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VOLUME 105, ISSUE 9 919 530.7116/CAMPUSECHO@NCCU.EDU WWW.CAMPUSECHO.COM

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Sports

Campus

A&E

Feature

Senior guard Chapman reflects on his legacy

Lewis Little tries to mend mind, reputation after arrest

Capitalism at a dead end; push towards southern revolution

East coast connection: A snapshot of our neighbors to the north

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Campus Echo

EAGLES PUT NCCU ON THE MAP Senior leadership guided an inspiring Eagles season. The historic run came to a close in San Antonio but will be remembered in the school’s record books.

NCCU Eagles in high spirits at their send-off celebration before they head off to NCAA Championships in San Antonio. Jamila Johnson/Echo staff photographer

Inside Coverage Page 10 & 11

Chancellor’s installation to make history Events lead up to the 11th Chancellor’s Installation ECHO ASSISTANT EDITOR

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WHO seeks better TB diagnosis, treatment BY JOHN ZAROCOSTAS MCT WASHINGTON BUREAU (MCT)

BY JAMAR NEGRON N.C. Central University welcomed the arrival of its new chancellor in a spirited fashion last week as programs in the chancellor’s honor were hosted on campus. On April 4, Chancellor Debra Saunders-White will make history as the first woman permanently appointed to a chancellor position at NCCU. She is also only the second female chancellor to serve at any of the University of North Carolina system’s five HBCUs. A Hampton, VA native, White graduated from the University of Virginia in 1979 with a bachelor’s degree in history. She then joined IBM in 1979 as a systems engineer and soon moved to marketing where she assumed managerial responsibilities for IBM’s higher education, public sector and finance marketing.

TB strikes up to 9 million annually

Chancellor Saunders-White stretches with students before the Chancellor’s Walk. Jamar Negron/Echo assistant editor

GENEVA — The World Health Organization is calling on the international community to step up its efforts to diagnose and treat tuberculosis, noting that one-third of the 9 million people who fall ill with TB each year receive no treatment. "Reach the 3 million" is the slogan of this year's world TB day, which the WHO is observing Monday. Less than one in four people with multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) receive timely treatment. "Earlier and faster diagnosis of all forms of TB is vital," said Margaret Chan, director general of the United Nations agency. Early diagnosis, "helps stop the spread" of the disease, which is the No. 2 cause of death from an infectious agent, despite the fact that most people who are treated can be cured of the disease in six months. The first leading cause of death is HIV. In 2012, an estimated 8.6 million people fell ill with

TB, including MDR-TB, and 1.3 million people died from TB, including 320,000 who also were HIV positive, WHO said. Eighty percent of the TB cases occur in 22 nations, with India and China having the highest caseloads, accounting for 26 percent and 12 percent of the total, respectively. Other countries with high TB rates are Pakistan, Indonesia, Bangladesh, South Africa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Philippines, Vietnam, and Russia. According to WHO statistics, there were 9,945 reported new and relapsed cases of TB in the United States in 2012. New diagnostic tests are seen a major hope for combating TB, with new tests yielding results within two hours. "Without diagnostics, medicine is blind," said Catherine Boehme, chief executive officer of the Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics, a partner in the WHO-led Expand-TB project, whose goal is to

make sure the disease can be quickly diagnosed and treated in 27 so-called middle- and low-income countries. In addition to better diagnostics, the project aims to slash the price of the new technologies and the costs of the screening tests. "Increased capacity and reduced prices mean more patients can be served," said Philippe Meunier, the French government's ambassador for the fights against HIV/AIDS and communicable diseases. While TB treatment costs around $25 to $30 per patient in developing countries, the cost for treating the resistant form is much higher_perhaps as much as $3,000, said Mario Raviglione, who directs the WHO's global TB program. That cost skyrockets in wealthy countries, where treatment of drug-resistant TB can run as much as $40,000. The countries with the most cases of drug-resistant

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Hicks takes SGA presidential seat Hicks plans to operate, support, develop and refine

Derrick Hicks speaks at the presidential debate night in H.M. Michaux School of Education, March 25. KIMANE DARDEN/Echo staff photographer

BY KENDRICK MOORE

where two candidates lobbied for the position. Political science junior Norman Jones, who is serving as student body Vice

omore Class President, were the candidates. Each candidate had his own platform. Hicks’ platform motto was The Student Government “Operate, Support, Develop Association elections at N.C. and Refined” C e n t r a l while Jones’ University platform was are always an “My goal is to develop initiatives “ G r o w t h exciting time T h r o u g h that will increase student morale for the camAction.” pus. Students and to create an atmosphere where The SGA have the Presidential opportunity students can thrive.” debate took to meet the place on March individuals DERRICK HICKS 25 at 7 p.m in who will SGA PRESIDENT the H.M. advocate on Michaux Jr. behalf of the School of s t u d e n t Education. body’s voice. Both candiAmong the dates came elections that and Junior took place was the election President n See SGA Page 3 of a student body president, Derrick Hicks, former sophECHO STAFF REPORTER

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CHANCELLOR CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 She would work in the corporate sector for 15 years. She went on to earn her MBA from The College of William & Mary in 1993 and her doctorate in higher education administration from George Washington University in 2004. Before being appointed chancellor, Saunders-White served as assistant secretary for the Office of Postsecondary Education at the Department of Education. On the NCCU News webpage, NCCU Board of Trustees chair Dwight D. Perry said Chancellor Saunders-White’s appointment “a momentous occasion in the history of the University.” NCCU’s installation week started on Saturday March 29 with a Chancellor’s Walk and rededication of a trail in honor of Chancellor Saunders-White. The one and a half long trail was established April 1st, 2006 to help combat the increase of obesity and inactivity in college students. Public health professor LaVerne Reid founded the trail in 2006. She said NCCU has responded well to the trail. “We’ve had wonderful support,” Reid said, adding that more funding from the university is needed to continue the success of the trail. Reid also called the rededication of the trail in honor of the first female chancellor a “triumph” and said it shows “the university’s commitment to the wellness of its students, faculty and staff.” She said the campus has evolved to include various forms of wellness but a collaborative effort between

all university departments must happen in order for the trail to experience continued success. Later that night, at the School of Education, students squared off in a debate over the future of HBCUs in America. Charles Gray, Trey Jeffries and Keisha Morris of the political science department faced off against Kia Debnam, Katina Harris and Christopher Nixon of the psychology department. The event, “The Great Debate: Survival of HBCUs,” addressed questions such as whether or not African-Americans should be the primary constituency of HBCUs and whether or not HBCUs are constitutional under the law. After a tense and heated debate, it was the psychology department students who took first place. After the program, SGA president Stefan Weathers said discussions over the future of HBCUs are rarely acknowledged on college campuses. “We don’t often highlight these types of discussions,” Weathers said. “This is what we should be rewarding. This is how we grow as an institution. This is how we grow as a people.” Director of Student Life Assessment Tia Marie Doxey said hosting student debates on campus helps the intellectual climate of the school. “It’s a wonderful opportunity to demonstrate the ability to have dialogue and discourse,” she said. Of NCCU appointing its first permanent female chancellor, Doxey said it is indicative of NCCU’s standard of achievement. “I think it shows that NCCU exudes eagle excel-

lence,” she said. “Eagle excellence is inclusive excellence and we have to model that in our leadership.” The next day, an interfaith service was held in the McDougald-McLendon gymnasium in honor of Chancellor SaundersWhite. Leaders from many triangle church services, from Jewish to Bahá’í, came to offer prayers of support to the new chancellor. The keynote speaker, Judge Penny Reynolds Brown, galvanized the audience with her powerful sermon. “I’ve been called to preach, not to speak,” Brown said. Brown said the current times call for bold leadership and urged students to view the chancellor as a role model. “You want to see a true black woman? Chancellor stand up,” Brown said. Brown also said Chancellor Saunders-White’s gender is a non-factor in her leadership. “Your gender should not and will not make a difference,” she said. “You have a prophetic destiny. Now let’s get to work.” After Brown’s speech, the chancellor offered her own words. “I am truly honored to serve North Carolina Central University,” she said. She said although she was being installed, that was not where the focus should be. “It’s not about me,” she said. “It’s about this place. Because North Carolina Central University was and remains the gateway of opportunity for America.”

On-campus pantry to fight student hunger NCCU students will no longer have to go far to get nutritious foods and personal hygiene products. BY MONIQUE LEWIS ECHO ASSISTANT EDITOR

NCCU’s Campus Pantry is one of many pantries opening on college campuses in the state. Kimane Darden/Echo staff photographer

N.C. Central University is putting an end to hunger in the Durham community by starting at home. NCCU is joining N.C. State University, Meredith College, Durham Technical Community College, among other schools in the state that have opened an oncampus food pantry to help hungry students. The NCCU Campus Pantry, located on the second floor of the Dent Human Sciences building, opened on Monday, March 31 at 1:30 p.m. with a dedication ceremony as part of the Chancellor’s Installation week of activities. In response to the food shortage many students at NCCU face, alumna Deborah Taylor brought the food pantry idea to the University in the spring of

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2013. Dr. Deborah Bailey, director of the Academic Community Service Learning Program helped facilitate the pantry by following the food pantry model of Durham Technical Community College. Jason O’Briant, director of the NCCU Dietetics program, serves as the chair of the committee to keep it going. Bailey says that hunger is not just about a lack of food; it is also about not having nutritious food. “Our student body is changing…this can be hard for some students who have to squeeze every penny after their tuition bill is paid,” said Bailey. Students can come into the pantry on Tuesdays from 1:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. and leave with the following shopping list: vegetables (3), soups (2), fruit (1), dairy/PC/grain (1), miscella-

neous (1), protein (1), and starch (1 box or 2 noodle products). Personal hygiene products are also available at the pantry, which is why Bailey says is called a “campus pantry” instead of a “food pantry.” The NCCU Campus Pantry relies on volunteers and donations. NCCU Campus Pantry is looking for Food Ambassador Volunteers who will take inventory, restock, organize, clean, inform people about the pantry and solicit gifts of food. The current stock of food comes of the NCCU campus family, but there are plans to partner with local farmers' markets and the North Carolina Food Bank. The NCCU Campus Pantry will add more food options and hours of operation to meet student demand.


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Student reflects on wrongful imprisonment Lewis Little was imprisoned in 2013 for a crime he didn’t commit

prepared to answer the questions and explain why they were eligible to become the next Student Body President. The candidates addressed campus issues such as student morale, academic retention and student lack of knowledge about campus resources. Voting took place March 26, 2014. Hicks was elected the next Student Body President for the 2014-2015 academic school year. Hicks described his vision for his upcoming term. “My goal is to develop initiatives that will increase student morale and to create an atmosphere where students can thrive,” he said. “Also to make sure that I advocate, defend and respond to student rights and concerns. I will help any student who feels like they have been mistreated unfairly.” During the election Olivia Robison was elected as the new student body Vice President for the 20142015 academic school year. Tania Irwin was elected as Miss NCCU and Demarre Richmond was elected as Mr. NCCU.

BY ALEX SAMPSON ECHO EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

For Durham native Lewis Little, starting college was no different than for any other incoming freshman. Little entered N.C. Central University in 2012 as a teenager trying to figure out what he wanted to get out of college. Little had his mind set on a career as a lawyer, but wasn’t sure what path to take. After some confusion, he switched his major from political science to mass communication. Like most incoming students, Little spent his freshman year adjusting to a new environment and enjoying a year that he described as “fantastic.” In 2013, Lewis returned to NCCU as a young man trying to pick up the pieces of a publicly tarnished reputation. A Google search would reveal his name and arrest record, mug shot and articles on WRAL, the News & Observer and ABC11 about his alleged involvement in a home invasion. One would be less likely to find articles concerning his innocence.

Wrong place, wrong time

Derrick Hicks (top) and Norman Jones (bottom). Kimane Darden/ Echo staff photograher

Little remembers June 20, 2013 as an “absolutely normal day.” He said it was a hot, summer day that he and his friends spent cooped up in the house. After lying around one of his friend’s houses for most of the day, the group decided they needed to go out. “That was actually what sparked it,” Little said. Little said they left the Mews Apartments around 11 p.m. to drive to Timberstone Apartments in Northeast Durham, the side of town that Little is from. Packed into one car, the group of six friends drove across town. As they approached the apartments, Little said they saw a form lying in the middle of the road. They quickly realized it wasn’t road kill; instead, it was a human body. “It was inevitable for us to see him,” Little said. Little and his friends got out of their car to check on the man. Little said he couldn’t tell what was wrong with the man, but that he was making a wheezing sound. Careful not to touch him, Little encouraged the man to get up. Despite opposition from his friends, Little called the police, who had already been informed of the situation. He decided to stay at the scene. Little said the police arrived soon after and began to investigate. What followed was unexpected.

“A white officer walked up to me and I was walking towards him … and I thought I was about to explain myself and he kind of pushed my left shoulder, turned me around and started to handcuff me,” Little said. Little was taken to Durham Police Headquarters where he was read his rights. He said he invoked his 5th Amendment rights out of fear. Around 7 a.m. the next day, Little was taken to the Durham County Jail. At that point, he said he was exhausted and in shock. Little was charged with first-degree burglary, two counts of first-degree kidnapping, one count of felony conspiracy and three counts of assault with a deadly weapon with intent to kill. He was subsequently incarcerated under a $1.4 million secured bond. Lewis said he was placed under 23-hour lockdown. After sleeping off his exhaustion, he was left sitting in a room with just the walls and his thoughts. He often jumped up to look outside the tiny window of his cell but could only hold himself up for several seconds before falling back down. “Days seemed like years,” Little said. The then 19-year-old had never been in jail or had issues with authorities, so the experience was confusing. Little went a while without showering because he didn’t realize at first that he could only take showers in the one hour he was allowed outside his cell. When Little was removed from lockdown, he said he thought he was being released. However, he was only being placed with the general population. On July 15, Little was told to pack up. Instead of packing, he went back to his room and lay down before he was told to pack up again. “I was trying my best to get ready before they realized they made a mistake.” After going through the motions, Little said the prospect of being released was too good to be true. That day, his charges were dropped. Little remembers that day as being hot. “That was the first time I sweated in like a month.”

Grisly discovery Little wouldn’t find out until later that the body the friends had happened upon was Michael Lee, 25, of West Club Boulevard. Not long before they made the grisly discovery, Lee and several other

Lewis Little, an NCCU mass comunication sophomore, spent one month in jail after calling the police about an injured man on Melbourne Street. Alex Sampson/Echo editor-in-chief

“A white officer walked up to me and I was walking towards him ... and I thought I was about to explain myself and he kind of pushed my left shoulder, turned me around and started to handcuff me.” LEWIS LITTLE MASS COMMUNICATION SOPHOMORE

armed men had broken into the home of Ronald Lee Snipes Sr. of Melbourne Street. According to police reports, Snipes’ wife, Brenda, was held at gunpoint while the suspects asked for her son. She was released when her son came out of the back bedroom. Brenda lay on the ground after hearing multiple gunshots. According to Durham Police Chief Jose Lopez, Ronald Lee Snipes Jr. shot Lee, who collapsed outside. Lopez said the homeowner gave a physical description of one of the attackers prior to seeing Little. He described the suspect as a dark-skinned black male with dreadlocks wearing black shorts with a red stripe down the side. He then pointed Lewis out in the crowd of onlookers. According to court documents, Little’s case was dismissed due to an error in the witness statement. No one else has been identified in connection with the home invasion.

Systemic abuse? The story of Little’s incarceration gained atten-

United Christian Campus Ministry 525 Nelson Street, NCCU Campus

JOIN US! Get involved with Campus Ministries today!

tion when Durham activist and writer Lamont Lilly wrote a piece entitled “One Month a Slave” in February 2014. “Lewis Little is just one case,” Lilly said. Lilly sees similarities between Little’s case and the cases of Jose Ocampo, Jesus Huerta and Stephanie Nickerson. “There’s obviously a systemic issue here of abuse, of not respecting certain communities,” Lilly said. “It just so happens that the people who have suffered these tragic situations involving the Durham Police Department, it just so happens none of them are white.” Lopez said the Durham Police Department is not the corrupt entity that people make it out to be. “The reality is that this organization is working in a morally correct way,” Lopez said. Lopez said several things need to be cleared up in response to Lilly’s article, one of which includes the reason Little was charged. “Lewis Little was never arrested for murder,” Lopez said. “The charges were what

was believed to be his involvement in the invasion.” Lopez also stated that there is no officer by the name of K. Hempstead. According to court documents, Keith Hempstead was the magistrate.

A damaged reputation Little was released in time to register for classes at NCCU. The sophomore is focusing on his education and progressing but said the situation still hurts. Little said he was unable to find a job because of the arrest. He’s now attempting to get his record expunged. Little said that after being released, he received an apology from the district attorney, but he said he deserves more than apology. While he isn’t sure what he wants to happen, Little said he wants justice. “It’ll take much more than that to reconcile the pain I feel,” he said. Little said he’s keeping his head up and remains determined. “It encouraged me to work 10 ten times harder and prove everyone wrong,” Little said. “I’m still not giving up.”

NCCU’s OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS SCHOLARSHIPS AWARDED • Two NCCU students have been awarded scholarships from Duke University to participate in the 2014 Duke in Ghana summer program. The students are Nyaira Hood who is majoring in Public Health; and Destiny Owens who is majoring in History and Mass Communication. Congratulations, Nyaira and Destiny!

STUDY ABROAD • First Thursday study abroad information session – April 3, May 1. 10:40 break, Lee Biology, 202 • Academic unit/class/Small group/study abroad information sessions are available on request • Departure Orientation for students studying abroad summer and fall 2014 – Thurs March 27, 10:00-12:30 p.m. Lee Biology, 202

Resource Michael D. Page Campus Minister

• Copies of “A Student Guide to Study Abroad,” an IIE and AIFS publication by Berdan, Goodman and Taylor, are available in the reference section of the Shepard Library and in the Office of International Affairs.

Deadlines for study abroad applications For more information contact Rev. Michael Page at 530-5263 or by e-mail at mpage@nccu.edu

•To study abroad in the spring semester September 1 •To study abroad in the summer, fall, or an academic year February 15 expand your horizons

STUDY ABROAD

Contact Dr. Olivia Metzger Jones at ojones@nccu.edu or 919.530.7713


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Speaker encourages sisterhood NCCU instructor empowers young women at Student African American Sisterhood event BY ALEXANDRIA GLENN ECHO ONLINE EDITOR

On March 25 at 8:30 p.m., N.C. Central University’s Student African American Sisterhood (S.A.A.S) hosted “A Saasy Night” in the Student Union to raise money for the new organization and to bring a sense of sisterhood to all women on campus.

opinions or judgments affect how they think or feel about themselves. Dancy, a former anchor for ABC News 14, also has worked for Oxygen, TVD News, Discovery Channel and WPTY in Memphis. “The idea of empowering women is very dear to my heart,” she said. She explained how past generations of women did

“We are a phenomenal group. We are phenomenal women. And because of that, we should reject the labels society tries to put on us and we shouldn’t let anyone tell us who we are.” SHELVIA DANCY ADJUNCT INSTRUCTOR Although young women were the targets of the event men were welcomed. Criminal justice sophomore Quansuella Miller and SAAS president Brittany Jackson invited vendors, performers and speakers to participate. Nia Sutton, public health education junior, opened the show by performing her poem “Freedom.” Shelvia Dancy, an NCCU adjunct instructor, law student and alumna, was the featured speaker. Dancy began with a video of herself as a television anchor. She encouraged audience members to chase their dreams and not let others’

not have the same opportunities as women today. “We are a phenomenal group. “We are phenomenal women. “And because of that, we should reject the labels society tries to put on us and we shouldn’t let anyone tell us who we are.” Dancy added that women need to empower each other instead of breaking each other down. “What empowers her, empowers you, empowers me,” she said. Dancy encouraged the crowd filled with young women to look at a failure in a different light. “I never failed,” she said.

Shelvia Dancy, NCCU mass communication instructor and featured speaker at Student African American Sisterhood’s event “A Saasy Night” on March 29, stressed self-motivation and self confidence. ALEXANDRIA GLENN/Echo staff reporter

“I just found a thousand ways that didn’t work.” She said she wanted audience members to walk away from the program recognizing who they are, honoring

who they are, believing in who they are and never underestimating themselves. After Dancy’s speech, former NCCU student Meshach Chavis performed his spoken

word piece. Former NCCU student TJ Walker performed a gospel piece about uplifting women. The event concluded with a male fashion show titled

“The Gentleman’s Club.” After the event, Jackson said she was pleased with the outcome of the event and she was grateful for the support.

NOTICE OF PARTISAN PRIMARY, SCHOOL BOARD ELECTION Polling Location Changes and Early Voting Schedule May 6, 2014 The Partisan Primary and School Board Election will be held in Durham County, NC on Tuesday May 6, 2014. All Durham County precincts will be open from 6:30 am until 7:30 pm. A photo ID is not required for this election but will be required for all elections beginning in 2016. All 17 year old voters who are registered and will be 18 on or before November 4th may vote in the Primary. A voter’s party affiliation and residential address will determine their ballot style. Voters registered as Republican, Democratic or Libertarian must vote the ballot for their party. Unaffiliated voters will choose one of the party ballots or a ballot containing only non-partisan contests. To view your correct ballot style go to https://www.ncsbe.gov/webapps/voter_search/ The following contests will be on the ballots:

One Stop No Excuse Absentee Voting will be held at:

Voters who are currently registered need not re-register. Registered voters who have moved or changed other information since the last election should notify the Board of Elections of that change by Friday, April 11, 2014. Same day registration is no longer allowed during the early voting period. The polling location for the following precincts has changed: Precinct 24 FROM: Hillandale Elementary School

Precinct 30-1 FROM: Oak Grove Elementary School

TO:

TO:

DPS Staff Development Center 2107 Hillandale Rd.

East Regional Library 211 Lick Creek Lane

Precinct 33 FROM: Lowes Grove Middle School

Precinct 32 FROM: Neal Middle School

TO

TO:

Lowes Grove Baptist Church 4430 S. Alston Ave.

East Regional Library 211 Lick Creek Lane

Information regarding registration, polling locations, absentee voting, or other election matters may be obtained by contacting the Board of Elections. Website: www.dconc.gov/elect Phone: 919-560-0700

Email: elections@dconc.gov Fax: 919-560-0688

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TUBERCULOSIS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

Netus Madiode, 17, is photographed May 4, 2010, before his spine surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia. A tuberculosis infection had festered in Madiode's spine for two years or more, eating away at ligaments and disks between his vertebrae. APRIL SAUL/Philadelphia Inquirer(MCT)

TB can run as much as $40,000. The countries with the most cases of drug-resistant TB are India, with 16,588 cases, Russia, with 13,612, South Africa, with 15,419, and Ukraine, which has 6,934, according to WHO statistics. The Expand-TB project has brought down the cost of drugs needed to treat drugresistant TB by 32 percent, said Joel Keravec, who manages drug procurement for

the Global Drug Facility, a U.S.-sponsored clearinghouse for purchasing and distribution of TB treatments. The Expand-TB project also has reduced the cost of the equipment needed to diagnose TB, from $70,000 to $16,000, under an agreement between the UNITAID, the international agency created to handle such purchases, the U.S. and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Currently only one company,

Xpert, manufactures the equipment for rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB, but the development of new technologies are expected to end that monopoly and drive prices lower. For now, drug-resistant TB remains a small part of infections in wealthy countries, but that trend may not hold. Raviglione said rates of drug-resistant TB infection are increasing in Sweden, Austria, Finland and Great Britain.

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Along the Garden City Trail, one will find architecture decades old.

The 7 train can take you to Time Square and back.

Gentrification surrounds the stairway to my grandfather’s house on Junction Boulevard.

A highrise in the primarily Jewish neighborhood of Forest Hills, Queens.

Photos and story by Kimane Darden

Want to go to Manhattan? Jump on the 7. It’ll take you about 15 minutes.

’m walking down Junction Boulevard. An old man asks ¿Conoces a Cristo? He must think I’m Dominican because of my dark hair and skin color. I smile and shake my head hoping that he’s not offended by my silence. I am surrounded by the blaring sirens of NYPD, the grating sounds of the 7 train braking above me at Junction Station, and the endless honking of enraged drivers.

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This ‘Queens Is The Future’ mural plasters a local school’s handball court wall.

I felt something overwhelming blossom in my chest: pride. I am home. I am in the most eastern of New York City’s five boroughs. I am in Queens. Specifically Jackson Heights, Queens. Hundreds of millions and millions have passed through Queens, but they hardly know it. Queens is home to La Guardia and JFK airports. Queens is home to 2.3 million. Home to

untamed, urban gardens and loitering, mischievous youth outside local bodegas. In Queens you can walk down one street and be swallowed by bustling commuters. A moment later you are totally alone and surrounded by towering bricks standing ever sentinel. Traverse down old Jackson Heights and you stand witness to the conflation of antiquity and modernity.

There’s the hushed Hebrew spilling from the synagogues in Forest Hills. There’s Arabic drifting from a mosque in Long Island City. There’s Spanish emanatting from La Abundancia, a popular bakery. Devour the smells of grilled hotdogs with tangy sauerkraut, or stand clear of the pungent, overwhelming smell of fresh fish at the Asian market. Queens is the most ethnically diverse urban area

in the world. Italians, Senegalese, Ecuadorians, Russians, Swedes, Liberians, Mexicans, Koreans, Nigerians and more. Queens is a fascinating and gigantic cultural pie. Almost half of the boroughs’ residents are foreign born. Linguists estimate that 138 languages are spoken in Queens, a mere 112 square miles. I love Queens. Queens is the Future.

Sabrett Hotdog vendors are a popular lunch stop for Jackson Heights locals.


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Capitalism is dead

Building a Southern movement for revolution and socialism

An unfinished sketch B Y L EAH M ONTGOMERY ECHO A&E EDITOR

Left: Jasiri X, left, performs his work at the Cuban Revolution restaurant March 29. Right: Duke student Gao Chia-Ren reciting the poem on the death of his brother. LEAH MONTGOMERY/Echo A&E editor

BY L EAH M ONTGOMERY ECHO A&E EDITOR

On Saturday, March 29, the Durham branch of the Workers World Party assembled to focus on building a Southern movement for revolution and socialism. The conference, “Hard Times are Fighting Times,” was held at the Durham County Main Library. The event included speakers from the Southern Workers Assembly, Black Left Unity Network, Fight Imperialism—Stand Together and the People’s Power Assembly. After the speakers, breakout sessions explored ideas about what it means to be a revolutionary today. Later, workshops explored such issues as ending the war on youth of color, police brutality, revolutionary cultural organizing and the hypocrisy of U.S. imperialism. Zaina Alsous of the Durham WWP opened her discussion, “New Paths to Power,” with a recap of Operation Dixie, the tobacco workers’ demonstrations of 1943-1950. At the time, R.J. Reynolds had the largest tobacco manufacturing facility in the world, with some 12,000 employees, two-thirds of whom were AfricanAmerican; more than half were women. Black workers were given low-paying jobs and were labeled unskilled, while white workers got the skilled jobs Operation Dixie laid the foundation for the formation of Local 22, the Food, Tobacco, Agricultural and Allied Workers of America Union. Operation Dixie later played an important role in the civil rights movement. First Secretary of Worker World Party Larry Holmes discussed why he thought capitalism is at a dead end. Holmes argued that working class leaders have become complacent. “The working class leaders need something to jump up in their face to see anything going wrong,” said Holmes. “They are too invested in capital, in the stability. “But there is no stability anymore, so things are changing.” Holmes said organized workers must embrace migrant workers, the LGBT community, black people, Latino people and unemployed workers. “What is frustrating to me is that they’re seen as separate movements and not as important, absolutely necessary sub-divisions within a larger movement,” he said. Rayn Cornielle, a member of Fight Imperialism—Stand

“Justice is dumb, blind and deaf. Justice, you’re full of shit,” said Bluford. “Justice is for those who can pay for it.” JERALYNN BLUEFORD MOTHER OF ALAN BLUFORD

Together, the New York branch of a revolutionary socialist youth organization, told a story about a Latino woman working in a Manhattan bakery who was physically and mentally abused by her employers and taunted by co-workers. Her employer struck her in front of customers. Cornielle said the woman was afraid to speak up because she was undocumented. Even though she spoke little English, the woman reached out to Cornielle and connected her situation to capital patriarchy. At the same session, University of Greensboro student Dhruv Pathak spoke about student debt and its connection to a capitalist economy. “The university is a tool that perpetuates global capitalism,” said Pathak. “[It] turns students into consumers. “[The] free market gives freedom to step over one another and compete for low paying jobs,” said Pathak. “It also disproportionately affects black and women students.” Pathak advised students to organize, to do their research and to have a clear message. “I just want to connect how important the student movement is to what the labor movement is becoming right now,” he said. After the workshops, Duke students Destiny Hemphill and Gao Chia-Ren performed. Chia-Ren recited a poem about the death of his brother, a victim of a police shooting in New York City. He said he held his dying brother in his arms for 40 minutes before the ambulance arrived. He had to pay $180 for his brother’s ashes. Chia-Ren said he wore his brother’s blood-stained clothing for days to protest police brutality. During the closing plenary, Oakland, Calif. resident Jeralynn Blueford spoke about the death of her 18year-old son Alan, who was murdered by an Oakland police officer in 2012. The officer, Miguel Masso, said he and his partner, Joe Fesmire, saw Blueford making a drug transaction with two other young men Masso thought Blueford was concealing a gun in his waistband. The two officers secured the three boys.

According to Masso’s testimony, Blueford fled, but eventually fell to the ground, pulling out a handgun and pointing it at Masso. Masso fired four shots — three to Blueford’s body, and one to his own foot. Masso was not charged for the murder. The Blueford family had to sue the city of Oakland for a police report. “It’s outrageous to me to accept the notion that on one or two occasions this young man pointed a gun at a police officer and didn't shoot,” said the family’s civil rights attorney, John Burris. “Racially profile, stop and frisk, murder and kill,” said Jeralynn Blueford. “There’s no jury, no prosecutor, no judge, no bill of rights to protect us.” Blueford said she sat at the police station for an hour before anyone would speak to her about her son’s death. She said the justice system has written off the case because of its dehumanizing image of an unloved, fatherless black boy. “Justice is dumb, blind and deaf. Justice, you’re full of shit,” said Blueford. “Justice is for those who can pay for it.” Some people, it seems, are simply not old enough for justice. According to Qasima Wizeman, a senior at Cherry High School in Raleigh, Selina Garcia, a 17-year-old foster child, was arrested March 7 by a school police officer after a fight on the school bus. There were no serious injuries, but Garcia was given a five-day suspension. Wizeman said the arresting officer decided that the suspension was not enough and that he wanted to “teach her a lesson.” He arrested Garcia on misdemeanor counts of disorderly conduct and communicating threats. Garcia was taken to the Wake County Detention Center on Hammond Road in Raleigh. Wizeman said the officer probably thought Garcia’s parents would pick her up there. She was never picked up, however, and because she was too young to sign herself out, Garcia spent 20 days in jail before she was released. “The judge ruled that she should be kept in jail until a placement was found for her and that jail would be her

temporary home,” said Wizeman. Wizeman said she and other students from North Carolina Heroes Emerging Among Teens sent letters to the Wake County Courthouse and social services, and to Garcia herself to try to have her released. “Selina’s in high school and is a minor but somehow she’s old enough to be in an adult jail,” said Wizeman. “Even though I’m no longer a minor, I wasn’t even allowed near her when she went to jail.” Selina was freed March 27. She told the judge she planned to do better. The “Hard Times are Fighting Times” conference closed with a video presentation by socially conscious rap artist Jasiri X. X recounted the testimonies and atrocities he had witnessed during a sevenday visit to Palestine. That evening, X, along with Leila Nur and the Beatnam Vets, performed their culturally aware music at Cuban Revolution restaurant in downtown Durham.

Ernest Oliphant, artist, active community member and close friend of N.C. Central University’s department of art, died Monday, Feb. 17. “He was … a real goodspirited person,” said Connie Floyd, associate professor and chair of the department of art. Floyd said he met Oliphant, who had been at NCCU since the 1970s as an “honorary Eagle,” somewhere between the late eighties and early nineties. A Durham native, Oliphant worked with Melvin Carver, art professor and former chair, at a car wash on Chapel Hill Street when they were teenagers. Carver and Oliphant renewed their friendship when Oliphant stopped by Carver’s T-shirt shop, Zebra Tints, and began working for Carver until the shop closed and Carver came back to work at NCCU. Carver lost connection with Oliphant until Oliphant paid him a visit and re-kindled the friendship around 2007. “He asked ‘what about sitting in some classes?’ and I said, well, we normally don’t do that,” said Carver. “But I knew that Earnest was sort of special…I also knew that he didn’t have the money to pay the tuition.” Carver did, however, allow Oliphant to sit in on a few printmaking and drawing classes where he befriended and inspired students. Floyd pointed out a stack of freshly shipped boxes of art materials he ordered for Oliphant just a month before his unexpected death.

“He was passionate about learning, he was passionate about screen printing, passionate about just making art period,” said Floyd Floyd said Oliphant could often be caught sketching portraits of people and animals in his free time which he frequently distributed. “It didn’t make him any difference who it was, but he would just draw,” said Carver. Oliphant’s second passion was bicycling; he was the first person to bike from Durham to Georgia. Oliphant developed diabetes in his 40s causing him near-blindness in one eye and he often passed out. “He said he wasn’t doing well,” said Floyd. “And sure enough, after that conversation, Earnest did pass out.” Oliphant’s funeral was held on Monday, Mar. 3. “We were saddened to find that he passed away and we were not made aware of it,” said Carver. “We found out the day that he was buried.” Sharada Fozard-McCall, visual communications sophomore, wanted to get Oliphant’s story out to the public in hopes that people have closure and pay their respects. Oliphant gained recognition by the Durham arts community after his participation in the “Truth to Power” show at Pleiades Fine Art Gallery which ran last year from Aug. 16- Sept. 15. His work will also feature in the “Local Flavor” show at Pleiades as tribute to his friendship and fellow passion for art. The exhibition runs from April 1st-May 10th and the gallery will also host a Third Friday reception on April 18th from 6-9 pm.

Photo courtesy of throughthislensblog.blogspot.com


Sports

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The Eagles have landed NCCU’s historic season comes to a close

NCCU men’s basketball team celebrates after their victory in the MEAC Conference tournament Photo courtesy of NCCU Athletics

BY

ROBERT LEWIS

ECHO CO-SPORTS EDITOR

After soaring high for much of the 2013-2014 men’s basketball season, the N.C. Central University men’s basketball team’s march to the NCAA tournament came to an end March 21. Their campaign was halted by the third seeded Iowa St. Cyclones in San Antonio by a score of 95-73. However, the score doesn’t reflect the success the MEAC champions had over the course of the season. For the first time in school history, NCCU found itself in NCAA Division I basketball tournament play as an automatic bid after winning the MEAC conference tournament March 15. There was no suspense during the televised selection Sunday event. NCCU was in and had high hopes against their next opponent. Those high hopes were not lofty based on their success over the season against higher profile and higher ranked teams. The Eagles won against N.C. State University on the road and challenged undefeated tournament one seed Wichita State University, University of Maryland and University of Cincinnati. Those games made the possibilities of potential success in the NCAA tournament clear. Senior captain Emanuel “Poobie” Chapman discussed the team’s mentality going into the game. “We played with that chip on our shoulder. We feel like we could play with anybody on

“I wanted them to enjoy everything they were seeing and I felt like I could let them do that ... ‘Smell your roses’.” LEVELLE MOTON HEAD COACH, MEN’S BASKETBALL

the court. We feel like since we played at NCCU, it did not make us less talented than other schools. Everybody on the team felt like that,” said Chapman. There was no sense of overwhelming awe or excitement for the team according to coach Moton. The team remained humble, showed up and fought just like after their win against N.C. State University. “That Appalachian State game sticks out most in my mind for the season. It could have been a trap game,” said Moton. “I wanted them to enjoy everything they were seeing and I felt like I could let them do that based on what I saw from them after the Appalachian game. ‘Smell your roses’.” Moton also noted his on and off court leaders, Chapman and All-Conference honoree and MEAC player of the year award recipient, senior guard Jeremy Ingram in the team’s success. “We were an immature team early on and Poobie and Jeremy were leading. They weren’t leading the way I wanted them to though. They have infectious personalities and the team was going to follow them. They would have followed them down a not so

positive path or the path that we wound up going.” Chapman discussed the responsibility of being a leader. “Once you step forward as a leader then you have to be accepted as a leader. And once I felt like I was accepted, I had to lead people to reoccurring events from the season before. Then it got to the point where I was leading people to places I have never experienced,” said Chapman. “Once we got to the tournament, I told the team, ‘I am still the leader and the captain, but feel free to tell me if I am doing something wrong,’” Chapman said. “I realized that being a leader is not always about being in front and doing everything first. It’s about letting everyone do what they have to do and have an input as well.” Spirits were high as the team boarded the bus for their journey to the big dance. A crowd of about 200 gathered in front of McLendonMcDougald Gym weathering the cold and rain for more than two hours. Blown up cutouts of head coach LeVelle Moton and player’s faces dotted the crowd as K97.5’s Brian Dawson and Wade Banner emceed the send-off for the team.

As the team stepped from the locker room onto the steps of McLendon-McDougald, the crowd burst into cheers. The players were all smiles as they video-taped the crowd to keep the moment for their own memory. The team credited the fans for their historic run. The Eagles ended the season on a 17 game win streak before the tournament game against Iowa State. Their overall record was 28-6 record and only one loss in MEAC play. “The fans have been incredibly impactful throughout the whole season. Their energy was incredible and I want them to feel as much a part of the success as we do,” said Moton.


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Poobie’s record-breaking legacy BY AVERY YOUNG ECHO CO SPORTS EDITOR

Out of the four years spent at a university the ultimate goal for many is to be remembered for the good they have done. Emanuel“Poobie” Chapman did that through his talents on the basketball court. Since his first game for N.C. Central University against Oklahoma University Poobie and the team put themselves in a position to be successful. Consequently, his first game was supposed to be a blowout. He and the team had other plans. NCCU ended the game losing by only three points in overtime. But it was a lesson learned. “It was that type of experience where you realize that just because you go to a smaller school does not mean that you cannot compete with a bigger school,” Chapman said. He learned that lesson early in his college career and it helped him gain the determination on the court. . Since that first game, Chapman devoted many nights and days to better himself. His hard work showed in his career statistics. Poobie now owns the assists record with 617 and is second in steals with 173 at NCCU and was named NCCU

Emanuel “Poobie” Chapman raises arms in joy as team wins first MEAC Conference Tournament. Chapman holds all-time record at NCCU for assists. Photo Courtesy of NCCU Athletics

student athlete of the month yesterday. To cap off a superb season, Chapman helped lead the team to their first MEAC Conference Championship over Morgan State University and also helped earn them a ticket to the “Big Dance”. Chapman was speechless

Future bright for NCCU athletics COMMENTARY inners never quit and quitters never win. I have to commend the N. C. Central Men’s Basketball team for keeping that mantra alive throughout this season. Yet, with coming off the heels of a stinging loss India to Iowa Wagner State, all eyes are on next season. This season marks the last season for seven of the seniors on the team. That is a huge chunk of players on a basketball team. Not only is that a large amount of players, but these are players that get real playing time, especially the MEAC Player of the Year, Jeremy Ingram, and the NCCU record-holder for most assists, Emmanuel “Poobie” Chapman. Deep in my eagle heart, I have overwhelming hope that NCCU’s fire will carry on into the next season. Players like Karamo Jawara, Jordan Parks, and Jay Copeland, who were key components to the Eagle’s success this year also fuel that fire of hope. I don’t doubt the capabilities of the players or coach Levelle Moton, but I am worried about another key factor in the Eagles success: student and alumni support. This year, we saw a plethora of alumni and student support. Even during the MEAC Championship Tournament in Norfolk, VA, NCCU students and alumni flooded the stands. Will that same support be matched next season? It’s hard to speculate, but it’s a necessary discussion.

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Many players on the team, as well as Moton, have expressed their deepest gratitude to the fans and to the student base for their support. You can see the product of that support with the undefeated 23 game winning streak at home we all experienced. Yet, the support isn’t just needed for winning, but for the success of the entire athletic department. This department doesn’t only provide opportunities for student athletes, but it generates revenue for the school and provides an opportunity for students to gain and express school pride. This history-making season has set the bar for our athletes and even more for our dear old NCCU. We are going to be expected to produce more competitive sports teams across the board and that all doubles back to support. Financial support, physical support, or just showing up to a game, with your maroon and gray are some examples of what we need. This past basketball season was a prime example of how those versions of support for our sports teams can carry us to the next level of play. I hope to see that next season as well as in the upcoming seasons for the rest of our teams. Schools with big teams like Duke and UNC Chapel Hill aren’t great just because of good players. They have a history of continuous fan support, extensive financial backing, and acclaim across the nation; a culmination of what your school and fan support can really do. We didn’t come back from San Antonio with a loss. We came back with the keys to a bright new future of NCCU Athletics.

about the records he has set at NCCU and the accomplishments of the team during the season. “It’s mind-blowing. It is always a goal that everybody sets out to do.” The team’s ultimate goal was to put NCCU on the national map. “To be the first to win the

MEAC here and bring the eye back to NCCU is humbling”, Chapman said. This is the team’s first MEAC championship since entering the conference. “Our main goal was to let people know that when they play NCCU it is not going to be an easy game for them,” Chapman said.

Chapman’s most memorable moment did not hit him until the team went to San Antonio to play Iowa State in the second round of the 2014 NCAA Tournament. He said, “My most memorable moment was the shoot around”. “We only had 30 minutes on the court but for the most

part it’s you, the court and your teammates. And that’s the moment that you dream of as a player” he continued. He mentioned how different it was: from the smell of the paint to the brightness in lights. After the team played their last game of the season Poobie walked up to coach LeVelle Moton and gave him a hug that highlighted the relationship that they established over the past four seasons. Chapman compared Moton to an old man that sits on the porch and yells at the kids. “He is like an older guy who has been through it,” said Chapman, referring to Moton’s collegiate, professional, and coaching careers. “You do not really understand it until you get to this point that we have been at this year. You see all the little stuff that he’s been nagging about over the years is paying off,” Chapman said. He called Moton his role model. He said everything Moton taught him, he taught to the younger players. Chapman said he wants to continue his basketball career and pursue professional basketball, but his ultimate goal is to attend graduate school and open up youth centers in Durham to get kids off the street. “I have been in Durham for four years and working in the community, so I think it would be best to start off here” he said.

Softball team looks to turn season around BY GLYNNIS HAGINS ECHO STAFF REPORTER

After beginning the season with several losses, the N.C. Central University Lady Eagles softball team looks forward to the rest of the season. They have set their sights on winning the conference and MEAC tournament. Coach Theresa Stephens said she knows her team has the talent and ability to win. “I want to win the conference. We are capable of doing it,” she said. An attitude of winning and the common goal of winning the MEAC have trickled down to the players as well. Senior London Germ, sophomore De’Onna Smith, and junior Emerie Germ individually echoed their coach. Smith also said, “I hope we continue to grow as a team.” The Lady Eagles have grown as players this season that has been tough for each of them. London Germ, who plays in the outfield, said that she has improved in her hitting. “As leadoff batter, I think I’ve done a good job of getting on base so the hitters behind me can hit me in,” she said.

Smith, who plays first base, said she has improved in all areas. She is also beginning to find her position on the team. “I’m starting to become the voice of the field,” she stated. Emerie Germ, catcher for the Lady Eagles, said, “I have improved in moving the runner and my RBI percentage. Being in the three or four position, that is my job.” Though they have made improvements, there are still areas where they seek to further improve their game. Coach Stephens expects her team to “continue to improve on fielding and consistency in hitting.” London Germ seeks to improve her hitting and helping herself to become a better all-around player. “I can always improve my hitting and continue to get on base,” she said. She also mentioned an area where the entire team can improve. “As a team, I think we need to improve our ability to finish a game,” she said. Emerie Germ echoed her sister London, “[I want to improve] my confidence and my attitude at the plate,” she said. The Lady Eagles hope to improve offensively so they can become better game

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finishers. Staying motivated to win while in a losing streak can be difficult. However, the team has bonded over their common goal to win. London Germ helps her teammates stay motivated and focused during difficult times by offering words of encouragement and leading by example. Smith is the “voice of the dugout.” She helps keep players motivated by chanting and cheering her teammates to victory. “If I see someone down, I try to cheer them up,” she said. As the catcher, Emerie

Germ has the advantage of calling timeout when she notices her teammates are struggling. She said, “I know that we’re good enough. We just need to get out of our heads.” Smith is thankful for this challenging season. “This is a humbling experience coming from where I was last year. I thank God for giving me this opportunity,” she said. The Lady Eagles take on Savannah State in a backto-back series on Saturday, April 5 and Sunday, April 6 in Durham at Parkwood Athletic Field.

Lady Eagles huddle on pitching mound before inning starts Photo Courtesy of NCCU Athletics

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Opinions

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Dear Chancellor... n honor of her installation, I have to address our first permanent female chancellor, Dr. Debra SaundersWhite. Over her short period of time at N. C. Central, I have been able to watch her. She is eloquent in her speech, graceful in her walk, but is still able to do the ‘Nae Nae’ dance with India her students. Wagner She is polite, educated, wellconnected, and everyone seems to love her. She is more than qualified to lead our university. In saying all these things, I am more than confident that she will understand and fulfill the charge I have for her. As a graduating senior, my biggest hope is to see NCCU better than how I left it. This starts with a chancellor willing to steer NCCU to its better future. That means starting new traditions and phasing out old policies that only make it harder for students to handle important business on campus.

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“With graduation approaching, I need to NCCU’s chancellor is continuously fighting for the affordability of higher education...”

Students need to be able to know that their chancellor wants them to be able to pay their tuition and fees, register for classes and register for housing without hassle. It means creating a culture on campus that reveres the student and the student experience in order to produce proud and capable alumni. Students want a chancellor that understands their role on this campus. Not just as kids here to be educated by professors, but as clients and stakeholders for the university. NCCU needs a chancellor that will break down the barriers between departments on campus to streamline the success in both the academic and administrative realms on campus. Incoming freshman should never have to worry that they may not have housing due to a misunderstanding between housing and admissions because their chancellor should have their back 100

percent. With graduation approaching, I need to know that NCCU’s chancellor is continuously fighting for the affordability of higher education, so that these hallowed halls will forever be filled with thirsty minds for knowledge. In this day and age no child should question whether or not they are able to obtain a higher education, especially from our illustrious NCCU. Lastly, NCCU needs a chancellor that loves NCCU just like Dr. James E. Shepard did. Without that love and pride, we can never see the eminent greatness that Dr. Shepard saw waiting in our future as a university. This charge doesn’t come from just me as an editorialist, but from the entire student body whether they know it or not. The only way we can have better for ourselves as students here at NCCU, is if we have a better university. I hope Dr. Saunders-White

is successful in her reign as chancellor, and I know she will do her best. Yet, I have a charge for the students just as I have for her. Hold her to her word and remind her of her purpose: the students. We have to accept our responsibility in our education as well. It starts in the classroom and it continues as we advocate for ourselves through staying involved and aware. How can we expect for our administration to care about us as students if we do not take the opportunities to speak up for ourselves? Often we blame administration for making decisions that we decided not chime in on. This is our time to help steer our university in the right direction alongside our new chancellor. Our chancellor needs students that are invested and will walk this journey with her. Our chancellor needs students that are not afraid to exude Eagle Excellence at all times. I thank Dr. Saunders-White for being here and for taking on the challenge. Now that she is here, it’s time for us all to get to work.

drawing by Rashaun Rucker

Question: What are your plans for the summer? "I’m trying to get ready for applying to a graduate school in Texas.” —Alex Castillo, Senior

Do the right thing! nfortunately, in life there are people who were either raised ratchet or they were raised properly and chose to ignore the principles of morality taught during their childhood. No one is perfect and some people tend to learn from life through experience or observation. I believe for a Angel majority of my Brown experiences, I’ve had to learn both ways. But I know one thing in life is guaranteed: karma. What determines the good karma or bad karma? You’d think the simple thought of right versus wrong, but I guess some people don’t really take into account that what you do can come back to you. This past weekend I celebrated my birthday. Friends came into town and accompanied me at a night club.

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“Next month when you’re trying to feed your family or struggling to pay a bill remember this moment where you had the opportunity to do the right thing...” As we were leaving to go home, I recognized I did not have my phone. I panicked and begged security to let me back into the club, to see if I left my phone by the bar, or in the bathroom. Of course the jerks wouldn’t allow me to, nor did they offer to go check, so my friends and I went home. The next day, everyone called and texted the phone continuously until someone replied. I received a message to my best friend’s phone that stated “I found this fone in the club, ain’t like I stole it or anything.” And yes the fool spelled phone with an “F”. I kindly asked if we could meet somewhere or if he could drop it off at some location. He replied “LOL I’m in South Carolina.”

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Oh? This was an LOL moment? I asked him, “If you found this phone and you know it’s not yours…why didn’t you try to call the last person that was in the caller list or give it to the DJ, maybe even a bouncer?” Well apparently it’s cool to keep property that isn’t yours and then tell the person it belongs to that you’re basically not going to give it back, nor do you think this is stealing. After being a reasonable and calm person debating with an idiot what the definition of stealing was, I told him this, “Listen I would love to get my phone back, it’s my birthday weekend and I don’t have another phone, but apparently you’re not going to give it back. Next month when you’re trying to feed your family or struggling to pay a bill remember

this moment where you had an opportunity to do the right thing but decided not to because you were trying to have a ‘come up’ with a stolen phone.” He made a sorry attempt to seem remorseful by stating he would be in NC the following weekend and he’d return it and also that my friends should stop harassing him or he’d throw it away. The nerve. Funny thing; I work at WRAL. I know how to research and find certain information such as mug shots, social media sites, contacts, and people that can help me find out pretty much anything. With that being said the ratchet lad took pictures on my phone which backed up on my Google gallery before I had the service disconnected…and I now have his picture, full facial. Eagles, take a lesson from his actions and remember to do the right thing. It will definitely pay off in the end, because karma is a bad b****.

"I’m actually going to be in basic training for the National Guard.” —Dionia Lucas, Junior

“I plan on goingto summer school and then probably go to Bike Week.” —Kristin Feemster, Junior

Sound Off by India Wagner


April 2, 2014