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VOLUME 105, ISSUE 3 919 530.7116/CAMPUSECHO@NCCU.EDU WWW.CAMPUSECHO.COM

@CAMPUSECHO

Beyond

Sports

Campus

Feature

Durham group aims to continue legacy of Pauli Murray

Frazier found not guilty of violating restraining order

Panel examines the ongoing issue of colorism

America’s last train traveling carnival

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Campus Echo Baynes’ blues

GOP’s big gamble Analysis: As shutdown drags on, risk increases BY DAVID LIGHTMAN MCCLATCHY WASHINGTON BUREAU

WASHINGTON — Republicans are taking a big political risk if the government shutdown persists. Polls are emphatic — people hate this shutdown. They blame Republicans more than Democrats. And Republicans remain divided about how to proceed, a schism that has already triggered some ugly partisan primary fights. Republicans still have some important advantages, enough so that analysts predict they will hold onto their House of Representatives majority and have a decent shot to control the Senate. But those forecasts could change if the partial closings that began Tuesday drag on. For now, damage to Republicans is cushioned by the protection incumbents enjoy, thanks to a political system rigged to protect them. Congressional districts are carefully drawn for the benefit of current officeholders, and in recent years, Republicans have been in charge of drawing a lot of them. Incumbents also prosper from an ability to amass huge campaign treasuries, thus scaring off their potentially strongest challengers. What threatens Republicans most is that party split over how to manage this drama. While Republicans

are unified in their disdain for the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, they disagree sharply on strategy. One group, generally conservatives backed by tea party activists, continues to want any move to keep the government open contingent on a delay or dilution of Obamacare. The other, usually veteran lawmakers or those from swing districts, would rather debate the issue at another time and keep the government open. Party members Tuesday tried to emphasize how the opposition to Obamacare has emerged as a unifier for a party that badly

needs one. “Any disagreement is about tactics. It’s not really a split,” said Rep. Pat Tiberi, ROhio, who is close to Speaker John Boehner of Ohio. But scratch the surface and the crevice appears. “We are in a fight taking all the oxygen out of the room when we should be focusing on the unraveling of Obamacare, which is taking place,” protested Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. Republicans have no consensus on a logical endgame, and that bothers McCain and his allies. In the House, that faction quietly tried Monday night to mount a rebellion, hoping to derail the effort to tie changes in Obamacare to government funding. It went nowhere. The practical coalition remains concerned about the party brand. They’re well aware Obama has the bully pulpit. If he makes a shutdown statement, as he did Tuesday, cable news channels instantly interrupt programming to air his remarks. Republicans don’t command that kind of attention. Adding to the conciliatory wing’s woes is that the Republican right is feeling unusually muscular. Rep. Tim Huelskamp, RKan., was asked how he justified a shutdown when polls showed that people dislike it.

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47-year-old residential hall showing its age

Four images taken on Oct. 2 show the deterioration of Baynes Residence Hall. Upper left: D’Akari Brown examines a scarred elevator. ALEX SAMPSON/Echo editor-in-chief

BY JAMAR NEGRON ECHO ASSISTANT EDITOR

It’s the fifth oldest residence hall on campus but it may be the first in need of some TLC. Baynes Residence Hall wasbuilt to house 400 students in 1966 for about $1 million. It was last renovated in 1996. Next to the recently built

Life after prison Transitioning from jail to society can be a struggle

Chidley North Residence Hall – which houses 517 – it is the second largest residence hall on campus. But unlike Chidley North, Baynes’ age is catching up to it — something that’s increasingly drawing the ire of its residents. Mass communication freshman T.J. Felton switched from McLean Residential Hall to

ALEX SAMPSON/Echo editor-in-chief

BY ALEX SAMPSON ECHO EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

In prison, inmates are guaranteed a bed, at least three meals a day, access to education and a bathroom.

Being incarcerated isn’t a luxurious experience, but it provides the bare necessities. After prison, those necessities are harder to come by. According to a 2008 survey by the N.C. Interagency

Council for Coordinating Homeless Programs, 6.5 percent of homeless people identified themselves as having been incarcerated. Due to their criminal

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Lyceum gets scandalous BY JADE JACKSON ECHO STAFF REPORTER

Lawrence Simmons is the house manager of the transitional home for convicts.

Baynes to get a single room. “It’s not the best,” Felton said. “You can just tell [Baynes] is not up to date.” He said that McLean is in better shape and that Baynes needs a computer lab. Fashion design freshman D’Andrea Watson said Baynes

On Sept 24, N.C. Central University had the chance to meet the inspiration behind the hot, fashionably fierce and scandalous character Olivia Pope of ABC’s hit serie, “Scandal.” “Gladiators in a suit” was the theme of the night. The crowd was dressed to kill in the spirit of meeting Judy Smith – the real-life Pope – at NCCU’s Lyceum event. The line was around the corner and B.N. Duke auditorium was at capacity. With “Scandal”’s viewership at 10.5 million, it’s no surprise that people were beyond excited to be in the same room as the woman behind the show. The anticipation grew with every speaker preceding Smith, founder and president of Smith & Co., a crisis management and communications firm. Smith was quick to point out a major difference between her life and the show inspired by it. “I have not ever had an affair with any president,

“You must know what is important to you. Stand for what you believe in.” JUDY SMITH CRISIS MANAGER AND INSPIRATION BEHIND “SCANDAL’S” OLIVIA POPE

just to clear the air on that,” Smith said. But she had plenty of other tales to keep the audience engaged. While providing the details of her work as a crisis manager, Smith said she wants students to arm themselves for success. “[Success] comes from hard work, determining your boundaries and defining your brand,” Smith said. Students looking to define their brand should ask, “What is your unique selling position?” Smith said. Smith said when determining boundaries, “You must know what is important to you. Stand for what you believe in.” She encouraged the audience to adopt a philosophy of honesty. “You might as well tell the truth because the truth

is going to come out eventually anyway,” Smith said. “Own your issue. Face it.” After taking questions from the audience, Smith closed with her formula for staying balanced. “You excel when you focus, and you do what you’re good at doing,” said Smith. Smith said because her parents were hard workers they taught her to be “fearless.” Smith served as White House press secretary during the 1989-1993 George H.W. Bush administration. She also has worked as an adviser to numerous leaders and influential people worldwide. Her message of professionalism was wellreceived. “I thought it was inspir-

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ALEX SAMPSON/Echo editor-in-chief

background, unaffordable housing and a lack of communication with family members along with other issues, settling back into society can be difficult for ex-offenders. To combat this issue, the Antioch Builds Community — a nonprofit affiliate of the Antioch Baptist Church — looked to provide a temporary home for released inmates. “We saw the need for responding to persons that had criminal records,” said the Rev. Michael Page of the Antioch Baptist Church. Page oversees the transitional home for ex-convicts in northeast central Durham. Page said his church started organizing for a transitional home in 2005. Building a house was out of the question because the church didn’t have the finances for it. Instead, they remodeled an existing house. Located at 214 N. Hyde Park, the home gives male ex-convicts a healthy environment to live in until they can regain their independence. Page said one of the goals of a transitional home is to prevent recidivism. According to a study by the Pew Center on the States and the Association of State Correctional Administra-tors, 41.1 percent of 22,406 inmates released in North Carolina in 2004 returned to prison within a three-year period. “We’re trying to give them the tools to ensure they won’t go back to that behavior,” said Page. The home can house up to three men, each having

their own bedroom. The exconvicts apply to a governing board made up of 6-8 members. Potential residents are usually coming out of the criminal justice system or have been out for less than a year. Everyone is expected to clean up behind themselves. The men have to be out of the house from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. to look for employment, conduct community service and perform assigned duties. The have an 11 p.m. curfew SundayThursday. If employed, they have to pay $200 per month for utilities. Rent is paid through community service. On Monday, Wednesday and Saturday, they perform janitorial duties at the church. To have Fridays and Saturdays off, the men must put in a request by Wednesday. If they intend to be out of the home for more than two days, the request is sent to the board. Otherwise, the request goes through Lawrence Simmons, the house manager. Simmons said along with these stipulations, the men are required to stay clean. A drug test is administered if someone is suspected of consuming drugs or alcohol. “If they’re found dirty, that’s immediate dismissal,” said Simmons. However, Simmons said this hasn’t been an issue so Another issue they’ve yet to have is violence. If violence is threatened or committed, the aggressor also faces dismissal. Simmons said the reality

NCCU’s OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS EVENTS • Country Focus Germany – Oct. 16, 4-5 p.m., Lee Biology, 118 (for faculty and staff) • Student to Student Culture Chat – Oct. 29, 5-6 p.m, Lee Biology, 202 • International Education Week – Nov. 11-15. Departments and clubs planning programs are requested to inform the Office of International Affairs • Country Focus – Sierra Leone – Nov. 20, 4-5 p.m. Lee Biology, 118 (for faculty and staff) STUDY ABROAD • Study abroad information session – Nov. 7, 10:40 break Lee Biology, 202 • Study abroad presentation – Fundraising for Study Abroad – Nov. 12,10:40-11:40 Lee Biology, 202 • Departure Orientation for students studying abroad in spring and summer 2014 – Nov. 21, 10:30-12:30 p.m.Lee Biology, 202 Deadlines for study abroad applications • January 15 - To study abroad in the summer • February 1 - To study abroad in the fall semester or to study abroad for a full academic year (fall/spring semesters) expand your horizons

STUDY ABROAD

Contact Dr. Olivia Metzger Jones at ojones@nccu.edu or 919.530.7713

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Hunger leads to action

TRANSITION

John Leverette has sought shelter since his release in 2012.

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of being faced with homelessness or re-incarceration if they slip up acts as a deterrent to recidivism. “It’s an incentive to let them know ‘this could one of your last chances, if not your last chance, to get your life together,’ ” Simmons said. Simmons personally knows what it’s like to be given a second chance. An addiction to drugs caused him to run into trouble with the law often. Simmons said he went to prison twice on drug-related charges. In total, he had 34 arrests and five felonies. “The last time I went to prison was March 17, 1991, the day I got off drugs,” Simmons said. Since his last stint in prison, Simmons said he hasn’t had any more trouble with the law. “I served time all the time I went, but the last time, time served me." After being released, he worked at not only repairing himself but his relationship with his family. Simmons said they were confused about his addiction and didn’t know how to handle it. His dedication as a father and husband deteriorated with his use of drugs. Simmons said it took time for his family to finally trust him again but they’re now on good terms. “After three or four years, they finally realized I was going to stay off [drugs],” Simmons said. Simmons began working at the transitional home on Nov. 1, 2011. Since coming to the home, he said there have been five residents. John Leverette is the only other resident besides Simmons now living at the transitional home. Leverette was imprisoned in 2009 for a committing a felony with a firearm. “I was living in Charlotte and three guys tried to rob me, and I shot one of them,” Leverette said. Leverette spent 14 days in a coma after being beat by his attackers. When he woke up he was informed he was going to jail. His bond was set to $150,000, an amount he couldn’t meet. As for the three males who attacked him, nothing happened to them. Leverette said prison life was rough because he had to deal with the same people every day. As a licensed barber, he said he focused on cutting hair. “I just kept my nose clean and did what they told me,” Leverette said. Leverette was released from Piedmont Correctional Institution in June 2012. “When I first got out of prison, I had a home,” Leverette said, adding that he lived with his family in Butner after his release. But after his mother developed Alzheimer’s and was placed in a nursing home, his sister had to put up the house for sale. Since then, Leverette said he’s been in and out of shelters and homes. When faced with the prospect of being homeless, Leverette said he went to Page for assistance. He moved into the home in March and placed his request for a six month extension in September. Leverette works occasionally with the Durham Economic Resource Center but wants to work as a barber again once Vocational Rehabilition Services helps him get the proper equipment. Leverette said he doesn't know how long he’ll stay in Durham after his six months are up. He said his main concern is finding a steady home. “The only difficulty is trying to find a place to stay,” Leverette said. “I ain’t never had to go through this.”

Social Work Society challenged NCCU to fight hunger

Donations collected on and off campus were sent to the Durham branch of the Food Bank of CENC. ALEX SAMPSON/Echo editor-in-chief

BY ALEX SAMPSON ECHO EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

On Sept. 27, N.C. Central University showed support for individuals struggling with hunger by participating in the Eagles Attacking Hunger Food Drive. Sponsored by the Social Work Society, donations were dropped in 212 of the Miller-Morgan Building. The drive was also held off campus on Sept. 28 at the Walmart on MLK Jr. Parkway where members accepted donations. All collected items went to the Durham branch of the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina. According to the Food Bank, over 96,000 people in

the counties the Durham branch serves are at risk of hunger. Altovise Bryant-Ellis from the Social Work Society’s public relations committee said the organization decided to collaborate with the Food Bank of CENC for drive since they provide community service hours. “We just wanted with the holidays coming up...to ensure that the Food Bank has enough [food] to support families and individuals during the holiday season as well as throughout the year,” said Bryant-Ellis. Held as a challenge, four academic departments and three organizations donated. The Social Work Department and Centennial

Scholars donated the most food. Criminal justice senior Tyrone Mabry is one of the volunteers who assisted with the drive. With his mother being the former director of a community center, Mabry said donating is important to him. “My parents always taught me to give,” Mabry said. As the first food drive from the Social Work Society, Ellis said the success has encouraged them to hold the event annually. “Because we had such a great turnout and support, this is something we definitely look forward to doing next year,” Ellis said.

BAYNES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 has room for improvement. “It’s OK but it could be better,” Watson said. Like Felton, Watson said dorms like New Res and Richmond were in better condition. She agreed that Baynes needs remodeling. “You got things that are broken, things peeling off,” Watson said. “They need to fix it up, add things to it.” Several students complained about Baynes’ elevators. Students said the doors sometimes jam, sometimes open before the elevator is level to the floor, and sometimes open and then close immediately. Political science freshman Zakia Douglas said she was once stuck in the elevator for at least ten minutes during summer school. “I thought I would never get out,” Douglas said. In 2003, three students had to be rescued from the Baynes elevator after being trapped for over an hour. According to students, there is also a peculiar smell lurking around the halls. “I don’t know what it smells like,” said Felton. “It’s not a good smell.” Business freshman D’Akari Brown simply said it was a “bad smell.” Watson said that the smell doesn’t happen all the time but it is noticeable when it happens. “One day it just smelled like sewage,” she said. Assistant Director of

Operations and Special Projects Christopher Medley said he had not been aware of student complaints about a foul smell, but that he would look into it. Medley said that Baynes’ age must be taken into account. “We love it, it’s a solid building, but at the same time it’s an old building,” Medley said. “You just can’t think that Baynes is not going to have any issues.” Medley said students need to be more careful with the old building. “We love our students but sometimes you’re going to have students who don’t care about the environment they’re living in,” Medley said. “When you have an older product, you just can’t treat it rough.” Athletic training senior and Baynes CA Brittany Crubbs said many of Baynes’ ailments are caused by its residents. “It’s mainly the students,” she said, adding that they leave trash around the building and don’t show respect for the residence hall. But Crubbs also said she thinks Baynes needs an upgrade. “Baynes is a very old building. I personally feel like it should be renovated,” she said. Medley said that some improvements have already been made, such as replacing furniture in the common

area. He said parts of Baynes , such as its multipurpose room, are rented to student groups, which puts the building through wear and tear. Medley also said that communication between residence halls and his department needs to improve. Sometimes students may not report what they feel is wrong. “My goal is that the communication comes not when needed but is just there,” he said. In September, Medley’s department implemented a monthly program in which members of his department set up a table in the residence halls and ask students about what is wrong in the building. Felton and Brown said that Baynes’ shortcomings don’t agitate them — they just deal with it. “We have no choice,” Brown said. Regardless of NCCU’s piecemeal attempts at patching Baynes, Medley said one day the fate of the residence hall will be looked at very closely. “I think at some point in time, addressing Baynes will occur,” he said, “whether that means remodeling it, tearing it down or repurposing it. “You can’t just do everything at once,” he said. “Everything has to come in its phase.”

JUDY SMITH CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 ing,” said criminal justice sophomore Daniella Hall. “No matter what major you are, the tips she gave were relevant to all of us.” Hall said it was empowering to see a woman of color do something she loves. She said Smith finding her niche in life has resulted in millions of people now paying attention to her 25year career through “Scandal.”

Psychology sophomore Shajuan Brown said her favorite part was when Smith cradled an audience member’s baby. “It just left me with such a positive feeling,” Brown said. Brown said Smith seems like a good person. “You could feel it was real — just the way she talked about her own son and family — that she really

is grounded and humble,” she said. The real-life “fixer” was clear and consistent in her message to the audience: Be prepared, hard-working, truthful, and, most importantly, “be yourself.” Smith said these are the elements of success. “You are so powerful and stronger than you will ever think.”


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Blacks still in chains

“New Slaves” — skin tone stirs tension in black community

The battle of “Team Light-Skinned” vs. “Team Dark-Skinned” encouraged students to explore colorism. JAMILA JOHNSON/Echo staff photographer

BY JAMILA JOHNSON ECHO STAFF REPORTER

The war between light skin and dark skin is an inner racial conflict among African Americans. This community of people have adopted the mindset of their former slave masters and, as a result, they have become “New Slaves.” That was the title of the program held in the Alfonso Elder Student Union on Sept. 26 sponsored by 100 Black Men and the Centennial Scholars Program. The coordinators of the

program, Harold Elmore and Michael Johnson, decided to approach the topic because of an ongoing joke between themselves. The joke later led them to pay more attention to the division among the different complexions at N.C. Central University. “We used to have conversations all the time and joke around with each other which later turned into debates then we felt it was something we had to bring to our advisors,” Elmore said. As students entered the union they had to take a brown paper bag test that

determined which side of the room to sit on. The room was divided between light skin, dark skin and other. “I was pretty shocked when they tested us with a paper bag,” music sophomore Jalisa Adams said. “It’s one thing to read about it in the history books but totally different when it happens to you.” One is likely to see the depiction of the tendencies of a “light skinned n---a” or a “dark skinned n---a” on social media. Posts that are black pictures with text reading

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Annual International Festival celebrates diversity

BY MONIQUE LEWIS ECHO ASSISTANT EDITOR

The Department of Language and Literature at N. C. Central University is going beyond the classroom to immerse students in Latin American, African, European and Asian cultures at the 7th annual International Multi-Culture Festival. The Spanish club “Voces Unidas,” the German club “Expressionen!” and the French Club are supporting the event which will showcase the music, dances and games of distant and nearby places. Students and faculty will interact with the community and share in the rich, cultural diversity of the NCCU population. According to the Office of International Affairs,

there are 55 international students enrolled at NCCU from countries including Australia, Bahamas, China and Egypt. “I think that this event is important because we have more than just African American students on this campus and the diversity here should be celebrated,” said Ciera’ Harris, student representative on the planning committee of the event. NCCU’s Department of Language and Literature stresses the importance of the university involvement in an international community. On their webpage, they say they feel it is “imperative to educate students to embrace their roles and responsibilities as global citizens and acquire the ability to understand both

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Run supports kids BY JAMAR NEGRON ECHO ASSISTANT EDITOR

Students, teachers and fitness freaks alike gathered to combat child hunger by participating in N.C. Central University School of Education’s program “Fill My Backpack” on Saturday Sept. 28. Teams and individuals participated in a 5k run to help surrounding Durham County schoolchildren get balanced meals they may not have access too. NCCU College of Arts and Sciences Dean Carlton Wilson said that the run was exhilarating and it was good to see people come together. “We need to take more responsibility for this,” he said. “The energy is great, the cause is great, we should do this more often.” The proceeds of the event went to the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle Backpack Buddies Program. Each week during the school year, Inter-Faith Food Shuttle’s Backpack Buddies program supplies over 400

Durham County schoolchildren with backpacks to take home on the weekends. The backpacks have six balanced meals and two snacks. “The main inspiration is the kids,” said Uty Utin, biology major. Utin said growing up in an urban community as a kid helped him to see firsthand the effects of hunger. “I knew friends that would be in class and unfocused,” he said, adding that he supports anything that helps “break that cycle of poverty and hunger.” Elementary education senior Whitney Dunlap also said she was there for the children. “Our school is about a lot of community service and doing good to help others,” Dunlap said. School of Education assistant professor and event coordinator Cheresa Clemons said programs like Fill My Backpack show that NCCU cares. “Service is intrinsic,” Clemons said. “We are service — that’s what we do.”

She added that the money generated from the event will specifically go to “our children” in Durham County. “We’re engaged with our whole community,” Clemons said. “It’s not about us. We do big things.” Alicia Burfield, secretary and board member for the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle, said it was exciting to see a healthy mix of young and old participants. She also said innovative programs like Fill My Backpack shows the community that issues like child hunger exist. “It helps bring awareness to hunger,” Burfield said, noting that through that awareness the program shows that “[child hunger] is something that we can fix if we come together as a community.” She said the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle and NCCU share common goals of community service. “That’s what we’re all about. We feed, we teach, we grow,” Burfield said.

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world and local events from multiple perspectives.” American students will also be able to showcase their talents in the student talent show hosted by Spanish sophomore David Monk. Students who are interested in participating should stop by room 305 in the Farrison-Newton Communications building to pick up a performance application, hhdue on Oct. 18. The event in the lobby will be DJ’ed by Mass communication senior Emmanuel Smith while performances will take place in the theater. The International MultiCulture Festival will be held on Oct. 31 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the first floor of Farrison-Newton. Participants may attend the event in international attire or a costume.

Over a hundred 5K runners came out in support of the “Fill My Backpack Program,” a project of School of Education and the Inter-Faith Food Shuttle. JAMAR NEGRON/Echo assistant editor


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Early College no easy ride

Mr. Bowtie

Students finish high school while earning college credits

Mr. NCCU get inspiration from his peers

Early College Principal Gloria Woods-Weeks in her office in the Robinson Science Building JASMINE HOLEMAN/Echo staff photographer

BY BRANDI ARLEDGE ECHO STAFF REPORTER

Some high school students who enroll in the Josephine Dobbs Clement Early College High School might think they can coast, but the first lesson they’ll be learning is that coasting is not in the curriculum. Desiree’ Lewis, a senior in Early College double majoring in psychology and Spanish with a minor in business and liberal studies, said she loves the freedom college students are given, but that freedom has its risks. “It’s kind of better having high school classes because you are more restricted and on a schedule, but on campus you must have time-manage-

ment,” Lewis said. Nelly Esperanza is a junior who plans on majoring in biology. She said the teaching styles of university foreign language professors are different from early college teachers. “They’re very different simply because I feel as if now in the foreign language that I’m taking — which is French — I’m pretty much teaching myself how to speak it with the help and review of my professor,” Esperanza said. Esperanza said she’s mostly learning pronunciation and translation. She said high school foreign language classes were much easier because she speaks Spanish fluently. Students in Early College typically take two

years of high school classes and two years of free college credits. The students then transition from either being a high school junior or senior to being classified as a college freshmen or sophomore on campus. For students to stay in Early College they must maintain a GPA of 2.0 or above. If the student falls below the GPA requirement, they may be sent back to their district school. If a student fails a college course, their parents will have to pay for the student to retake it. If they don’t pay, the student cannot advance. A student’s advancement depends on the student’s performance throughout

their time in school. Darrick Wiggins is a junior who plans to join the military. “I’m trying to pass all of my courses the first time. I want to get in and get out,” Wiggins said. Principal Gloria WoodsWeeks is notified if any student is failing and takes the appropriate actions. Woods-Weeks said the students have a support system to guide them through the transition. “What we like to do is employ a comprehensive suite of support,” WoodsWeeks said. “These are early inventions so what I do is target the student who will need extra help and time either in academics, non-academics or post-secondary transition.” Juniors have to schedule regular office visits with their professors and the seminar teacher. Juniors have to meet with their professors once before mid-terms and before finals. They meet with the seminar teacher twice a week. The seminar teacher provides help through tutorials which are taught by other students. The school provides applications for scholarships and grants. All early college students must still take required college interest programs including The PSAT, SAT and ACT. Early College students can participate in activities or clubs at N.C. Central University, excluding sports, sororities and fraternities. Esperanza said she’s interested in joining the drama club and possibly the choir.

COLORISM CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 “C’mon man I told you to turn the flash on” referring to dark skinned people or pictures of Prince drinking through a straw with “How light skinned n****s get drunk” written on it are common social media memes. Some of these posts were shared — with humor — in the opening of the program. Questions were later posed for a group of panelists representing each team as well as the audience. Questions like “What color do you prefer to date?” and “Is being light skinned a complex, an attitude or just a skin color?” Despite the humor behind the topics and questions, the subject of skin color evoked emotion

and strong opinions from people in the crowd. “Whether you’re black, Asian, Russian or Mexican, we’re all different shades of brown,” mass communication junior Kyle Jeffers said. “We foster the attitude of ‘you’re not good enough’ because of our complexion,” said panel member India Wagner. There were different perspectives from other members of the panel who asked why skin color matters. “A junior or senior without a competitive resume? Who’s about to be the “new slave?” said Kent Williams, assistant director of Student Involvement. Williams consistently

steered the discussion away from color to education. At the closing, a video was shown titled “Strange Fruit.” The video showed the history of hatred behind skin color. There was a time when it didn’t matter which shade of black someone was. Just the mere fact of being black would lead to dehumanization. When students heard of the program, it was suspected that they thought it would be a humor led program exchanging why one complexion was better than the other. “I think the program made a good impact,” said Johnson. “People probably thought that it would just be a battle like on

Instagram.” But one program will not change the perspective of a generation that has not had to experience slavery firsthand. ‘’There has always been a separation; I still think [the students] feel the same way. It will always be separate,” said biology sophomore Jamil Cherry. It’s impossible to change the opinions of an entire community with one program which is why Elmore and Johnson said they plan to have many more programs on campus. “Look for more programs that are focused on combining intellectual stimulation with social programming,” said Johnson.

Cornelius Richardson takes pride in his trademark bowties KENNETH L AMPKIN/Echo staff photographer

BY REGINALD SIMON ECHO STAFF REPORTER

Born in Halifax County, N.C. and raised in Warren County, N.C., Cornelius Richardson is truly a country boy turned king. March 28, 2013 is a day that Richardson will never forget. On that day that this country boy became Mr. NCCU. Richardson said he ran for Mr. NCCU because he wants to make an impact on the campus and the community. Richardson, a member of the Alpha Kappa Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., recalls the shocking moment he was crowned Mr. NCCU. “I remember when people doubted that I could ever be in such a position as Mr. NCCU,” Richardson said. “To have my family, friends, the student body, and everyone else who believed in me, there to witness that moment was a blessing.” Richardson said that his biggest influence and inspiration is N.C. Central University student body. “Seeing my peers each day makes me remember why I’m here and in this position,” he said. “Each day my peers motivate me to achieve.” Although Kent Williams, Richardson’s mentor and the adviser for the Royal Court, was surprised that

Richardson wanted to run for the position, he had no doubt that Richardson would be successful. “I knew he would make a great Mr. NCCU, but he does not like a lot of attention and he likes to be in the background so I was surprised,” said Williams, adding that Richardson is “presidential,” a humble, caring, energetic and motivated model of Eagle Excellence. Richardson said he enjoys serving as Mr. NCCU because it gives him a chance to serve as a role model to others and to represent the university to the community. One of Richardson’s passions is changing the image of males in society. In an effort to do this,, Richardson is promoting the idea across campus that “Real Men Wear Suits.” “The event is an image statement to the public that males are striving to achieve while changing our image and branching away from the stereotype of how a typical male dresses in society,” said Richardson. One challenge Richardson faces every day is balancing his personal life with student involvement in campus organizations. But he uses John Lennon’s quote for daily inspiration: “Everything will be OK in the end. If it’s not OK, it's not the end,” as a daily

United Christian Campus Ministry 525 Nelson Street, NCCU Campus

“The Church Role in Social Justice” Annual Clontz/Harris Lecture Series 9:30 A.M. Thursday, Oct. 17, 2013 St. Joseph's A.M.E. Church 2521 Fayetteville Street, Durham Register for the event using contact information below.

Michael D. Page Campus Minister For more information contact Rev. Michael Page at 530-5263 or by e-mail at mpage@nccu.edu

@campusecho


Beyond NCCU

Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

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Rescuing a legacy: Pauli Murray Project

Barbara Lau, director of the Pauli Murray Project, at an Oct. 1 fundraiser held at the Beyu Café JAMAR NEGRON/Echo assistant editor

BY ALEX SAMPSON ECHO EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Some know her as a civil rights activist, feminist and the first African American ordained Episcopal priest. Others know her as a LGBT icon, lawyer, poet and author. Regardless of what society knows her as, those that attended the fundraiser for the Pauli Murray Project on Oct. 1 agreed on one thing: Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray was someone ahead of her time. The Pauli Murray Project, a community-based initiative, has committed itself to upholding the diversity of Murray by renovating her old home into The Pauli Murray Center for History and Social Justice. “We want to have a historical site where we can tell her story,” Barbara Lau said. Lau is the director of the Pauli Murray Project at the Duke Human Rights Center. Lau previously worked as the director for the Center of Documentary Studies. During Face Up: Telling Stories of Community Life, a collaborative mural project with Southwest Central Durham, Murray was one of the figures featured. The DHRC soon took an interest in Murray’s story and in March 2009, planning for the center began. Murray lived in Durham from 1914-1926 at 906 Carroll St. Built in the 1890s by Murray’s grandfather, the home is arguably one of Durham’s most prominent historical landmarks.

Lau said the house is important because it’s where Murray’s legacy started. “She grew up in that house, she was formed in that house, she had probably some of the most important thoughts of her life in that house,” Lau said. She went on to describe just how deteriorated the house is with the destroyed foundation, old cemetery water running beneath the house and the crumbling chimney. Renovation will begin around 2014 or 2015. Lau said that over the course of four years, PMP has raised around $40,000 for the house project. As far as getting the center set up, though, Lau said they’re five years out at the minimum. Lau said the purpose of the center is to create an open dialogue within the community about issues and to provide a space for education, the arts and activism. She also said her hope is that the center will create the vision Murray had of unity across all barriers. Charmaine McKissickMelton, interim chair of the Department of Mass Communication at N.C. Central University, said Murray is someone she would’ve personally loved to have known. “She took risks,” McKissick-Melton said. “Everywhere she went, she transformed what was happening.” McKissick-Melton referenced the fact that Murray tried to sue and integrate

UNC-Chapel Hill nearly 10 years before her father successfully did so. She said an issue Murray commonly dealt with in the 60s and 70s was separating her struggle as a black person and as a woman. “Women’s rights. Civil rights. She said they were intertwined,” McKissickMelton said. “She could not separate herself from being a woman or from being black. They were one in the same.” Because of that time period and with majority of civil rights activists being men, the black community wanted to focus racial injustice first. McKissick-Melton became involved with PMP through her friendship with Lau. She said they worked on several projects in Durham and bonded over their shared issues. McKissick-Melton said one of the goals PMP has already successfully completed is encouraging conversations among the Durham community. She mentioned an event she was involved in that focused on desegregation. Hundreds of people from ages 3-93 showed up. McKissick-Melton said the discussion gave them the ability to express things that they wouldn’t have been able to express before. “My personal belief and I think what Pauli Murray believes in is you can’t make change without dialogue,” McKissick-Melton said. “Talking to people is not the same as talking with people.”

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Taliban threaten to target her again LOS ANGELES TIMES (MCT)

In one short year, Malala Yousafzai has transformed herself from obscure Taliban victim to an internationally celebrated model of courage in defense of human rights. Founder of the nonprofit Malala Fund that advocates for girls’ education and raises money for schools and tuition in her native Pakistan, Malala has used her place on the world stage to declare personal victory over terrorism and to call for peace talks with the Islamic extremists who attacked her. Her activism in defiance of renewed death threats has, in the estimation of prominent media and human rights organizations, put her in the running for the Nobel Peace Prize that is to be awarded Friday. If the prestigious award is bestowed on 16year-old Malala, she would be the youngest peace laureate in Nobel history. Taliban gunmen boarded her school bus on Oct. 9, 2012, and shot her in the head for denouncing their attempts to return her Swat Valley homeland to the social mores of the Middle Ages. Girls’ education was banned, women were beaten for leaving their homes without a male relative escort, and the central square of Malala’s hometown,

Mingora, became a place of flogging and execution. Malala was airlifted to Britain after the attack and spent months in a Birmingham hospital being treated for her injuries. Once recovered, Malala stepped back into the public eye with ardent speeches in support of equal rights for girls and education for all. She kicked off her reinvigorated activism with an address to 1,000-plus youth delegates to the United Nations in July, when she declared books and pens “our most powerful weapons.” Last month, at the opening of Birmingham’s massive new public library, Malala again proclaimed education “the only weapon that can defeat terrorism.” Malala marked the impending anniversary of the assassination attempt with a series of interviews, including with the BBC, where her blog on life under the Taliban first drew her to the religious zealots’ attention. Excerpts of her forthcoming autobiography, “I am Malala,” were also released in Sunday’s Parade magazine. In her first in-depth interview since the attack, Malala told the BBC that the West needed to engage the Taliban in peace talks if the social

and political conflict in South Asia is ever to be resolved. “The best way to solve problems and to fight against war is through dialogue,” she said. “Killing people, torturing people and flogging people ... it’s totally against Islam,” she said of the Taliban. “They are misusing the name of Islam.” A Taliban spokesman, Shahidullah Shahid, told news agencies in Pakistan that Malala was shot for defaming Islam, not for her outspoken support for girls’ education, and that the group would try to attack her again. “She is not a brave girl and has no courage,” Agence France-Presse quoted Shahid as warning. “We will target her again and attack whenever we have a chance.” In the BBC interview, Malala said she wanted to return to Pakistan and go into politics as a means of changing her homeland for the better. “I will be a politician in my future,” she said, vowing to make education compulsory. “I hope that a day will come when the people of Pakistan will be free, they will have their rights, there will be peace, and every girl and every boy will be going to school.”

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Malala stands her ground BY CAROL J. WILLIAMS

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institute’s assistant director. Both political parties Tuesday claimed the shutdown will give them momentum heading into the 2014 congressional campaigns. Both parties were already out Tuesday with ads and statements charging opponents with being irresponsible. “Ami Bera Voted Against Repealing Obamacare. Ami Bera Voted Against Delaying Obamacare,” declared a National Republican Congressional Committee press release. The California Democratic freshman is considered one of the more vulnerable House of Representatives members; the NRCC has sent out similar statements targeting other Democrats. Democrats launched their own initiative. Starting Tuesday, the party is directing automated phone calls to the districts of 63 vulnerable Republicans. “While you were sleeping, Congressman (fill in name) shut down the government. You heard that right,” the caller says. Republicans have one big advantage. They were in the right places at the right time. “They had a timely wave in 2010,” said Geoffrey Skelley, associate editor of Sabato’s

Crystal Ball, which studies congressional races at the University of Virginia. Republicans that year won a House majority and did well in gubernatorial and state legislative races, allowing the party to control the congressional redistricting in many states. Lines were drawn so that even in some states Obama won last year, Republican House members were able to survive. Obama won Pennsylvania and Ohio, yet Pennsylvania has 13 House Republicans and five Democrats, while Ohio has 12 Republicans and four Democrats. Whether Republicans can grow those numbers remains uncertain. Party officials worry the party is often seen as intransigent, even intolerant. The party’s 2012 presidential candidate, Mitt Romney, won 7 percent of the black vote and 27 percent of the Hispanic vote. Two Senate candidates lost winnable seats because of what were seen as insensitive comments about rape. If the shutdown keeps going, and Obama keeps railing against Republican stubbornness, the political prediction map could change. “It’s not likely now,” said Skelley, “but it could depend on how big a mess this becomes.”


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eptember 21 was the last day of the Danville/Pittsylva nia County Fair in Ringgold, Va. I got there before the gates opened on James E. Strates Shows – the last railroad carnival in America. Each season, Strates loads up its 61 rail cars and heads up the East coast from its Orlando base. This year, the carnival set up at 17 fairs or festivals, traveling a total of 6,500 miles. This week, it’s in Winston-Salem at the Dixie Classic Fair, which runs through October 13. In 1909, James E. Strates immigrated from Greece, and worked a variety of jobs before becoming a wrestler. He joined Lee Schaefer’s Athletic Show, part of the travelling carnival World At Home Shows. In 1922, Strates and his partners acquired and reorganized the carnival as Southern Tier Shows. Its first season, in 1923, was rough. The following year, Strates bought out his partners and in 1932 changed the name to

James E. Strates Shows. By this time, America was deep in the Great Depression, this country’s biggest economic slump. Many carnivals were forced to close, but Strates survived. In the early days of the carnival industry, travelling by rail was the standard. In 1934, Strates acquired his first 14 flatbed rail cars. Over time, many carnival operators abandoned the rails and began transporting their shows on highways. But Strates continued to expand his train. Strates Shows is still family owned and operated. Its 61 cars include 50 flat cars for rides and equipment, 10 sleeping coaches for its more than 100 employees, and a generator car. The company’s train crew can load or unload the entire train in less than 18 hours. More information about the Strates Shows is at www.strates.com. You can see the entire train on the move at www.youtube.com/watch? v=7LFgyXcDb9E.


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Alum’s designs hit British Vogue BY ADRIENNE STEPHENS ECHO STAFF REPORTER

Amanda Williamson is a N.C. Central University graduate, who’s not only made a great name for herself on NCCU’s campus but is also making a lasting impression in the fashion world. Williamson created and designed a timeless and unique label, known as “Ennyluap.” It has not only caught the eyes of the locals but has captured the attention of big names such as British Vogue. As a child, Williamson was struck with an eye for fashion and insured that those around her would be able to experience her inner passion for fashion. “My mother use to dress me out of this catalog by the name of Story Book. It was full of the most whimsical, dainty and unique girl clothes you could ever find on the market,” said Williamson. Williamonson said fashion was a perfect calling for her. “[I’ve] always been an arts and craft, hands on individual and looks at fashion as a non verbal way to express feelings and creative thoughts,” said

“In ten years, I would like to have at least one to two Ennyluap stores on the east and west coast of the United States and with my newest partnership with Preciosa Genuine Czech Crystal, Ennyluap will now have a new collection that will feature crystal embellished garments, for everyday wear.” AMANDA WILLIAMSON FOUNDER AND DESIGNER OF ENNYLUAP

Williamson. Williamson is a NCCU alum. Williamson said it’s a legacy university for her family. She majored in Biology with a concentration in Premedicine. Even though Williamson was a part of the science scene, she was no stranger to the theater department, as well as the social scene, where she met her assistant and best friend, Jazmine Godbold. Godbold and Williamson met their freshmen year and have been side by side ever since. “Working with Amanda is great. She is respectful, honest and an all around fun person. She loves what she does and puts one hundred percent into every piece she makes. The level of passion and dedication is

what connects her to every piece,” said Godbold. After putting in many years and hours of work, Williamson and Godbold can both agree that the future for Ennyluap is looking very promising and bright. “In ten years, I would like to have at least one to two Ennyluap stores on the east and west coast of the United States and with my newest partnership with Preciosa Genuine Czech Crystal, Ennyluap will now have a new collection that will feature crystal embellished garments, for everyday wear,” said Williamson. “In the next ten years, Ennyluap will be another household name like Ralph Lauren and Banana Republic,” said Godbold. The journey doesn’t stop here for this passionate and determined designer.

Amanda Williamson’s fashion has been featured in New York fashion week, the Grammy Awards and the AMAs. Photo courtesy of Ennyluap

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Experience the Variety Exhibition shows four years of a colorful and emotional body of work BY LEAH MONTGOMERY ECHO A&E EDITOR

Twenty-three-year-old art and design senior Quintin D. Neal will host his senior art exhibit, “Experience the Variety,” on Sunday, Oct. 13. Neal said his childhood in Greensboro, N.C. with an older sister and parents, Quinne and Daniel Neal, as “fun.” Neal has always been interested in art and playing with colors since childhood. His passion developed into talent during junior high school. By high school, Neal said he started thinking seriously about art. He became a member of the art club at James B. Dudley High School, serving as its president as a junior and senior. Neal’s high school art teacher, Angela Morris Neal, first pushed him to consider art as a career. “She was able to give me little hints,” Neal said. Neal said Morris suggested such career paths as graphic design, painting, photography and sculpture. “Neal as a student is a very hard-working, motivated artist,” said N.C. Central University art professor Achameleh Debela. Debela said he immediately noticed Neal’s prompt class attendance and persistent questions. He said Neal sets a good example for other students. Visual communications senior Tia Taylor met Neal in a freshman art class with adjunct instructor Myongsin Choi. “The first time I met him, I thought he was a really sweet guy,” Taylor said. “He was really nice, he was helpful, and he was very artistic.” Neal said his love of art rests in the expressiveness it allows. “I love the individuality of each artist,” Neal said. “I never want to imitate – I want my own inspiration and flow of what pieces

Above: Neal with his art work. His art will be on display at his senior exhibition on Oct. 13. Below: A monotone self-portrait of the artiist KENNETH LAMPKIN/Echo staff photographer

mean.” Neal finds inspiration in real-life emotions. “It’s not everything I’ve been through but rather the universal.” Neal’s inspiration is evident in such pieces “Three Sisters,” “Warmth” and “Through It All.” “Three Sisters” is a compilation of three portraits of “storytellers,” each with a contrasting personality: the red and fiery, the orange and optimistic, and the yellow sage. “Warmth” depicts a muscular black man whose warmth radiates from within. Neal used yellow, orange and red to create the portrait. Green, purple and blue surround the man, symbolizing outward coolness and collectivity. “It’s beautiful to see the different interpretations of

my art,” Neal said. “I want someone to buy it, not for my name, but because it’s something that they want in their personal space.” One piece Neal thought he would never complete — let alone grow to love — is “Through It All.” This was a self-portrait that Neal had abandoned in his closet. He was planning to work on the piece and had left it outside to dry when a thunderstorm hit and distorted it. Although the picture seemed to be ruined, the canvas was intact. Neal sprayed enamel patterns of raindrops and added tiny red hearts. After adding layers of color and texture, Neal layered a rough outline of a male figure over it. The figured symbolizes a person

who stood “Through It All.” “People fell in love with it,” he said. “It has an emotion but it’s an uplifting emotion.” Neal has successfully tried his hand at a variety of arts including painting, graphic design, ceramic art and interior design. After graduating in the spring, he plans to earn his Masters in art education in order to teach at a college level. Neal also works with the Young Rembrandts program, which encourages all children to learn the fundamental skills of visual arts. He teaches art in four schools: Voyager Academy, South West Elementary, Sandy Ridge Elementary and Spring Valley Elementary. “The experience to work with children is beautiful,” he said. “I get to have an impact on young people’s lives through art.” Aside from teaching, Neal has his foot in a few other doors. He is program assistant for “Big Picture,” a program run by the N. C. Museum of Art that educates faculty and teachers in the school system on how to incorporate art in all levels of school curricula. Neal is also helping his friend, J’Nai Willingham, with interior design for Studio 925, a jewelry studio at Golden Belt in Durham. Neal said his dream, — soon to be a reality — is to own his own studio that will allow the community more access to art. He said he wants to engage visitors and artists in a variety of art forms like painting, sculpture, graphics and photography, and showcase children’s art in his galleries. Neal’s art exhibit, “Experience the Variety” will be held Sunday, Oct. 13. from 3 to 7pm in Ballroom Chamber-E on the third floor of the Millennium Hotel.

From Paradyce to utopia A modeling troupe’s renaissance and hopeful rise to the top BY MARCUS CHRISTON ECHO STAFF REPORTER

The modeling troupe De Haute Allure, French for “the high attraction,” is making every effort to live up to their name by becoming the next big attraction at N.C. Central University. DHA evolved from a previous modeling troupe, Paradyce. Paradyce was established in 2003 and was originally a modeling troupe for a clothing line, but the group was disbanded in 2012. The troupe was quickly revamped into DHA. In the Fall of 2012 former Paradyce executive board members and adviser,

Christopher Medley, initiated a troupe that was “revived to slay,” which is one of the troupe’s mottos. The troupe has about 30 members. Although many of the members are former members of Paradyce, they are aiming for a completely different image. “The difference between Paradyce and De Haute Allure is that we’re not all about competition,” said Myava Mitchell, the troupe’s president. “We just want to have fun, be fashionable and be a team.” DHA initially went without a president for two semes-

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ters. Former Paradyce model, Nia Sutton, asked Mitchell, a communications senior from Bowie, Md., to be the president. “I guess she liked my work ethic and the different things that I was involved in on campus,” said Mitchell. Mitchell works with the Black and Gold Pageant, SGA, American Cancer Society, and Metro Eagles. Confidence is key when looking for a DHA model; the troupe is not based solely on looks. According to Mitchell, a member’s GPA and leadership skills are considered for DHA membership.

DHA does not only recruit models; choreographers, photographers, business managers, and directors of fashion and communications are recruited as well. The new troupe is steadily preparing for their upcoming shows. They practice Sunday through Thursday for three hours each day to ensure that they deliver an exciting and entertaining performance. To gain some buzz around campus and the Durham community, DHA is looking to book runway shows at Southpoint and Northgate malls. “Since we are a new modeling troupe our main focus

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is to get our name out in the public,” said Mitchell. “We are not really focused on modeling competitions right now.” DHA will perform at the 2013 NCCU Homecoming’s “Rip the Runway” fashion competition on Thursday, Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. in McDougalMcLendon Gymnasium. “I’m really excited to see De Haute Allure at homecoming this year,” said Victoria Flowers, English junior. “Homecoming is a much anticipated time and people from all over, including alumni, look forward to attending the fashion show.” Additionally, DHA will be

performing during 10:40 breaks and at an AIDS awareness event on Dec. 3. “We are all about our brand,” said Timothy Williams, membership coordinator. “Our signature shows are over the top and fashion forward. We also believe in uniformity and developing a sense of pride for the organization.” DHA members see their troupe as “the beginning of true perfection,” which is also one of their mottos. They are determined to progress as a team to build their brand as a fun and social modeling troupe.

The UNC Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma and Lung Biology is seeking healthy volunteers, age 55-70, for a research study about cardiovascular inflammation and ozone.

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Frazier aquitted, seeks reinstatment

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Not afraid to fly

Punter’s family has ties to historic flight

“We’re certainly glad that Mr. Frazier has been exonerated in crimal court. I thought it was a total abuse of the system” RALPH

FRAZIER

ATTORNEY REPRESENTING COACH FRAZIER

Henry Frazier III BY

T EVIN S TINSON

ECHO SPORTS EDITOR

As the Eagles of N.C. Central University fight for a MEAC championship, former head football coach Henry Frazier III continues his fight to get his job back. On September 30, a month after Frazier’s appeal was denied, Wake County Judge Jennifer Knox declared Frazier not guilty of all charges. Frazier was fired just one week before the start of the 2013 season after he was charged with violating a domestic violence protection order between him and his ex-wife. On August 29, Frazier

filed an appeal with the chancellor’s office. Nearly a month later in a letter to Frazier, Saunders-White said she would not consider reinstating Frazier. Linda Kenny Baden, one of Frazier’s lawyers, said in a press release, “I do not think the Chancellor even addressed the issue that ... Coach Frazier has an absolute due process right to maintain his innocence.” Also in the press release, Ralph Frasier, another of Frazier’s lawyers, said, “The judge has dismissed this matter after Coach Frazier was afforded legal due process. “He intends now to concentrate on restoring his good name, and raising his minor children.” A few days after the charges against him were dismissed, Frazier again asked Saunders-White to remedy his termination.

Frazier requested a hearing in front of the NCCU Board of Trustees, or UNC System President Thomas Ross and the UNC Board of Governors. As an alternative to his filing a case against the University, Frazier asked that NCCU mediate the dispute with the help of mediator of the University’s choosing. Baden’s press release said that NCCU should choose a representative who has an interest in social justice and who could, in accordance with NCCU’s Points of Light principles, “resolve the matter without litigation.” Despite two attempts to contact her, the chancellor did not comment on Frazier’s appeal or Baden’s statements. Frazier also did not respond to a request for comment after his acquittal.

It’s a family affair Scruggs brothers finally reunite at NCCU BY

T EVIN S TINSON

ECHO SPORTS EDITOR

At N.C. Central University, it’s very common see the football team as a brotherhood. After early morning practices and hours of weightlifting, most players see their teammates as an extension of their families. Two team members have a bond that goes deeper than the maroon and grey on their jerseys. Since they were kids in Jacksonville, Fla., brothers Lamar and Nathan Scruggs have dreamed about playing football together. “It’s an exciting thing to experience having my brother here with me,” said Nathan. “Words can’t explain it. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.” Younger brother Nathan is taking full advantage of having his older brother in the same huddle. When he has any questions about any techniques or running routes, he doesn’t hesitate to ask Lamar for advice. “Because he’s had that experience on the field he always lets me know what I can do to improve myself,” said Nathan. Lamar – who transferred from South Carolina following the 2011 season – said he enjoys watching Nathan grow into a man as well as

Matthew Cornelius punts during a Sept. 21 home game against Towson University at O’Kelly-Riddick Stadium. RED ROCKET PHOTOGRAPHY/Courtesy NCCU Athletics

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When senior Matthew Cornelius joined the Eagles in 2009, he was one of the few white people on the team — not that his teammates made a big deal about his race. With his senior season underway, Cornelius, is one of the few white players ever to be named a captain at N.C. Central University. “The fact that I am a minority at an HBCU, I’m glad that I can be someone that my teammates look up to,” said Cornelius. Making history runs in Cornelius’ bloodline. His great-great grandparents, Adam and Lilly Ethridge, helped the Wright Brothers invent their airplane. On December 17, 1903, in Kitty Hawk, N.C., brothers Orville and Wilbur Wright made the first controlled, powered and sustained

heavier-than-air human flight. Adam Ethridge was part of the safe and rescue team and the Wright Brothers recruited him to help carry and push the airplane off the sand dune. Lilly Ethridge helped repair the airplane’s silk gliders. In 2003, the Ethridge family celebrated a 100year anniversary in remembrance of the Wright Brothers’ flight. “It was cool just to know that my family and I are a big part of history,” said Cornelius. “I don’t really fly,” he said, “but I don’t have any fear of heights.” In 2010, as a freshman, Cornelius made a statement against Delaware State, when he punted twice for 51 yards (25.5 avg.) with a long punt of 36 yards. During his sophomore year, Cornelius ended the

season with an average of 35.4 yards per punt. He also earned a careerlong 66-yard kickoff. Cornelius got off five 50yard punts and put 23 punts inside the 20-yard line with only one touchback. In 2012, Cornelius finished the season averaging 35.9 yards per punt, including a punt of 58 yards. He also placed 16 punts inside the 20-yard line with only two touchbacks. This year, Cornelius was selected for the pre-season All-MEAC Second Team. Last weekend, the Eagles defeated Howard University 37-28 in the nation’s capital. On Thursday, Cornelius and the Eagles will be back home at O’Kelly-Riddick Stadium where they will face off against the Bulldogs of South Carolina State University. The game is scheduled to kick off at 7:30 p.m. and will be televised on ESPNU.

Brothers Nathan and Lamar Scruggs are excited to share the same lockeroom. Nathan is a sophomore tight end and Lamar is a senior wide receiver. Courtesy NCCU Athletics

improving on the field. With countless meetings and practices, it was hard for Lamar to stay in contact with Nathan while he was at South Carolina. “We’ve played ball together since we were little, so seeing him mature is the biggest upside for me,” said Lamar. Playing for the same team doesn’t stop these brothers

from competing against each other. During summer workouts, Lamar and Nathan had a number of competitions to see who could go the longest without dropping a pass. “The catching competitions are not to see who’s better,” said Lamar. “It’s more about trying to keep our focus and to better both of us.”

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Campus Echo WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9, 2013

IVER SITY

Not your baby Y

ou’ve seen it around campus. The group of boys (emphasis on boys) who loiter around the steps near Annie Day and catcall at any lone female who steps into their line of sight. The boys who’d rather honk a car horn and shout from the rolled down windows of a Alexandria busted car rather than Sampson acknowledging a female like a human instead of a dog. The boys who feel they can approach a female any way they deem acceptable because female autonomy is obviously a foreign concept. And I focus on this group mentality because a self-entitled misogynist by himself isn’t nearly as confident in acting like a fool if he isn’t with his gang of drooling pack mules. It’s these exact same boys who have nothing to say when you’re in the presence of someone with a penis but once that presence is gone, the howling begins. They care more about how a

male feels in their poor approach to women rather than how the woman they’re harassing feels. That or they’re afraid of getting their ass beat. And heaven forbid, you have the nerve to reject them or not respond. See how quickly you go from being “gorgeous” to a “stuck up b*tch.” Society dictates that we must grin and bear our treatment even when we’re being sexually harassed. And for those of you don’t know or pretend not to know, yes, it’s sexual harassment. Eventually, the polite, good girl expectation gets tiring. Last year, I vividly recall walking by the Hubbard Tottem Building on the way to my car. Coming down the stairs was a group of 10 or so males. The naive part of me was saying “don’t judge a book by its cover.” The self-aware part of me had my hands wrapped around my pepper spray. Onward I treaded in hopes that maybe I’d be ignored. They converged on me like predators on their prey.

“Hey, beautiful.” “How you doin’?” “What’s yo’ name?” The polite, good girl in me won over and I nervously smiled while trying to maneuver my way through a maze of bodies. One male – who wasn’t even a student – followed me until I told him I was meeting my very nonexistent boyfriend. After several similar encounters with males who make it their mission to stalk, badger and demean women in any way possible, I have now have no issue giving my best impression of B*tch Face or simply telling someone “hell no.” The humiliation and the anger finally reach a level where that sense of paralysis and fear is overridden even when you’re asking yourself “Could I get knocked out or worse?” For those of you who think being a good girl – ignoring the problem or dressing like a Catholic nun – is going to make the issue go away, I encourage you to find a comfortable seat and sit in it. Preferably in a Women’s Center where someone can

educate you. They don’t care about how many layers of clothes a female has on. They don’t care if her hands are noticeably shaking and her eyes are downcast. They don’t even care is she’s toting 20 pounds of textbooks. It’s about intimidation. Not flirtation. It gives them a sense of power. Whether they’re struggling with LPC (Little Penis Complex), have mommy issues or were simply raised to be immature, sexist simpletons, it’s gratifying to them to treat a female like a sexual object. There’s a rush they get from reclaiming their patriarchal power by reminding women that “Yes, you are below me and no, you won’t do anything about it.” Well to those boys who have nothing better to do than project their insecurities onto unsuspecting women, I have this to say: “Yes, you are a poor excuse of a male and no, I’m not your damn baby.”

A couch date? I

want to discuss something that tends to grind my gears. The subject is dating, a tradition that I think should not change no matter how much men call the women of today “progressive”. It's as if someone informed them that equal means don't do anything to Angel impress the Brown “independent” woman because then you violate her declaration of self sufficiency. Who the hell told y'all this?!? When did dating become something you do involving a couch? I can not tell you how aggravating it is to meet a guy and the first thing he wants to do is request a opportunity to “chill” in my establishment. So many things are wrong with this. And no, it is not about going to an expensive restaurant and buying expensive flowers to impress a

Examine this ladies: if a guy can't afford to take you to get coffee, is he really looking for “love” or a easy lay? woman. It is a simple gesture that became a bit TOO simple. First, understand the purpose of dating; it is a opportunity for two people to get to know each other in a intimate setting. That does not mean getting intimate in a private setting such as a living room. Why? Think about this, why would you want a stranger someone you DON'T know well enough dwelling in the place you rest your head and keep your valuables? People are clearly crazy these days, male and female. Meeting at a cafe, restaurant, Barnes & Nobles, hell, even a park. You know, a place where enjoying each others company seems reasonable? If you take a woman out to lunch or dinner, you get the opportunity to see how she carries herself in public. If she

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has a horrible attitude with the waitress/waiter, she'll probably curse your mom out too. If he doesn't want to get anything to eat with you, he probably is a cheap jerk and will not address your father as sir when they first meet. And if you disagree with either of those statements you probably haven't been on a proper date ever. Some of you are probably rationalizing and opposing my way of thinking, saying “I don't care about going out to eat, I just enjoy the company of a man.” Okay and how long do you expect ol’ buddy to come over and “chill” with you on your couch before your victim #13 this month? Or have you already fallen for the cunning “Red-box and pizza” scandal? Examine this ladies: if a

guy can't afford to take you to get coffee, is he really looking for “love” or a easy lay? Because in that case, his priorities are all out of order. My father didn't ask my mom to “chill” as a first date, so why would I find that acceptable? If you really have the best intentions in dating a woman, get creative bro. A picnic, museum, art gallery, festivals, local artist shows. None of those require a lot of money. And if you are still griping over my suggestions, have a congregation of seats and bow gracefully out of the dating game. I'm nowhere near bourgeoisie and if you think I am because I refuse to have a date on a couch....where did our ancestors go wrong? Dating is a fun and necessary way to meet a potential mate. I'm pretty sure “Broke” Barack took Michelle to open mic or something.

drawing by Rashaun Rucker

Sound Off via @Twitter By Ciera’ Harris

Question: What homecoming event are you looking forward to the most? "Definitely the Fashion Show. It's a "Rip The Runway" theme featuring last years winners @evalescomodels! Why not be ECSTATIC!” —@AfroDominiking

"The Step Show and the Fashion show. Those are the most exciting events.” —@moniquellewis

“Choir Ball. I enjoy the performances and the hype the entertainers bring. I feel like this year will be a great show.” —@ayeeyoreggie


October 9, 2013