positive momentum. Story by Eric Cooper


Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2005

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(from left to right) Cassie King and Shante’ Collins have emerged as leaders for the Lady Eagles this season. The Lady Eagles are 8-5 5 in the CIAA. AARON DAYE/Echo Photo Editor

Hard core, hard times Lady Eagles season full of ups and downs but they continue to make strides.

Lady Eagles 2004-2005

4 Alisha Battle 10 Tabitha Hodge 11 Latoya Jones 12 Porschia Holmes 13 Karla Gamble 21 Shea Qualls 25 Casey Daniel 30 Cassie King 33 Lesley Gadson 40 Marissa Parker 42 Natasha Bailey 45 Lisa Richardson 50 Sasha Vann 51 Shante’ Collins

During the 2000-2002 seasons, the women’s basketball team averaged 24.5 wins a season. Since then, wins have not been close to that total but they have had respectable seasons. The Lady Eagles finished the 2003-2004 season 14-14 overall record and 8-8 in conference play. The 2003-2004 season saw something special happen on the court for women’s basketball team. Last season was guard Tiona Beatty’s last season as a Lady Eagle but fans got the opportunity to see the emergence of a fierce freshman by the name of Cassie King. King accomplished a lot last season; she was named CIAA Rookie of the Week three times and was named to both the CIAA AllRookie team and the CIAA All-Tournament team while being among the league leaders in seven statistical categories. This season started off on the right foot. Former NCCU standout Shenika Worthy

retuned from her professional stint in Switzerland to add additional experience to an already excellent coaching staff. Currently, the Lady Eagles have a 12-12 overall record but, they have an excellent conference record which currently stands at 8-4. With Beatty gone, King had to pick up where she left off from last season. King is averaging 21 points and 10 rebounds. This season another freshman, Karla Gamble, has emerged and contributed to team success. Gamble is the teams second leading scorer and has been twice named the CIAA Rookie of the Week. This season the team has more balance when compared to last year. Players such as Alisha Battle, Shante’ Collins, and Porchia Holmes are all making crucial contributions. The Lady Eagles are currently second in the Western Division and are one of the hottest teams in the CIAA.

Story by Eric Cooper

Guard Porschia Holmes looks for an open Lady Eagle. AARON DAYE/Echo Photo Editor


CIAA 2005

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TOURNAMENT QUOTABLES

By the numbers YEAR CIAA WAS FOUNDED

1912

NUMBER OF INSTITUTIONS

12

LAST YEAR’S TICKET SALES

104,500 CIAA BASKETBALL PROS

9

CITIES CIAA HAS BEEN HELD

8

CIAA PRIMARY SPONSORS

5

YEARS OF THE TOURNAMENT

60

DAYS OF FESTIVITIES

6

‘This season has been up and down like a roller coaster, but it’s getting better.’ KARLA GAMBLE, WOMEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM

S

$11M

‘I think we’ve been good as a collective unit so far this season. Everyone understands their role.’

It’s like starting over. No matter what you’ve done all season. Everyone will be on the same page.

JONATHAN

MONEY GENERATED IN RALEIGH

MOORE, MEN’S BASKETBALL TEAM

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NCCU’S FIRST MEN’S TEAM

1927

FIRST CIAA MEN’S TITLE

1946

LAST CIAA MEN’S TITLE

1950

JOLI ROBINSON WOMEN’S COACH T

CIAA SECOND PLACE FINISHES

I’m still an outsider (to the tournament), but I’m really excited about it and I’m looking forward to it.

7 LAST YEAR’S DIVISION FINISH

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2004 TOURNAMENT FINISH

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‘[The CIAA tournament] is the essence of black college basketball.’

RETURNING STARTERS

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MAURICE GLENN, STUDENT

NCCU’S FIRST WOMEN’S TEAM

1975

‘I would like to see our teams win.’ RHONDA DIGGS, STUDENT

FIRST CIAA WOMEN’S TITLE

‘Black athletes are sometimes underrepresented and this is a great way for them to showcase their skills.’ AGU ONUMA, STUDENT

1984

LAST CIAA WOMEN’S TITLE

1984

CIAA SECOND PLACE FINISHES

1

LAST YEAR’S DIVISION FINISH

‘[The CIAA] brings a real experience only HBCUs can provide.’ STACY HARRIS, STUDENT

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WOMEN’S NCAA APPEARANCES

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Forward Lisa Richardson plays defense against a USC opponent. MIKE FEIMSTER/Staff Photographer

RETURNING STARTERS

2


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