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Camp Dudley News Fall — 2012

Just when you thought you knew Dudley and Kiniya . . . The Dudley/NOLS Partnership — Lander, Wyoming

A Camp Dudley Association Publication Serving Camp Dudley and Kiniya The oldest camp in the country — Since 1885


Key 2013 Dates — 2013 Camper Applications Due January 15 Friday-Sunday, February 8-10 — Father/Son Weekend Open House Gatherings Tuesday, February 12 — 7:00 pm — Dallas, TX Saturday, February 16 — 4:00 pm — Fort Lauderdale, FL Sunday, February 17 — 11:00 am — Naples, FL Work Weekend May 17-19, 2013 Tuesday, June 25, 2013 — 1st Session Opening Day! Friday, July 19 — Kiniya Parents Day Saturday, July 20 — Dudley Parents Day and Kiniya End of 1st Session Sunday, July 21 — Dudley End of 1st Session Tuesday, July 23 — 2nd Session Opening Day! Friday, August 16 — Kiniya Parents Day Saturday, August 17 — Dudley Parents Day and Kiniya End of 2nd Session Sunday, August 18 — Dudley Closing Day Sunday, August 18 — Saturday, August 24 — Kiniya Mini Camp CDA REUNION Thursday-Sunday, August 22-25 See full calendar at campdudley.org


Camp Dudley News

Fall 2012

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30 German Exchange Kids visit our Nation’s

CDA Man  of   Capitol The  Year  .  .  .   #9408 Rusty Davis recognized for a half century of loyalty

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Teamwork and  Anatomy   by #19408 Linda Saarnijoki

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by #23164 Brigadier General Daniel Yoo

Dudley/ NOLS Partner “Best-­Ever”   Fun   Photos from

Dudley and Kiniya 2012 summer PANTONE 289C

SERVICE — Servant  -­   Leadership  

4 color process

for first co-ed outdoor adventure in Wyoming

20 PANTONE 143C

4 color process

C: 100

C: 0

M: 60

M: 30.5

Y: 0

Y: 100

K: 56

K: 0

Healthcare —   Dudley/ Kiniya  style

A tribute to our healthcare professionals on both sides of the Lake

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Kiniya Senior   Beach   Renovations   Two new staff cabins dedicated, Senior Bath House completed

The Gift  .  .  .

by #10846 Rev. Bob Langston

Interview with  the  Van   Burens  by #20595 Kat Hood

4 Letters 6 CDA Reunion 12 New Faces 13 Willie Fest! 32 Farm-to-Plate IM 33 Peavy Awards 36 Blast from the Past 38 News & Notes 52 Crossword 54 Small World 56 Weddings 58 Future Dudleyites 60 Obituaries

Board of Managers Dwight Poler, Chairman Chip Carstensen Ian Clark Bill Combs Rick Commons Anna C. Florence Betsy Griffith Tony Hawes Charlie Johnson, IV Jane Lee Scott Martin Kevin McCormick Ben Nelson Chris Perry Karen Ramsey Andy Rosenburgh Dennis Ryan Ted Smith Mike Stevens Peter Treiber Dick Wallace Director, Camp Dudley Matt Storey Director, Camp Kiniya Marnie McDonagh Business Manager Fred Guffey Leadership & Alumni Outreach Mark Davenport Kiniya Leadership Development Kat Hood Admissions & Program Director Evan George Kiniya Program Director Intern Nick Ansell Development Administrator Dawn Gay Communications Coordinator Brendan Loughman Outdoor Program/ Sustainability Director Scott Steen Kiniya Food Service Director Gail Coleman Plant & Property Manager Steve Denton Maintenance Staff Jeff Schwoebel, Ben Sudduth, Roger Bigelow, Mike D’Amico, Angie Hill, John Tomkins, Office Staff: Sherri Guffey, Anita Johnson Camp Dudley Association Jay Wells, President Marcus Chioffi, Vice President Publication Assistance John and Martha Storey copyright ©2012

CAMP DUDLEY YMCA, INC. Printed by Miller Printing FALL 2012

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To Our Dudley Family — Dear Dudleyite: The  Camp  Dudley  Family’s  

support never  ceases  to  amaze  me.  It  comes  in  many  forms,   and  always  seems  to  arrive  just  when  we  most  need  it.   We  witness  that  support  each  year  as  we  work  to  fill  the  camps   for  “the  best  ever”  season  for  our  campers.  In  2012,  we  were   oversubscribed  on  both  sides  of  the  lake  with  a  record  number   of  campers  enrolled  for  the  first  session  at  Dudley  .  .  .  350   campers  enjoying  all  that  we  could  offer.   Our  leaders  faced  the  “full  house”  challenge  head  on,   supporting  our  campers  and  each  other  in  true  Dudley   fashion,  and  the  boys  did  have  the  summer  of  their  lives.  The   extended  Dudley  family  and  its  referrals  brought  us  this  robust  group  of  campers,  and  it’s  reassuring  to  know  that   we  can  depend  on  it  in  the  future.   #11264  Mark  “Davo”  Davenport  and  Dudley  Director   #13804  Matt  Storey

We’re now  on  our  “Open  House”  Trail,  meeting  with  current  families,  loyal  alumni  and  prospective  campers  as  we   celebrate  the  place  we  love.  We  have  seen  record  turnouts  and  smiling  faces.  But  more  importantly,  we  have  been   taken  in  with  open  arms  at  every  stop  .  .  .  offered  spare  bedrooms,  taken  to  the  best  bagel  shops,  fed  homemade   soups,  treated  to  world-­class  golf,  honored  with  roasted  s’mores,  and  given  cozy  couches  for  naps  in  between   events.  This  support  reminds  us  that  even  though  we  are  away  from  our  immediate  families,  we  are  always  part  of   the  extended  Dudley  Family.   This  support  is  unchanged  through  our  highs  and  our  lows.  A  recent  weekend  had  both.  On  that  Friday  night   I  was  fortunate  to  attend  a  West  Point  celebration  with  former  Dudley  Director  Rollie  Stichweh,    as  he  was   inducted  into  the  Army  Athletic  Hall  of  Fame.  (See  page  51).  As  guests  arrived,  it  became  clear  that  well  over  half  of   the  participants  were  there  to  honor  Stich.  We  also  realized  that  no  fewer  than  30  of  us  had  camp  numbers.  It  was   remarkable  to  share  in  such  a  special  evening,  each  of  us  proud  of  our  relationship  with  the  honoree.   On  Sunday  of  the  same  weekend,  we  travelled  to  Boston  to  celebrate  the  life  of  a  dear  friend  of  Dudley  who  lost   her  battle  with  cancer.  The  mother  of  two  of  our  finest  young  leaders  touched  the  lives  of  many  within  the  various   communities  of  which  she  was  a  part.  It  was  a  very  sad  day,  for  sure,  but  I  was  proud  to  look  across  the  church  and   see  so  many  Dudleyites  there  in  support  of  their  Dudley  brothers  and  sisters.   As  we  prepare  to  enter  a  New  Year  with  new  challenges  and  opportunities,  all  of  us  here  at  Dudley  thank  you,  the   Dudley  Family,  for  your  continued  support.   Respectfully, Matt  #13804

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS


Thank You! Dear Kiniya-ite: You’re  driving  to  Camp,  

and  at  the  I-­89  exit  it  begins  .  .  .  the  realization  that  you’re   almost  there!  You  turn  onto  Camp  Kiniya  Road,  the  place   where,  on  Opening  Day,  girls  get  that  feeling  in  their   stomach  of  eager  anticipation  .  .  .  ready  to  begin  yet   another  unforgettable  summer  at  Camp! Summer  2012  marked  Camp  Dudley  at  Kiniya’s  7th   season  and  a  summer  to  remember!  No  better  way  to   do  so  than  on  the  Reunion  Trail  where,  at  any  given   location  in  the  U.S.,  we  come  together  with  camp   friends  and,  for  an  hour  or  two,  it  feels  like  summer  again!

Kiniya  Director  #20001  Marnie  McDonagh,  center,  with   #21518  Nick  Ansell  and  #20595  Kat  Hood

To  a  person  we’ve  heard  “this  was  the  best  summer  yet.�  Was  it  the  terrific  leadership  lineup,  the  singing  at  meals,   the  sideline  cheers  for  team  activities,  the  screams  of  joy  on  seven-­layer  bar  night,  the  friendships  we  form,  the   Camp  Spirit  which  permeates  everything,  or  the  remarkable  campers?  Hard  to  put  your  finger  on  it  exactly,  but   one  thing  is  for  sure  —  it  truly  was  the  best  summer  yet.   We  are  incredibly  proud  of  what  Camp  Dudley  at  Kiniya  has  become  in  the  past  seven  years.  We  have  re-­built  the   infrastructure  of  Camp,  upgraded  many  of  its  buildings,  added  and  enhanced  program  offerings.  Most  importantly,   we  have  created  the  most  special  camp  culture  —  where  campers  are  respected,  care  about  one  another,  foster  new,   life-­time  relationships  —  resulting  in  an  infectious  spirit  and  a  tight-­knit  community  that  understands  the  impor-­ tance  of  doing  good  things  for  others!     There  are  many  reasons  why  each  one  of  us  loves  Camp.  I’m  willing  to  bet  that  the  primary  reason  girls  develop   such  a  deep  love  for  Kiniya  is  for  the  sense  of  belonging.  We  not  only  get  to  do  amazingly  fun  things  and  live  with   so  many  great  people,  we  all  cherish  the  feeling  of  belonging.   So,  as  we  continue  on  the  trail,  with  the  summer  of  2012  in  the  rearview  mirror  and  our  excitement  for  the   summer  of  2013  on  the  horizon,  a  few  thank  you’s  are  in  order.                

‡7RDOORXUOHDGHUVDQGVWDIIZKRZRUNHGVHOIOHVVO\HDFKGD\WRPDNHVXUHHDFKDQGHYHU\FDPSHUZDV  taken  care  of  and  that  everyone  had  a  great  time.  The  continued  leadership  our  team  provides,  by  coming back  year  after  year,  means  that  we  are  always  improving  .  .  .  in  obvious  ways,  and  in  subtle  but  equally       important  ways  that  make  the  camp  experience  richer! ‡7RDOORXUSDUHQWVDQGIDPLOLHVZKRWUXVWHGXVWKLVVXPPHUZLWKWKHLUJLUOVDQGEHOLHYHLQWKHYDOXHVDQG the  mission  of  Camp.   ‡7RHYHU\RQH²SDUHQWVFDPSHUVOHDGHUVDQGVWDIIPHPEHUVZKRJHQHURXVO\JDYHWRWKH&DPS'XGOH\  Annual  Fund.   ‡0RVWLPSRUWDQWO\WRDOOWKHFDPSHUVRI²\RXUHQHUJ\VSLULWHQWKXVLDVPDQGORYHRI&DPSPDNHV Kiniya  so  special.  The  success  of  summer  2013  lies  in  the  hands  and  hearts  of  each  of  you!  

Fondly  from  Kiniya, Marnie  #20001 SPRING  2012

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Letters to the Editor . . . tion of  Dudley  certainly  does  get  around.  Even  the  son   of  our  investment  counselor,  Doug  Kallet,  was  here   along  with  our  grandson  Ned  Colegrove!  So,  you  see,   we  still  talk  about  Dudley!”    

#2713 Arthur  Miller  at  Dudley,  1921

Sue Miller  wrote  from  Oneida,  NY,  about  her  dad,   #2713  Arthur  Drysdale  Kelley,  Jr.,  who  was  at  Camp   from  1917-­21  hailing  from  New  York  City.  “Dear  Matt,   Thank  you  so  much  for  the  information  about  my   dad’s  time  at  Dudley.  His  memories  were  so  positive  .   .  .  I  know  he  wished  that  he  had  had  a  son  to  send  but   it  was  only  open  to  boys,  so  he  took  me  hiking,  rock   climbing,  canoeing.  One  thing  I’m  sure  he  learned  at   Dudley  was  safety.  We  lived  on  a  lake,  in  Mountain   Lakes,  NJ.  He  insisted  that  we  be  able  to  swim  across   the  lake  or  we  couldn’t  go  to  the  neighborhood  beach.   He  threw  both  my  sister  and  me  into  the  lake  and   then  rowed  the  boat  next  to  us  across  the  lake  with   my  mother  screaming  at  him  from  the  shoreline!  He   must  have  learned  that  at  Dudley  because  he  was  liv-­ ing  in  Brooklyn  Heights  at  that  time.  Another  family   connection  is  #6056  Bill  Prior,  a  tennis  friend  of  my   husband.  Each  summer  he  would  arrive  out  of  the  blue   on  his  way  north  to  Dudley,  usually  with  a  handful  of   dirty  laundry,  which  I  would  wash  for  him.  He  always   left  the  next  morning  before  we  got  up!  Then  he  would   spend  the  summer  at  Dudley  .  .  .  truly  his  ‘home’  in  his   later  years.  Our  elementary  school  here  in  Oneida  is   named  after  his  dad,  Willard  Prior,  Sr.,  superintendent   of  schools  before  we  moved  here  in  1968.  The  reputa-­

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS

#7441 Phil   Bisselle  enjoyed   seeing  the  “Dudley   Olympians”  article.     “#10057  Sam  Amu-­ kum,  the  Ugandan   sprinter,  ran  for   Colgate  University,   graduating  in  1966.   He  also  ran  for  his   country  in  the  1960   and  ’64  Olympics.   In  1964,  he  was   the  IC4A  100-­yard   #10057  Sam  Amukum,  Leader  in  Owasco   dash  winner.”  Sam   Lodge,  1963 attended  Dudley  in   the  early  1960s. #7486  Rocket  McElroy.    “I  was  excited  to  read  about   the  acquisition  of  a  rowing  shell  for  the  boathouse.  I   brought  an  Alden  Ocean  shell  for  the  110th  alumni   weekend  to  get  some  exposure  for  rowing.  Having  the   Winkelvoss  twins  and  #11887  Bill  Manning  as  notable   rowing  alumni  will  give  the  program  a  shot  in  the  arm.   Great  memories  as  I  peruse  the  CD  News.”   #8616  Harry  Pore  wrote  from  Sarasota,  FL.  “I  read   about  the  ‘old  boys’  gathering  in  Venice,  FL,  and  want   to  sign  up  for  next  year.  I’ve  not  been  back  to  Dudley   since  being  in  camp  in  the  ’50s,  but  I  looked  it  up  on   Google  Earth.  I  remember  Albany  Island.  I  passed  the   swim  and  boat  test  and  got  my  ‘very  own’  boat  and   oars  and  made  it  out  there.  I  felt  the  like  captain  of  my   own  ship.  Looking  at  Westport  and  the  mountains,  I   need  to  go  back.  Next  summer  will  be  my  60th  anniver-­ sary  of  starting  at  Dudley.” #10367  Austin  Erwin  wrote  to  Matt  and  Marnie  while   sitting  in  a  Lebanese  restaurant  in  Dubai,  reading  the   Spring  2012  CD  News.  “I  was  at  Dudley,  well,  a  while   ago.  And  because  I’ve  lived  outside  the  U.S.  most  of  


Letters to the Editor continued my adult  life,  my  association  with  Dudley  has  never   been  as  close  as  I  would  have  wished.  What  a  bril-­ liant  magazine.  Reading  it  gave  me  goose  pimples  and   brought  tears  to  my  eyes  remembering  all  my  wonder-­ ful  times  at  Camp.  And  I  was  only  on  page  10!  I  work   in  corporate   debt  restructur-­ ing;  I  don’t  of-­ ten  tear  up  over   a  magazine.  I   was  impressed   with  the  degree   of  care  in   planning  that   goes  into  the   CDN  –  like   everything  else   #10367  Austin  Erwin,  Teale  Lodge,  1966 at  Camp.  Things   happen  at  Dudley/ Kiniya  for  a  purpose  and  because  they  should.  I  read   the  questions  from  parents  about  learning  lacrosse   and  honing  tennis  skills.  Summer  camp  is  competitive.   Parents  today  (and  I  am  one)  want  the  best  for  their   kids  in  a  very  competitive  world.  Dudley/Kiniya  com-­ pete  for  kids  with  other  summer  activities  where  kids   will  do  nothing  but  hone  skills  in  one  specific  activity   or  another.  I  continued  to  read.  As  I  did  so,  I  became   prouder  and  prouder  of  Dudley.  It  remains  true  to   itself.  Yes,  we  have  NFL  players  and  coaches.  Yes,  we   have  Olympians.  But  Dudley  and  Kiniya’s  strength  is   that  it  builds  the  man  and  the  woman.  I  loved  #16999   Jessica  Storey’s  article  about  Healthy  Food  and  Exer-­ cise.  In  true  Dudley  spirit,  all  those  activites  –  many  of   which  so  importantly  involve  the  campers  and  staff  –   demonstrate  the  creativity  and  extent  our  Camps  walk   the  walk.  But  Dudley’s  “build  the  person”  philosophy   really  hit  home  in  the  #18500  Rev.  Bill  Harper’s  story   about  the  soccer  game.  People  with  talent  and  drive   will  achieve.  They’ll  become  great  athletes  or  entertain-­ ers  or  lawyers  or  hairdressers  or  builders  whether  they   go  to  a  specialized  camp  or  not.  Finely  honed  talent  is   important  but  not  the  sole  ingredient  for  success.  Suc-­ cessful  people  –  in  every  field  –  have  more  than  simply   talent  and  drive.  There  are  certainly  exceptions,  but   complete,  well-­rounded,  self-­aware  people  with  values   and  spirit  (thanks  Rev.  Harper)  are  the  ones  best  able  

to harness  talent  and  drive.  Well,  the  Oude  player  and   drummer  just  started  to  play.  I’m  having  an  Arabic   mint  tea.  And  I  am  thrilled  to  have  about  30  or  so   more  pages  of  my  CD  News  to  go.  Thank  you  Dudley/ Kiniya  for  the  memories!  May  our  Camps  flourish  for   many,  many  more  years  building  successful,  complete   people  in  a  happy,  healthy,  value-­filled  environment!!!”   Marnie  heard  from  Dawn  Giovannoli,  mother  of   #21919  Christine  Giovannoli,  Upper  Saddle  River,  NJ,   after  Hurricane  Sandy.            “We  were  hit  pretty  hard  down  here  —  our  house  in   North  Jersey  is  still  without  power,  water  and  heat    five   days  after  the  storm  and  the  utility  company  has  posted   a  service  restoration  date  of  November  11th.  But  we   were  really  concerned  about  our  shore  house  as  we  had   heard  that  Beach  Haven  West  had  been  ‘destroyed.’   After  seeing  news  coverage,  I  was  fairly  certain  that   we  had  lost  everything,  but  the  one  thing  that  I  was   most  devastated  by  was  the  fact  that  Christine’s  letters   from  Kiniya  were  in  my  dresser  drawer  in  that  house.   We  have  insurance  but  as  difficult  putting  things  back   together  would  be    —  those  letters  are  irreplaceable.          Yesterday,  after  providing  proof  of  residency  and   passing  a  police  checkpoint,  we  were  shuttled  in  by   bus,  a  group  at  a  time,  to  collect  up  valuables.  The   view  on  the  ride  to  our  house  can  only  be  described   as  what  one  might  expect  in  a  war  zone.  Boats  strewn   about  like  they  were  dropped  from  the  sky,  gaping   holes  in  some  houses  and  personal  effects  and  debris   everywhere.  We  got  to  our  house  and  there  was  thick   mud  all  over  but  the  house  was  still  standing  —  we  were   one  of  the  lucky  ones.  Trembling  as  we  opened  the   front  door,  what  an  incredible  relief  when  we  found   only  a  layer  of  mud  throughout    but  little  other  dam-­ age  inside.  I  immediately  went  to  the  dresser  and  there   they  were  in  a  little  plastic  bag.  Christine’s  letters  from   Camp!    It  was  an  indescribable  feeling  of  joy  amidst   the  devastation  surrounding  us.”                                                                                                                                                                            

FALL 2012

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CDA Reunion  Recap Jay  Wells  #14107 Marcus  Chioffi  #13820

Marcus Chioffi  and  Jay  Wells  overseeing   the  details  of  the  Reunion  Weekend

The 2012  CDA  Reunion  provided  gorgeous  weather,  great  times,  and  a  typi-­ cally  fantastic  group  of  people  to  create  new  memories  with.  The  heart  of  the   weekend  was  the  ceremony  to  honor  camper  #9408,  H.  William  “Rusty”  Da-­ vis  as  the  CDA  Man  of  the  Year.  (See  pages  8-­9)  Rusty  is  an  amazing  individual,   and  the  remarks  from  old  friends  including  Rollie  Stichweh,  Bill  McCutcheon,   and  Tom  Simpson  reinforced  that  through  stories  that  displayed  several  of  the   traits  that  so  many  Dudleyites  have  admired  in  “RD”  over  the  years.   The  summer  staff  played  a  critical  role  again  in  keeping  major  activities  open   including  boating,  swimming,  arts  and  crafts,  golf,  and  archery  in  the  newly   renamed  Waller  Archery  Glen.  We  owe  a  great  debt  of  gratitude  to  Bill  Mc-­ Cutcheon,  Big  Joe  Mairrano,  Dawn  Gay,  Westy  West  and  Fred  Guffey.  Wendy   Higgins  and  her  team  had  Witherbee  running  smoothly  for  the  after-­hours   gatherings  and  the  events  in  the  Hall,  including  Hymn  Sing,  where  James  Mayo   and  a  number  of  current  campers,  leaders,  and  staff  from  Westport  and  Col-­ chester  tried  hard  to  show  the  alums  how  to  do  it.  #11904  John  Ulin  held  up   the  alumni  end,  and  there  was  clearly  a  tie  when  James  suggested  that  we  all   “just  think  it”  for  a  round  of  Rock-­a-­My-­Soul.  Hymn  Sing  changes  over  time,  but   it’s  always  an  indescribable  experience,  and  James  continues  to  carry  that  torch   with  amazing  talent  and  energy.

Golfers Pat  Butler,  Michael  and  Chris   Perry  and  Berk  Johnson  ready  for  a   winning  round

Molly Farnham,  Kari  Post  and   Bill  Stratton

Thursday and  Friday  provided  a  great  chance  for  us  all  to  reacquaint  ourselves   with  the  activities  and  scenery  around  Camp  and  for  many  of  us  to  introduce   future  Dudleyites  to  the  experience  and  the  facilities.  On  Saturday,  additional   activities  brought  great  fun  to  those  who  participated.  A  number  of  folks   enjoyed  challenging  themselves  on  the  climbing  wall  in  Sommer  Hall,  under   the  watchful  eye  of  #22406  Molly  Farnham  and  #15509  Scott  Steen.  Molly   also  led  a  number  of  Dudleyites  including  #15069  Bill  Stratton,  #13817  James   Feuer,  and  #11846  Tom  and  Paula  Canning  on  a  long  and  rewarding  hike   up  and  across  Nun-­Da-­Ga-­O  Ridge,  on  the  side  of  Big  Crow  and  Little  Crow   Mountains  in  Keene,  and  #7951  Jack  Kotz  again  led  a  group  up  Baxter.  #9698   Warren  Fuller  and  #11202  Bear  Granfors  led  kids  of  all  ages  in  a  rigorous   game  of  Capture  the  Flag  in  which  the  only  injury  was  very  mild  and  attributed   to  the  age  of  the  injured,  #13174  Reese  Madden  from  the  1982  Cub  Division.   Reese  says  he  is  fine  and  that  he’s  never  felt  better.  We  at  the  CDA  would  never   question  that  publicly,  so  we  won’t.  #15328  JD  Boyle  led  the  greased  water-­ melon  contest,  and  the  afternoon  was  capped  off  with  an  awesome  pig  roast   dinner  on  main  campus  thanks  to  #22425  Christine  Hubbard  and  her  amazing   team  from  Beckman  Hall.

Jack, Warren,  as  well  as  JD  led  activities  for  many  years  during  reunion,  and  we   are  thrilled  to  have  them  back  year  after  year.  It’s  a  real  pleasure  to  see  alums   lead  activities  with  the  same  zeal  they  have  since  their  earliest  days  at  Camp.  We  are  

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS


always looking  for  ideas  that  will  make  Reunion  even  more  fun  and  an   even  better  way  to  interact  with  Camp,  so  please  share  any  ideas  you   have  and  let  us  know  at  CDA@campdudley.org  if  there’s  an  activity   you’d  like  to  lead! We  were  fortunate  to  continue  to  have  beautiful  weather  through   Sunday  morning  so  that  we  could  enjoy  chapel  outside.  #11584  Rev.   Peter  Allen  delivered  an  inspirational  sermon  about  how  different   scents  can  trigger  different  parts  of  our  memory  and  our  hearts.  Citing   examples  from  Camp,  his  childhood,  and  his  recent  work  with  some   severely  impoverished  and  inspirational  people  he  has  worked  with  in  rural   areas  of  Mexico,  Pete  reminded  us  that  we  all  have  the  opportunity  to  exude   an  aura  and  to  influence  people.  He  challenged  us  to  send  the  signals  to   those  around  us  that  we  want  to  send  and  that  we  believe  God  wants  us   to  send.  Many  thanks  go  to  Pete  for  his  years  of  service  to  Dudley  and  for   leading  us  through  a  perfect  ending  to  a  wonderful  weekend.

Pete Allen,  left,  and  Scott  Steen  at   Sunday  Chapel

Finally, Marcus  and  I  want  to  thank  everyone  who  made  the  trip  and   contributed  to  the  fun  and  fellowship  over  the  weekend.  Reunion,  just  like   Camp,  is  about  the  people  who  make  up  the  vast  yet  intimate  community  of   Dudleyites.  We  are  already  looking  forward  to  next  year,  so  thanks  again  for   coming,  and  we’ll  hope  to  see  even  more  Dudleyites  and  friends  in  2013.   All  the  best, Jay  Wells  #14107,  President Marcus  Chioffi  #13820,  Vice  President

Evan and  Diana  George  with   Marcus  and  daughter  Caroline   enjoying  a  sunny  luncheon

P.S. It’s  not  too  early  to  start  making  plans  to  reconnect  with  folks  from  your  divi-­ sion  next  summer.  We’ll  be  hoping  to  celebrate  any  group  that  wants  to  get  together,   especially  the  divisions  that  started  with  the  1963,  1973,  1983,  1993,  and  2003  Cubs.   We  have  created  an  event  for  those  divisions  and  linked  it  to  Dudley’s  Facebook   page  http://www.facebook.com/#!/CampDudley.  If  you’d  like  us  to  help  organize  a   gathering  for  your  division  during  reunion,  please  just  let  us  know  at   CDA@campdudley.org.  

SPRING 2012

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#9408 Rusty Davis —— CDA 2012  Man  of  the  Year CDA  President  #14107  Jay  Wells  focused  the  Witherbee   crowd  on  the  CDA’s  highest  recognition.  Said  Jay,  “Being   named  the  Camp  Dudley  Association’s  Man  of  the  Year   puts  you  in  arguably  the  best  company  you  can  possibly   be  in.  The  list  of  previous  honorees  includes  philanthro-­ pists,  leaders  in  business,  law,  education,  and  more.    In   addition,  they  all  believe  deeply  in  Camp  and  in  Camp’s   mission,  and  they  exemplify  it  in  all  aspects  of  their  lives.          “This  year  we  are  honoring  a  Dudleyite  who  is  a  won-­ derful  example  of  all  of  these  traits.  He  is,  by  training,  a   rocket  scientist  .  .  .  I  am  not  kidding!  In  case  you  think   that  makes  him  sound  stiff,  he’s  also  a  jazz-­man,  playing   multiple  instruments,  especially  the  tenor  sax.  He  has   been  an  ardent  supporter  of  Camp  throughout  the  years,   supporting  our  mission  directly  through  years  of  personal   #9408  Rusty  Davis,  2012  Man  of  the  Year! service  as  well  as  financial  support.          “He  is  also  a  world-­class  educator  and  coach,  impacting   the  lives  of  young  people  over  a  career  spanning  four  decades.  If  you  ask  the  girls  who   played  on  his  soccer  teams  at  Taft,  they’ll  tell  you  his  secret  is  straightforward,  but  elu-­ sive  for  so  many;  ‘Try  Hard.  Have  fun.  Care  about  each  other.  Love  what  you’re  doing.’          “The  CDA  is  proud  to  name  as  it’s  2012  Man  of  the  Year,  Camper  #9248,  Rusty   Davis.”          Former  Director  #9061  Rollie  Stichweh  and  colleagues  #10065  Bill  McCutch-­ eon  and  #9663  Tom  Simpson  then  came  forward.  Said  Stich,  “When  Bob  Marshall   retired,  I  was  privileged  to  inherit  the  terrific  team  that  Bob   had  assembled.  In  June,  1970,  we  met  at  the  Darien,  CT,  rental   home  of  three  wild  and  crazy  bachelors  at  the  time  —  Paul   Grinwis,  Ed  Higgins,  and  George  Nelson,  all  teachers  at  local   schools,  along  with  Ink  Clark,  the  Associate  Director.  Also  in   this  meeting  on  that  day  was  Rusty  Davis,  preparing  to  serve   as  one  of  the  Division  Heads.  He  immediately  impressed  me   as  someone  very  special.  He  was  mature  beyond  his  years,  had   a  sharp  wit,  contributed  insights  as  plans  were  discussed,  and   displayed  a  marvelous  confidence  despite  his  youth.  Neither  he   nor  I  knew  at  that  point  that  he  would  become  my  ‘go  to  guy,’   starting  that  summer  and  for  the  balance  of  my  tour  of  duty,   whenever  challenges  arose  and  intelligent  decisions  needed  to   be  made.  When  Rusty  later  joined  the  Dudley  Board,  he  stood   out,  pressing  for  the  creation  of  a  ‘rainy  day’  fund  in  case  a   major  emergency  arose  requiring  immediate  financial  support.   When  the  devastation  caused  by  extensive  erosion  hit  Dudley’s   Messrs.  Schollmaier,  Thayer  and  Davis,  the  summer  of  1974 shore  last  year,  that  fund  was  in  place  to  allow  prompt  and   effective  remediation  to  take  place.  No  one  in  Camp  Dudley’s   glorious  history  has  deserved  ‘Man  of  the  Year’  recognition  

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more  than  Rusty  Davis.  He  has  always  been  a  very  spe-­ cial  human  being,  admired  and  loved  by  us  all.� Bill  McCutcheon  added,  “Rusty  Davis  is  the  definition   of  leadership.  He  always  made  the  right  decisions.  He   was  my  JL  coach  when  I  was  a  Plebe,  my  boss  (D-­Head)   for  years  when  I  was  a  Leader.  Later  he  carefully  guided   and  mentored  me  so  I  could  do  a  respectable  job  as   Chair  of  Plant  &  Property  on  the  Board.  His  wit  is   unmatched  .  .  .  he  was  the  head  of  the  ‘Platters’  when   Stich  crashed  his  motorcycle  onto  the  Witherbee  Stage.   He  was  the  steady  guy  with  the  answers  for  his  peers   both  at  camp,  college,  and  at  Taft.  As  our  resident   astrophysicist,  we  could  sit  and  have  him  explain  the   universe  while  scheduling  the  activities  for  the  next   day.  No  one  at  Camp  knew  the  Dudley  dome  like  he   did.  He  was  unselfish  and  generous  to  all  his  worker-­ bees,  which  just  drew  us  closer  to  him.  In  many  ways   I  try  to  be  as  good  a  person  as  he  was,  has  been,  and   continues  to  be.� Tom  Simpson  shared  stories  of  hits  and  near  misses   from  the  ’70s,  all  with  Rusty  at  the  wheel.  “This  in-­ cluded  an  amazing  four  week  7,000  mile  road  trip  in   Rusty’s  yellow  Buick  convertible,  departing  from  New   Orleans,  and  a  tour  de  force  of  our  national  parks.  It   also  included  his  ingratiating  himself,  on  behalf  of  a   carload  of  Dudley  pals,  to  a  Port  Henry,  NY,  police   officer,  quickly  turning  a  probable  ticket  into  a,  “I  

hope  you’ll  come  over  to  Camp  for  a  visit.�  Rusty  has   been  an  exemplary  member  of  the  Dudley  community   since  the  day  he  set  foot  on  this  campus.  As  a  camper   he  absorbed  the  key  lessons  about  personal  and  leader-­ ship  development  from  his  leaders  coaches.  In  turn  he   passed  those  lessons  on  to  his  campers  and  the  leader-­ ship  teams  in  the  divisions  that  he  ran  so  well.  Key   parts  of  that  were  really  knowing  his  campers,  running   proactive  division  leaders  meetings,  being  personally   involved  in  so  many  facets  of  Camp,  and  being  a  loyal   supporter  of  every  director,  and  particularly,  Rollie   Stichweh  and  Willie  Schmidt.  Our  camp  has  been   blessed  to  have  him  as  one  of  our  guiding  lights.  It  is   indeed  appropriate  that  we  honor  Rusty  as  the  2012   CDA  Man  of  the  Year.�   Board  Chairman  Dwight  Poler  then  read  the  Man  of   the  year  Certificate,  as  follows,  which  read  in  part:

Camper, Leader, D-Head, and two-term Dudley Board Member, H. William “Rustyâ€? Davis III H[HPSOLĂ€HVDOOWKDWWKH&'$KRQRUV $VD\RXQJ'+HDGDW'XGOH\5XVW\ EURXJKWZLWDQGZLVGRPWRGHOLEHUDWLRQV EHFRPLQJWKH´JRWRJX\ÂľZKHQHYHU FKDOOHQJHVDURVH $VD'XGOH\%RDUG0HPEHUKHSUHVVHG IRUD´UDLQ\GD\ÂľIXQGWKDWHQDEOHG LPPHGLDWHDFWLRQZKHQPDMRUĂ RRGLQJ GHYDVWDWHGRXUVKRUHOLQH Rusty’s formula was simple . . . ´DOZD\VKDYHIXQÂľ,QWKHSURFHVVKH KHOSHGWKRXVDQGVRIVWXGHQWVDQG FDPSHUVWRPDNHWKHPRVWRIZKDW WKH\ZHUHJLYHQ

Rusty  recieving  the  plaque  with  Matt  Storey  and  Dwight  Poler

,QUHFRJQLWLRQRIKLVKDOIFHQWXU\RI loyalty and dedication to Camp Dudley, WKH&'$QDPHV5XVW\'DYLV LWV0DQRIWKH<HDU FALL Â 2012

9


2012-What a summer it was –

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS


– on both sides of the Lake! FALL 2012

11


New Faces at Dudley & Kiniya! After 20  years  of  service   to  Kiniya,  #20005  Gail   Coleman  joined  the  year-­ round  team  in  the  spring   of  2012!  Gail  started  in   1992  as  second  chef,  serv-­ ing  lunch  and  dinner  four   days  per  week.  A  talented   chef  with  strong  leadership   skills,  she  moved  to  Head  Chef  in  1995.  Hundreds   of  Kiniya  campers  and  staff  have  benefited  from  her   many  talents.  Each  summer,  Gail  commits  over  60   hours  per  week  to  Kiniya.  Now,  in  the  off-­season,  she   works  with  Marnie  and  Matt,  catering  for  all  off-­season   events,  including  Board  and  Leadership  meetings,   work  weekends  and  user  groups.  In  addition,  she  cooks   a  delicious  meal  every  two  weeks  for  the  entire  Dud-­ ley/Kiniya  team.  This  new  tradition  is  much  antici-­ pated  and  thoroughly  enjoyed  by  the  entire  year-­round   staff!  (Today  is  lasagna  day  .  .  .  anyone  hungry?!) This  past  summer  we   welcomed  back  Program   Director,  #21518  Nick   Ansell,  from  Johannes-­ burg,  South  Africa,  for   his  Kiwi  (4th)  summer.   Starting  in  2009  as  our   boat  driver  and  water  ski   instructor,  Nick’s  talents   quickly  crossed  many  program  areas.  Nick’s  leadership   skills  resulted  in  his  step  to  Waterfront  Director  and   then  Program  Director  in  2011’s  second  session.  Last   spring,  Marnie  and  Nick  secured  an  18-­month  intern-­ ship  visa,  allowing  him  to  stay  in  Vermont  at  camp   through  summer  2013.  Nick  splits  his  time  between   helping  the  Kiniya  Maintenance  Team  maintain  our   beautiful  campus  and  working  in  the  office,  learning   camp  management  and  program  planning.  Nick’s  work   over  this  next  year  will  strengthen  our  daily  program   and  help  prepare  us  for  the  future.  

#15017 Evan  George  is  Dudley’s  new  Admissions   and  Program  Director,  responsible  for  the  coordina-­ tion,  outreach,  and  development  of  our  admissions/ enrollment  process  with  particular  attention  to  ex-­

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panding diversity.  In  the   summer,  Evan  will  be   the  Program  Director  at   Dudley.  Evan  first  came   to  Sunday  Chapel  in  1987   when  his  father,  Rev.   Floyd  E.  (Skip)  George,   III,  of  the  Westport  Feder-­ ated  Church,  preached  at   Dudley.  He  was  a  camper  from  1989-­94  returning  as  a   Leader  in  2000,  Senior  D-­Head  from  2001-­2003,  and   Boathouse  Chief  in  2004.  Dudley  has  never  been  far   from  his  heart  as  here  he  met  his  wife,  #18079  Diana   McGuigan.  Nephews/nieces  #20695  Jacob  Martz,   #21854  Samuel  Scott,  #22554  Ben  Scott,  and  #22879   Hannah  McGuigan  followed.  Evan  graduated  from   Hobart  in  2001,  taught  English  and  coached  soccer  at   the  Winchendon  School  in  Massachusetts  (NEPSAC   Class  B  Championship  in  2003!).  Evan  returned  to   New  York  in  2005  as  a  program  administrator  for   Working  In  Support  of  Education,  Inc.,  then  was  a  Fel-­ low  at  the  Coro  Leadership  Center.  Since  2007,  Evan   has  been  a  Project  Manager  with  the  NYC  Department   of  Parks  and  Recreation.

#15877 Brendan   Loughman,  “Lefty”  to   most  everyone  that  knows   him  has  joined  the  year-­ round  staff  at  Camp  Dud-­ ley  as  the  new  Commu-­ nications  Coordinator.  A   recent  resident  of  Burling-­ ton,  VT,  Brendan  gradu-­ ated  from  Plymouth  State  University  in  2007  in  New   Hampshire  with  a  degree  in  Communications.  Ever   since  entering  the  gates  as  a  Cub  in  1993,  Brendan  has   found  it  nearly  impossible  to  not  spend  his  summers   on  the  shores  of  Lake  Champlain.  After  completing   four  years  as  a  camper,  Brendan  quickly  shifted  his   focus  to  leadership,  climbing  through  the  ranks  which   ultimately  led  to  an  Assistant  D-­Head  position  with   pal  #17681  Steven  Nelson  in  the  mighty  Senior  Divi-­ sion.  You  can  find  Brendan  now  at  the  Dudley  Office,   tackling  the  next  version  of  the  Last  Whistle  and  Spirit   or  helping  with  the  Camp  Dudley  News.  


Willie Fest! April 27th, 2012 at the Powerhouse Arena DUMBO, Brooklyn, NY

The Willie Fest had it all! It was the ultimate Dudley mix of great men and women from all over the country, gathering around the central themes of music, giving, and Willie. Every ‘other fellow’there left with a huge grin, knowing that the Dudley message reaches further out than just summertime in the North Country.” — Ted Smith #12664 Unlike the reunions or small meet-‐ups that take place year-‐round, Willie Fest packed a room with four generations of raw musical talent. But identical to those other gatherings, “The Other Fellows First” outshined even the most talented performer.” — James “Yappy” Guimaraes #17185

Bob Kindred and his sax

James Guimaraes and Teddy Smith FALL 2012

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New Aides Experience Launched

Trip leaders  Matt  Langston  and  Tom  Dils   with  a  group  of  Aides  near  Elk  Lake

The vision  for  the  new  Aides  Experience  and  Leadership   Orientation  began  to  take  shape  when  Camp  Dudley   purchased  three  yurts  to  replace  cabins  for  the  2011  sum-­ mer.  This  was  the  silver  lining  of  the  clouds  that  produced   enough  rain  to  cause  serious  lakeshore  landslides  and   damage  to  several  Camp  cabins.  It  was  the  perfect  oppor-­ tunity  for  Outdoors  Program  Director  Scott  Steen  to  fill   a  need  in  our  outdoor  program,  to  create  an  off-­campus   wilderness  leadership  school.  Through  the  hard  work  and   vision  of  Scott,  Head  of  Leadership  Mark  Davenport,  Head  of  Aides  Experience   Mollie  Farnham  and  several  other  Dudley  staff,  this  disaster  has  indirectly  created   the  Yurt  Village  above  our  Stacy  Brook  Site  #1  that  supports  the  new  10-­day  Aides   Experience  and  Leadership  Orientation.   “The  use  of  challenge  in  the  woods,  the  natural  consequences  of  the  environment,   and  the  opportunity  to  lead  one’s  peers  and  receive  feedback  are  all  optimal  factors   for  an  introductory  leadership  program.”                          –Mollie  Farnham-­  Head  of  Aides  Experience

Jeff Schwoebel  takes  charge  of   the  re-­construction  of  the  yurts  on   Stacy  Brook  Site  #1.  Below,  the   finished  yurt,  snug  in  the  woods

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The sixty  boys  who  participated  in  the  program  this  summer  worked  hard   and  played  hard.  The  experience  consisted  of  four  days  living  at  the  Yurt   Village,  Opening  Day  at  Dudley,  and  five  days  on  a  wilderness  expedi-­ tion  in  the  Adirondacks.  The  Aides  kept  busy  at  the  yurt  village  learning   wilderness  and  leadership  skills  in  the  form  of  games,  scenarios,  challenge   course  work,  free  time,  council  rings,  vespers,  rock  climbing  and  even  a   Tyrolean  Traverse  across  Stacy  Brook.  From  building  amateur  carpentry   projects,  constructing  dams  in  the  brook,  to  old-­fashion  exploring,  the   Aides  made  the  most  of  the  freedom  of  a  forest  playground.    This  was   also  an  opportunity  for  the  boys  to  get  to  know  their  fellow  Aides  and  to  


form lasting  friendships.  When  it  was  all  said  and  done,  the  2012  Aides   felt  well  prepared  to  enter  the  cabin  leadership  team,  better  situated  to  lead   future  Dudley  hikes,  and  that  the  experience  was  well  worth  the  effort.   “I  learned  valuable  lessons  about  outdoor  leadership  that  could  not  have  been   gained  without  the  appropriate  level  of  adversity  that  goes  along  with  the  Aides   Experience  .  .  .  I  loved  the  whole  ordeal  and  would  gladly  do  it  again.”                                                —  Trey  Collins,  A  2012  Aide One  of  the  key  players,  and  keepers  of  the  vision  of  the  yurt  village  was   Jeff  Schwoebel,  Dudley’s  Foreman  of  Facilities.  Jeff  can  tell  you  more   about  the  yurts  than  anyone  around.  Jeff  and  his  team  spent  countless   hours  deconstructing  the  yurts,  moving  them  to  Stacy  Brook  Wilder-­ ness,  hauling  them  over  hills,  creeks,  and  forests  to  their  new  sites,  and   reconstructing  them.  The  effort  was  amazing.  An  avid  and  accomplished   outdoorsman,  Jeff  took  on  this  project  with  an  ingrained  understanding   of  the  full  potential  of  a  backcountry  classroom  for  our  young  leaders.   Through  Jeff  and  team’s  unrelenting  work  ethic,  a  work  project  involving   the  local  inmates  from  Moriah,  and  help  from  all  40  leaders  in  pre-­season,   they  finalized  construction  just  a  few  days  before  summer  staff  arrived.   An  important  component  of  realizing  the  vision  was  obtaining  “buy-­in”   -­-­from  the  year-­round  Dudley  staff.  Camp  Director  Matt  Storey,  Head  of   Leadership  Mark  Davenport,  Head  of  facilities  Steve  Denton,  and  Jeff   Schwoebel  took  a  trip  to  see  an  existing  yurt  village  to  gain  a  sense  of  the  fi-­ nal  product,  see  the  scope  of  the  work,  and  to  get  excited.  Who  better  than   Camp  Dudley  Alumnus  and  recently  retired  Founder/President  and  CEO   of  Expeditionary  Learning  Schools,  a  division  of  Outward  Bound,  #9106   Greg  Farrell  to  show  us  how  its  done.  Greg  Farrell  owns  an  inspiring  piece   of  property  in  the  Adirondacks,  home  of  beautifully  constructed  wooden   yurts,  lean-­tos,  and  house.  He  was  good  enough  to  take  this  Dudley  team   on  a  tour  of  the  facility  last  spring,  and  to  answer  questions  about  his   yurts.  It  was  just  the  inspiration  we  needed  to  build  our  own.   Read  the  full  version  of  this  article,  including  photos,  quotes,  stories,  and   information  on  curriculum  at  www.campdudley.org  

Tight living  conditions  at  one  of  the   smaller  campsites  on  the   ADK  expedition

Downtime for  the  Aides  in  one   of  the  yurts.  Below,  Jeff  Schwoebel,   left,  and  Greg  Farrell  make  plans   for  the  Yurt  Village

FALL 2012

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German Exchange  Program   Enters  its  6th  Decade Our  German  program  features  an  ex-­ change  of  campers  and  leaders  between   Dudley,  Kiniya  and  CVJM  Camp  Ab-­ bensen  near  Hannover  Germany.      De-­ veloped  in  the  early  1960’s  by  Dudley’s   Bob  Marshall,  Abbensen’s  Herr  Walter   Lutz  and  Martin  Sommer,  the  program   offered  “fellowship  and  international   understanding.”  Three  generations  of   American  and  German  campers  have   now  participated,  on  both  sides  of  the   Atlantic.  

Summer of  2013

The German  kids  get  a  lesson   in  American  history  inside  the   rotunda  at  the  Capitol

It is  Dudley’s  turn  to  send  a  group  of   boys  and  girls  overseas  on  the  German   Exchange.  Every  other  year,  Dudley  sends   a  cabin  group  to  Germany  and  in  the   interim  years,  Dudley  hosts  a  group  from   the  German  YMCA.  The  trip  is  an  incredible  opportunity  for  our  14-­15-­years-­old,  who   have  completed  their  Senior  year  at  Camp.  Just  like  at  Dudley,  campers  at  Abbensen   return  year  after  year  to  enjoy  an  unbeatable  summer  experience.  Abbensen  is  co-­ed,   has  about  one-­third  the  number  of  campers  as  Dudley,  runs  for  two-­and-­a-­half  weeks,   and  is  situated  in  a  forest  rather  than  on  a  lake.  Its  program  stresses  diversity,  under-­ standing,  creativity  and  fun.  The  campus  is  rustic  and  beautiful.  The  vibe  is  just  like   Dudley’s,  with  a  supportive  staff  and  a  genuine  effort  to  serve  the  ‘Other  Fellow.’ The  2013  Dudley  trip  has  several  components.  The  main  attraction,  the  ‘Inter-­Camp’   at  Abbensen,  is  a  two-­and-­a-­half  week  camp  session  designed  to  integrate  youth  from   YMCA  camps  worldwide.  In  recent  years,  campers  from  Russia,  Spain  and  Japan  have   participated.  Besides  attending  Abbensen,  there  is  a  stay  at  the  Hanover  YMCA,  a   three-­day  home  stay  with  a  local  family,  and  a  tour  of  selected  areas  of  Germany,  which   in  recent  years  have  included  Hamburg,  Berlin,  Leipzig  and  Munich.  In  2013  we  will   be  sending  approximately  eight  boys  and  four  girls  to  Germany.    Please  contact  Davo   at  davo@campdudley.org  for  more  information  on  the  program.  Also  check  Dudley’s   website  www.campdudley.org  for  recent  pictures  from  this  exchange.

German Exchange  Alumni  Stay  in  Touch

Following the  August,  2012  season,  former  exchange  leaders  #18070  David  Nelson   and  #17425  Matt  Ator  led  an  Abbensen  group  through  our  nation’s  capital  and  NYC.   Highlights  included  all  of  the  major  monuments  including  the  Washington  Monu-­ ment,  Lincoln  and  Jefferson  Memorials.  Thanks  to  Dudley  alum  #8252  Charlie  John-­

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS


— and  Connections  Stay  Stong! son,  III,  the  group  was  able  to  visit  the   floor  of  Congress  and  tour  the  building.  A   visit  to  Georgetown  gave  everyone  a  chance   to  shop  and  relax  during  a  busy  trip.   “In  New  York  City  we  visited  the  ‘top  of   the  Rock’  .  .  .  in  Rockefeller  Center  to  see   the  city  lit  up  after  sunset.  We  had  break-­ fast  in  Central  Park  and  visited  Chinatown   and  little  Italy.  We  also  had  the  opportu-­ nity  to  see  a  Brooklyn  Cyclones  baseball   game  at  Coney  Island  Park.  Of  course  no   trip  would  be  complete  without  a  chance   to  do  more  shopping  in  Times  Square!   “The  trip  was  a  fantastic  opportunity  for   the  campers  and  leaders  to  see  many  differ-­ ent  parts  of  American  history  and  culture   and  surely  will  not  be  soon  forgotten.”

Matt Ator  and  David  Nelson  led   the  German  Exchange  campers   to  Washington,  DC,    before  they   headed  back  home

Dudleyites in  Germany

#14000 Blake  Little,  wrote  from  Germany,  “After  four   years  teaching  in  Italy,  I’m  starting  my  second  year   in  Stuttgart  teaching  for  the  Department  of  Defense   Schools  at  our  military  bases.  I  get  back  home  to  Ohio   in  the  summers,  and  am  currently  busying  himself   before  school  starts  with  German  language  immersion   and  triathlons.”   #19304  Tom  Dils,  spending  the  fall  playing  soccer     outside  of  Frankfurt,  Germany,  connected  with  two   Dudley-­Abbensen  friends,  #19180  Lukas  Ebeler  and  his   older  brother  Moritz,  who  is  studying  at  the  Karlsruhe   Institute  of  Technology,  for  a  weekend  of  hiking  in  the   Black  Forest.  Earlier  this  fall,  Tom  traveled  to  see  #19116   Will  Plumb  at  Oktoberfest  in  Munich,  and  #14000   Blake  Little  in  Stuttgart.

Lukas Ebeler,  Tom  Dils  and   friend  Leo  in  front  of  the   Karlsruhe  Palace

FALL 2012

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The Inaugural  Dudley-­Kiniya-­NOLS   Leadership  Trip by  #15509  Scott  Steen The  2012  season  marked  the  beginning  of  a  new  partnership  between  the  National  Out-­ door  Leadership  School  (NOLS),  Camp  Dudley  and  Camp  Kiniya.  Last  summer,  we  sent   twenty-­nine  young  men  and  women  on  three  separate  trips  to  Wyoming’s  wild  and  scenic   Wind  River  Mountains  to  embark  on  an  adventure  of  a  lifetime.  The  trips  were  co-­led  by   NOLS  instructors  and  Camp  Dudley  and  Kiniya  staff,  Catherine  Butler,  Dylan  Pollock,   Will  Sword  and  Peter  Treiber.  While  in  the  mountains,  the  trips  kept  busy  for  21  days   backpacking,  fly  fishing,  and  rock  climbing.  The  primary  focus  was  on  leadership  develop-­ ment.  Each  and  every  member  of  the  expedition  dedicated  weeks  to  developing  both  back-­ country  skills  and  personal  leadership  skills  in  an  outdoor  classroom  that  melded  NOLS   curriculum  with  the  Dudley  mission  and  core  values.   Said  #20680  Austin  Huber, “Throughout  the  trip,  whether  we  were  climbing  a  vertical  rock  face   or  relaxing  around  the  campsite,  we  were  constantly  learning  and  practicing  our  various  leadership   techniques.  Learning  and  literally  attending  a  Leadership  School  allows  for  a  more  concentrated   and  focused  environment  in  which  the  upcoming  leaders  at  Dudley  are  able  to  acquire  their  own   signature  styles.”             From  an  outside  perspective,  it  may  seem  that  a  NOLS  trip  to  Wyoming  and  a  Dudley   summer  as  an  Aide,  JL  or  AL  are  quite  different.  This  is  true  in  many  ways.  It  is  the  dif-­ ference  between  waking  up  to  horns  and  waking  up  to  frost  on  the  nose.  A  day  spent  on   the  soccer  field  or  a  day  spent  in  an  alpine  field.  An  evening  at  candy  store  or  an  evening   making  sure  the  grizzly  bears  don’t  eat  your  candy  store.  Or  even  a  moment  of  silence  in   the  Camp  Chapel  versus  a  moment  looking  at  the  divine  beauty  of  glaciated  granite  spires   against  deep  blue  sky.  

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“I became a better leader, a better speaker and a more environmentally conscious person by being the Leader of the Day twice, writing a chapel talk, creating a vesper, attending all the classes, and following the 7 principles of Leave No Trace Ethics.” – #21266 Monolo Sanjurjo Dudley NOLS graduate THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS

“Through my progression of understanding the leadership model, I realized how being a leader at Camp and being a leader in the woods connect and have many similarities.“ – #21193Matt Eldridge Dudley NOLS graduate


“A highpoint of my trip was summiting 13,000 foot Wind River Peak. It was truly a lifetime accomplishment.” – #20725 Ragon Willmuth, Kiniya NOLS graduate

When looking  past  these  differences,  a  little  deeper  into  the  two  programs,  Dudley  and   NOLS  have  an  astonishing  amount  of  overlap.  It  can  be  found  in  our  motto.  This  is  true   especially  in  our  Camp  Leadership  Development  Program.  Both  organizations  teach  how   to  live  well  with  others.  Our  motto,  “The  Other  Fellow  First”  is  similar  to  the  NOLS  credo   of  “Expedition  Behavior”  and  “Leave  No  Trace”  ethics.    At  Dudley  and  Kiniya,  we  con-­ centrate  our  efforts  primarily  on  the  people  in  our  immediate  cabin,  team  and  divisional   communities.  This  is  because  every  Aide,  JL,  AL  and  Leader  is  charged  with  taking  care   of  someone  else’s  children.  We  take  this  job  very  seriously.  On  the  Dudley  Kiniya  NOLS   Leadership  trips,  campers  are  removed  from  the  equation,  and  the  groups  learn  to  live   well  with  just  each  other  and  the  outdoors.  Then,  after  spending  a  camp  session  on  a  trip   like  this,  the  young  men  and  women  can  delve  back  in  the  Dudley  and  Kiniya  communi-­ ties  and  beyond.  They  have  fresh  perspectives,  new  confidence,  and  honed  leadership  and   outdoor  skills  to  pass  on  and  “pay  forward”  to  others. This  summer,  when  the  young  men  and  women  returned  to  Dudley  and  Kiniya,  it  was  evi-­ dent  on  the  faces,  in  the  stories  and  with  the  high  level  of  energy,  that  they  had  an  amaz-­ ing  time,  a  trip  of  a  lifetime.  The  lasting  memories  and  friends  created  on  the  trips  will   continue  to  weave  their  way  through  many  Camp  Dudley  and  Kiniya  summers  to  come.   The  stories  and  photos  are  of  29  individual  journeys  —  incredible,  and  in  some  cases   transformative  experiences. For  additional  informationon  the  Dudley-­Kiniya-­NOLS  Program,  contact scott@campdudley.org.

“After the first day, we were already so comfortable with each other and we grew closer as the days went on. We joked around during the trip that we were a dysfunctional family, but we were indeed, a family. I consider all the people on the trip some of my closest friends, and I still keep in touch with all of them.” – #20393 Erin Hogan- Kiniya NOLS graduate

“Guillaume had a truly great time. We are seeing him quite transformed as school is resuming. We are very grateful to you. We hope to see you next year.” – Albin and Delphine, parents of Dudley NOLS graduate #20912 Guillaume Jacquemont FALL 2012

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The Gift

 Excerpts  from  a  Chapel  Talk  on  

Parents Weekend  July  22,  2012   by  #10846  Rev.  Robert  Langston

H

Rev. Bob  “Lang  Fu”  Langston

e was  in  second  grade  when  it  happened,  and  only  8  years  old!    He  was  in   Math  class,  which  he  hated  because  he  wasn’t  very  good  with  numbers,  and   the  teacher  had  just  called  on  him  to  share  his  answer  to  the  math  problem   she’d  written  on  the  board  moments  before:      8,043  -­  5,898  .  .  .  equals?  And,   it  was  back  in  the  day  when  you  had  to  do  the  math  in  your  head  and  stand  up  when   you  were  called  on  to  give  your  answer!          “What’s  the  answer  please?”  the  teacher  said  to  the  boy.          So  he  stood  up  to  answer  the  question  with  a  pit  in  his  stomach  because  he  did  not   know  the  answer,  and  just  as  he  was  about  to  confess  that  reality,  there  was  a  knock  on   the  classroom  door.          The  teacher  went  to  answer  it  and  she  stepped  outside  for  minute.  When  she   stepped  back  in,  she  called  the  boy  into  the  hallway.  He  was  surprised  to  see  his   mother  and  grandmother  standing  there  with  his  older  brother,  who  had  apparently   just  been  retrieved  from  his  fourth  grade  classroom.            After  the  teacher  nodded  awkwardly  to  the  boys’  mom  with  tightly  pursed  lips,  she   went  back  into  the  classroom  and  left  them  alone.              The  boy  felt  a  little  strange  standing  there  in  the  hall  with  his  family,   but  if  truth  be  told  he  also  felt  a  little  relieved  that  they  had  saved  him  from   certain  embarrassment  in  class!          Simple  greetings  were  exchanged  and  then  there  was  an  awkward  silence   as  the  four  of  them  began  to  walk  down  the  hall  and  the  silence  and  the   walk  were  no  doubt  in  response  to  the  boy’s  question:    “Why  are  you  here?”   They  walked  a  little  further  in  silence  and  the  boy  asked  again,  “Mom,   grandma  .  .  .  why  are  you  here?”          And  then  they  stopped,  and  the  boys’  mom  said  simply  and  stoically  –     “Boys  we  have  some  bad  news  for  you  .  .  .  it’s  about  daddy  .  .  .  ”              And  before  she  could  finish  the  older  brother  had  doubled-­over  and  was   crying  out,  “NO  .  .  .  NO  .  .  .  NO  .  .  .!”          And  then  the  mom  said  what  she  came  to  say,  what  she  hated  to  say  —   “Daddy  died  last  night  .  .  .  ”  “NO  .  .  .  NO  .  .  .  NO  .  .  .!  ”          And  the  reality  slowly  hit  the  boy  too,  and  then  tears,  like  a  torrent,   began  to  fall  from  all  of  their  eyes.          And  so  began  a  journey  for  the  two  Lang-­FUs  on  May  11,  1966,  three  days  after   Mother’s  Day,  and  the  night  after  our  father  died!  This  is  her  story  .  .  .  and  her  boys  .  .  .  and  it’s  a  story  about  life  .  .  .  and  the  gifts  my  mother  gave  my  brother  and  me  in   the  46  years  since  this  journey  began.

Our mother  gave  us  religion  and  the  fear  of  God.    When  I  spilled  grape  juice   on  the  carpet  one  time,  she  was  adamant  in  her  proclamation  —  “You  better  pray  that   stain  will  come  out  of  the  carpet,  son!”          Mom  also  gave  us  the  ability  to  understand  irony  because  she’d  say  –  “Keep  laugh-­ ing  and  I’ll  give  you  something  to  cry  about.”

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And .  .  .  I  will  never   forget  the  day  mom  gave   me  an  understanding  of   the  circles  of  life  in  a  very   tender  and  moving  way   when  she  said  to  me  —  “I   brought  you  into  this   world,  and  I  can  take  you   out.”          Yes  .  .  .  Mom  has   given  us  an  awful  lot  over   the  years.  But  the  abso-­ lutely  best  gift  she  gave  us   was  .  .  .  Camp  Dudley!          Two  years  after  dad   died  I  attended  my   first-­ever  Camp  Dudley   reunion  in  Buffalo,  NY,   and  I  “interviewed”  with   Bob  Marshall,  the  direc-­ Left  to  Right:  Lora  Langston  #17855,  Matt  Langston  #16887,  Bobby  Shaw,  Skylar  Dunklebarger  #21887,  Karen   Langston,  Bob  Langston  #10846,  Janet  Walther  —  an  amazing  mother  –  Dave  Langston  #10555,  and  Uncle  Jim   tor  back  then.  My  broth-­ Shaw  #7505,  gather  in  the  Chapel  after  the  emotional  service. er  Dave  (Fu-­the  elder)  had   done  so  two  years  before   and  already  had  two  summers  under  his  belt.              The  next  thing  I  knew  mom  was  ordering  labels  and  sewing  them  into  all  my   clothes  .  .  .  and  I  was  burning  my  name  and  camp  number  onto  my  new  baseball  glove! Dudley  was  in  the  family  .  .  .  her  dad,  my  grandfather,  Jim  Shaw,  Sr.,  came  here  back   in  Chief’s  Day,  and  mom’s  brother,  my  Uncle  Jim,  who  is  back  at  Camp  this  morning   for  the  first  time  in  65  years,  spent  some  time  here  too.  And  her  cousin,  John  Tauch,   was  a  Cub  about  the  same  time.          Somehow  it  occurred  to  mom  all  those  years  ago  that  maybe  there  was  a  gift  that   Camp  Dudley  could  give  to  my  brother  and  me  that  she  couldn’t  give.  In  her  wisdom,   she  knew  that  there  would  be  people  here  who  would  change  me  in  good  and  kind   and  needed  ways  and  become  life-­long  friends  and  mentors.  She  knew  that  “boys   through  the  years”  had  given  to  its  name,  and  that  I  needed  Camp  Dudley  and  the   influence  of    “The  Other  Fellow  First”  because  back  in  that  day  and  time,  well  .  .  .  it   was  all  about  ME!     #10846 The Rev.          So  a  new  day  dawned,  and  that  day  in  1969,  for  Camper  Number  #10846,  that  day   Robert “Lang Fu” was  the  beginning  of  a  whole  new  way  of  life  for  me! Langston was at          Now,  46  years  after  our  dad  died,  I  know  that  the  greatest  gift  my  mom  gave  me   Camp from 1969-78, was  Camp  Dudley  .  .  .  and  I  know  now  that  the  gift  of  Camp  Dudley  opens  doors,  it   along with his Brother gives  access  to  the  great  —  to  great  people,  to  great  life  lessons,  to  great  experiences,  and   #10555 David. great  fun.  It  gives  access  to  great  memories,  to  great  responsibilities  and  challenges,  to   Bob is minister of the a  great  network  of  humanity  that  knows  firsthand  the  magic  of  Camp  Dudley  to  help   Onondaga Hill form  the  essence  of  who  we  are! Presbyterian Church in          Mom,  I  can’t  thank  you  enough  for  all  you  did  to  give  me  the  gift  of  Camp  Dudley.   Syracuse, NY.   I  cannot  imagine  my  life  without  it!    You  gave  me  access  to  the  great,  and  I  am  the   greater  for  it.  Thank  You!  You  are  a  great  mom!   FALL  2012

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Teamwork and  Anatomy?!  

Excerpts from  a  Chapel  Talk  July  8,  2012                                                    by  #19408  Linda  Saarnijoki  

I

am delighted  to  be  here,  to  see  Kiniya  in  action  for   myself  instead  of  just  listening  to  Eliza’s  many  tales,   and  to  see  what  a  wonderful  camp  you  all  have  built   together  following  the  Dudley  traditions  and  mission   from  across  the  lake  and  following  the  traditions  of  the  original   Camp  Kiniya.    Eight  years  ago  this  place  was  merely  a  dream   for  me  and  other  members  of  the  Dudley  Board.    What  a  thrill   and  honor  to  be  here! The  theme  of  the  week  here  at  Kiniya  is  teamwork.    Today  I  am   going  to  talk  about  teamwork  by  talking  about  anatomy,  about   some  key  parts  of  your  body  and  how  they  work  together  as  a   team.  But  I’m  not  going  to  speak  as  a  scientist;  I  am  going  to   talk  about  the  spiritual  basis  to  teamwork,  to  this  important   teamwork  of  the  body  and  spirit. Part  of  my  inspiration  for  this  talk  comes  from  a  yoga  class  I   took  this  winter.  Besides  being  a  physical  activity,  yoga  is  also   #19408  Linda  Saarnijoki,  speaking  at  the  Kiniya  Chapel   a  mental  and  spiritual  discipline,  training  you  to  be  mindful  of     your  body  and  its  power.     Two  basic  movements  of  yoga  have  been  spiritually  provocative  for  me.    And  pretty   easy,  fortunately,  for  a  beginner  like  me.  When  in  class  we  were  standing  up  or  perhaps   touching  our  hands  to  the  floor,  my  teacher  asked  us  to  connect  to  the  earth,  “rooting   down”  she  calls  it,  to  feel  the  force  of  the  earth  pushing  back  against  our  hands  or  feet.     The  earth  supports  us  and  holds  us  with  its  gravity.    In  a  symbolic  sense,  too,  the  earth   sustains  and  supports  us,  nurturing  us  with  food  and  energy.    As  I  concentrated  to  feel   that  support  beneath  my  feet,  I  also  thought  metaphorically  about  all  that  supports   me,  all  that  I  stand  on  as  I  live  my  life:  my  family,  my  friends,  my  traditions,  my  cul-­ ture,  my  spiritual  beliefs.  As  I  thought  about  “rooting  down,”  I  thought  about  digging   deep  into  the  love  I  feel  from  family  and  friends,  into  the  values  I  care  about,  into  the   central  core,  the  meaning  of  my  life,  and  feeling  it  flow  into  my  body.     The  other  yoga  movement  that  I  find  inspiring  is  reaching  up,  stretching  high  and   far,  fingertips  stretching  upward.    Toward  the  sky,  certainly,  but  also  toward  dreams,   toward  hopes,  toward  whatever  you  aspire  to  be,  toward  your  best  self.  

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Your ability  to  reach  high  is  absolutely  dependent  on  the  earth  staying  solid  beneath   your  feet.  If  you  lose  your  balance,  the  earth  will  catch  you.    Metaphorically  you  form   dreams  and  reach  toward  them  with  the  support  and  strength  developed  from  relation-­ ships  and  traditions,  the  nurturing  of  the  earth,  the  roots  of  your  life.  If  you  stumble   or  lose  balance  in  life,  your  beliefs  and  core  values  set  you  right  again;  they  catch  you.     Your  friends  and  family  catch  you.  Your  feet  on  the  earth  support  your  arms’  reach.     Know  that  you  are  rooted.    Use  that  certainty  to  reach  ever  higher.   THE  CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS


Important for  my  message  to  you  today,  however,  is  not  just  what  happens  at  your   feet  or  over  your  head.    Important,  too,  is  what  happens  in  the  middle,  the  connector   between  your  deply  rooted  values  and  your  high  aspirations  and  hopes.    It  is  in  the   middle  that  the  daily  work  of  your  life  is  done,  the  small  actions  that  will  lead  you  to   your  dreams.    The  middle  is  where  your  hands  and  your  heart  are.   It  is  your  heart  that  takes  all  your  relationships,  all  your  traditions,  all  that  you  have   learned  and  believe  and  translates  them  into  dreams  for  your  future.    All  the  power   and  energy  of  your  roots  channel  through  your  heart  and  inspire  those  goals.    Your   hands  are  your  tools  for  working  toward  those  goals.   But  your  hands  and  your  heart  serve  an  even  more  important  function.  They  connect   you  to  others.    Your  roots  grow  deepest,  you  achieve  your  highest  dreams  when  you  are   connected  to  others.    Your  hands  and  your  heart  connect  you  to  others  in  two  comple-­ mentary  ways:  they  reach  out  to  help  and  they  reach  out  to  be  helped.    They  help  you   create  a  team.    You  extend  a  hand  to  help  clear  the  table  even  when   it’s  not  your  turn,  to  pick  up  the  stuffed  bear  that  the   girl  in  the  upper  bunk  dropped  as  she  fell  asleep;  you   sing  songs  with  the  girls  struggling  at  the  back  of  the   hike;  you  wrap  your  arm  around  the  shoulder  of  the  girl   who  is  lonely.    Your  hand  and  your  heart  reach  out  to   help  when  help  is  needed.    The  other  fellow  first. It’s  important  to  remember,  too,  that  you  must  also   reach  out  when  you  yourself  are  in  need.  You  reach  for   a  hand  to  help  you  over  that  last  ledge  on  the  top  of  Mr.   Mansfield.    And  when  you  feel  lost  and  alone,  you  open   your  heart  to  someone  else—your  leader,  your  cabin   mate,  your  friend,  and  you  say  hold  my  hand,  share   Linda  with  her  husband,  #9408  Rusty  Davis,  and   your  strength  with  me.      No  one  can  do  it  all  alone,  everyone   daughter  #20108  Eliza needs  help  sometimes,  we  all  need  a  team.     Our  hands  and  our  hearts  help  others  and  they  ask  for   help—we  give  and  we  receive  and  we  are  connected  as  a  team.    Through  our  hearts  we   channel  the  power  of  our  roots  in  the  earth,  the  power  that  comes  from  tradition  and   love,  so  we  can  aspire  to  the  goals  that  we  will  reach  both  by  helping  and  being  helped   by  others. Stand  up,  feel  the  earth  beneath  your  feet,  take  the  hand  of  the  person  next  to  you,   and  reach  up  high—stretch  together.    Use  the  support  of  the  earth  at  your  feet  and  the   strength  and  balance  of  the  person  next  to  you  to  reach  even  higher.    Together.    As  a   team.    As  Dudley  women  at  Kiniya. #19408  Linda  Saarnijoki,  the  mother  of  Kiniya  Assistant  Leader  #20108  Eliza  Davis,  is  an   English  teacher  at  the  Taft  School  in  Waterbury,  CT.  She  is  a  former  member  of  the  Dudley   Board  of  Managers  and  of  the  Girls  Committee  and  is  married  to  Rusty  Davis.   FALL  2012

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Healthcare Dudley & Kiniya Style At Dudley:

As far  back  as  1885,  when  Sumner                                                        Dudley  led  the  first  “hike  and  canoe  trip”  to  Orange  Lake,  health  and                                                  safety  have  been  given  the  highest  priority  at  Dudley.  “Mr.  Dudley                                                personally  took  care  of  first-­aid  cases  in  ‘Headquarters,’  but  with  the   increased  numbers  in  Camp,  a  hospital  tent  was  provided  for  boys  requiring  medical   attention.”1          In  1896,  a  physician,  Dr.  Elias  G.  Brown  was  hired  to  take  charge  of  the  medical   department.  As  might  be  expected,  there  were  critics.  “When  Camp  Dudley  employed   a  physician  on  its  staff  the  criticism  was  offered  that  the  boys  were  being  coddled.”2          In  1908,  the  Infirmary  was  moved  indoors,  to  the  old  office  building’s  2nd  floor.   A  gift  enabled  the  1918  construction  of  a  stand  alone  infirmary,  located  by  Hurd  and   Ross  Cabins.  #643  Minott  Osborn  wrote,  “Able  and  competent  supervision  with   proper  facilities  for  caring  for  boys  temporarily  ill  are  necessary,  if  a  healthful  camp  is   to  be  maintained.”3          Seasoned  campers  will  tell  you  that  fresh  water  is  a  must.  Once  Camp  found  its   permanent  location  in  1908,  a  dependable  water  supply  became  a  key  goal.  “In  1923,   a  gift  of  Mr.  Hamilton  M.  Barksdale  provided  funds  for  the  purchase  of  a  mountain   spring,  building  a  52,000  gallon  reservoir  and  piping  the  water  four  miles.  The  spring   water  system  (located  above  our  Stacey  Brook  campsites)  also  made  possible  the   present  flush  toilet  system  with  filtration  fields.”4          One  of  the  early  professionals  in  our  health  community  was  #1698  Dr.  Condict   W.  Cutler,  Jr.,  who  came  to  Camp  as  a  leader  in  1909  and  later  served  as  camp   physician,  eventually  spending  a  half  century  at  Dudley.  Cutler,  a  hand  surgeon,   provided  valuable  counsel  in  the  betterment  of  health  and  sanitary  conditions  and   for  many  years  guided  the  health  policy  of  Camp.  Dudley  wisely  made  Cutler  a   Dr.  Condict  W.  Cutler,  Jr.  guided   member  of  the  C.D.  Committee,  setting  precedent  for  always  having  a  doctor  on  the   health  policy  for  50  years Board  of  Managers.            #6342  Doctor  George  L.  Hagman  and  his  wife,  nurse  Ruby  Stone  Hagman,   who  had  been  missionaries  in  China,  hailed  from  Royal  Oak,  Michigan,  and   ran  Dudley’s  infirmary  from  the  1930s-­’50s.          Said  #5310  Dudley  Dalton,  “The  Hagmans    were  at  camp  when  I  first   arrived  in  1938.  I  remember  Dr.  Hagman  as  soft-­spoken  and  friendly.  His  wife,   I  think,  was  the  first  woman  to  work  at  the  camp.  They  were  ‘old-­fashioned’   keeping  minor  crises  under  calm  control.  I  recall  one  time  when  a  friend  went   with  a  group  to  Stacy  Brook.  Needing  to  ‘take  care  of  business,’  he  followed  the   time-­honored  tradition  of  finding  a  secluded  spot  in  the  woods  and  using  leaves   as  toilet  paper.  Unfortunately,  the  leaves  he  chose  were  from  a  poison  ivy  plant.   Shortly  after,  I  went  to  the  Hagmans’  infirmary  and  found  my  friend  laying  on   his  stomach,  his  bottom  heavily  coated  with  pinkish  white  calamine  lotion.  He   told  me  that  he  had  asked  Dr.  Hagman  if  he  couldn’t  cover  his  bottom  with  a   towel    but  Dr.  Hagman  replied  that  it  was  important  for  the  air  to  get  at  it.  I   don’t  know  what  the  modern  medical  policy  is  when  someone  mistakes  poison   Dr.  and  Mrs.  Hagman,  center,  ran  the   ivy  for  a  Sears,  Roebuck  catalogue!” Infirmary  for  two  decades

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS


Dr. #7987  Dick  Edie  recalled  that,  “The  Hagmans  gave  us  all  physicals  upon   entering  camp,  and  then  newcomers  suddenly  came  down  with  a  case  of  ‘earlobes,’for   which  their  ears  were  painted  red  with  merthiolate,  to  the  delight  of  everyone  in  the   dining  room!    I  also  remember  Dr.  Hagman’s  comment  about  eating:  ‘Always  get  up   from  a  meal  a  little  hungry.’”  The  Hagmans  provided  care  for  two  decades,  through   1959.          A  gift  from  #101  Charles  Stewart  Mott  led  to  the  1963  construction  of  a  new   infirmary  which  “Greatly  improved  our  ability  to  handle  emergencies,  accidents,  and   health  problems.”5    That  same  year,  the  Last  Whistle  was  dedicated  “to  the  doctors  and   nurses  of  the  infirmary.”  “While  you  may  have  forgotten  the  cause  of  your  visit,  you   will  probably  always  remember  the  warmth  and  understanding  with  which  you  were   treated  .  .  .  by  all  the  infirmary  staffs  throughout  the  years.”6          Dudley  bolstered  its  coverage  by  asking  Dudley  alumni  and  friends  to  return  as   “Dudley  Docs”  during  their  vacation.  Two  of  the  early  alums  were  Drs.  #7446  John   Brust  and  #7314  Don  Stevenson,  in  the  summer  of  1963.  As  Don  recalled,  “The   brand  new  Infirmary  was  in  place  and  I  spent  two  weeks  there.  I  returned  in  the  early   ’70s,  when  Willie  Schmidt  became  director,  staying  until  2000.”  Don  remembered   with  a  chuckle,  “When  Willie  was  the  director,  he  hired  Camp  doctors  for  2  weeks  at   a  time,  with  a  major  preference  toward  specialists  who  could  help  him  with  his  own   chronic  conditions  (Allergy,  Cardiology,  GI)!”          While  we  joke  about  having  an  Allergist  on  staff  just  when  GI  problems  break  out,   both  Drs.#9988  Nick  Langan  and  #13469  Joe  Donahue  proved  to  the  “the  right  Doc   in  the  right  spot”  during  recent  tours  of  duty.  Langan,  a  heart  specialist,  diagnosed   a  heart  abnormality,  and  later  performed  surgery  on  one  Dudleyite.  And  Donahue,   an  orthopedic  specialist,  was  able  to  identify  an  unrecognized  knee  fracture  and  get   immediate  treatment,  allowing  the  first-­time  camper  to  stay  for  a  great  summer.          Another  longtime  volunteer  (22  years)  is  #8665  Dr.  Mike  McCutcheon  who   remembered  the  Hagmans  well.  “She  wore  the  traditional  nurses  uniform  every  day   she  was  on  duty  (e.g.  every  day  of  the  summer!).  I  admired  their  lifelong  partnership  as   doctor  and  nurse,  husband  and  wife.”          Mike  also  spoke  of  Dudley’s  influence  on  his  thinking  about  medicine.  “I  knew   I  wanted  to  be  a  doctor  before  starting  camp,  but  along  the  way,  Don  Stevenson,   Dick  Edie  and  stories  of  Doc  Cutler  fortified  my  desire.  I  also  know  that  just  being   at  Dudley,  hearing  from  all  quarters  that  service  to  others  was  a  an  honorable  career,   solidified  my  decision.”          Alum  #8674  Dr.  Bill  Vanneman,  has  been  volunteering  in  the  infirmary  since   1996.  Bill  remembers  that,  “A  Doc  who  followed  the  Hagmans  (Dr.  #9519  Harold   Smulyan)  let  me  look  through  his  microsope  at  blood  cells  when  I  was  a  JL.  I   remember  thinking  that  this  was  ‘neat.’  I  returned  several  times  that  summer,  and  he   showed  me  various  types  of  cells.  No  question  that  kindled  my  interest  in  medicine.”            Dudley’s  modern  healthcare  era  has  been  led  by  longtime  nurse  #15305  Sheila   Kapper.  Though  many  dedicated  nurses  have  served  Dudley  wisely,  including  #15279   Betsy  Denton,  Sheila  helped  professionalize  Camp’s  health  care  on  many  levels  over   the  past  22  years.  We  caught  up  with  Sheila  recently.

The porch  of  the  old  Infirmary

#8674 Dr.  Bill  Vanneman

#8665 Dr.  Mike  McCutcheon

#7987 Dr.  Dick  Edie FALL  2012

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Q. How  were  we  lucky  enough  to  find  you? A.    I  found  my  way  to  Camp  Dudley  in  late  July  1990.  The   persuasive  Willie  Schmidt  called  and  said  one  of  his  nurses,   #15042 Ellie Moon  (See  “New  Arrivals  page  58)  had  to  return   to  California  and  could  not  complete  the  season.  Could  I  “fill  in   for  a  few  hours  per  day”  giving  some  relief  to  Betsy  Denton  who   was  the  second  nurse  at  the  Infirmary.  I  was  hesitant  to  say  yes,  as   son  Devin  was  a  mere  four  months,  but  I  have  never  regretted  my   decision  .  .  .  the  substitute  that  never  left! Q.  You’ve  seen  significant  changes  over  this  period,  yes? A.  Computerization  came  in  1995.  Previously,  the  chart  system   was  on  cards.  There  were  no  health  charts  for  campers  or  staff  and   #20637  Carol  Schwoebel,  #15305  Sheila  Kapper,  #18408  Chris   it  was  very  difficult  for  any  continuity  of  documented  care.  The   Carpenter  and  #21195  Juanita  Napper  made  up  the   computer  allowed  us  to  target  names  for  many  health  conditions   nursing  staff and  to  have  a  heads  up  prior  to  Opening  Day.  It  allowed  us  time  to   contact  parents  prior  to  arrival  to  assure  a  complete  health  history.   We  then  created  a  health  care  chart  for  everyone  at  Camp,  including  current  immunization   status  for  whooping  cough,  measles  and  chicken  pox.            We  began  sending  camper’s  health  information  and  contact  numbers  when  they  went  off   campus  for  any  trip.  Each  trip  leader  received  a  one-­on-­one  conversation  with  “need-­to-­know”   information  on  their  campers.            A  satellite  phone  system  for  trip  leaders  now  allows  conversations  to  reassure  each  leader  that   they  are  taking  the  proper  steps  on  injuries  or  illnesses  when  out  of  camp. Q.  What  are  some  of  the  decisions  made  at  Camp  that  have  boosted  the  healthfulness  of  the   community? A.  Taking  Epi-­pens  and  medications  out  of  camp  for   each  trip.  We  started  this  in  1996,  and  it  became   NYS  law  in  1999.  We  had  orders  for  specific  known   “It  has  been  my  privilege  to  be  the  ‘board  doctor’   allergies,  but  not  for  the  life-­threatening  allergies  that   for  the  past  eight  years.  The  doctor  serves  as  an   might  appear  on  a  trip  for  the  first  time.  Each  leader   informational  resource  to  the  directors  and  the  sum-­ is  taught  to  identify  these  life-­threatening  situations   as  part  of  their  pre-­season  training.  Fortunately,  we   mer  health  staff.  The  doctor  is  also  a  resource  to   have  never  had  to  initiate  this  procedure. fellow  board  members  as  they  weigh  risk  manage-­          We  have  also  enhanced  staffing,  moving  from   ment  and  safety  issues.  During  my  tenure  we  have   two  nurses  that  worked  24/7  to  a  three-­nurse  system   had  high  level  meetings  with  NYS  Health  Depart-­ team  approach,  with  nurses  working  12  hour  shifts.   Most  are  school  nurses  or  have  pediatric  experience.  

#11871 Dr.  Kevin  McCormick

ment officials  in  Albany,  created  a  new  infirmary   at  Kiniya,  and  developed  a  plan  for  the  recent   H1N1  flu  epidemic,  which  could  have  cancelled   our  camp  season.”                      —  #11871  Kevin  McCormick,  M.D. 26

THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS

Q. How  has  our  relationship  with  the  NYS  Health   Department  changed?   A.  Over  the  past  23  years,  I  have  found  that   our  standards  at  Dudley’s  Infirmary  are  greater   than  what  is  required,  cementing  a  great  working   arrangement  with  those  at  the  Health  Department.   Often,  our  systems  are  used  as  models  in  presentations.  


Healthcare continued — That is  the  ultimate  compliment  to  our  level  of  care. Q.  Is  there  a  “nurse’s  story”  that  you  might  share?   A.  One  summer,  a  JL  was  at  a  cabin  supper  with  his  group  on  Albany  Island.  He  climbed  a  tree   and  became  impaled  on  the  tree.  Quite  literally,  his  arm  somehow  had  the  tree  trunk  enter  his   skin  like  an  IV.  The  group  borrowed  a  saw  from  a  nearby  Canadian  boat  and  the  JL  was  cut   off  the  tree,  wood  intact  in  his  arm.  A  very  smart  adult  that  was  on  site  left  the  wood  in  place   and  got  the  young  man  to  the  Infirmary.  The  story  has  a  wonderful  ending  .  .  .  no  permanent   damage!      

Meanwhile, At Kiniya . . . Healthcare  has  enjoyed  

the same  high  standards.  As  Marnie  describes  it,  “Our  Health  Center  is  staffed  by   RNs  who  are  available  to  provide  medical  care  to  campers  and  staff  at  all  times.  The   Infirmary  has  open  office  hours  and  includes  scheduled  daily  sick  call  where  we  often   see  coughs,  sore  throats,  minor  bumps  and  bruises,  headaches  and  bug  bites.  These   concerns  don’t  normally  take  a  girl  out  of  an  activity,  but  need  to  be  addressed  at  a   convenient  time.          “We  are  fortunate  to  have  an  excellent,  local  pediatric  group,  Essex  Pediatrics,  in   Essex  Junction,  VT.  and  the  Fletcher  Allen  Health  Care  Emergency  Department    in   Burlington,  just  15  minutes  away,  for  campers  who   need  physician  assessment  for  illness  or  other  medical   concerns.            “We  are  indebted  to  our  many  Kiniya  nurses   throughout  the  years,  particularly  #20003  Kary  Towne,   who  dedicated  ten  summers  to  Camp  between  2001-­ 2010,  #20313  Elizabeth  Glass  (great-­great  niece  of  our   founder,  Helen  Van  Buren),  and  more  recently  #22375   Jean  Stowell.  Over  the  years  our  nurses  have  not  only...’   One  of  those  inspired  is  #19231  Kari  McKinley,  who   returned  to  Kiniya  as  our  second  nurse  in  2012.” Kari  shares  her  story:  “I’ve  spent  the  last  two  and  a  half   years  in  New  Haven,  CT,  at  the  Yale  School  of  Nursing   (YSN).  YSN  has  a  Graduate  Entry  Program  that  involves   an  eleven-­month  accelerated  Registered  Nurse  (RN)   program,  for  people  who  have  degrees  in  other  areas,   straight  into  a  Masters  program  in  Advanced  Practice   Nursing.  I  entered  into  the  Pediatric  Nurse  Practitioner  specialty,   focusing  on  primary  care  for  children.  I’m  now  in  my  final  year,   doing  rotations  in  primary  care,  adolescent  care  in  a  School-­Based   Health  Center,  and  at  a  Pediatric  Ear,  Nose  and  Throat  specialty   practice.  I  will  continue  this  rotation  through  the  spring,  along  with  a  development   specialty  rotation,  and  possibly  a  rotation  at  the  Yale  Child  Sexual  Abuse  clinic.  A   large  portion  of  our  nursing  program  is  devoted  to  understanding  the  social  and   economic  factors  that  affect  our  patients  and  how  we  can  serve  as  a  bridge  to  resources  

The Kiniya  Health  Center

FALL 2012

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Healthcare continued — for the  children  and  families  for  whom  we  care.  Many   of  my  nursing  colleagues  share  a  mission  to  work  with   underserved  families,  and  in  doing  so  live  by  the  motto  we   hold  so  dear  at  camp.                    “During  last  year’s  Kiniya  Ladies’  Tea  in  New  York  City,   I  snuck  in  an,  ‘If  there  happens  to  be  a  need  for  another   nurse  at  Kiniya  .  .  .’  (wink  wink,  nudge  nudge  to  Marnie.)   I  knew  Kiniya  had  been  transitioning  from  a  single  full-­ time  nurse  to  two  on-­site  nurses.  After  receiving  an  official   offer  to  work  as  a  nurse  at  Kiniya,  I  just  needed  to  pass   my  national  licensing  exam!  My  excitement  over  being   able  to  return  to  Kiniya  was  slightly  greater  than  actually   passing  the  exam.  I  couldn’t  have  done  that  without  the   Kiniya  team  supporting  and  encouraging  me  all  along   the  way.  #22375  Jean  Stowell  (head  nurse,  see  article,  Spring   #19231  Kari  McKinley,  RN,  with  camper  #20958  Mahala   2012  CD  News)  was  a  great  mentor,  with  not  only  an   Marshall-­Rutter amazing  knowledge  of  nursing,  but  also  a  love  for  adventure   and  a  great  sense  of  humor.  My  time  at  Kiniya  was  spent   reconnecting  with  friends  and  developing  into  a  stronger   more  confident  member  of  the  nursing  community.          “Next  year  brings  a  new  chapter  in  my  life.  I  will  be  looking  for  work  in  the   northeast,  with  Vermont  as  my  starting  point.  I  plan  on  focusing  on  pediatric  primary   care,  in  part  because  I  believe  healthy  habits  are  easiest  to  maintain  when  begun  early   and  the  future  of  the  world’s  health  requires  our  youth  to  be  knowledgeable  advocates   for  themselves  and  others.  Plus,  kids  make  me  laugh.  Ideally,  I’d  like  to  do  what   anybody  in  their  right  mind  would  do,  which  is  find  a  job  that  allows  me  to  return   to  Camp  each  summer.  Realistically,  I’ll  find  a  job  that  will  allow  me  the  flexibility  to   #20003  Kary  Towne,  RN spend  at  least  a  couple  of  weeks  at  camp  and  perhaps,  down  the  road,  the   whole  summer.  So  either  way,  I’ll  be  back  and  with  the  same  excitement   and  appreciation  I  had  the  first  day  I  walked  onto  the  Kiniya  campus  six   years  ago.”  

#22375 Jean  Stowell,  RN,  and  Celia  Meyer,  RN

Ed. Note:  for  additional  background  on  “Dudley  Healthcare”  please  go  to  our   website  www.campdudley.org.  Have  a  story  of  your  own  you’d  like  to  share?     Please  send  it  to  Brendan@campdudley.org From  The  First  100  Years,  page  40,  2From  The  First  100  Years,  page  48,  3From  The  First   100  Years,  page  49,  4From  The  First  100  Years,  page  49,  5From  The  First  100  Years,  page   104,  6The  Last  Whistle,  1963,  page  2                 1


Early History of Kiniya . . . An Interview with

Jane and Betty Van Buren by #20595

As any   Dudley  and   Kiniya-­ite   would,  I   jumped   at  the   opportunity   to  find   a  small   insight  into   our  camp   Betty  and  Jane  Van  Buren,  Kiniya  historians history.  Last   semester  at  UVM,  I  was  taking  a  class  with  Professor   Jane  Van  Buren.  Recognize  the  name?  Jane  is  the   great-­niece  of  our  founder,  Helen  Van  Buren,  and  a   non-­profit  guru  that  I  have  now  had  the  pleasure  of   learning  from.   Last  February,  I  sat  and  chatted  with  Jane  and  her   mother,  Betty.  Betty  had  married  Helen’s  nephew,   Carmer,  and  moved  to  Vermont  in  the  1940s.  While   Jane  and  Betty  did  not  have  much  interaction  with   Kiniya,  they  did  have  memories  of  Helen  and  “Road’s   End,”  the  house  just  before  the  Kiniya  Stables  and   the  current  home  of  Elizabeth  Glass  #20313.  Jane   and  Betty  spoke  of  their  time  with  their  extended   Van  Buren  family  and  we  had  a  great  time  discussing   their  memories  and  comparing  them  with  how  I  know   Camp  today.  It  was  the  simple  things  that  brought   a  smile  to  my  face.  One  quandary  began  when  we   realized  we  must  have  been  talking  about  two  different   cabins  by  the  same  name.  We  determined  that  Roads   End’s  property  had  a  cabin,  Nubin.  Once  it  was   mentioned  that  it  had  a  bedroom  and  running  water,   I  knew  it  was  different  than  the  Nubin  that  is  now   used  as  the  Store!  Another  area  we  seemed  to  be  a  bit   confused  about  was  the  use  of  Junior  Beach  and  which   trail  it  was  that  they  used  to  get  down  to  the  beach.   Camp  primarily  used  Senior  Beach  for  all  activities,   and  Jane  and  family  had  access  to  Junior  Beach  as  a   place  to  spend  time  picnicking  and  swimming.   As  I  learned  more  about  Helen,  Betty  spoke  of  her   funeral  as  surprisingly  impersonal  and  perhaps  that  

Kat Hood

was because  Helen  had  kept  to  herself  after  moving   away  from  Kiniya.  Having  never  married,  Camp  was   always  her  first  passion  and  she  worked  tirelessly  to   maintain  the  camp  and  its  program.  Jane  was  quite   young  when  she  knew  Helen  but  always  thought  of   her  as  a  neat  lady  devoted  to  teaching  piano,  painting   and  reading.  The  little  red  house  that  Helen  lived  and   taught  from  still  remains  on  Pearl  Street  in  downtown   Burlington.  Jane  also  recalls  enjoying  a  stay  in  Nubin   cabin  at  Road’s  End  because  it  was  full  of  Helen’s   paints  and  various  pieces  of  artwork.  In  fact,  Helen   gifted  one  of  her  paintings  to  Jane  that  resembles  the   West  Entrance  of  camp  coming  down  towards  the   Stables. The  Van  Burens  provided  additional  history  about   our  gorgeous  pines  on  campus.  Jane’s  father  helped   Helen  in  planting  many  of  the  pines  at  camp.  Carmer   Van  Buren,  as  a  young  teenager,  worked  with  Helen   planting  many  of  the  pines  that  we  so  love  on  campus.   We  are  forever  grateful  to  Helen  and  her  family   for  creating  such  a  wonderful  setting  for  our  camp.   Although  the  trees  will  not  last  forever,  they  will  always   be  remembered  with  fondness  as  they  have  brought   character  to  our  little  slice  of  heaven  in  Colchester.   Our  pines  will  always  remind  us  of  our  great  history,   our  founder   and  our   character.  

“Road’s End”   by  Helen  Van  Buren,   1940 FALL  2012

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Service

Servant-Leadership —  Excerpts  from   a  Chapel  Message  by  #23164  Daniel  Yoo,  August  19,  2012

W

hen Matt  Storey  invited  me  to  speak,  I  was  surprised  because  I  am  not  a  Dudley-­ alumnus.  However,  when  you  read  Dudley’s  Mission  Statement  you  see  a  very   similar  theme  to  what  we  do  in  the  United  States  Marine  Corps.  We  are  .  .  .

‡  Both  very  old  organizations  (the  Marines  at  236,  Dudley  at  127  years)   ‡  Proud  of  our  history  and  traditions   ‡  Organizations  that  value  the  same  character  attributes  (leadership  –  moral,                                    mental,  and  physical)   ‡  Places  that  hold  our  predecessors  in  high  esteem. The  essence  of  what  we  both  strive  to  accomplish  is  character  development.  There  is  a   slight  difference  in  the  training  environment  –  our  boot  camp  is  a  little  less  fun  than   camping  at  Dudley.  Instead  of  Leaders,  ALs,  JLs,  Aides  and  Campers,  we  have  the  legend-­ ary  Drill  Instructors  and  Recruits.  At  the  conclusion  of  Marine  or  Dudley  Leadership   training,  there  is  a  kinship  that  only  those  who  have  traveled  this  path  can  truly  appreci-­ ate. As  each  one  of  you,  as  an  aspiring  leader,  matures,  you  are  continually  developing  your   own  unique,  God-­given  personalities,  passions,  gifts,  and  abilities.  As  you  do,  you  will   increasingly  have  opportunities  to  make  a  difference  in  your  family,  your  school,  your  com-­ munity,  and  your  country.   Why  do  people  want  to  be  leaders?  Certainly  leaders  are  respected,  admired,  given  more   responsibility,  able  to  make  final  decisions,  paid  more,  given  bigger  offices  and  maybe   front  row  parking  spaces.  Who  wouldn’t  want  to  be  a  leader?  But,  what  attracts  our  atten-­ tion  on  the  outside  is  far  from  what  makes  a  leader  on  the  inside.  When  you  set  aside  all   material  benefits,  at  its  heart,  leadership  is  about  service.  Service  should  be  the  first  thing   we  learn  about  leadership  and  the  one  thing  we  never  forget.  Leaders  are  put  in  place  for   the  needs  of  others,  not  for  the  needs  of  themselves.   Think  about  this:  To  be  a  good  leader,  do  you  need  an  impressive  title?  Do  you  need  to   achieve  a  certain  rank  or  position?  Do  these  things  automatically  make  you  a  good  leader?   I  would  suggest  that  you  don’t  need  any  of  these  things  to  do  what  good  leaders  do.  Good   leaders  find  ways  to  serve  others  and  make  a  positive,  lasting  difference  wherever  they  are.   This  kind  of  leadership  comes  from  the  heart,  from  the  inside  out.   Jesus’  leadership  came  from  the  heart.  He  didn’t  have  a  fancy  title,  but  he  made  an  unfor-­ gettable  difference  wherever  he  went.  When  he  was  personally  threatened  and  rejected,   he  continued  to  minister  to  others.  Though  he  was  the  greatest  among  his  disciples,  he   willingly  took  on  the  dirty  jobs.  Jesus  modeled  for  all  of  us  an  important  leadership  lesson:   Never  allow  status  to  get  in  the  way  of  service.  Jesus  understood  that  SERVANT–  LEAD-­ ERSHIP  could  be  done  by  anyone  at  any  rank.  It’s  not  too  early  for  each  of  you  to  begin   developing  that  attitude  of  service  to  others.    

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It’s not  easy  serving  others  –  it  requires  courage  and  sacrifice.  It’s  easy  to  point  out   what  is  wrong  with  a  situation.  But  a  leader  is  willing  to  step  up  and  work  to  make   things  better  –  to  be  part  of  the  solution Good  leaders  are  well-­rounded  people.  They  are  people  of  faith  and  convic-­ tion,  who  also  realize  they  must  work  hard  to  play  their  part.  Good  leaders   can  be  strong  and  firm  but  also  gentle  and  compassionate.  They  can  work  in-­ dependently  but  also  build  teams  that  work  together  for  a  greater  good.  Good   leaders  use  their  strengths  but  continue  to  work  on  their  weaknesses.  Good   leaders  are  always  learners  because  they  know  that  they  must  continually  grow.   And  in  the  end,  good  leaders  aren’t  worried  about  who  sacrifices  the  most  or   who  gets  the  most  credit.       Each  of  you  has  passions  and  gifts  that  will  lead  you  into  all  kinds  of  callings   in  our  society.  You  may  teach  or  coach,  serve  in  the  ministry  or  public  office,   even  join  the  Marine  Corps  protecting  our  freedoms  and  the  freedoms  of   others.  I  am  not  surprised  when  I  hear  our  Marine  recruits  explain  that  they   joined  the  Corps  to  become  part  of  something  bigger  than  themselves.  I  think   God  put  that  desire  in  each  and  every  one  of  us.   If  you  want  to  see  good  leaders  who  know  how  to  serve,  you  don’t  have  to   look  far.  Start  right  here.  Look  around  at  Matt  and  Marnie,  the  staff,  leaders,   and  volunteers  who  run  this  camp.  They  each  come  together  and  serve  a  cause   greater  than  themselves.  They  invest  their  time,  energy,  and  talents  in  you  be-­ cause  they  believe  that  you  are  our  country’s  future  leaders.  They  believe  in  you,   and  in  the  plans  and  purposes  God  has  for  you.   When  you  return  home,  look  around  at  the  leaders  who  serve  in  your  communi-­ ties  –  teachers,  clergy,  coaches,  Boy  Scout  leaders,  policemen,  firefighters,  may-­ ors,  military  men  and  women  ¬–  and  thank  them  for  their  SERVANT-­LEADER-­ SHIP.  Without  each  one  of  these  individuals,  we  would  not  have  the  nation  we   have  today  or  the  freedoms  we  so  enjoy.  With  God’s  help  and  the  example  of  the   SERVANT-­LEADERS  here  at  camp,  each  one  of  you  will  come  to  know  that  life   of  fulfillment  and  reward  as  well.                 Winston  Churchill  once  said,  “We  make  a  living  by  what  we  get,  but  we  make   a  life  by  what  we  give.”    Said  another  way,  always  remember,  “The  Other  Fellow   First.”    God  bless  you  and  Semper  Fidelis.

Daniel Yoo  was  born  in  Seoul  Korea  on  the  4th  of  July  and  grew  up  to  be  a  General  in  the   United  States  Marine  Corps.  He  has  given  service  to  America  for  nearly  three  decades,  and   is  now  Brigadier  General  of  the  Marines,  based  in  San  Diego,  CA.  He  and  his  wife,  Grace,   are  the  parents  of  #22164  Alexander,  a  2012  Plebe  in  Avery  Cabin.  

#23164 Brigadier  General  Daniel  Yoo,  speak-­ ing  at  the  Dudley  Chapel  this  summer

Left to  right,  #10801  LtCol  David  Dona-­ hue  (retired),  #  23164  Brigadier  General   Dan  Yoo,  #11156  Colonel  John  Lowry   (retired)  at  the  San  Diego  Recruit  Depot   Marine  Corps  Birthday  Ball  in  November.     Yoo’s  son,  #22164  Alex,  a  plebe  at  Dudley   this  past  summer,  had  #19801  Nick  Dona-­ hue  as  his  JL.  Alex  was  at  Dudley  because   John  Lowry  preached  the  virtues  of  a  Dud-­ ley  summer,  “non-­stop,”  to  the  Yoo  family   when  John  and  Dan  were  fellow  infantry   lieutenants  in  the  1980s. FALL  2012

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Home Grown   and  Homemade! As  you  can  see  from  the  thumbs  up  and   smiles,  #16999  Jessica  Storey’s  (top  center)  plan   to  bring  local  foods  to  Dudley  has  been  a  great   success!  These  campers  enjoyed  their   IM  (Individual  Major)  Farm-­to-­Plate   involvement  by  learning  about  and  working  in   some  local  gardens,  including  the  one  at  Camp.   They  then  had  great  fun  preparing  recipes  — from  strawberry  shortcake  to  individual   pizzas  to  blueberry  tarts,  all  with  locally   grown  produce.  The  best  part? Obviously  the  eating!  

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#14229 Patrick M. Peavy Leadership Awards Announced Awards are  made  annually  to  leaders,  voted  by  their  peers,  who  best  exemplify  the  traits   of  Dudley  leadership  .  .  .  caring,  integrity,  and  putting  others  before  self.  This  year,  for   the  first  time,  both  Dudley  and  Kiniya  Leaders  were  recognized.  The  award  is  intended   to  help  defray  academic  costs,  including  books,  tuition,  room  and  board.   #19399  Bolster  “Bo”  McKinley  and  #21982   Domanick  “Dom”  Walker,  two  highly  talented   Dudley  leaders,  received  the  Peavy  recognition   this  summer.  And  from  Kiniya,  #20444  Hannah   McPheron  .

Bo McKinley

Dom Walker

Said Matt  Storey,  “Bo   did  a  fantastic  job  as  the   Leader  in  Union  Cabin   in  the  Senior  Division   while  helping  to  run  the   basketball  program  this   summer.  He  is  a  first  year   student  at  Connecticut   College  in  New  London,   CT,  and  hails  from   Westport,  NY.” “Dom  Walker  was  the   Leader  in  Yale  Lodge   in  the  Plebe  Division,   and  put  huge  energy   into  helping  to  run   the  music  program   this  summer.  He  is   a  senior  at  Morgan   State  University,  in   Baltimore,  MD,  and   hails  from  Parkville,   MD.”  

#20444 Hannah   McPheron,  was  named   the  first  Kiniya  recipient   of  the  Peavy  Award.  Said   Marnie,  “Hannah  truly   lives  by  the  camp  motto   and  mission.  Arriving   in  2007  as  a  camper,   she  has  risen  through   Hannah  McPheron the  leadership  program   showing  growth  each   summer.  She  completed  her  first  year  as  a  Leader  in   Cady  Cabin  and  is  in  her  first  year  at  the  University   of  California,  Santa  Cruz.  Her  willingness  to  learn   and  grow  each  year  allows  her  to  continuously  strive   to  become  the  best  leader  that  she  can  be.”  Hannah   is  from  El  Cerrito,  CA. The  Peavy  Award  was   created  through  the   generosity  of  #10065   William  T.  McCutcheon   and  his  family,  in  memory   of  #14229  Patrick  Peavy,   former  camper  and  leader   at  Dudley  who  passed  away   in  1995.    Said  Bill,  “Pat  was   Pat  Peavy thoughtful,  fun,  honest   and  had  a  great  concern   about  others.  His  parents,  Linda  McCutcheon  and   Patrick  Peavy,  were  very  proud  of  him,  as  was  his   brother  #14665  Michael.  He  was,  in  short,  a  great   Dudley  Leader.”

FALL 2012

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New Senior  Bath  House  and   Two  New  Staff  Cabins   Completed  at  Kiniya

The Neihu  Cabin August,  2012

!

In loving  memory  of  Paul  Por  wen  Hung,   grandfather  of  campers,  Clark  #19322  and   Mia  #20898  Lambo.  His  beloved  child-­ hood  home,  Neihu,  is  in  Taiwan  and  the   name  means:  the  cabin  beside  the  water.   Made  possible  through  the  generosity  of   Nancy  Hung,  for  the  girls  and  women  of   Camp  Dudley  at  Kiniya.

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L

ast spring’s  storms  put  Kiniya’s  Junior  Beach  staff   cabins  underwater.  A  smaller  landslide  took  the   Senior  Beach  swim  area  offline  for  the  summer     and  challenged  the  long-­term  positioning  of  the   Senior  Bathhouse.  Following  engineering  consultants   recommendations,  both  Junior  Beach  Cabins  were  demol-­ ished  and  rebuilt  as  “Muhlhausen”  and  “Neihu”  during   the  early  part  of  2012,  providing  new  quarters  for  senior   staff.  Said  #20595  Kat  Hood,  Leadership  Development   Director,  “I  lived  in  Muhlhausen,  and  it  made  a  huge   difference  in  my  summer  .  .  .  removed  from  main  campus,   but  close  enough  to  be  available  was  ideal.  Waking  up  in   the  mornings  and  looking  out  at  Lake  Champlain  and  the   Adirondacks  was  the  perfect  way  to  start  each  workday  at   camp.”              Three  senior  staff  members  occupied  the  new  and  


Senior Bath  House

spacious second  cabin,  Neihu.  “It  is  our  hope  to  continue   to  offer  this  cabin  to  talented  women  who  are  educators   during  the  year  and  devote  their  time  to  Kiniya  each  sum-­ mer,”  said  Kat.              Additionally,  a  very  welcome  modern  Senior  Bath   House  was  built  on  the  main  campus  before  June  2012’s   opening  of  Camp.          Said  Marnie,  “We  are  so  grateful  for  the  generosity  of   the  Camp  Dudley  and  Kiniya  Family,  which  enabled  these   projects,  adding  greatly  to  the  quality  of  life  for  our  camp-­ ers  and  staff.    We  are  particularly  grateful  to  Dwight  Poler   and  his  family  for  making  the  Muhlhausen  Cabin  possible   and  to  the  Lambo  family  for  Neihu.          If  you  would  like  to  contribute  to  the  ongoing  shoreline   restoration  fund  for  both  camps,  please  contact  marnie@ campdudley.org  or  matt@campdudley.org.  

The Muhlhausen  Leadership  Cabin August  2012

!

In honor  and  memory  of  Mary  Saylor   “Mimi”  Muhlhausen,  1907-­2010,  writer,   editor,  spiritualist,  volunteer,  world  trav-­ eler,  conservationist  and  an  inspiration   to  three  generations  of  the  Muhlhausen   and  Poler  families.  This  cabin  will  afford   Kiniya’s  leadership  director  the  space  to   reflect,  energized  by  Lake  Champlain  and   the  Adirondacks,  encouraging  the  same   optimism  that  characterized  Mimi’s  life. FALL  2012

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Blast from Past

100 Years Ago — The Summer of 1912

The Dudley  Doings,  launched  in  1905  served  up  classic   Dudley  humor  each  week.  “This  year  our  slogan  shall  be   ‘the  camp  beautiful,’”  announced  editor  Gus  Bloom.  “Let   us  beautify  our  camp,  make  it  a  very  heaven  of  artistic   and  aesthetic  delight,  a  joy  to  the  eyes  of  this  and  future   generations.  Our  task  should  not  be  a  hard  one,  for  Nature   has  already  been  very  kind  in  giving  us  a  start.  However   we  expect  to  go  nature  one  better,  and  to  this  end  have   instituted  at  great  expense  the  order  of  ‘Dudley  Janitors’ .  .  .  (we  mean  Sanitary  Engineers.)  Now  we  need  only  sit   back  and  watch  the  camp  blossom  like  a  rose.  The  grass   will  be  freshly  painted  each  morning,  the  lake  will  be   filtered  twice  a  day,  every  tent  will  be  whitewashed  and   fumigated,  and  the  lodge  will  be  taken  apart  and  scrubbed   regularly.  The  baseball  diamond  will  be  polished  until   it  gleams,  and  the  dark  room  will  be  made  as  bright  as   the  sun.”  Art  Editors  Larry  Darrin  and  Vic  Vanneman   provided  the  artwork  for  this  tongue-­in-­cheek  piece.  

50 Years Ago — The Summer of 1962 Editors Howie  Miller,  Bill  Acheson  and  “Shifty  Pete”  Lamison   provided  a  running  commentary  on  the  summer  of  ’62.  In  late   August,  the  summer  came  to  a  climax  as  Witherbee  presented  the   53rd  Annual  Big  Show,  “Pardon  Me  For  Mentioning  It,  But  Your   Fig  Leaf  Needs  Dusting,”  followed  by  a  spectacular  final  banquet.   The  show  revealed  mysteries  of  the  Nile  .  .  .  how  the  annual  flooding   of  the  River  came  to  sun-­drenched  Ancient  Egypt.  Amid  elaborate   sets,  the  plot  emerges  .  .  .  a  great  red  ruby  known  as  the  Hope  Navel   has  been  stolen  from  a  statue  in  the  Temple  of  the  Floods.  The   ruby  held  great  powers  over  the  waters  of  the  Nile,  so  the  threat  of   flooding  had  reached  crisis  proportions.  The  lead,  Cleo  Patra,  was   played  by  Jim  Van  Hoven,  his  mother  Stella  Patra,  by  Tom  Drake,     Detective  Al  Kaseltzer  by  Norm  Boyer,  Lois  Butterdish  by  the  lovely   Princess  Patra,  better  known  to  her  friends  as  Cleo,  from   Walt  Stockman,  Bertram,  the  Butler  of  Cleo,  by  Don  “Robin  Hood”   the  1962  Big  Show  “Pardon  Me  For  Mentioning  It,  But   Saluta.  Music  was  written  by  Pete  Edwards  and  Allen  Shaffer.  Script   Your  Fig  Leaf  Needs  Dusting.” by  Pete  and  Bev  Edie.  Show  director,  Bev  Edie.  

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In August,  Dudley  went  live  with  its  first  ONLINE  AUCTION  to   benefit  the  Camp  Dudley  Family.  Called  “Do-­Right  for  Dudley,”  the   auction  took  place  during  the  CDA  August  Reunion  weekend.     More  than  75  auction  items  were  contributed  by  members  of  the   Dudley  family,  ranging  from  a  trip  to  Yosemite  Park,  golf  outings  at   Baltusrol  and  Winged  Foot,  a  week  in  Malaga,  Spain,  with  a  Dudley   host  family,  a  Harlem  Globetrotters  package,  a  Kayak  Trip  on  New   York’s  East  River  to  Kiniya’s  very  own  #20005  Gail  Coleman’s   famous  7-­layer  bars,  shipped  to  you  on  your  birthday. Proceeds,  which  exceeded  $45,000  (not  bad  for  a  first  try!)  have  gone   to  the  Camp  Dudley  Annual  Fund,  helping  more  than  250  boys  and   girls  to  attend  our  camps  on  scholarship,  improving  our  campuses,   allowing  us  to  hire  the  very  best  Leadership  summer  after  summer,   and  preserving  our  traditions  as  the  oldest  Camp  in  the  country. What a great way to “Do-Right for Dudley!” Our thanks to all who participated. FALL  2012

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News & Notes #4436 Fred  Russell   Bentley  wrote  from   Cortland,  NY.  “Ten   years  ago,  my  wife   Grace  and  I  attended   the  summer  reunion  at   Camp  Dudley,  my  first   time  back  since  being   a  camper  in  1930.  At   that  reunion,  Grace  was   asked  to  play  the  piano   for  the  hymns  at  the   outdoor  Sunday  service.   1930  Camp  Dudley.  #4436  Fred   I  am  now  on  the  nurs-­ Bentley ing  floor  of  the  Cort-­ land  Regional  Nursing   Center.  Grace  and  I  have  been  married  71  years!”   Thanks  Russ,  for  sharing  your  memories. #4720  Bob  Leslie,  wrote  from  Gulfport,  MS.  “Hope   this  contribution  from  a  93  ½  year-­old  Dudleyite  will   help!”  Thanks  Bob,  you  bet  it  will. #5125  Bill  Kennard  is  still  recruiting  for  Dudley  in   Columbus,  OH.  “I  have  two  very  good  prospects  for   Dudley.”  Bill  was  at  Camp  from  1934-­37,  and  wonders   if  any  camper  ever  found  the  “key  to  the  pitcher’s  box.”   #5614  Bruce  Cornish  wrote  from  Lee’s  Summit,   MO,  “Great  memories  of  my  summers  at  Dudley  .  .   .  in  1937,  as  a  Junior  in  Champlain  Lodge.  The  next   summer  I  was  in  Tent  II  for  the  first  month,  helping   in  kitchen  operations,  then  for  August  in  St.  Lawrence   Lodge.  In  1939  I  served  as  waiter  in  the  nurses  and   visitors  dining  room,  again  in  a  nearby  tent  in  July  and   Hurd  Lodge  in  August.  The  Mt.  Marcy  hike  was  a  high   point.  Tent  living  was  not  all  that  bad  .  .  .  you  just  had   to  make  sure  you  rolled  the  sides  down  in  the  rain.” #5875  John  McDonald  wrote  from  Ticonderoga,  NY.   “I  enjoyed  the  article  in  the  latest  CD  News  on  Dudley   and  the  New  York  Giants.  I  was  at  the  Army/Colum-­ bia  game,  and  sat  on  Army’s  bench  with  many  brass   hats  and  cheered  for  Columbia!  Gehrke,  Bill  Swiacki,   quarterback  Gene  Rossides,  Lou  Kusserow  and  Ventan  

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Yablonski were  all  outstanding.  It  was  a  big  thrill  for   a  Port  Henry  boy  who  was  at  prep  school  for  a  senior   post  grad  year  before  going  to  Dartmouth.  I  now  have   a  grandson  at  Dudley.”  Rudd  Fawcett  was  here  in  2012,   and  Elizabeth  was  here  from  2007-­2010. #6439  Chick  Lyttle   was  in  fine  form  at   CDA  Reunion,  having   winged  his  way  north   with  fellow  Georgian   #7381  Paul  Lutz.  This   duo  rendezvoused  with   their  old  pal  #6581   Berkeley  Johnson,  ask-­ ing  the  Albany  rental   car  agent  for  an  “elec-­ tric  blue”  sedan  that   they  could  easily  spot  in   Chick  Lyttle,  center,  ADK  hiker parking  lots.  They  mo-­ tored  north  to  Dudley,   teaming  up  with  #7289  Horace  “Ace”  Scharges  for  an   elegant  quad  at  MacLean  Lodge.  Messrs.  Lyttle,  Lutz   and  Johnson  then  defied  the  odds,  climbing  Mount  Jo,   a  towering  2876-­foot  peak,  hovering  over  Heart  Lake   near  the  ADK  Loj  south  of  Lake  Placid  in  the  heart  of   the  High  Peaks.  By  the  end  of  the  weekend  the  three   were  remembering  it  as  an  Everest-­type  assault  to  anyone   who  would  listen.  Well  done,  boys! #7104  Stephen  Murray,  from  Delray  Beach,  FL,  visited   Camp  in  August  and  received  his  50-­year  pin.  “My   short  visit  today  was  a  lot  of  fun!  Everyone  was  friendly   and  obviously  very  happy.  I  was  at  camp,  I  believe,   from  1945  -­  1948.  What  a  big  change!!  The  new  build-­ ings  and  facilities  are  spectacular.  I  visited  Union   where  I  lived  my  first  year  with  #6056  Bill  Prior  as  my   leader.  I  think  Camp  must  be  three  times  larger  than   it  was  when  I  was  there.  My  brother,  David,  and  my   son,  Steve,  as  well  as  my  grandsons,  Harry  and  Jake   Colville,  and  my  friend  John  Hall,  have  indeed  been   very  fortunate  to  enjoy  the  Dudley  experience.  I  feel   strongly  that  this  was  one  of  the  outstanding  times  of  my   life!!  Thank  you!”


#7114 Torrey  “Ted”  Foster  wrote  from  Naples,  FL.  “I   continue  to  enjoy  and  be  impressed  with  the  high  qual-­ ity  of  the  Camp  Dudley  News.  It  is  an  impressive  publica-­ tion  and  reminds  me  that  maybe  I  haven’t  updated  my   more  recent  news.  My  first  wife  died  from  the  compli-­ cations  of  cancer  in  2009.  I  was  married  on  November   12,  2011  to  Anne  Russell,  who  also  resides  in  Naples.   We  are  both  active  in  the  volunteer  community  and   share  interests  in  golf,  tennis,  cultural  activities  and   travel,  especially  internationally.  We  cruised  to  Alaska   last  fall  and  recently  returned  from  a  most  interesting   trip  to  Cuba.  My  grandchildren  are  campers  at  Dud-­ ley  and  Kiniya,  which  makes  the  Foster  family  fourth   generation  alumni.”

Torrey and  Anne  Foster  celebrate  their  marriage  with  friends  and  family

#7314 Don  “Doe  Eyes”  Stevenson  and  his  lovely  lady   Jeanne  glided  in  to  Westport  from  La  Jolla,  Califor-­ nia,  taking  advantage  of  #7446  Dr.  John  and  Meridee   Brust’s  offer  of    “a  room   with  a  view”  from  the  Brus-­ tian  lighthouse  on  Barber   Point.  Don  also  caught  up   with  fellow  Princetonian   #9106  Greg  Farrell  and   Kathy  at  their  Adirondack   home  nestled  in  Keene  Val-­ ley  just  above  Yurtland,  NY.   The  younger  Farrell  lads,   #14916  Andrew  and  #15910   Nicholas  hosted  a  Yurt  festi-­ val  earlier  in  the  summer.

Judy Marshall  Kennedy,  daughter  of  #2700  Bob   Marshall,  wrote  from  Conway,  NH,  where  husband   Dan  and  she  operate  White  Horse  Press  with  books   and  gear  for  motorcycling  enthusiasts.  “We’re  off  for  a   week  in  London  and  southern  England  in  September,   and  I’m  very  much  looking  forward  to  some  time  away.   We  did  get  to  Americade  in  Lake  George  for  a  few  days   in  June,  but  had  to  pass  up  a  more  leisurely  ride  up  via   Dudley.  Too  bad,  as  I  always  like  my  once  a  year  ‘Dudley   drive-­by!’” #7370  Tom  Crowe  and  his  wife  Carol,  of  Bonita   Springs,  FL,  returned  to  Camp  after  65  years  (1947),   when  Tom  was  a  second-­year  camper.  Checking  into   MacLean  for  a  late  June  weekend,  Tom  said,  “It  all   flooded  back  to  me  immediately,  the  main  cam-­ pus,  Swim  Point,  the  Dining  Hall.  While  much  had   changed,  the  mission  and  tradition  .  .  .  The  Other   Fellow  First  and  all  that  stands  for  .  .  .  remains  solidly   in  place.  When  I  showed  up  at  Camp,  I  was  something   of  a  ‘City  Kid’  –  so  many  ‘firsts’  of  things  that  became   lifelong  pursuits  started  at  Dudley  –  from  competitive   swimming  to  sailing  to  multiple  outdooor  sports,  even   group  Glee  Club  singing  which  I’m  sure  began  at  Dud-­ ley  with  Hymn  Sing.”   #7379  Herb  Bonnice  wrote  from  Kingston,  PA.  “I  en-­ joyed  the  Spring  CD  News.  I  saw  Kingston,  NY,  native   Will  Powell’s  name.  He  and  one  of  my  brothers  were  in   the  same  high  school  class.  Don  Hilbert  brought  Paul   Lutz,  Glenn  Rhinehart  and  myself  to  camp  in  1946  as   part  of  the  kitchen  crew!  Mrs.  Hilbert  had  responsibil-­ ity  for  the  guesthouse.  She  needed  help  and  asked  me   to  do  that  job.  That  was  the  best  summer  of  my  life!   One  time  when  I  was  on  the  mound,  pitching  to  #6102   Cab  Woodward,  he  hit  a  long  home  run  off  of  me.  I   think  that  John  Glenn  found  the  ball  on  the  moon!   The  all-­star  basketball  team  that  year  was  Cab,  George   ‘Buckets’  Montgomery,  Archie  MacAllaster,  Glenn   Rhinehart  and  myself.  I  am  now  83  years  old  and   would  like  to  visit  Camp  again.”  Just  let  us  know  when,   Herb,  and  we’ll  be  delighted  to  see  you.   #7441  Phil  Bisselle  and  his  lovely  bride  Holly  were   “no  shows”  at  Reunion  this  summer.  Asked  for  an   excuse,  Phil  said,  “Sorry  .  .  .  Holly  and  I  can’t  make  it   FALL  2012

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News & Notes continued this year  as  we  will  be  cruising  to  Bermuda  to  celebrate   fifty  years  of  smoothly  wedded  bliss.  Say  hello  and   good  wishes  to  all.”    How  Phil  could  have  passed  up  a   chance  to  stay  in  his  beloved  Hurd  Lodge  in  favor  of  a   cabin  on  a  cruise  ship  baffles  all  of  us!  Must  have  been   the  cruise’s  shuffleboard  tournament  that  the  “not-­too-­ competitive”  Lefty  undoubtedly  won. #7532  Paul  “Grinny”   Grinwis  logged  another   summer  at  Dudley  as  the   Camp’s  utility  infielder   and  master  bus  driver.  He   and  Mary  Lou  continue   to  enjoy  their  cabin  in  the   foothills  of  the  Adirondacks,   while  posting  time  at  Saint   Simon’s  Island  Georgia   during  the  winter.

#7906 Bill  Bertsch  wrote  from  Oyster  Bay,  NY.  “I   found  a  couple  of  photos  from  the  summer  of  1949  for   the  Dudley  Archives.  Hope  you  had  a  great  summer

Bob Stubbs,  JL  (left)  and  Paul  Lutz,  Leader  with  #7609   Bill  Bertsch,  1949,  Adirondack  Lodge.

“Jack of  all  trades”  Grinwis

#7593 Tom  Walton  and  Judy  spend  as  much  time  as   they  can  at  their  lake  home  in  Nelson,  NH.  Daughter   Debbie,  and  her  boys  visited  in  August.  “Two  of  the   boys,  Kevin  and  Sean,  were  at  Dudley  the  second  half     (Cub  and  Junior)  and  loved  it.” #7714  Tom  Trowbridge  wrote  from  Orinda,  CA,  say-­ ing,  “I  got  my  Dudley  fix  in  July  when  I  visited  brother   Pete  in  Willsboro.  We  came  down  to  Camp  and  had   a  visit  with  Matt,  and  Dudley  looked  great,  as  always.   We  also  got  to  play  some  golf  at  the  Malone  Golf  Club   for  the  first  time  and  really  enjoyed  the  course.  We’ll   miss  the  Reunion,  as  Lynn  and  I  have  a  trip  planned  to   England  and  Wales.”    Tom  was  at  Camp  in  1948,  ’50-­ ’52  along  with  brother  #8612  Pete.  Their  dad,  Tom,   Sr.  was  a  Dudley  pioneer,  #2516. #7837  Toby  James  continues  to  be  the  “go  to  guy”  for     St.  Louis,  MO,  parades.  Having  already  run  the  2000   Rams  Super  Bowl  parade  and  the  2006  World  Series   parade,  he  did  a  repeat  for  the  Cardinals  11th  World   Series  win  last  fall.  He  continues  his  work  as  a  tax  ac-­ countant  in  St.  Louis.

#7951 Jack  Kotz  and  wife  Katie  were  back  at  Dudley   for  Reunion.  Said  Jack,  “It  is  a  great  that  there  is  now   a  ‘Chief  Beckman  Society.’  (See  inside  back  cover).  I   feel  some  special  connection  because  my  grandfather   Cowlin  and  Chief  were  boyhood  friends  and  came  to   Dudley  together  from  the  New  York  YMCA.  They  were   lifelong  friends.  We  have  four  Kotz  grandchildren  at   camp  (Dudley  and  Kiniya)  this  summer! #7975  Rod  Beckwith  wrote  from  Keswick,  VA.  “Please   give  my  very  best  to  all  the  ‘old  guys’  who  were  able  to   attend  the  Dudley  Reunion.  I  am  not  traveling  very   much  these  days,  or  I  would  have  been  there  with  you   to  enjoy  recollections  of  earlier  times.”  Rod  and  his   wife  Liz  live  in  Keswick.  Rod  and  his  brother  Pete  were   at  Dudley  in  the  1950’s.     #8053  John  Riley  made  it  back  to  Reunion  from  Pitts-­ burgh,  along  with  his  son  #13853  Ryan.   #8070  Ben  Nelson  continues  to  keep  NY  State’s  Sec-­ tion  IV  athletics  pointed  in  the  right  direction,  while   finding  time,  along  with  wife  and  partner  Pam,  to  serve   up  350  all-­beef  “Michigan  Red  Hots”  during  Reunion   weekend.  This  fell  short  of  Ben’s  record  750  Michigans   during  the  125th  Reunion,  but  more  than  satisfied  the   large  crowd  on  campus. #8200  Ken  McAllister  wrote  from  Amelia,  OH.  “My   Dudley  days  provide  great  memories  in  my  time  of   retirement.  I  remind  myself  that  it  is  better  to  have   character  than  to  be  one.  That  fulfillment  in  life  comes  

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through giving  service.  And  service  is  not  servility.  The   Other  Fellow  First!”

many in  the  Dudley  leadership.  Look  forward  to  the   ‘old  boys’  gathering  in  Southwest  Florida  in  March.”

#8252 Charlie  Johnson  of  Bethesda,  MD,  spent  a   little  summer  time  in  Westport,  along  with  his  lovely   wife  Martha,  occupying  one  of  the  Frisbee  Cottages   near  Camp.  Fellow  Dudleyite  #9933  Bob  “Hot  Daddy   Wags”  Wagner,  a  master  craftsman  working  on  an   adjacent  cabin,  had  his  progress  slowed  significantly  as   Charlie  wandered  onto  his  work  site  each  morning  to   provide  some  little  needed  supervision.  Charlie  contin-­ ues  to  pitch  his  book,  Parliament  and  Congress:  Represen-­ tation  and  Scrutiny  in  the  Twenty-­First  Century,  to  anyone   interested  in  Robert’s  Rules  of  Order.     #8276  Charlie  Updike,  of  New  Rochelle,  NY,    got   some  good  time  in  Westport  this  summer  with  his  wife   Beth.  Brother  #7582  Dr.  Stu  Updike  was  out  from   Wisconsin  for  a  visit.

#8674 Dr.  Bill  Vanneman,  of  Lexington,  MA,  stepped   in  as  “Dudley  Doc”  for  a  week  in  August,  and  then   came  back  with  Irene  for  Reunion.  Bill  is  looking  to   find  ways  to  spend  a  bit  more  time  in  Ludlow,  VT,   where  they  have  a  home.  Bill’s  brother  #8972  Reeve   “Ting”  Vanneman  joined  in  the  Reunion  along  with   his  wife  Jane  and  grandson  Charlie,  who  is  likely  to  be   a  Cub  in  the  summer  of  2013.  

#8608 Bob  and  Tuey  Stroud  flew  the  Dudley  flag   once  again  this  summer  over  their  place  in  Nantucket,   MA.  Tracking  Kiniya  registrations  carefully,  Tuey   reported,  “Bill  and  Lynne  Combs  granddaughter,   Felicity,  is  in  the  same  cabin  (Pinecrest)  as  our  grand   daughter,  Olivia,  at  Kiniya.  Bob  and  Bill  were  plebes  in   the  same  cabin  in  1952!  Isn’t  that  cool??    Ed.  Note:  We   have  no  doubt  that  Director  Marnie  had  easily  factored  that   history  into  her  Cabin  assignments.     #8616  Harry   Pore,  wrote   from  Sarasota,   FL.  “I  came   to  Dudley  as  a   Cub  in  1953,   next  year  as  a   Plebe,  skipped  a   year  then  went   back  as  an  Aide   Harry  Pore,  Cub,  1956,  with  Leader  Don   to  #7314  Don   Stevenson Stevenson  in   a  Cub  cabin.   Very  memorable  times  and  growing  experiences.  I  was   introduced  to  Dudley  by  Phil  Benjamin,  librarian  and   professor  at  Allegheny  College,  who  volunteered  many   years  in  the  camp  office  and  was  a  great  recruiter  of  

#8697 Dr.  Walter  “Wally”  Merriam  visited  Camp  this   summer  from  his  home  in  Fayetteville,  NY,  where  son   #14197  Steve  is  giving  him  some  time  off  from  work.   This  allows  Wally  to  grow  giant  pumpkins.  Here’s  a   shot  of  Wally’s  2012  “big  boy”  pumpkin  this  weighing   in  at  935.5  lbs,  impressing  his  grandkids,  as  well  as   the  judges.

Wally’s 935.5  pound  “big  boy”  with  some  special  judges!

#8704 Bill  Combs,  of  Millington,  NJ,  was  up  for  the   Dudley  Board  Meeting  in  Colchester,  where  grand-­ daughter  #21604  Felicity  had  a  great  experience  at   Kiniya,  all  the  way  from  London.   #8964  Fred  Tibbits  made  it  back  to  Reunion  in  Au-­ gust  with  stepsons  Mehn  and  Mi.  Mehn  is  joining  the   U.S.  Marines  (boot  camp  in  October)  and  Mi  is  now  a   senior  at  his  high  school  near  Austin,  TX.  Fred  contin-­ ues  as  a  mover  and  shaker  in  the  beverage  industry.   FALL  2012

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News & Notes continued Peter visited  Camp  this  summer.  His  dad  was  #3922   John  D.  “Jack”  Burr,  and  Peter  was  at  Camp  in  the   1960s.

#8964 Fred  Tibbits,  Jr.,  2nd  from  right,  with   guest  s  at  the  16th  Annual  Fred  Tibbits  &  Assoc.   “Spring  Evening  with  Friends  in  NYC”

#9060 Ian  Crawford,  wrote  from  New  York.  “Mary   Ann  and  I  had  a  good  summer,  but  it  just  blew  by  as   time  seems  to  do  these  days.  I  will  be  at  goddaughter’s   wedding  during  Reunion  Weekend,  but  thinking  of   who  might  be  at  Reunion.  Goddaughter,  Ali,  attended   many  years  of  Reunions,  and  she  still  keeps  in  touch   w/the  friends  she  made  there.”   #9189  Michael  Keiser,  of  Chicago,  IL,  following  up   his  launch  of  Bandon  Dunes  Golf  Course  in  Oregon,   has  done  it  again.  Situated  on  the  site  of  a  former   coalmine,  Cabot  Links  is  Canada’s  first  authentic   links  course,  located  in  Inverness,  on  the  west  coast   of  Cape  Breton  Island.  The  course  sprawls  along  the   shorelines  of  the  St.  Lawrence,  surrounded  by  sandy   dunes,  rolling  hills  and  wide  green  spaces.  Said,  Mike,   interviewed  in  the  NY  Times,  “We  have  seen  year  after   year  that  ocean  side  and  links  is  a  magical  golf  formula,   and  being  out  of  the  way  has  not  been  a  disadvantage.   The  trip  invests  you  in  the  experience.”  Mike  Founded   Recycled  Paper  Greeting  Cards  in  Chicago,  and  was  at   Dudley  in  the  1960s. #9191  Carlton  A.  “Cleve”  Cleveland  wrote  from  New   Canaan,  CT.  “Sorry  to  miss  Reunion,  but  just  can’t   make  this  work  this  year.  We  will  be  in  Naples,  FL,  in   March  and  will  probably  try  to  visit  both  coasts  and   maybe  hit  the  reunions  down  there.”   #9459  Dr.  Peter  Burr  wrote  from  Louisville,  KY.   “Daughter  #18659  Carrie,  great  granddaughter  of   Leroy  E.  Burr,  donor  of  Burr  Lodge,  is  getting  married   to  Ben  Serrell  of  Philadelphia,  PA,  at  Devil’s  Thumb   Ranch  in  Colorado.”  Carrie  worked  at  Camp,  and  

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#9663 Thomas  B.  Simp-­ son,  III  made  it  back  to   Reunion  from  Gainesville,   FL.  Tom  was  at  camp  from   1961  to  1976,  with  just  a   couple  of  years  off.  Tom   did  a  great  job  in  recogniz-­ ing  Dudley  Man  of  the   Year  and  longtime  pal,   #9408  Rusty  Davis  (See   #9663  Tom  Simpson,  back,   pages  8-­9). Leader  in  Owasco,  1975 #10062  Bill  Lerchen.  “Just  received  my  copy  of  Camp   Dudley  News  .  .  .  will  enjoy  reading  it.  It  brings  back  so   many  great  memories  of  my  leader  summer  there  with   my  friend  Jeff  Fisher.  We  both  came  from  Michigan.   We  then  had  two  sons  attend  Dudley,  Andrew  Lerchen   and  Alex  Lerchen.  Now  with  Kiniya  you  have  two  great   camps!  All  the  best.”    Bill  was  at  Camp  in  the  early  1960s. #10264  Brian  Mahoney  wrote  from  Washington,  DC.   “Hey,  boy,  could  I  use  some  North  Country  time  right   about  now,  but  this  year  it  is  not  meant  to  be!  On   Wednesday  the  22nd  of  August,  my  four  siblings  and   I,  at  long  last,  will  be  ceremonially  putting  our  parents’   cremains  into  the  collumbarium  of  Arlington  National   cemetery;  it  would  have  been  their  70th  anniversary.   I  am  heading  out  the  next  morning  to  San  Diego,  to   give  news  of  this  to  a  few  of  Dad’s  old  colleagues  at   a  reunion  of  the  492nd  Bomb  Group.  Then  back  to   Washington,  for  a  job  hunt.” #10352  Bob  Cushman,  of  Rye  Brook,  NY,  filled  us   in  on  the  background  of    “the  Pipemaker’s  Cottage”   on  Dudley  Road.  “Longtime  Dudleyite  Billy  Burger   was  not  the  original  ‘pipemaker.’  That  honor  went   to  a  gentleman  by  the  name  of  James  Smith.  At  one   time  Mr.  Smith  had  a  business  on  the  Dudley  Road   property,  manufacturing  clay  pipes.  I  think  the  clay  was   imported  from  England.  As  kids  we  used  to  dig  around   in  the  yard  and  find  pipe  fragments.  My  grandfather   was  somewhat  taken  by  the  whole  pipe  thing  and  made   it  a  theme  when  he  had  the  house  built.”  


#10400 Tom  Storrier  wrote  from  Wilton,  CT.  “In   recent  years  I  have  had  the  pleasure  of  running  up  to   Kiniya  to  drop  off  my  girls  and  experience  the  joy  in   doing  so.  They  have  had  enjoyable  and  productive  sum-­ mers  in  the  true  Dudley  spirit  from  what  I  read  in  their   letters.  Today  we  make  the  ride  again  but  this  time  to   pick  them  both  up.  Carolyn  and  I  are  as  excited  about   this  as  the  girls  were  to  go  to  camp.  Both  the  camper   and  the  parent  experience  the  wonder  of  Dudley   together,  be  it  not  always  at  the  same  time  or  with  the   same  emotions.” #10475  Ellie  Edwards,  of  South  Weymouth,  MA,  was   back  to  Reunion.  “I  thoroughly  enjoyed  a  visit  from   son  #13373  Jonathan,  and  his  two  children,  Quinn,   7,  and  Makenna,  4  1/2,  this  summer  when  they  drove   east  from  Calgary,  Alberta,  where  Jon  and  his  wife,   Michelle  have  a  bedding  and  furniture  store  called,   ‘Cushey  Life.’  It  is  growing  by  leaps  and  bounds.  Jon   had  four  lacrosse  athletes  at  elite  camps  in  the  east  this   summer  and  they  all  did  extremely  well  playing  for  col-­ lege  coaches.  The  trip  was  filled  with  several  firsts  for   the  kids  .  .  .  lobster,  Grammy’s  OLD  house,  crabs  in   Baltimore,  bike  rides  in  Central  Park  and  the  Espla-­ nade  in  Boston.  They  plan  to  come  back  next  summer   and  fit  in  a  trip  to  camp.”  Ellie  can’t  wait! #10698  Helen  Edsten  wrote  from  Taylorsville,  KY.    “I   was  Camp  Secretary  from  1968-­72,  and  now  in  my   fifth  year  of  retirement,  busy  doing  my  favorite  things,   volunteering,  quilting,  reading  and  most  important,   traveling.  How  did  I  ever  have  time  to  work??!!” #11824  Michael  Bastian  wrote  from  Rio  Rancho,  NM,     “My  twin  brother  and  I  were  beneficiaries  of  the  Dud-­ ley  scholarship  program  in  the  late  1970s.  Thanks  to   such  financial  help,  Jenns  and  I  spent  meaningful  sum-­ mer  weeks  at  Camp.  No  small  matter  for  two  German-­ born  twins  at  that  time!  I  am  grateful  to  this  day  for  the   generous  support  and  the  great  welcome  we  received   from  Willie  Schmidt  once  we  arrived  at  Camp.  I  am  a   pastor  in  the  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  of  America,   and  have  served  congregations  for  over  20  years  in  Ger-­ many  and  the  U.S.,  moving  recently  to  the  Community   of  Joy  Lutheran  Church  here  in  Rio  Rancho,  NM.”

#12163 Bob  Kindred  of  New  York  will,  once  again  be   musical  directing  “Bending  Towards  the  Light,  A  Jazz   Nativity”  but  this  time,  for  the  first  time,  in  Spanish… La  Natividad  en  Jazz!    Friday,  December  21st  at  7:30   pm  at  B.B.  King’s,  237  West  42nd  Street,  NY,  NY.   212  997  4144.  Written  by  Anne  Phillips  and    billed   as  a  “colorful  presentation  that  delights  children  and   families.”    Bobby  K  was  at  Camp,  mostly  in  Witherbee,   in  the  1970s.    Photo  credit  David  Rubin. #12524  Paul  Berry  is  working  in  Las  Vegas  since  grad-­ uating  from  the  Cornell  Hotel  School.  Currently  he  is   at  the  Aria  Hotel  Las  Vegas,  located  in  City  Center  as   director  of  hotel  operations. #12639  Scott  Beckley   wrote  from  Denver   with  the  good  news   of  his  engagement  to   Suzanne  Talbott,  from   Wheat  Ridge,  CO.  “I   am  still  working  with   Merrill  Lynch  in  Denver   and  Suzanne  works  for   Graphic  Controls,  based   in  Buffalo.  Taylor  Scholl-­ Scott  Beckley  and  Suzanne  Talbott mayer  moved  to  Boulder,   CO,  so  we  have  gotten  together  for  sporting  events  and   good  times.  Chris  Sullivan  is  working  in  downtown   Denver  as  well.” #12731  David  Willmott,  and  his  wife  Catherine,  live   in  Portland,  OR,  where  David  is  President  of  Blount   International,  a  manufacturer  of  outdoor  products,   industrial  and  power  equipment.  Children  Charles,   Anne  and  George  are  all  prospects  for  a  Dudley  and   Kiniya  experience.  

FALL 2012

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News & Notes continued #12985 Tim  Campbell  wrote  this  summer  that  he  and   his  wife  Suzanne  live  in  Bedford  Hills  NY,  and  he  is   teaching  at  the  Masters  School.  “Married  two  and  a   half  years,  and  baby  on  the  way  in  July.”    Tim  was  at   Camp  from  1981-­1996.  Let  us  know  about  that  baby  Tim,   and  send  some  pictures.   #13024  David  Howson  is  a  professor  and  the  Arthur   Zankel  Director  of  Arts  Administration  at  Skidmore   College  in  Saratoga  Springs,  NY.    Charged  with  devel-­ oping  the  College’s  new  arts  administration  program,   he  teaches  both  Arts  and  Philanthropy.  Before  join-­ ing  Skidmore,  David  was  the  associate  director  of  the   Modlin  Center  for  the  Arts,  at  the  U.  of  Richmond  in   Virginia.  He  has  a  BA  and  MLA  from  the  U.  of  Rich-­ mond  and  an  MFA  from  the  Yale  School  of  Drama.   Per  David,  “My  schedule  allowed  me  to  get  up  to   Westport  this  summer,  helping  out  as  Special  Projects   Manager  for  the  Depot  Theatre.”    Dave  was  wise  to  put   his  mom,  Barbara  Carr  Howson,  to  work  at  the  Depot   as  well. #13322  Karen  Bartholomew  wrote  from  Teaneck,  NJ,   that  she  is  happily  retired,  playing  with  the  “  Dr.  Dubi-­ ous  Hot  Jazz  Band,”  as  well  as  playing  organ  for  local   churches.  Having  fun  visiting  her  grandkids  in  Chicago   and  Colorado  Springs.  “Hope  to  launch  my  voice  over   endeavor  in  2013.  ‘Best  Ever’  CD  News  .  .  .  keep  up  the   good  work.” #13426  Ned  Johnson  and  wife  Vanessa  enjoyed  their   summer  place  in  Elizabethtown,  NY,  with  daughter   Katie.  Son  #22526  Matthew  was  at  Dudley  this  sum-­ mer.  The  Johnsons  live  in  Washington,  DC,  and  he  is   president  of  PrepMatters,  a  test  preparatory  and  edu-­ cational  consulting  firm  based  in  Maryland.  He  is  also   the  coauthor  of  Conquering  the  SAT:  How  Parents  Can   Help  Teens  Overcome  the  Pressure  and  Succeed. #13919  Steve  Hufnagel  wrote  from  Maine.  “Follow-­ ing  Seattle  and  then  Ann  Arbor,  my  wife  Liza  and  I   have  been  living  in  Midcoast  Maine  and  working  at   the  Damariscotta  River  Association  (DRA  land  trust   and  conservation  organization)  for  almost  nine  years,   two  as  director,  and  in  the  meantime  have  had  two   kids,  Audrey  and  Nathaniel,  now  6  and  3.  The  town  of  

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS

Damariscotta fits  E.  F.  Schumacher’s  ‘small  is  beauti-­ ful’  Paradigm.  It  has  a  strong  tradition  of  community   theater,  which  I’ve  gotten  involved  in  a  bit.  DRA  offers   nature  education  programs  serving  1,000  kids  a  year.   This  is  beautiful  land  right  on  the  salt  water,  with   farms,  forests,  Native  American  shell  mounds,  more   than  30  miles  of  trails  and  Maine’s  oyster  hotspot.   Dudleyites  are  invited  to  come  on  down  to  Damar-­ iscotta  –  think  of  it  as  Westport  on  the  Atlantic  –  for   islands,  oysters,  lobsters,  and  coastal  hikes.  Private  tour   by  the  land  trust  director  included  with  your  visit!” #14002  Jennifer   Gillis,  of  St.  Louis,   MO,  had  a  great   dinner  at  Niche  res-­ taurant  in  St.  Lou-­ is,  and  thought  the   chef  owner’s  name,   Gerard  Craft,  rang   a  bell.  Checking   in  with  the  Camp   office,  she  was   put  in  touch  with   #8580  Bob  Craft,   Chef  Gerard  Craft  opening  a  new  restaurant   who  emailed  her   that  indeed,  Gerard   was  his  son.  While  Gerard  did  not  attend  Dudley,  his   brother  #14580  “Tiger”  did.  Now  we’re  working  on   Bob  to  help  organize  a  special  reunion  in  St.  Louis,  so   that  Gerard  can  share  his  highly  acclaimed  cuisine.  If   you’re  in  the  area,  make  a  reservation  at  Niche,  Brasserie   or  Taste,  all  owned  by  Chef  Gerard.  A  new  opening,   Pastaria,  has  been  named  by  Eater,  an  influential  food   blog,  as  one  of    “the  25  most  anticipated  restaurant   openings  of  2012,”  according  to  St.  Louis  Magazine.   #14866  James  Mayo,  Dudley’s  “music  man”  accepted   an  offer  at  the  Maret  School  in  Washington,  DC,  and   started  in  September.  This  is  a  department  head  posi-­ tion  at  a  great  day  school  in  downtown  DC  –  directly   across  from  the  National  Cathedral.  Once  there,  James   immediately  ran  into  Dudleyite  #13426  Ned  Johnson.     He’ll  also  be  20  minutes  from  home.


#14922 Libby  Carrier  Doran  of  Minneapolis,  MN,   continues  to  do  consulting  and  executive  recruiting   through  her  company  LymanDoran.  Her  three  chil-­ dren,  ages  3,  7,  8  are,  according  to  grandpa  #7221  Tom   Carrier,  “All  fine  and  into  every  possible  activity  from   golf  to  Irish  dance.  We’re  hoping  for  a  Dudleyite  in  a   few  years.”    Tom  and  Anne  got  back  to  Dudley  for  a  visit   this  summer.  Libby  was  at  Dudley  in  the  late  1980s. #15191  Oliver  Jeffers  of   Brooklyn,  NY,    continues   to  write  and  illustrate.   His  illustration  clients   include  the  Guardian,  the   Irish  Times,  Newsweek  and   the  New  York  Times   Magazine,  and  he  has   authored  and  illustrated   a  number  of  childrens’   books.  His  latest  picture-­ The  newest  childrens  book  by  Oliver   book,  The  New  Jumper,  was   published  by  HarperCol-­ lins  Children’s  Books  in  April. #15192  Todd  Ruff  from  New  Jersey  writes,  “I  got  mar-­ ried  to  Colleen  (Cunningham)  Ruff  and  we’re  living   in  Cherry  Hill,  NJ  –  we  have  two  beautiful  children   –  Aidan  (4),  and  Cailin  (1).  As  a  life-­long  Laxer,  I   recently  made  the  decision  to  make  my  passion  my  job   and  opened  my  own  Lacrosse  shop/training  facility  in   Maple  Shade,  NJ  –  aptly  named  RuffLax!  I  still  try  to   get  up  to  the  Adirondaks  as  much  as  possible  .  .  .  this   summer  Aidan  climbed  his  first  ADK  peak,  Mt.  Jo!  We   can’t  wait  till  we  get  to  drop  off  Aidan  and  Cailin  for   their  own  summers  at  Dudley/Kiniya!” #15358    Peter  Hudnut  of   Encino,  CA,  played  on  the  2012   U.S.  Olympic  water  polo  team   in  London.  A  Stanford  U.  and   Harvard-­Westlake  Grad,  Peter   used  his  6’5”,  230-­pound  frame   to  good  defensive  advantage  for   the  U.S.  team.   Peter  Hudnut  on  the  2012  U.S.   Olympic  Water  Polo  Team

#15588 “Big  Joe”   Maiurano,  of  Nor-­ wich,  NY,  beyond   Dudley’s  water-­ front,  has  official   duties  as  Mayor  of   Norwich.  Here  is  a   photo  of  Joe  with   Congressman   Mayor  Joe  Maiurano,  2nd  from  left,  on   Richard  Hanna,   the  job Senator  Kirsten   Gillibrand,  and  Hamdi  Ulukaya,  the  CEO  of  Cho-­ bani.  Chobani  is  that  American  brand  of  Greek-­style   yogurt  that  has  been  selling  faster  than  hotcakes  from   its  New  Berlin,  New  York,  headquarters,  right  in  Joe   the  Mayor’s  backyard.  It  is  rumored  that  Joe  has  added   Chobani  to  his  diet,  and  is  considerting  a  national  run   in  2016. #16394  Michael   Fleming  (right)   and  brother   #17145  Andrew  at   the  Army  Com-­ missioning  and   Fordham  Univer-­ sity  Graduation   of  #18145  2LT   Alexander,  Andrew  and  Michael  Fleming  at   Alexander  Poler   Fordham  Graduation Fleming.  Michael   is  in  his  final  year   at  Brooklyn  Law,  Andrew  resides  in  Portland,  Oregon,   and  Zander  reports  for  armor  active  duty  at  the  end  of   the  year.  Grandfather  #7083  Michael  Poler  is  very  proud,   as  great-­grandfather  #3043  Ed  Poler  would  also  have  been. Will  Graves,  Jr.  sent  a  post  card  to  Grinny  from  Florida   with  the  news  that  “My  nephew,  #16892  Peter  Graves,   represented  the  U.S.  in  the  Olympic  quadruple  sculls   event  in  London.  My  other  nephew,  #16893  Tom,   wasn’t  chosen,  but  he  and  Peter  missed  the  Beijing   Olympics  by  one  second  in  the  double  sculls  competi-­ tion.”  Both  guys  were  at  Camp  in  the  1990s.  Peter  hails   from  Cincinnati,  OH,  where  he  and  his  brother  began   rowing  with  the  Cincinnati  Country  Day  School  in   1999.  Both  graduated  from  Trinity  College,  where  Pe-­ FALL  2012

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News & Notes continued ter now  coaches.  Brother  Tom  is  a  Field  Sales  Manager   with  Vector  Marketing. #17087  Bruce  “B.G.”  Orr,  Jr.  writes  from  San   Francisco,  CA.  “I’m  working  for  Sirius  Decisions,  a   business-­to-­business  sales  and  market  research  firm,  as   an  Account  Exec  covering  Los  Angeles,  San  Diego  and   Colorado.”    BG  was  at  Camp  from  1997-­2008. #18085  Karl  Schlobohm,  wrote  from  South  Carolina,   where  he  is  teaching  at  a  Montessori  secondary  school.   “I  recently  read  the  Camp  Dudley  News  and  came  across   the  article  about  NOLS.  The  only  two  half-­summers  I   had  at  Dudley  (all  the  rest  were  full),  were  when  I  did   the  Wind  River  trip  my  summer  as  a  senior  and  the   SE  Alaska  kayak  trip  as  an  AL.  NOLS  played  a  crucial   role  in  my  adolescent  development.  Great  that  Dudley   is  involved  with  NOLS  and  let  me  know  if  I  could  be   of  any  help  towards  promoting  or  developing  this  great   initiative.” Actor  Kevin   O’Rourke,  father   of  #18555  Char-­ lie  and  #19045   Peter,  was  the   Artistic  Direc-­ tor  again  this   summer  at  the   Williams  College   Summer  Theatre   O’Rourkes  celebrate  Peter’s  graduation Lab  in  MA.  The   Lab  was  launched  in  2004  and  has  produced  more   than  30  works  with  60  undergraduates  and  40  alumni.   “What  the  audience  gets  to  see  is  experimental  and   interesting,”  said  Kevin.  Even  bigger  news,  son  Peter’s   graduation  from  Whitman  College  in  May.  Kevin  and   his  wife  Edith  live  in  Hastings  On  Hudson,  NY.   #18576  Edward  Earl  “Chip”   Whittemore,  II,  of  Nokomis,  FL,   graduated  from  the  Massachusetts   Institute  of  Technology  with  a   B.S.  and  a  major  in  aerospace   engineering  with  information   technology.  He  is  now  working  

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Graduate Chip  Whittemore THE  CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS

Great questions   of  great  people! #18778  Blake  Harper  updates  us  from  Ver-­ mont.  “Life  at  Middlebury  is  awesome.  The   water  polo  season  is  coming  to  a  close,  this   weekend  we  are  hosting  New  England  League   Champion-­ ships  at  our   pool,  and   in  Novem-­ ber    we  will   be  hosting   Division   III  national   club  cham-­ pionships   Blake,  in  blue  shirt,  listening  to  the   here  as  well,   Dalai  Lama which  is  pretty   exciting!  Meeting  the  Dalai  Lama  was  pretty   incredible  as  well.  He  came  to  Middlebury  for   two  days,  and  I  was  on  a  planning  committee   for  his  visit.  I  was  invited  to  a  luncheon  with   him  where  I  was  able  to  ask  a  question  and  I   got  up  close  and  personal  with  a  real  peaceful   presence.    As  a  religion  major  and  someone   who  is  definitely  interested  in  the  fruits  of   religious  life,  it  was  great  to  have  an  exposure   to  a  human  who  deeply  embodies  the  kind   of  selflessness,  care  and  compassion  that  we   should  all  strive  for  and  that  we  practice  and   teach  every  summer  at  Camp  Dudley.  The  Da-­ lai  Lama  has  visited  Middlebury  College  three   times  and  promised  to  return  when  he  is  99!” And  from  his  dad  on  Facebook,  #18000   Bill  Harper,  “Just  a  shameless  FB  moment   of  parental  gladness:  that  would  be  Blake   listening  to  the  Dalai  Lama  answering  his   question:  ‘How  do  we  sustain  hope?’  Ah,   the  deep  goodness  of  a  liberal  arts  education   means  you  get  to  ask  great  questions  of  great   people!”


for an  aerospace  engineering  firm  based  in  Washing-­ ton,  DC  and  London  

tough games.  Not  for  himself  .  .  .  but  always  for  his   team.”  Well  done,  Dylan!

#18584 Tim  Slater  is  a   senior  at  the  U.  of  Wis-­ consin  in  Madison,  WI.   He’s  a  starting  wing  on  a   great  D-­1  rugby  team  that   has  had  a  strong  season,   playing  in  tournaments   around  the  country.  This   summer  he  worked  in   Chicago  for  investment   firm  Robert  W.  Baird.   Tim  Slater,  in  red,  about  to  fend  off   Sister  #22761  Kelly   a  defender Slater  worked  at  Kiniya   this  summer.  Proud  dad   #11084  Scott  Slater  started  at  Camp  Dudley  40  years   ago  this  summer.  

#19065 William  O’Hearn  is  enjoying  his  freshman   year  at  Trinity  College  in  Hartford,  CT,  according  to   mom  Martha  Zipp,  who  wrote  from  New  York,  NY.

#18649 Carrie  Baker  Campbell  wrote  from  California.   “Hi  Fellow  Camp  Dudley  friends.  Gosh,  I  miss  my  staff   camp  days!!!    I  wanted  to  share  that  I  started  a  local   Santa  Barbara,  CA  area  website.  It  is  a  free  newslet-­ ter  to  subscribe  to  and  receive  family-­friendly  activity   ideas.  If  anyone  knows  folks  that  live  in  Santa  Barbara   area  or  are  visiting  the  area,  please  go  to  my  website   and  subscribe  www.santabarbara.macaronikid.com!  I   am  also  on  Facebook  at  www.facebook.com/sbmaca-­ ronikid.com.” #18986  Dylan   Lynch  of  Rye,   NY,  received  his   school’s  “Gar-­ net  and  Black   Award”  2012.   The  recognition,   established  in   1977,  read,  in   Dylan  Lynch  and  proud  family part,  “Whether   in  the  classroom,   or  on  the  football  field,  Dylan  Lynch  was  a  confident,   unselfish  leader.  His  creed  has  always  been  ‘The  Other   Fellow  First.’  He  always  helped  keep  his  teammates   focused,  yet  relaxed.  He  led  the  way  to  success  in  the  

#19375 Stephen  Gordon   graduated  from    Bishop   O’Dowd  High  School  in   Chico,  CA,  in  June  and  will   start  at  Chico  State  College   in  Northern  California  this   fall.  He  was  at  Camp  from   2005-­09,  and  comes  from   a  long  line  of  Dudleyites,   Graduate  Stephen  Gordon including  his  grandfather   Carl  Gordon,  who  worked  at   Camp,  his  dad  Paul  and  uncle   Matthew  Gordon,  and  his   cousins  Dylan,  Max,  William  Pollock  and  Daniel  Kurt.   Proud  mom  Jan  writes,  “When  I  came  to  Camp  to  pick   him  up,  I  knew  that  Dudley  was  a  life-­changing  experi-­ ence.  Thank  you  for  creating  a  beautiful,  peaceful,  fun,   growing  place  for  boys  to  grow  to  men.”  

Lake Champlain,  A  Poem,   by  Stephen  Gordon   Lake  Champlain  steadily  moving, Glistening  in  the  sun With  sparkles  of  beauty Swimming  in  the  lake  is  overwhelming Because  you  feel  like  a  jellybean Getting  swallowed  by  a  giant If  you  touch  the  calm  waves Of  the  morning  it  will  break Shatter  like  a  thin  piece  of  glass The  wind  howls  as  it  blows against  the  crashing  waves. Then  night  falls, And  the  lake  reflects  the  moon To  heaven Always, Always  and  forever To  heaven.

FALL 2012

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News & Notes continued #20839 Conor  Mook  is  in  his  first  year  at  Williams   College  this  fall,  according  to  his  mom  Suzy  Akin,  of   Sleepy  Hollow,  NY.  His  brother  #21307  Ian  has  joined   the  track  team  at  Hackley  School  and  looks  forward  to   competing  with  Dudley  pal,  #19839  Hugh  Kenny  at   league  competitions. #21883  Kelly  Dale,  former  Kiniya  Assistant  D-­head   and  sister  of  #18583  Teddy  Dale,  was  sworn  into  the   Peace  Corps  in  the  Republic  of  Benin,  in  West  Africa.   Kiniya  and  Dudley  friends  can  follow  her  at  http:// bonjourfrombenin.wordpress.com/.  She  is  part  of   a  Peace  Corps  Care  Group,  reaching  out  to  African   mothers  with  healthcare  services,  and  her  French  is   getting  pretty  sharp.  Says  Kelly,  “I  hope  to  keep  up  this   blog  during  my  time  in  Benin  to  share  with  you  all  the   joys,  opportunities,  and  challenges  that  I  encounter.   I  hope  to  shed  light  on  life  in  Benin  and  as  a  Peace   Corps  volunteer  in  general.  Get  excited,  I  know  I  am!!” #20108  Eliza  Davis,  of  Watertown,  CT,  2012  Assis-­ tant  Leader,  is  taking  a  gap  year  and  spending  the  fall   semester  in  Sevilla,  Spain.  She  is  with  a  program  called   CIEE,  Council  on  International  Educational  Ex-­ change.  Eliza  lives  with  a  host  family  and  takes  classes   in  Sevilla.  

#20254 Elle  Womack,  of  Brooklyn,  NY,  2012  Junior   Leader,  is  living  in  Rennes,  France  for  nine  months   through  SYA,  School  Year  Abroad.    All  of  her  classes   are  in  French  except  for  English  and  Math.  Elle  lives   with  a  host  family  in  Rennes. #20203  Mary  Piazza  of  Bethlehem,  PA,  is  studying   abroad  at  the  University  of  Manchester  in  Manchester,   United  Kingdom.  She  has  visited  with  many  former   Kiniya  Staff  including  #20047  Katy  Sampson  and   #22361  Salli  Dixon. #21945    Julie  Hoppmann  began   her  first  year  as  the  assistant  field   hockey  coach  at  Hartwick,  and   came  from  the  Wheeler  School   in  Providence,  RI,  where  she  was   the  girls’  lacrosse  coach  and  the   elementary  physical  education   teacher.  She  also  served  as  fitness   center  manager  and  was  the  event   Julie  Hoppmann manager  for  basketball.  Julie  was  a   varsity  field  hockey  player  at  Spring-­ field  College  from  2006-­2010.  She  garnered  Long-­ streth/NFHCA  Division  III  All-­Region  honors  in  2009   and  also  was  named  to  the  NEWMAC  All-­Conference   Team.  The  Pride  qualified  for  the  NCAA  Division  III.

Waller Archery  Glen   The  Waller  Archery  Glen  celebrates  the  life  of   William  J.  Waller,  son,  brother,  friend  and   camper  #12535.     Bill  never  lost  the  beauty  of  what  it  means  to  be   a  kid  at  heart  and  embodied  the  Dudley  spirit   his  entire  life.    All  of  us  that  knew  and  loved   him  remember  his  laughter,  energy  and  friend-­ ship.    By  living  everyday  to  the  fullest,  Bill  is   an  enduring  example  for  all  of  us  to  chase  our   dreams  today  and  never  wait  until  tomorrow.     Take  a  look  around,  dream  and  smile. With  love  from  Bill’s  family  and  friends.

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS


#22255 Aicher  “Ike”  Hearon  —  a  46’er  at  age  11!

Ike atop  East  Dix  .  .  .  #46!

The CD  News  picked  up  on  this    stunning  accomplishment  this  summer.  As  Ike  tells  it:   “My  first  46’er  was  Porter  when  I  was  six  years  old.  I  started  climbing  smaller   mountains  when  I  was  really  young  with  my  family  in  the  summers  before   attending  Dudley.  Once  I  got  that  first  46’er  I  really  started  climbing  for  real.   I  hiked  with  my  family,  my  friends,  and  with  a  hiking  camp  out  of  Keene  Valley.   I  even  went  first-­half  to  Dudley  so  that  I  could  hike  in  the  second  half  of  the   summer.  Once  I  realized  I  was  getting  close  to  46,  I  just  went  for  it  and  we   planned  out  how  to  finish  this  past  summer.  My  favorite  mountain  is  Skylight   because  when  I  hiked  it,  we  got  up  really  early  in  the  morning  to  catch  the   sunrise  and  it  was  really  cool.  The  view  was  absurd.  My  final  peak  was  East  Dix   which  I  climbed  on  August  14th  this  summer.  It  was  a  challenging  final  hike   because  we  chose  to  climb  up  a  difficult  slide.  It  was  a  great  experience,  but   now  that  I  am  done,  I  really  want  to  go  to  Dudley  full  season  for  my  junior  year.”    Ike  lives  in  Saxtons  River,  VT,  with  mom  and  dad,  #14255  Christy  Coyne  and  #12495   Fanning  Hearon,  and  brother,  #19895  Miles.

#21529 Kellyn  Metzler  of  Guilford,  CT,  has  finished   her  Masters  in  Elementary  Education.  Currently  she  is   completing  her  student  teaching  before  searching  for  a   full-­time  teaching  job.

Late Breaking News & Notes Tales of Some 6000-Era Dudleyites

#6245 Carrol  “Nick”  Coyne  celebrated  his  80th  birth-­ day  in  Cazenovia,  NY.    A  very  nice  gift  to  the  Willie   Schmidt  Scholarship  Fund,  in  Nick’s  honor,  arrived  at   the  Camp  Office  from  his  sister,  Esther  Flanagan.  He   was  also  visited  by  his   old  pal  #6581  Berk   Johnson,  who  wrote,   “I  drove  to  Cazenovia   where  I  found  Nick  in   great  shape  and  we  had   a  lively  recollection   of  Dudley  days,  the   friendships,  the  adven-­ tures.  We  had  a  deli-­ cious  dinner  lakeside.   Nick  Coyne,  right,  with  an  old  pal Nick  and  I  met  at  Camp   in  1942  and  our  friendship  ever  since  has  meant  so   much  to  me.  He  is  a  great  Dudleyite,  and  I  look  for-­ ward  to  more  visits  as  we  age  gracefully.”

#6581 Berk  Johnson  has  been  on  the  go.  He  traveled   to  Kiniya  where  granddaughter  Alexia  Cazemajou   arrived  for  the  one-­week   Camp  in  August.  “Went   to  Ireland  with  my  son   #11544  David,  nephews   #11452  Peter  Corbett   and  Scott  Johnson,  for   a  period  of  golf  and   culture.  We  played  some   wonderful  courses  (Killar-­ ney,  the  site  of  the  2012   Irish  Open,  Waterville,   Ballybunion  Old,  and   Dooks,  all  in  the  South-­ From  the  left  Berk,  Lara,  and   Alexia;  their  mother  Heidi  behind   west,  and  Portmarnock   Berk;  Sue  Johnson  next  to  Alexia;   and  The  Island  Club   her  daughter  Linda  Pinkerton  and   near  Dublin).  On  the   her  daughter  Taylor  Pinkerton culture  front,  the  high-­ light  was  a  boat  ride  out   to  Skellig  Michael  off  the  south  coast  and  a  climb  up   six  hundred  plus  stairs  to  the  beehive  stone  huts  built   without  mortar  by  Irish  monks  in  the  6th  Century,   there  to  copy  books  among  other  monastic  chores.  On   our  last  night  in  Dublin  we  were  treated  to  a  session  of   outstanding  traditional  music  at  a  fine  pub  downtown.   It  was,  indeed,  a  trip  to  remember.” .

FALL 2012

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Recently Recognized Dudleyites John Brust,  Rick  Commons,  and  Rollie  Stichweh  honored  in  their  respective  fields #7446  Dr.  John   C.M.  Brust,  MD,  of   New  York,  Professor  of   Clinical  Neurology  at   Columbia  University,   received  the  Presidential   Award  for  Excellence  in   Teaching  at  the  Colum-­ bia  Commencement  in   May  2012.  This  award   goes  to  current  Co-­ lumbia  Physicians  and   Surgeons  faculty  mem-­ bers  who  have  had  a   Dr.  John  C.  M.  Brust,  M.D. significant  influence  on   the  intellectual  develop-­ ment  of  students  at  the   university,  recognizing  teaching  excellence  at  both  the   undergraduate  and  graduate  levels.          John  has  been  practicing  medicine  in  New  York   for  46  years.  He  received  an  AB  degree  from  Harvard   College  and  an  MD  at  Columbia  University  P&S.  His   Neurology  Residency  was  at  the  New  York  Neurologi-­ cal  Institute/Columbia-­Presbyterian  Medical  Center.   He  is  currently  Professor  of  Clinical  Neurology  at   Columbia  University  and  Director  of  the  Department   of  Neurology  at  Harlem  Hospital  Center.  John  is  the   author  of  over  200  publications  on  topics  that  include   disorders  of  music  and  language,  alcoholism,  drug   abuse,  stroke,  epilepsy,  nutritional  disease,  and  health   care  delivery.    He  is  a  frequent  speaker  and  editor  of   numerous  journals,  including  Current  Neurology  and   Neuroscience  Reports.            John  was  at  Camp  for  seven  years,  starting  in  1947,   as  a  camper  and  leader,  and  was  a  mainstay  in  the   musical  and  theatrical  programs  of  Witherbee  Hall.  He   served  on  the  Dudley  Board  of  Managers  from  1986-­ 91.  John  lives  in  Manhattan,  and  each  summer  in  the   Barber’s  Point  Lighthouse,  in  Westport  NY,  with  his   wife  Meridee.  Their  three  children  are  #14140  James,     #13143  Frederick  and  Mary.  

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS

#12434  Rick   Commons,  the   current  Head-­ master  of  Groton   School  in  Massa-­ chusetts,  has  been   named  President   of  the  Harvard-­ Westlake  School   in  Los  Angeles,   CA.  Current   President  Thomas   C.  Hudnut,  in  an   announcement   Rick,  Lindsay,  Clara  and  Matthew  Commons to  the  school   community,  said,   “Rick  is  an  extremely  accomplished  educator,  with   nearly  25  years  of  teaching  and  leadership  experience   at  some  of  the  nation’s  premier  independent  schools.”          Groton,  established  in  1884,  is  regularly  ranked  as   one  of  the  top  college  preparatory  schools  in  the  coun-­ try.  According  to  Hudnut,  the  two  schools  are  similar   in  attracting  highly  talented  students  and  great  teachers   who  challenge  students  to  extend  themselves  and  excel   in  all  aspects  of  school  life.  Said  Hudnut,  “Rick  isn’t   so  much  joining  the  Harvard-­Westlake  community  as   he  is  returning  home.  I  hired  him  as  a  faculty  member   in  1992,  and  for  five  years  he  served  our  school  with   distinction,  as  an  English  teacher,  college  counselor,   assistant  dean  and  soccer  coach.”          Rick  came  to  Dudley  in  1979  as  a  camper  and  was  a   Leader  in  1986  and  1987.    He  is  currently  a  member  of   the  Board  of  Managers.  Originally  from  Philadelphia,   PA,  Rick  graduated  from  the  University  of  Virginia  in   1988.  He  earned  his  masters  degrees  from  Stanford   University  (1992)  and  Middlebury  College,  Bread   Loaf  School  of  English  (1994).    At  Groton,  Rick  has   authored  and  implemented  the  school’s  first  success-­ ful  strategic  plan  and  raised  more  than  $50  million  in   annual  and  capital  funds.    Rick  has  also  been  a  mentor   and  advisor  to  many  of  the  young  Dudley  men  and   women  working  in  the  Independent  School  field.


Rick is  married  to  Lindsay  McNeil,  who  teaches   at  Groton,  and  the  father  of  future  Dudleyites  Mat-­ thew  (5)  and  Clara  (2).  Rick,  Lindsay  and  the  children   spend  their  summers  at  their  cabin  in  Hague,  NY,  just   45  minutes  from  Dudley.  “It  was  at  Dudley  that  I  first   witnessed  and  felt  the  power  of  great  teaching,  and  it   was  at  Dudley  that  I  first  recognized  the  power  of  com-­ munity,  particularly  a  residential  one,  to  instill  values.”     Rick  will  take  the  helm  at  Harvard  Westlake  in  July  2013.  

#9061 C.  Roland   Stichweh,  Easton,   CT.      On  June  11,   2012,  The  Army   Hall  of  Fame  at  West   Point,  NY  announced   the  selection  of  seven   former  athletes  for  in-­ duction  on  September   28th.  Among  those   inducted  was  #9061   C.  Roland  “Rollie”   Rollie  with  one-­time  nemesis  and    longtime   Stichweh. friend  Roger  Staubach          A  small  “army  of   our  own”  (more  than   200  of  Stich’s  well  wishers)  attended  the  evening.  In   addition  to  every  member  of  Stich’s  immediate  fam-­ ily,  Dudley  was  well  represented  by  Rich  and  Susie   Burmann,  Paula  and  Tom  Canning,  Rusty  Davis  and   Linda  Saarnijoki,  Greg  Farrell,  Paul  Grinwis,  Charlie   Johnson,  III  and  IV,  Alf  Kaemmerlen,  Rich  Maxwell,   Bill  McCutcheon,  Ben  Nelson,  Randy  and  Sibyl  Quay-­ le,  Matt  Quigley,  Rodger  Stebbins,  John  and  Martha   Storey,  and  Director  Matt  Storey.  Stich’s  former  coach,   Paul  Dietzel,  now  88  years  old,  came  all  the  way  from   Baton  Rouge,  LA.          Stich’s  football  legend,  and  his  close  relationship   with  Navy  opponents  Roger  Staubach,  Tom  Lynch  and   Skip  Orr,  were  recounted  in  a  classic  article  by  George   Vecsey  in  the  New  York  Times  on  the  day  before  Stich’s   induction.  http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/27/ sports/ncaafootball/army-­navy-­rivalry To  Stich’s  delight,  all  three  of  his  former  foes,  and   long-­time  friends,  attended  the  ceremony.  To  Stich’s   surprise,  former  professional  QB  Roger  Staubach   recognized  Stich  as  “easily  the  best  opponent  we  ever   played.”  Skip  Orr  added,  “The  respect  we  had  for  Rol-­ lie  as  a  player,  and  the  friendship  we  have  all  enjoyed   though  these  many  years,  made  us  all  want  to  do  every-­

thing we  could  to  be  here.  It  was  a  great  evening.”          Army  mentor  Pete  Dawkins,  a  Heisman  Trophy   winner,  wrote,  “In  the  long,  illustrious  history  of  Army   football,  you  are  –  by  every  measure  –  a  remarkable   and  conspicuous  standout.  But  what,  in  my  mind,  sets   you  apart  from  other  superb  athletes  is  the  way  you   have  taken  your  brilliant  achievements  on  the  Fields   of  Friendly  Strife,  and  extended  them  –  through  your   widely  respected  leadership  –  to  realms  that  reach  far   beyond.  In  athletics,  in  the  military,  in  business,  with   your  community,  and  in  philanthropy,  you  have  shown   the  way.  And,  in  doing  so,  you  have  embodied  the   ideals  and  the  power  of  our  Academy’s  time-­honored   motto.  Well  done,  good  friend.  And  congratulations!”        Stich  spoke  on  behalf  of  all  of  the  inductees,  re-­ minding  everyone  that  while  the  individual  recogni-­ tion  is  appreciated,  it  is  always  “the  team”  that  is  the   more  important  goal.  He  thanked  West  Point,  and   reminded  all  of  what  a  privilege  it  was  to  serve  one’s   country.            Perhaps  Rodger  Stebbins  characterized  it  best  when   he  said,  “Celebrating  Stich’s  distinguished  induction   together  and  being  present  with  so  many  familiar   friends  created  such  resounding  Dudley  cheer.  As  I  lis-­ tened  to  the  U.S.  Military  Academy  alumni  and  cadets   singing  the  West  Point  anthem,  I  was  especially  aware   of  the  reverent  voices  in  unison,  Stich  and  his  West   Point  brothers’  proud  and  extraordinary  accomplish-­ ments,  especially  their  devoted  service  to  our  country,   and  the  faces  I’ve  known  since  my  enriched  childhood   and  young  adulthood  at  Camp  Dudley.  While  listening   intently  to  the  song,  I  reflected  on  the  Army  service   men  and  women’s  profound  sacrifices  and  the  symbol-­ ism  of  the  small  gold  cross  in  Eisenhower  Hall,  as  well   as  my  image  of  the  birch  cross  at  the  Dudley  Chapel.”  

Loyal Dudleyites  share  Stich’s  big  night  at  West  Point FALL  2012

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Answers at www.campdudley.org

ACROSS

ACROSS

40. Like  gear  in  a  pack 1. Aide Village cabins, circa 2012 42.  Wetted,  outdoors 6. Inkling 1.  Aide  Village  cabins,  circa   45.  Order  a  pizza  for  delivery,     10. Shoot, in a            for  example way 2012 14. Cub baseball no-no 6.  Inkling 46.  “Weird  Beard”  and   15. ______ miss 10.  Shoot,  in  a  way 16. Camper item            “Strange  ________,”  Hike   no longer permitted 14.  Cub  baseball  no-­no17. Dudley’s Woodstock            Hut  theme  of  2010 19. Partner organization for Dudley’s and 15.  ______  miss 47.  Athlete’s  outfit,  for  short Kiniya’s Aides48.  Simpson  and  Kudrow 16.  Camper  item  no  longer   20. Austin Power’s nemesis Dr. _______            permitted 49.  Spanish  island 21. Model Banks 17.  Dudley’s  Woodstock 50.  Peak  summit 23. Many performers on Wednesday 19.  Partner  organization  for   51.  Remove  gradually  from,   nights?            Dudley’s  and  Kiniya’s  Aides            with  “off” 26. Nacho man 20.  Austin  Power’s  nemesis   28. Big name 53.  “Sounds  good  to  me!” in glue 32. Long Trail55.  Hands  pressed  together   or Ubu, for example            Dr.  _______ 33. Monster 21.  Model  Banks            over  the  head 34. Mentioned58.  A  great  way  to  start  the  day   predecessor 23.  Many  performers  on   35. Shaded            Wednesday  nights?37. Greek salad            on  both  sides  of  the  lake component 26.  Nacho  man 63.  Penultimate  word  of  the   38. The Muppet’s “_____ a Happy Song” 28.  Big  name  in  glue 39. Treasure ___________            Lord’s  Prayer 40. Like gear in a pack 32.  Long  Trail  or  Ubu,  for   64.  “I  Would  Be  _____” 42. Wetted, outdoors            example 65.  _______  stare 45. Order a pizza for delivery, for example 33.  Monster 66.  Magician’s  tool 46. “Weird Beard” and “Strange 34.  Mentioned  predecessor 67.  Former  jets,  retired  in  ‘03 ________,” Hike Hut theme of 2010 35.  Shaded 68.  New  ______  Finest   47. Athlete’s outfit, for short 37.  Greek  salad  component 48. Simpson and Kudrow 49. Spanish island 38.  The  Muppet’s  “_____  a              Happy  Song” 39.  Treasure  ___________

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50. Peak summit

24. Pie ____ mode

DOWN 36. 4th  straight  year  honor,  in   51. Remove gradually from, with “off” 25. Some reds 53. “Sounds good to me!”            Vermont 27. How to watch a movie at 55. [Hands pressed together over the 37.  Paper  craft head] abbrev. 1.  Cub  shirt  size,  abbr. 58. A great way to start the day on both 29. Ascended 2.  Salt  Lake  City  athlete 39.  Farmers’  are  notorious sides of the lake 30. “Able was I ___ I saw El 3.  Fam.  member 40.  Salt,  en  France 63. Penultimate word of the Lord’s Prayer 31. Hi-_____ 4.  Some  mass  vespers 41.  ____  chi 33. Half-court only, in Westp 64. “I Would Be _____” 5.  Neighbor  of  Hung. 42.  Dorm  heads,  for  short 65. _______ stare 36. 4th straight year honor, in 66. Magician’s tool 37. Paper craft 6.  Conflagrated 43.  “The  Power  of  _____”  –   67. Former jets, retired in ‘03 39. Farmers’ are notorious 7.  Chef  Boy-­ ar-­______            Bryce  Courtenay  novel 68. New ______ Finest 8.  Bat  and  stick  maker 44.  Eliminate 40. Salt, en France 41. ____ chi 9.  One  way  to  act  in  the  Treiber   46.  ALs  and  below,  typically DOWN 42. Dorm heads, for short        Center  or  Brodie 50.  ________-­S43. axon “The Power of _____” – 10.  Hymn  Sing  feature 52.  Quantities,  abbrev. 1. Cub shirt size, abbr. Courtenay novel 11.  Facebook’s  occurred  on  May   54.  ________  midnight  (curfew   2. Salt Lake City athlete 44. Eliminate 3. Fam. member            18,  2012            request) 46. ALs and below, typically 4. Some mass vespers 12.  “Hilarious!”  (online) 55.  ______  tree50. ________-Saxon 5. Neighbor of Hung. 13.  Drs. 56.  Egg  cells 52. Quantities, abbrev. 6. Conflagrated 54. ________ midnight (curf 18.  Increased,  as  in  a  lead 57.  Chick  chaser 7. Chef Boy-ar-______ 55. ______ tree 22.  Authentic,  with  “the” 59.  In  a  _______  (stuck) 8. Bat and stick maker 56. Egg cells 23.  “It’s  ____  the  radish.” 60.  Singer  _____  Williams 9. One way to act in the Treiber Center or 57. Chick chaser Brodie 59. In a _______ (stuck) 24.  Pie  ____  mode 61.  R.  Inslee  Clark,  informally 10. Hymn Sing feature 60. Singer _____ Williams 25.  Some  reds 62.  OT  follower 11. Facebook’s occurred on May 18, 2012 61. R. Inslee Clark, informal 27.  How  to  watch  a  movie  at   12. “Hilarious!” (online) 62. OT follower, in soccer            home,  abbrev. 13. Drs. 29.  Ascended When not creating crossword 18. Increased, as in a lead 30.  “Able  was  I  ___  I  saw  Elba” 22. Authentic, with “the” puzzles, #16404 Blair Dils 23. “It’s ____ the radish.” 31.  Hi-­ _____ teaches and coaches in 33.  Half-­court  only,  in  West Williamstown, MA, and leads            port  hoops

the A-Hut each summer.


50-Year Pins awarded in Westport Let us know if you should receive your 50-or 75 year pin!

#7620 Steve  Chinlund   New  York,  NY

#9119 Roger  Blanc   Mt.  Kisco,  NY

#9933 Bob  Wagner Westport,  NY

#9612 Jim  Smith Hendersonville,  NC

#9974 Greg  Zeitler   Beaver  Creek,  OH

#10555 Dave Langston, named Director of Development On November  16th,   Dudley  Director  Matt   Storey  announced   the  good  news     that  #10555  Dave   Langston  would   become  the  Director   of  Development   at  Dudley.  Said   #10555  Dave  Langston,  Dudley’s  new   Matt;    “Dave  comes   to  us  most  recently   Director  of  Development   from  Susquehanna   Township  School   District  where  he  has  been  a  science  teacher  and   advisor.  Prior  to  that,  he  was  the  Executive  Director  of   the  Harrisburgh,  PA,  Chapter  of  the  Red  Cross  where   he  managed  all  fundraising  and  disaster  relief  for  his   region.    We  are  delighted  that  he  can  join  our  team.”          Dave  came  to  Dudley  for  the  first  time  in  1967  and   has  known  and  worked    with  all  six  directors  since  

Errors and  Omissions  — #7701  Fred  Schrodt’s  (Obits,  Spring  2012  CD  News)   first  year  at  camp  was  1950  not  1944  as  we  had  previ-­ ously  published.

then. More  recently,  he  has  been  a  member  of  the   2012  Dudley  summer  staff  as  the  head  of  the  Spiritual   Program  and  as  lead  challenge  course  instructor  in  the   outdoor’s  program.            Said  Matt,  “Dave  is  a  very  solid  professional   and  Marnie  and  I  look  forward  to  getting  Dave  on   board.    He  is  incredibly  well  prepared,  will  strengthen   our  management  team  and  grow  our  successful   development  efforts.”          Dave  will  be  taking  on  Dudley’s  Annual  and  Capital   Giving,  Planned  Giving  as  well  as  overall  responsibility   for  the  CD  News.          Dave  and  his  wife  #17855  Lora,  who  works  on  our   summer  staff  in  Brodie,  will  be  moving  to  the  area  in   2013.  Son  #16887  Matt  was  at  Camp  in  the  1990s  and   early  2000s.    Said  Dave,  “I  am  excited  and  honored  to   have  been  selected  to  serve  and  we  are  looking  forward   to  what  lies  ahead  in  the  North  Country.”            Dave  will  be  in  his  office  at  Dudley  in  early  January.   He  can  be  reached  at  Dave@campdudley.org. #12415  Ben  Sudduth,  in  the  spirit  of  full  disclosure,   let  us  know  that  his  recovery  time  was  actually  two   MONTHS  not  two  weeks,  as  reported  on  page  57  of   the  Spring  2012  CD  News.  Anyone  who  knows  Sudsy   would  not  have  been  surprised  with  two  weeks! FALL  2012

53


Small World

The “other”  #5776  Bob  Marshall  and  the  Kennedy  clan,  parading   in  Ohio

#5776 Bob  Entenman’s  daughter  #19976  Holly  Ken-­ nedy  wrote  from  Rye,  NY.    “You  never  know  when  you   are  going  to  have  a  mini-­Dudley  reunion!  We  visited   my  dad  in  Hudson,  OH,  for  Memorial  Day  weekend   .  .  .  three  Dudley  grandchildren  (Son:  #17976  John,   Daughters:  #20076  Anne,  #20376  Sarah)  and  their   mother  (that  would  be  me)  and  guess  who  else  lives  in   Hudson  Ohio-­-­-­#8399  Bob  Marshall  (not  THE  Bob   Marshall  #2700,  but  a  guy  with  the  same  name  that   went  to  Camp  when  Marshall  was  Director  in  the   1950s).  We  all  had  a  great  chat  and  watched  the  annual   Hudson  Memorial  Day  parade  together.  Everybody   sends  their  hellos.  Pictured  are  grandchildren  John,  in   from  Rochester,  and  the  rest  of  the  Entenman/Kennedy   clan  in  from  Rye. #8498  Jud  Phelps  wrote  from  his  home  on  Cape  Cod.   “Bonnie  and  I  were  on  the  south  rim  of  the  Grand   Canyon  and  had  just  stopped  in  the  lobby  of  the   Bright  Angel  Lodge  when  I  heard  a  little  voice  saying,   ‘There’s  someone  over  there  wearing  a  Camp  Dudley   jacket.’  Since  I  was  the  guy  with  the  Dudley  wind-­ breaker,  I  looked  around  and  who  should  I  be  greeted   by  but    #8704  Bill  Combs!  Bill  was  trying  to  organize   his  group  of  seven,  including  wife  Lynne,  daughter   Elizabeth  Whelan  her  husband  Dennis,  and  their  three  

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kids, Felicity,  Zach  and  Rose.    Bill  and  his  family  were   in  a  rush,  late  to  meet  their  mules  for  their  overnight   ride  to  the  bottom  of  the  canyon  (they  had  just  gotten   tickets  due  to  someone’s  last  minute  cancellation),  so   we  didn’t  get  a  photo.  Bonnie  and  I  rode  mules  for   three  hours  through  a  Ponderosa  Pine  forest,  but  defi-­ nitely  not  a  trip  to  the  ‘Hidden  Ranch.’”   #8804  John  Storey’s  college  pal,  Ben  Wagner,  wrote   to  him  recently  with  this  news.  “Not  too  long  ago,  I   received  a  long  letter  from  #4143  Bobbie  West.  After   catching  up  on  what  her  kids  were  doing,  I  learned   that  her  son,  David  was  on  the  staff  at  Camp  Dudley.   I  asked  Bobbie  if  David  knew  you.  Of  course,  I  learned   that  you,  Ward,  Bobbie  and  David  had  known  each   other  for  years,  and  that  their  company  had  printed   The  CDA  News  for  many  years.  My  family  and  the   Wests  go  back  as  far  back  as  my  memory  allows.  Ward   and  Bobbie  were  my  parents’  closest  friends  (we  called   them  Uncle  Ward  and  Aunt  Bobbie).  As  toddlers,  our   families  took  summer  vacations  together.  From  those   early  years,  I  heard  non-­stop  about  Camp  Dudley  and   Williams  College!  I  figured  that  if  Ward  West  could   be  so  enthusiastic  about  Williams,  it  must  be  really   special.  I  never  made  it  to  Camp  Dudley,  but  it  has  to   be  a  special  place.” #9137  Donald  K.   “Ken”  White,   of  Westport,  NY,   provided  us  with   no  fewer  than   three  Dudley   “small  world”   events.    Said  Ken,   “Ann  George,   mother  of  #15017   Evan  George,   mother-­in-­law  of   #18079  Dianna   George  and  a   good  friend  of   mine,  shared  a   #9554  Cleve  Penberthy,  with  his  1960   Owasco  Cabin story  while  dis-­ cussing  unusual  


names. Ann  told  of  a  game  that  she  and  a  friend  of   hers  played,  sharing  unusual  names  with  each  other,   always  trying  to  out-­  do  the  other.  Ann’s  friend  told   her,  “I’ve  got  a  real  good  one  for  you  today.  How  about   Cleve  Penberthy?”  When  Ann  told  me  this  story  she   indicated  that  she  thought  her  friend  was  making  up   this  name,  and  that  it  was  just  too  strange.  I  then  told   Ann  that  that  not  only  did  I  believe  the  name  to  be   legit,  but  that  I  personally  knew  #9554  Cleve  Penber-­ thy,  and  attended  Dudley  with  him  as  a  camper,  JL  and   Leader!    For  months  Ann  didn’t  believe  me  .  .  .  I  think   she  does,  now.”  Editor’s  Note:  Maybe  this  picture  will  help.          “Then  there  was  this  one  about  #7926  R.  Inslee   “Ink”  Clark.  Per  Ken,  “As  I  heard  it,  two  doctors  and   their  wives  were  on  their  way  to  a  medical  conference   in  Florida  one  winter.  Upon  landing  at  the  airport  they   hailed  a  cab.  There  being  four  passengers,  one  of  the   men  sat  up  front  with  the  driver.    On  the  way  to  their   hotel,  the  passenger  in  the  front  seat  leaned  around  to   the  others  in  the  rear  and  asked,  ‘What’s  Inky  doing   now?’  Without  hesitation  the  cabbie  answered,  ‘Oh   he’s  the  Headmaster  at  the  Horace  Mann  School  in   the  Bronx.’  The  group  was  flabbergasted  that  the  driver   would  have  the  slightest  idea  of  who  ‘Inky’  was  or  what   they  were  talking  about!  It  was  later  revealed  by  the   driver  that  he  was  ‘Buck’  Buchman  who  lived  in  the   big  brick  house  on  Route  9,  between  Camp  and  Port   Henry,  and  he  was  on  the  Dudley  maintenance  staff  as   a  painter  (pre  #11310  Herb  Burke)  during  the  summer   months  and  drove  a  cab  in  Florida  during  the  winter!          “Finally,  while  on  a  cruise  ship,  one  of  the  ship’s   performers  boarded  the  elevator  that  I  was  on  and   noticed  my  Dudley  shirt.  He  inquired  if  that  was  Camp   Dudley  in  the  Adirondacks.  I  answered  yes  indeed,  to   which  he  replied  that  he  was  #16974  Barry  Lowin  and     had  attended  Dudley  and  that  former  Director  #9398   Wheaton  Griffin  was  his  uncle!  So  .  .  .  as  we  all  know,   the  Dudley  link  is  extensive  and  will  reach  out  and   grab  you  when  you  least  expect  it!”

#13919 Steve  Hufnagel  wrote  from  Maine.  “I  had  a   #12931  Scotty  Sly  sighting  right  here  in  Damariscotta,   ME.  It  so  happened  that  #13789  Andrew  Smith,  my   old  Ross  Cabin  pal  when  #11436  Tom  Bolster  was   our  Leader,  was  visiting  for  literally  an  hour  on  his  way   down  the  coast.  As  we  were  walking  together  on  Main   Street  who  should  be  coming  right  down  the  street   but  Scott.  We  were  amazed!  Scott  was  thinking  about   a  move  to  Columbia  County,  NY.  Haven’t  heard  the   latest,  but  Andrew  is  now  living  in  Middlebury,  VT,   teaching  in  the  college  theater  department.  

VISIT US ONLINE! DUDLEY: (518)  962-­4720 matt@campdudley.org KINIYA:  (802)  893-­7850 marnie@campdudley.org www.campdudley.org

Enjoy Dudley Publications Online Now, The  Last  Whistle,  The  Spirit  and  The  Camp  Dudley   News  are  all  available  to  read  by  going  to  www.camp-­ dudley.org/camp-­information/publications,  AND  —   we’re  updating  our  FACEBOOK,  Twitter,  Linked  In,   Google  +  and  blog  pages  daily.  Join  in  on  the  discus-­ sion,  connect  with  old  pals  and  find  out  which  Dudley   and  Kiniya  gathering  is  coming  up  next!

FALL 2012

55


Weddings #13491 Jonathan  Petty  got  married  on  August  25th   in  Larchmont,  NY,  to  Catherine  Hyland.  Jon  works  in   the  client  services  group  at  Stone  Harbor  Investment   Partners,  in  New  York.  Catherine  is  an  executive  direc-­ tor  at  Morgan  Stanley,  where  she  specializes  in  corpo-­ rate  bond  sales. #14967  Alan  and  Jessica   Sheldon  were  married   October  1st  of  2011  in   Jekyll  Island,  GA.  They   live  and  work  in  Roches-­ ter,  NY. Back,  left  to  right:  Maisie  McGlynn,  Emily  Rocap,  Amy  and  Peter,   Scott  McGlynn,  Guthrie  McGlynn.  Front,  left  to  right,  Cece  and  Lila   McGlynn,  Benjamin  Rocap,  and  Grace  McGlynn.

#12666 Peter  McGlynn  married  Amy  Marie  Rocap  at   the  Bedell  Vineyard  in  Cutcheogue,  NY,  on  September   22,  2012.  Brother  #13050  Scott  McGlynn  served  as   best  man,  and  son  #19666  Guthrie  McGlynn,  daugh-­ ter  #21066  Maisie  McGlynn  were  part  of  the  wedding   party,  and  niece  #22650  Grace  McGlynn  was  a  brides-­ maid.  The  McGlynns  live  in  Denver,  CO,  where  Peter   has  an  investment  advisory  firm,  McGlynn  Advisors,   and  Amy  is  a  Registered  Nurse.

Dudley alums  in  attendence  at  the  Petty  wedding  (and  pictured  from   left  to  right):Rich  “Moose”  Rogers  #8891,  Ben  Stapleton  #16147,  Alex   Rogers  #15891,  Greg  MacFarlane  #13554,  Rob  Frehse  #13392,  Bob   Henning  #8953,  Tim  Petty  #14491,  Jon  Petty  #13491,  The  Bride   (Catherine  Hyland,  now  Catherine  Petty),  Matt  Rogers    #13891,  Trip   Todd    #14688,  Tom  Hyland  #18022,  Pat  Troy  #15164,  Todd  Wehm-­ ann  #13849,  Chris  Hyland  #18021

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Alan and  Jessica  Sheldon

#15385 Peter   Maiurano  and   #19555  Lauren   Widing  were  mar-­ ried  at  Camp  Dud-­ ley  on  September   8,  2012.  180  well-­ wishers  were  on   hand,  many  with   camp  numbers,  to   help  rock  Beckman   Hall.  Lauren  is  a   fourth  grade  teach-­ er  at  the  Fessenden   School  in  West   Newton,  MA,  and   Lauren  and  Pete  Maiurano Pete  teaches  eighth   grade  math  at  the   Carroll  School    in  Lincoln.  This  past  summer,  Lauren  was   the  head  of  Brodie  Arts  and  Crafts  and  Pete  was  in  Wither-­ bee.  Pete  and  Lauren  are  living  in  Framingham,  MA.  


Weddings

Dudleyites celebrate  with  Pete  and  Lauren  Maiurano  in  Beckman  Hall

#15460 J.  Mark  English  wrote:  “So  here  are  the  basics!   We  were  married  on  May  12,  2012  -­  at  the  Chapel   on  the  campus  of  Fordham  University.  The  name  of   the  Bride  is  Rosanne  Zipprich  English.  #15335  Alex   Wood,  was  one  of  my  groomsman  –  a  Dudley  alumni! Hope  things  are  well  at  Dudley.  We  would  like  to  plan   a  visit  over  the  next  year. #  15558  J.T.   Ervin  was  married   September  2,  2012   to  Amy  Roy  at  the   Samoset  Resort  in   Rockland,  ME.  J.T.   is  a  senior  under-­ writer  for  Starr   International.  Amy   is  an  associate  at   Ropes  &  Gray.  The   Ervins  are  living  in   Boston,  MA.

Caitlin  Spontelli  and   #15905  Luke  Kapper   were  married  Oct.  6  at   First  United  Method-­ ist  Church  in  Bowling   Green,  OH.  #19537   Devin  Kapper  of  West-­ port,  NY,  brother  of  the   groom,  served  as  the   best  man.  Caitlin  and   Luke  will  live  in  New   Albany,  Ohio. Caitlin  and  Luke  Kapper          The  bride  is   employed  as  protocol   implementation  coordinator  at  the  Ohio  State  Univer-­ sity  Comprehensive  Cancer  Center  in  Columbus.The   groom  is  a  business  development  officer  for  Bank  of   America  Practice  Solutions  in  Westerville.   #15917  Christian  Thorn  is  engaged  to  MacKenzie   Landers  of  Cody,  CO.  MacKenzie  works  for  HFZ  Capi-­ tal  Group,  a  Manhattan-­based  real  estate  investment   and  developing  company,  as  director  of  asset  manage-­ ment  and  development.  Christian  is  a  principal  at  ABS   Investment  Management  LLC  in  Greenwich,  Conn.   The  two  will  wed  August  31,  2013. #16679  Bob  Close  wrote  from  Lowell,  MA,  with  the   news  that  he  had  married  Joanna  Caffrey  in  Essex,   NY,  in  2012.  They  have  a  son,  Felix  Close.  Rob  and   his  brother  #17773  Taylor,  also  of  Lowell,  MA,  were  at   Dudley  in  the  mid  1990s.    

JT Ervin  and  his  bride

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Future Dudleyites #9633 Koji  Kuroda  writes  from  Mesa,  AZ.  “We  have  a   new  Grand  Daughter  ‘Maya’  who  arrived  last  July.  We   hope  she  will  be  a  Kiniya  camper  in  the  future  .  .  .  it  is   our  dream.”  Koji  was  at  Camp  in  the  early  1960s. Proud  grandpa  #9732  Jamie  Greene  reports  from  Hill-­ sborough  CA,  that  James  H.  Greene  IV  was  born  on   March  20,  2012  to  son  #17032  James  H.  Greene  III   and  his  wife,  Amanda.  “Our  second  grandson  is  due   May  7  2012  to  our  daughter  Lindsay  and  son-­in-­law,”   according  to  Jamie. #12268  John  Bolger  reports  that  John  Richard  James   Bolger  .  .  .    “Jack”  to  his  pals  .  .  .  was  born  September   25,  2011  to  his  wife,  Megan,  and  him.  They  live  in  Col-­ legeville,  PA.   #12985  Tim  Campbell.  “Married  2  1/2  years  to   Suzanne,  teaching,  living,  enjoying  life  in  Westchester   County,  NY.  Just  had  a  boy,  Oscar  Michael  James   Campbell,  on  July  9th  —  10  pounds  at  birth!  Should   be  ready  for  Dudley  in  2023.”  Tim  is  teaching  and   coaching  at  The  Masters  School  in  Dobbs  Ferry  while   Suzanne  has  taken  the  year  off  from  her  teaching  at   Rye  Country  Day  School.   #14410  James  Brust  and   his  wife  Sophia  are   delighted  to  announce   that  Nicholas  has  a  new   baby  brother:  Henry   Morrison  Brust,  Born   November  6,  2012.  8   pounds  5  ounces.  “Ev-­ eryone  is  well.  Looking   forward  to  having  you   all  meet  him.”  The  Brust   family  lives  in  New  York   City.   Henry  Morrison  Brust

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#14107 Jay  Wells  reports   from  Alexandria,  VA,   that  Caroline  Louise   Wells  May  10,  2012  (1:30   am.    already  cooperative   on  the  times.),  weighing   in  at  5  lb.  7  oz.  Mom,   Robin,  and  two  big  broth-­ ers  are  delighted

Caroline Louis  Wells

#15042 Elli  Moon  Tiller,   former  Dudley  Head   Nurse  wrote  from  Chico   CA  with  the  happy  news   that  son  #16020  Joseph   F.  Moon  and  his  wife   Brooke  brought  a  first   grandson  into  the  world   on  February  17,  2012,   Collan  James  Moon.  The   happy  family  resides  in   Chico,  CA.  “We  all  hope   to  get  back  to  Dudley   Ellie  Moon  Tiller for  a  visit  one  day.  It   will  reign  in  our  hearts   forever.” #16321  Dan  Lipin  wrote   from  Tarrytown,  NY.   “Here  is  a  photo  of  the   next  Drori-­Lipin.  Ron   Eliyahu  Drori-­Lipin  was   born  on  September  24   at  8:23  am  and  weighed   7  pounds  3  ounces  (19   inches  long).  Gil  smiles   whenever  he  sees  his   little  brother  and  starts   to  pet  him  until  we   #16321  Dan  Lipin  and  newest  son,   don’t  look  and  then  he   Ron  Eliyahu  Drori-­Lipin


Future Dudleyites tries to  hit  Ron  in  the  face.”  Dan,  wife  Tal,  and  young   Gil  were  at  Dudley  this  summer. #20594  Ryan   Spring  and  wife   Stacy  report  the   arrival  of  Elea-­ nor  “Elly”  Ann   Spring,  9:17am,  8   pounds  7  ounces,   21inches,  to   join  big  brother   Owen.  Everyone   Elly  Spring doing  well  in   Blairstown,  NJ. #14993  David  and   Emmy  Ready  wel-­ comed  Richard   Thomas  Ready  June   11,  2012  in  New  York   City,  weighing  in  at  8   lbs.  “Tommy”  enjoyed   a  fun-­filled  August   with  his  grandpar-­ ents  on  Virginia’s   Eastern  Shore.  Next   summer,  they  hope   Richard  Thomas  Ready to  finally  get  up  to   Westport  to  dip  him   in   the  lake.  And  as  Jon  Ferrari  reminded  them,  the  sum-­ mer  of  2023  is  going  to  “involve  some  serious  Ready/ Ferrari  hijinks!

#14359 Andy  Morris  and  wife  Eliza  hosted  a  first   birthday  party  for  their  daughter  Harper  at  a  farm  near   Danbury,  CT.  They  were  joined  by  a  great  Dudley  crew   and  some  future  campers!  Much  to  the  confusion  of   the  other  guests  the  Happy  Birthday  song  was  followed   by  a  rousing  rendition  of  the  Hallelujah  Chorus!

Back row  from  left  to  right,  #14889  Jon  Ferrari  (son  Will  not  pictured),   #14992  David  Ready  with  son  Tommy,  #15017  Evan  George,  #15198   Ben  Cady,  #18079  Diana  McGuigan-­George,  #14158  Will  Long,   #12985  Tim  Campbell  with  son  Oscar.  Front  row  left  to  right,  Andy-­ Morris  with  the  birthday  girl  Harper,  #14841  Matt  Art  with  daughters   Quinn  and  Camryn.

We have  some  creative   campers  on  both  sides  of   the  Lake.  

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Obituaries Helen Agate  Hurd,  96  of  Sauquoit,  NY,  died  on  Sep-­ tember  6,  2012.  Married  for  64  years  to  #3944  Robert   W.  Hurd,  M.D.,  Helen  was  born  in  Rochester  and   received  her  R.N.  degree  at  Strong  Memorial  Hospi-­ tal,  where  she  met  and  married  Bob  in  1940.    They   moved  to  Utica  in  1943  where  Dr.  Hurd  established   his  Internal  Medicine  practice.  She  loved  gardening,   playing  bridge,  cooking  for  family  gatherings,  traveling   and  birding,  and  was  a  member  of  St.  James  Episcopal   Church.  She  is  survived  by  her  three  daughters  and   sons-­in-­law;  Marcia  and  the  late  Thomas  Garber  of   Utica,  Kathlyn  and  Craig  Heuss  of  Sauquoit,    Nancy   and  George  Taylor  of  Florida/Clinton,  seven  grand-­ children  #11636  Scott  Garber  and  his  wife  Suzanne,   #12493  Robert  Garber,  #12811  Christopher  Heuss   and  his  wife  Jill,  Jennifer  Aldobrandi  and  her  husband   Enrico,  Kimberly  Roberts  and  her  husband  Steven,   Mary  Beth  Geglia  and  her  husband  Joseph,  #13344   Stewart  Roberts  and  his  wife  Natalia,  and  by  12  great-­ grandchildren. #5634  Gale  D.  Benn,  87,  of   Westport,  NY,  died  October  14,   2012.  Born  in1924  in  Roches-­ ter,  NY,  Gale  came  to  Dudley   in  1937  and  served  on  the  staff   in  1978.  He  attended  Colgate   University,  and  was  a  U.S.  Navy   fighter  pilot  during  WWII.  Gale   was  a  communications  consul-­ tant  to  the  U.N.  Industrial  Devel-­ opment  Organization  and  a  Commonwealth-­American   School  Trustee  in  Lausanne,  Switzerland.  In  1984  he   created  High  School  Sports  magazine,  and  published   several  Olympic  guides,  short  stories  and  poetry.  He   is  survived  by  his  devoted  wife  of  29  years,  #22034   Kathleen  (Seguin)  Benn;  four  children,  #12300  Stefan   Benn  and  wife  Lynn  of  New  York,  NY,  Eric  Benn  and   wife  Fae  of  New  York,  NY,  Dru  Wheelin  of  Ithaca,   NY,  Jeffrey  Wheelin  of  Quakertown,  PA;  sisters,  Joyce   Simmonds  and  Barbara  Buxbaum  of  Auburn,  NY,  four   grandchildren  —  Chlo,  Nikola,  Natassja  and  Elinor;   nephews  and  nieces,  William  Simmonds,  Robert   Simmonds  and  Debbie  Hulik  of  Auburn,  NY,  Nina   Simmonds  of  Binghamton,  NY,  and  Jodie  Brinley  of  East  

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Hartford, CT. #6077  Donald  H.  Tredwell   passed  away  October  27,   2012  in  Racine,  WI.  He   was  83  years  old.  Don  was   born  in  1929  in  Vancouver,   BC,  raised  in  Bronxville,   NY,  and  Darien,  CT.  before   moving  to  Racine.  He  was   at  Camp  in  the  1940s,  along   with  his  brother  #5868  Bob.  Their  dad,  #2612  Tom   Tredwell,  founded  the  Camp  Dudley  Annual  Giving   Program.  Don  and  his  wife,  Anne,  hosted  reunions  in   Racine  and  were  proud  to  be  a  four-­generation  Dudley   family.              Don  graduated  from  Wesleyan  University  and   Harvard  Business  School  and  served  in  the  US  Army   during  the  Korean  War.  He  spent  his  career  in  advertis-­ ing,  marketing,  and  brand  management  in  New  York   for  McCann-­Erickson,  and  Colgate-­Palmolive  before   joining  S.C.  Johnson  &  Son,  Inc.  In  1981  he  started  a   manufacturing  company  selling  medical  products  for   diabetics.  Don  had  a  zest  for  life  that  was  contagious   and  a  model  for  others.          He  loved  his  sports  and  the  outdoors,  both  in  Ra-­ cine  and  Tucson,  AZ,  playing  tennis,  squash,  biking,   hiking,  skiing,  canoeing  and  camping.  He  also  loved  to   travel  and  experience  the  world,  often  times  on  a  bike,   in  a  canoe  or  train.  He  was  always  curious,  and  shared   a  belief  in  life-­long  learning  with  his  family.        Don  was  active  in  his  communities  and  enjoyed  giv-­ ing  back  via  his  involvement  with  Dudley,  the  Rotary,   The  First  Presbyterian  Church,  The  Health  Care   Network,  Darien,  CT  Board  of  Education  and  various   alumni  organizations.        Don  married  Anne  Graham  Scott  in  1955  and  to-­ gether  raised  three  children,  #11086  Jim,  #11164  John   and  #14247  Susan.  He  is  survived  by  his  wife,  Anne,   and  their  energetic  dog  Summer,  sons  Jim  (Karen),   Pewaukee,  WI,  and  John  (Susan)  Crystal  Lake,  IL,  and   daughter  Susan  Kuruvilla  (Greg)  San  Diego,  CA;  six   grandchildren,  Erika,  #18755  Graham,  Maggie,  Chris-­ topher,  Laura  and  Thomas;  and  two  great-­grandchil-­ dren,  Emma  and  Morrison.


Obituaries #6958 John  William  Eden   of  Washington,  DC,  Lake   Wales,  FL,  and  Edgartown,   MA,  passed  away  on  Satur-­ day,  February  11,  2012  at   the  age  of  84  from  Par-­ kinson’s  disease.  Born  in   Cleveland,  OH.  John  was   at  Dudley  in  1944,  1946   and  1949.  He  graduated  from  Cranbrook  School,  and   in  1951  from  Yale  University.  John  served  in  the  U.S.   Navy  and  attended  the  Maine  Maritime  Academy.            A  former  Assistant  Sectary  of  Commerce  during  the   Ford  Administration,  John  joined  Russell  Reynolds  in   Washington,  DC.  He  was  twice  a  candidate  for  U.S.   Congress  in  the  19th  Congressional  District  of  Penn-­ sylvania.  An  avid  golfer,  he  was  a  President  of  the  U.S.   Seniors  Golf  Association  and  an  advisor  to  the  LPGA.            John  is  survived  by  his  wife  Caroline  Ballou  Eden,   sons  John  Jefferson  Eden  and  #11115  Timothy  Starr   Eden,  daugher  Emily  Eden  Trotman,  and  four  grand-­ children.  His  third  son,  #11100  Carter  Remington   Eden  passed  away  in  1995. #8966  Marquette  de  Bary,  Jr.  passed  away  December   10,  2010  at  the  age  of  65.  He  had  lived  with  his  sister,   Kyle  Hausrath,  in  Waynesboro,  VA,  after  contracting   emphysema  13  years  earlier.    He  had  spent  most  of  his   adult  life  in  Formentera,  Balearic  Islands,  Spain,  but   returned  to  the  states  because  of  his  health.  He  was   at  Dudley  during  the  late  1950s.  He  is  survived  by  his   sister  and  brother  #8967  Mikiel  de  Bary.   #9172  John  Pearson   Hammond  of  Wilton,  CT,   a  former  Darien  resident   who  was  a  camper  from  1957   to  1959,  a  JL  in  1961,  and   Leader  from  1963-­66,  died   on  March  9th.  Mr.  Ham-­ mond,  66,  was  the  husband   of  Suzanne  Simons  Ham-­ mond.          Born  in  1945,  John  grew  up  in  Darien  and  Cha-­

tham, MA.  He  graduated  from  Lafayette  College,  and   later  earned  his  MBA  from  Columbia  University.          John  started  his  career  at  GMAC  in  New  York,   leaving  to  join  Phelps  Dodge  Corp.  He  then  built  the   Woodworker  Store  in  South  Norwalk,  and  spent  the   rest  of  his  career  developing  hi-­tech  Internet  companies.          Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hammond  lived  in  Wilton  for  38   years,  where  John  served  on  the  Wilton  Zoning  Board  of   Appeals.          John  had  many  passions  in  his  life,  his  family  said.   “His  love  of  the  ocean  came  from  a  long  family  history   of  sea  captains  in  Chatham.  His  love  of  the  mountains   grew  from  his  many  summers  spent  at  Camp  Dudley  in   Westport,  NY.  Most  recently,  John  had  devoted  much   time  to  his  love  of  education  through  his  support  of   Colby  Sawyer  College  in  New  London,  NH.”          Besides  his  wife  of  42  years,  Mr.  Hammond  is   survived  by  his  brother,  Paul  Hammond  and  his  wife,   Paige,  of  Westport;  brother-­in-­law,  John  Simons  and   his  wife,  Patsy,  of  Cincinnati. #9655  William  Sword,  Jr.   of  Princteon,  NJ,  was  killed   on  October  29th  after  a  large   tree  fell  on  him  in  his  yard   on  the  Great  Road  in  Princ-­ eton  as  Hurricane  Sandy   swept  through  the  area.  He   was  61  years  old.          Bill  and  his  wife,  Martha,   brought  up  their  family  in   Princeton,  where  Bill  served  as  Managing  Director  of   William  Sword  &  Company,  an  investment  banking   and  advisory  organization.    He  graduated  from  Princ-­ eton  University  in  1976.  He  also  served  on  the  board   of  Centurion  Ministries,  a  Princeton  non-­profit  that   works  to  free  innocent  people  from  prison,  and  on  the   advisory  board  of  the  Princeton  First  Aid  and  Rescue   Squad.          Bill  and  Martha  were  longtime  hosts,  along  with   his  brother,  sister  and  mom,  of  wonderful  Dudley   Reunions  in  Princeton,  picking  up  from  where  his  late   dad,  Bill  and  mom,  Sally,  left  off  after  four  decades  of   hosting.    Bill  was  at  Camp  in  the  1960s  as  a  camper,   Aide,  Junior  Leader  and  Leader. FALL  2012

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Obituraries        Bill  leaves  his  wife  Martha,  and  a  son,  #18655   Will,  who  was  a  Leader  on  the  Dudley-­NOLS  trip   this  summer,  and  is  now  at  Colorado  College,  daugh-­ ters  Gretchen  and  Hope,  as  well  as  his  mother,  Sally   Pitcher  Sword,  his  brother,  #9969  Richard  M.  Sword   and  his  wife,  Elizabeth;  his  sister,  #13331  Molly  S.   McDonough  and  her  husband,  Peter;    and  sister  Sarah   Lazarus  and  her  husband  Kenneth;  and  6  nieces  and   nephews.          Said  Matt  Storey,  “Bill  brought  an  incredibly  posi-­ tive  approach  to  everything  that  he  took  on.  He  loved   returning  to  Dudley  for  a  summer  Chapel  Service   and  Hymn  Sing,  getting  out  to  Colorado  to  see  Will,   who  will  be  heading  our  NOLS  trip  this  summer,  and   always  asking,  ‘How  can  I  help.’    The  Dudley  Com-­ munity  has  lost  a  great  friend,  and  our  thoughts  and   prayers  go  out  to  Martha  and  the  entire  Sword  family.” #9846  Douglas  Ketcham  McClure  of  Rye,  NY,  beloved   husband  of  Ruth  Lind  McClure,  died  peacefully  at   home  on  August  19,  2012.  Known  for  his  warmth  and   keen  sense  of  humor,  he  loved  all  that  surrounded   him.  In  addition  to  his  wife  of  34  years,  he  is  survived   by  his  mother,  Elizabeth  Ketcham  McClure,  his  sisters,   Marilyn  Plumb  Beck  and  Dawn  McClure  Morton,  sev-­ en  nephews  and  eight  nieces.  Doug  was  at  Camp  from   1962-­63  and  66.    Most  recently,  James  Plumb,    #22202   his  nephew  was  a  camper  at  Dudley  2011  and  2012.  He   was  predeceased  by  his  father,  Carl  H.  McClure  III  and   by  his  sister,  Marcy  McClure  Parker.   David  Clark  Glaeser,  father  of  #11972  James  Glaeser,   passed  away  on  July  15,  2011  in  Leesburg,  FL.  He  was   born  in  1931  in  Waukesha,  Wisconsin  and  graduated   from  the  University  of  Wisconsin  in  1963.  He  married   Betsey  Ruth  Adair  in  1962  and  raised  three  children   in  Baltimore.  David  was  a  member  of  The  Church  of   the  Holy  Comforter  Episcopal  Church,  Lutherville,   MD.  He  coached  soccer,  lacrosse,  and  Indian  Guides.   He  was  an  avid  tennis  player  and  fisherman  for  over  50   years,  a  Mason,  a  life-­long  patriot  and  proud  conserva-­ tive.  In  1995,  he  retired  to  Leesburg,  FL,  after  a  career   in  insurance  and  estate  planning,  and  then  Crossville,   TN,  and  Winston-­Salem,  NC,  with  his  beloved  wife  of   49  years  to  be  close  to  family,  and  enjoy  his  grandchil-­

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dren and  old  friendships.  He  is  survived  by  his  wife,   Betsey  A.  Glaeser,  his  children,  Amy  G.  Moser  of  War-­ rensburg,  MO,  Julia  G.  Zenger  of  Lewisville,  NC,  and   Petty  Officer  First  Class  (USN  Ret.)  James  D.  Glaeser   of  Annandale,  VA,  and  by  eight  grandchildren. #12837  Thomas  Franklin   “Tommy”  James,  IV  passed   away  peacefully,  Tuesday,  July   31,  2012,  at  the  age  of  43  in   St.  Louis,  MO.  Passionate   about  all  things  sportive,   Tom  (also  called  Tommy  and   TJ)  shared  his  enthusiasm,   wealth  of  knowledge,  and   appreciation  of  athletics   and  athletes  with  his  wide  circle  of  friends  and  col-­ leagues  from  his  alma  maters,  St.  Louis  Country  Day   School  1987  and  Lehigh  University,  to  the  St.  Louis   Cardinals,  Blues,  and  Rams,  to  the  NCAA.  His  genu-­ inely  generous  spirit  will  be  missed  by  the  many  who   knew,  loved,  and  worked  with  him.  Tom  was  a  sports   statistician  for  many  sports  at  MICDS,  and  for  Purdue   University  football.  He  provided  statistical  support   during  games  to  broadcasters  from  ESPN,  Fox  Sports   and  St.  Louis  professional  sports  teams.  Tom  was  the   youngest  person  to  qualify  as  an  Official  Major  League   Baseball  Scorer  when  he  passed  the  examination  in  his   mid-­twenties.  To  quote  Tom’s  license  plate  “SPTNUT,”   he  was  truly  a  “Sports  Nut”  and  was  an  invaluable   resource  to  all.          Said  Mark  Davenport,  “Tommy  James  was  a  favor-­ ite  among  his  peers  and  his  Leaders.  His  inimitable   personality  and  love  of  all  things  statistical  made  him   the  go-­to  guy  when  two  or  more  people  were  looking  to   settle  a  fact-­based  discussion.  We  will  remember  him   as  a  Dudleyite  who  never  had  a  mean  word  for  anyone   and  who  never  shied  away  from  a  request  for  a  favor.   He  loved  Camp  Dudley  and  its  many  characters  probably   because  he  was  so  well  loved  for  his  own  uniqueness.”                      Said  David  Kvidahl  of  StLouisToday.com,  “James   was  a  fountain  of  statistics,  numbers  and  history.  With   his  fingers  zipping  across  his  keyboard  he  would  crank   out  whatever  you  needed,  and  then  some.  And  it   wasn’t  just  that  James  was  fast.  He  was  accurate.  If  my  


Obituaries notes didn’t  match  up  with  his,  I  knew  I’d  screwed  up.”                  Beloved  son  of  T.  Frank  Toby  James,  III  and  Christy   Franchot  James;  brother  of  Constance  Franchot  James,   Martha  James  Zimmerman,  and  Laura  Elizabeth  Ahn-­ er;  uncle  of  Matthew,  Meagan,  and  Charlie;  grandson   of  his  late  grandparents  T.  Frank,  Jr.  and  Ruth  Pitcairn   James,  Nicholas  V.V.,  III  and  Anne  Christy  Franchot.   Elizabeth  Alling  Sewall,   mother  of  #19172  Scott  and   #19658  Duncan  Sewall,  died   on  September  1,  2012  from   metastatic  breast  cancer  in   Milton,  MA.    Elizabeth’s  life   with  this  difficult  disease   was  marked  by  perseverance,   grace,  and  care  for  others,   especially  her  sons,  and  her   husband,  Gordon.    A  de-­ voted  mother,  wife,  daughter  and  friend,  Elizabeth  was   also  an  extraordinary  professional  with  an  established   record  of  excellence  in  fundraising.    She  held  leader-­ ship  roles  at  Lawrence  Academy  (Groton,  MA),  West-­ minster  School  (Simsbury,  CT)  and,  most  recently,   she  was  the  director  of  advancement  at  the  Fessenden   School  in  West  Newton  where  she  led  the  most  suc-­ cessful  campaign  in  the  school’s  history.          Born  on  May  26,  1964  to  Cynthia  Sykes  Alling  and   the  late  Duncan  Wells  Alling,  she  spent  her  early  years   in  Charlottesville,  VA.    A  graduate  of  Miami  Valley   School  in  Dayton,  OH,  Yale  University  and  the  Har-­ vard  Graduate  School  of  Education,  she  was  a  volun-­ teer  leader  at  Yale  and  managed  many  crucial  volunteer   efforts  at  Milton  Academy.            Elizabeth  leaves  her  husband  Gordon,  her  sons   Scott  and  Duncan  of  Milton,  her  mother  Cynthia   Alling  of  Charlottesville,  VA,  and  her  brother  Greg   and  his  family  of  Manila,  Philippines,  as  well  as  many   other  beloved  family  members  and  friends.          Elizabeth  worked  hard  to  understand  and  man-­ age  her  own  disease.  During  treatment  for  her  second   round  of  cancer,  Elizabeth  Sewall  volunteered  to  help   advance  the  research  of  her  doctors,  Dr.  Eric  Winer   and  Dr.  Elgene  Lim  at  the  Dana-­Farber  Cancer  Insti-­ tute  by  undergoing  a  procedure  to  provide  tissue  for  

medical research.  To  continue  this  important  work,  an   endowment  has  been  established  in  Elizabeth’s  name   at  Dana  Farber  Cancer  Institute,  10  Brookline  Place   West,  Brookline,  MA  02445-­7226,  attention  Dr.  Eric   Winer.            Known  for  her  patience  in  any  challenging  situa-­ tion  and  her  concern  for  others,  Elizabeth  hoped  her   contribution  would  help  physicians  improve  care  for   the  next  generation  of  women  diagnosed  with  breast   cancer,  and  perhaps  enable  some  to  avoid  the  illness   altogether. Jeanne  K.  Shellenberger,   age  85,  of  Brewster,  MA,   passed  away  on  April  1,  2012.   She  was  predeceased  by  her   husband,  #6309  Donald  J.   Shellenberger,  to  whom  she   was  married  for  51  years.  Don   came  to  work  on  the  Dudley   Kitchen  Crew  in  the  1940s   where  he  met,  and  remained   a  lifelong  friend  of  #7405  Willie  Schmidt.  Mrs.  Shel-­ lenberger  was  born  in  West  Stockbridge,  MA,  gradu-­ ated  from  Bates  College  and  later  earned  a  Master’s   degree  at  Framingham  State  College.  She  helped  in   her  husband’s  work  as  a  YMCA  executive,  and  ulti-­ mately  became  a  Y  executive  herself.  Mr.  and  Mrs.   Shellenberger  raised  two  children,  David  and  Susan.   In  1962,  he  directed  Camp  Becket  in  Becket,  MA.  The   Y  acquired  Camp  Chimney  Corners,  a  girls’  camp  in   Becket,  in  1972  and  Mrs.  Shellenberger  became  direc-­ tor.  She  served  until  1989,  when  she  and  her  husband   retired  to  Brewster.  In  September  2011,  the  Becket-­ Chimney  Corners  Alumni  Association  honored  her   with  a  Distinguished  Service  Award.          Surviving  are  son  David  E.  Shellenberger  of  Cam-­ bridge,  MA,  and  daughter  Susan  G.S.  Bowers  of  New   York  City;  brothers  William  of  Berlin,  MD,  James  of   Ft.  Pierce,  FL,  and  Alan  of  Branson,  MO,  sisters  Patri-­ cia  Jordan  of  Magalia,  CA,  and  Geraldine  Whitehead   of  Pittsfield,  MA.

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Obituraries Barbara Gaines  Fernandez,   mother  and  grandmother  of   many  Dudleyites,  passed  away   in  August  2012  in  Ports-­ mouth,  RI.  Barbara  was  born   in  1924  in  Sherburne,  NY,   graduated  from  Marymount   Academy,  and    Marymount   College  in  1945.  She  mar-­ ried  A.  Christie  Fernandez  in   1946,  a  pilot  in  the  Army  Air   Corp,  and  settled  in  Norwich,  NY.  Widowed  in  July   1965,  Barbara  steadfastly  raised  her  family.  In  1969  she   married  Derek  Drummond  of  St.  John,  USVI  where   she  resided  for  the  next  decade.  With  her  children   grown,  Barbara  lived  in  Newport,  RI,  and  wintered  in   Florida.  Barbara  was  a  skier,  sailor,  cook,  and  loved  the   ponies.  Barbara  also  possessed  a  quiet  kindness  and   lived  her  life  practicing  many  silent  acts  of  generosity.   Barbara  leaves  four  children  -­  Christie  and  husband  Ed   Smith  of  Newport,  RI,  #9983  Mark  and  wife  Laura  Fer-­ nandez  of  Newport,  RI,  #10234  David  and  wife  Lissa   Fernandez  of  Middletown,  RI,  and  Drew  and  his  wife   Sarah  Fernandez  of  Middletown,  RI.  Also  surviving  are   Barbara’s  grandchildren  #14234  Christopher  Smith,   Bess  Fernandez,  #15090  Ryan  Smith,  Anne  Fernandez,   #17834  Alex  Fernandez,  Leigh  Fernandez,  #18034  Ben   Fernandez,  Teddy  Fernandez,  and  Carolina  Fernandez,   and  three  great-­grandchildren  Shaelyn  Smith,  Colin   Smith,  and  Ayleigh  Smith.  She  also  leaves  her  sisters   Mary  Gaines  of  New  York,  NY,  and  Joan  Dinneen  of   Winter  Park,  FL.  Barbara  was  preceded  in  death  by   husbands  Chris  Fernandez  and  Rick  Drummond,  and   sister  Gloria  Gaines,  and  brother  John  R.  Gaines. #9016  Peter  D.  Whitney,   a  Chappaqua,  NY,  native,   economist  and  former  dip-­ lomat,  died  in  Feb.  2012  in   Arlington,  VA.  He  was  68.     Pete  was  at  Camp  from  1956   to  1958.  The  former  director   of  economic  policy  for  Latin   America  and  the  Caribbean   for  the  U.S.  Department  of   State,  Pete  also  worked  as  a  professor  and  senior  advisor.  

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THE CAMP  DUDLEY  NEWS

       Born  in  New  York  City,  he  was  the  son  of  the  late   Donald  #3576  and  Phoebe  Whitney.  He  grew  up  in   Chappaqua  and  went  on  to  live  in  Virginia,  North   Carolina  and  Japan.          He  received  a  B.A.  in  history  from  Princeton  Uni-­ versity,  a  M.A.  in  economics  from  Vanderbilt  Univer-­ sity  and  a  M.A.  in  public  administration  from  Harvard   University.          As  a  diplomat,  Whitney  served  in  the  U.S.  Foreign   Service  as  deputy  chief  of  mission,  economic  coun-­ selor,  consul  and  economic  officer  to  Argentina,  Brazil,   Chile,  Jamaica,  Japan  and  Portugal.          Whitney  was  also  a  former  economist  in  residence   at  American  University  in  Washington,  DC,  adjunct   professor  at  Fuqua  School  of  Business  at  Duke  Uni-­ versity  in  Durham,  NC,  and  economics  professor  at   Sophia  University  in  Tokyo  and  University  of  North   Carolina  -­  Chapel  Hill.          A  lover  of  botany,  he  served  as  president  of  Botani-­ cal  Society  of  Washington  in  2001.          Surviving  are  his  wife  Martha  Overholser,  son   Tyson  #12716,  daughter  Vanna,  sister  Mary  Hoch  and   two  granddaughters.   #11738  Wyeth  Hewett  Phelps,  47,    died  in  Brockton,   MA,  November  11,  2012.  Born  in  Norfolk,  VA,  he   grew  up  in  Ridgefield,  CT,  graduated  from  Ridgefield   High  School  ’83,  where  he  played  soccer  and  skied.   He  loved  dogs  and  rescued  several,  was  an  excellent   hunter  of  deer  and  birds,  and  a  Red  Sox  and  NY  Gi-­ ants  fan.    He  loved  to  travel  and  lived  in  many  states.   He  had  construction  and  repair  talent,  using  many   different  tools  and  materials.  He  attended  Dudley  and   Outward  Bound.  He  suffered  from  mental  illness  and   substance  abuse.  Wyeth  had  found  some  peace  and   support  through  the  Solid  Rock  Ministry  Program  in   Falmouth,  MA.  He  will  be  remembered  for  his  charm,   charisma,  big  heart  and  strong  sense  of  justice.  He   leaves  his  loving  parents,  Judson  and  Barbara  Phelps  of   Yarmouthport,  MA;  his  brother  #12354  Christopher   Phelps,  his  wife  Mary,  sons  Nathan  Hayes  and  Jack   Edward  of  Ridgefield,  CT;  his  sister  Whitney  Magee   Phelps,  her  husband  Troy  Soka,  their  daughters  Sydney   Ruth,  Rosamond  Sophia  and  son  Jacob  Putnam  of   Delmar,  NY.


Chief Beckman Society In the spring issue of the CD News, we offered Dudleyites who were thinking about including Dudley in their will or estate plan the opportunity to be included in the “Chief Beckman Society.” We are happy to include this listing of those who have made such plans as of October 2012, along with those who had previously established endowed funds for Dudley: #5288 David “Dave” Coffin #6245 W. Carroll “Nick” Coyne #6581 Berkeley D. Johnson #6652 James S. “Jim” and Marge Weaver #7221 Dr. Thomas C. “Tom” and Anne Carrier #7370 Tom and Carol Crowe #7582 Dr. Stuart F. “Stu” Updike #7689 Henry S. “Hank” and Gail Poler #7701 Frederic E. Schrodt #7731 Peter S. Willmott #7837 T. Frank “Toby” James, III #7951 John “Jack” and Katie Kotz

#7905 George “Skip” and Nancy Rieger #7975 Rodney F. “Rod” and Liz Beckwith #8276 Charles B. “Charlie” Updike #8527 Ernest F. “Ernie” and Anna Steiner #8608 Robert “Bob” and Tuey Stroud #8674 Dr. William M. Vanneman, Jr. #8686 Gene E. Little #8704 William H. “Bill” and Lynne Combs #8798 Alfred M. “Al” and Tony Cady, III #8804 M. John and #18204 Martha Storey #8891 Richard K. Rogers #9060 Ian R. and Mary Ann Crawford #9061 C. Roland “Rollie” and #19061 Carole Stichweh #9459 Dr. Peter Burr #9606 Richard T. “Rick” Tomlinson and Julie Welch #9827 Richard J. Coyle #10065 William T. “Bill” and Terry McCutcheon, Jr. #10215 Donald M. Meisel, Jr. #10555 David L. and #17855 Lora Langston #12079 Joseph L. “Joe” and Tink Bolster #15400 Sally Sword, Parent/Grandparent Loris Tower, Parent, Grandparent #19517 Brent Shay Gifts have been made to Camp by way of simple bequests, to the leaving of IRAs, gifts of stock, life insurance policies and through trust arrangements. Please contact M. John Storey, john@storeyfarm.com or 413-458-4424 if you have already made plans for a gift to Dudley or would like to discuss the Chief Beckman Society.

The ageless “Yum Yum” tree on the upper field, a symbol of Dudley’s enduring values


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Profile for Camp Dudley

Camp Dudley News Fall 2012  

Camp Dudley News Fall 2012

Camp Dudley News Fall 2012  

Camp Dudley News Fall 2012