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Mission Statement The mission of the School of Pharmacy is to educate students in a Christian environment to be pharmacists or pharmacy-related professionals who will meet existing and future healthcare needs and who will provide leadership to their profession and to organizations that represent pharmacy.

Campbell University

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S tat e m e n t o f P u r p o s e

ampbell University is a university of the liberal-arts, sciences, and professions which is committed to helping students develop an integrated Christian personality characterized by a wholeness of body, mind, and spirit that includes: a method of critical judgment; an appreciation of the intellectual, cultural, and religious heritage; stewardship of the body; and a sensitive awareness of the world and society in which they live and work with persons. Campbell University is a Baptist university affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina. Both in and out of the classroom, the University endeavors to present Christian principles to students and to foster their application to daily life. The purpose of Campbell University arises out of three basic theological and Biblical presuppositions: learning is appointed and conserved by God as essential to the fulfillment of human destiny; in Christ, all things consist and find ultimate unity; and the Kingdom of God in this world is rooted and grounded in Christian community. Therefore, the mission of Campbell University, as a community of Christians scholars, is to: • Provide students with a Christian world view; • Bring the Word of God, Mind of Christ, and Power of the Spirit to bear in developing moral courage, social sensitivity, and ethical responsibility that will inspire a productive and faithful maturation as individuals and as citizens; •  Transfer from one generation to the next the vast body of knowledge and values accumulated over the ages; • Encourage creativity, imagination, and rigor in the use of intellectual skills; • Affirm the University’s commitment to the belief that truth is never one-dimensional but in wholeness is revelatory, subjective, and transcendent as well as empirical, objective, and rational, and that all truth finds its unity in the mind of Christ;

• Frame University teaching in the context of a liberal arts education seeking to free persons to live more abundantly and securely in an ever-changing social order; • Foster stewardship in nurturing the gifts of the mind and in developing aesthetic sensibilities; • Equip students with superior vocational skills, productive insights, and professional integrity; • Provide a community of learning that is committed to the pursuit, discovery, and dissemination of knowledge to serve the region as well as national and international communities; • Prepare students for purposeful lives and Christian service throughout the world through undergraduate graduate, and professional instruction including terminal graduate and professional programs; • Provide services to the general community through research efforts, continuing education, cultural enrichment programs; and extended campus education; • Cooperate with other educational institutions for the advancement of mankind. This university sees the human vocation as living by faith under grace with no conflict between the life of faith and the life of inquiry.

Disclaimer This bulletin is intended as a guideline for students and should not be construed as an offer to contract or as a contract between Campbell University, Incorporated, and any student or a warranty of any entitlements, programs, regulations, or benefits set forth herein. Campbell University, Incorporated, its agents, officers, and employees may rescind or modify any benefit, program, regulation or entitlement set forth herein at anytime, for any reason, with or without notice. This bulletin supercedes all previous editions of this bulletin. Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/pharmacy for the most up to date curriculum and tuition information.




B r i e f H is t o r y Ad astra per aspera

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mplicit in this old Latin motto, To the stars through diffi- culties, adopted during the dark days of Reconstruction, are beliefs, aims, and objectives that have guided this institution through ever-changing circumstances. Campbell’s rise from a community school of twenty-one students to eminence as a great Southern academy and later to its present standing among the state’s largest church-related senior universities is illustrative of what perseverance can accomplish in scaling the heights. Campbell University was founded on January 5, 1887, by James Archibald Campbell, a North Carolina preacher who believed that no student should be denied admission because of the lack of funds. Known as Buies Creek Academy, the school that began with 21 students grew slowly during the early years. From the beginning, Dr. James Archibald Campbell’s passion was that his school prepare young men and women for a living and for a life, not one but both. He was concerned that Christ have His way in the classroom and that He have His way in the church house, no difference... Campbell College — Big Miracle at Little Buies Creek (1887–1974) Dr. J. Winston Pearce. In 1925, the school’s property was deeded to the North Carolina Baptist State Convention. In 1926, the school attained junior college status and changed its name from Buies Creek Academy to Campbell Junior College. In 1961, Campbell became a senior college. The name was changed to Campbell University on June 6, 1979. Graduate programs were begun in 1977 with the Master of Education degree. The Master of Business Administration degree was added in 1978, and the Master of Science in Government was established in 1982. The Campbell University School of Law was founded in 1976, and the Lundy-Fetterman School of Business was begun in 1983. The Schools of Pharmacy and Education were established in 1985. The Divinity School was established in 1995.

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Accreditation

ampbell University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the Associate, Bachelor’s, Master’s, Education Specialist, and Doctor’s degrees. The Campbell University School of Pharmacy is a member of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy and is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education.

In over one hundred years of service, Campbell University has been served by only four presidents:

James Archibald Campbell 1887–1934 Leslie Hartwell Campbell 1934–1967 Norman Adrian Wiggins 1967–2003 Jerry M. Wallace 2003–Present

Academic programs continue to expand, one of the most recent additions being the Campbell University School of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree which is the highest award given in recognition of academic preparation for pharmacy practice. The Pharm.D. degree opens new opportunities for the graduate. Graduates will be prepared for careers in community pharmacy, hospital pharmacy, industrial pharmacy, and consultant pharmacy, as well as teaching and other specialized areas. The recently introduced Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Clinical Research are designed to prepare students to enter highly technical roles in the pharmaceutical industry or to pursue postgraduate studies in the biomedical sciences.

Campbell University School of Pharmacy

The Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education

P. O. Box 1090 Buies Creek, NC 27506

20 North Clark Street, Suite 2500 Chicago, IL 60602-5109 (312) 664-3575 (800) 533-3606 Fax: (312) 664-4652 Fax: (312) 664-7008

Pharmacy Admissions: (800) 760-9734 Ext. 1690 Fax: (910) 893-1937

e-mail address: pharmacy@campbell.edu

website: 

Jerry M. Wallace

www.campbell.edu/pharmacy

website: www.acpe-accredit.org


Student Life Housing

Telephone/Computer

There are residence halls for men and women which are conveniently located to all classrooms and administrative facilities at the university. In addition to these residence halls, the University provides limited housing for faculty, graduate, and married students. There are also rental properties and a number of commercial apartments and individual homes for rent or lease in the immediate area.

Local telephone service is provided to all residence hall rooms at no additional charge. All students need to do is plug in their personal phone. The University contracts long distance service for the residence halls. Access is achieved through the use of PIN numbers. Students may apply for a PIN number through the Residence Life Office on the second floor of the Wallace Student Center, Room #35. Computer network connections are available in all University housing at an additional charge.

Auto Registration Because parking space is limited, all automobiles and motorcycles must be registered with the campus security office during the normal school enrollment period. Registration of vehicles may be accomplished at the campus parking office located in the Campbell Welcome Center

Student Center The Wallace Student Center facilities include a grill and deli, lounge areas, a multipurpose room, and the offices for the Dean of Student Life, Director of Residence Life, Intramural Sports, and Campus Minister.

Bookstore

Dress Code

The Campus Bookstore, located in Britt Hall is operated by Barnes and Noble and is available to all students. All required textbooks and school supplies are available. In addition, a variety of sundries, cosmetics, computer supplies, jewelry, snack items, athletic items, and other miscellaneous items are for sale. The Bookstore operates on a cash basis (personal checks, Visa, and Master Card are acceptable). A Chick-fil-A Express is adjacent to the bookstore.

In order to prepare pharmacy students to enter a responsible health profession, the students and faculty of Campbell University School of Pharmacy expect dress which gives the impression of cleanliness, orderliness, and sense of purpose. Proper professional attire signals to patients and other health professionals a student’s self-confidence, knowledge level, and willingness to participate in responsible decision-making processes. As increasing responsibilities are rapidly placed on a student’s shoulders as he or she progresses through our Doctor of Pharmacy program, professional attire is encouraged upon entrance to our program and demanded in all clinical experience settings. The short-length white lab coat is essential for pharmacists in training. During the first three didactic years of our program, “business casual” attire is appropriate for classroom and examination sessions. Business casual attire for men includes collared shirts and khaki or dress slacks; for women, it includes knee-length skirts or dress slacks with tailored blouses. The following dress and accessories are unacceptable in the clinic and classroom: hats, caps, T-shirts, men’s sleeveless shirts, blue jeans, sweat pants, athletic attire, tank tops, tube tops, bare midriffs, and visible tattoos or any body piercing other than earrings.

Banking Facilities There are two commercial banks located on campus offering a full range of banking services. Additional banking facilities are in Lillington (5 miles); Erwin (5 miles); Coats (4 miles) and Dunn (10 miles).

Postal Services A U.S. Post Office (zip code 27506) is located on campus and has sufficient post office boxes available to serve all students and residents of the community. The post office also offers the usual range of services available.

Equal Opportunity Campbell University is an equal educational opportunity institution; and in keeping with this policy, the University makes no distinction in the admission of students or any other of its activities on the basis of race, color, sex, creed, or national origin.

Health Services The Pearson Memorial Health Service is a fully staffed medical office that provides the primary medical services for the Campbell University community. Services include the diagnosis and treatment of illness or injury.

Recreational Facilities

Complaint Procedure Students have the right to file formal written and signed complaints regarding policies and procedures of the school to the Dean’s Office. Student complaints will be evaluated by appropriate administrators as referred by the Dean. Students should expect a timely, fair, and comprehensive review of their complaints to include personal discussions with appropriate administrators, and the opportunity to supply supportive documentation or the testimony of fellow students regarding their complaints. A written response to a student complaint will be provided following review by the school’s Executive Committee. The student’s original complaint and Executive Committee’s response will be kept on file for a period of six years and be subject to review by appropriate accreditation agencies.

A variety of recreational facilities are available to students at the University. These include the Keith Hills Golf Course which is near the campus, the Nathan Johnson Natatorium (which has an indoor Olympic-sized swimming pool), Carter Gymnasium, two tennis complexes and five separate outdoor areas which are available for intramural and recreational use.




Pharmacy Administration Ronald W. Maddox Dean B.S.Ph., Pharm.D. Thomas J. Holmes, Jr. Associate Dean for Academic Affairs B.S.Ph., Ph.D. William Mark Moore Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Admissions B.S.Ph., M.B.A., Pharm.D. Josiah Whitehead Assistant Dean for External Affairs B.S.Ph., M.B.A. Emanuel J. Diliberto, Jr. Chairman, Pharmaceutical Sciences B.S.Ph., Ph.D. Larry N. Swanson Chairman, Pharmacy Practice Pharm.D. J. Rick Turner Chairman, Clinical Research BSc, Ph.D., PGCE

P h a r m a c y F a cul t y Dr. Thomas Abraham

Dr. Christopher Breivogel

Dr. Michael L. Adams

Dr. Brad Chazotte

Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Pharmacology & Toxicology B.S., Chemistry, Mars Hill College; Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences/Pharmacology, East Tennessee St University

Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Medicinal Chemistry Pharm.D., Campbell University; Ph.D., Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington; R.Ph.

Dr. Antoine Al-Achi

Pharmaceutical Sciences Associate Professor Pharmaceutics B.S., Pharmacy, Damascus University; M.Pharm., Hospital Pharmacy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Sciences; M.S., Radiopharmaceutical Sciences, Northeastern University; Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences/ Pharmaceutics, Northeastern University; CT (ASCP)

Dr. Connie L. Barnes

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Director, Drug Information Center Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. Timothy J. Bloom

Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Pharmacology & Molecular Biology B.A., Zoology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Pharmacology, University of Washington

Dr. Andrew Bowman

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Director of Continuing Education Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. James A. Boyd

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Pharmacy Administration B.S., Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center; M.B.A., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Pharm.D., University of Nebraska Medical Center; R.Ph.



Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Pharmacology & Toxicology B.S., Chemistry, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Pharmacology, Wake Forest University

Pharmaceutical Sciences Research Associate Professor B.S., Bucknell University; Ph.D, Chemistry, Northern Illinois University

Dr. Robert Cisneros

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Pharmacy Administration B.S., Pharmacy, Northeast Louisiana University; M.S., Hospital Pharmacy, Auburn University; MBA, University of Alabama; Ph.D., Auburn University; R.Ph.

Dr. April A. Cooper

Pharmacy Practice Clinical Assistant Professor Internal Medicine Durham Regional Hospital B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pharm. D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, R.Ph.

Dr. Steven M. Davis

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Internal Medicine Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Pharm.D., University of Florida at Gainesville; R.Ph.

Dr. Emanuel J. Diliberto, Jr.,

Pharmaceutical Sciences Professor and Chairman B.S., Pharmacy, Albany College of Pharmacy; Ph.D., Pharmacology, University of Rochester; R.Ph.

Dr. Richard Drew

Pharmacy Practice Professor Internal Medicine/Infectious Disease Duke University Medical Center B.S., Pharmacy, University of Rhode Island; M.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pharm.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; R.Ph.


Dr. Lewis M. Fetterman, Jr.

Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor B.S., Chemistry, Washington and Lee University; M.S., Analytical Chemistry, Purdue University; Ph.D., Analytical Chemistry, Purdue University

Dr. Stephen H. Fuller

Dr. James B. Groce, III

Pharmacy Practice Professor Internal Medicine Moses Cone Memorial Hospital B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Ambulatory Care Cary Healthcare Associates B.S., Chemistry, Wake Forest University; B.S., Pharmacy, Medical College of Virginia; Pharm.D., Medical College of Virginia; R.Ph.

Dr. Rebekah Grube

Dr. Kathey Fulton

Pharmaceutical Sciences Associate Professor Industrial Pharmacy B.S., Pharmacy, Gujarat University; M. Pharm., Industrial Pharmacy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences; Ph.D., Industrial Pharmacy, Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences

Pharmacy Practice Clinical Associate Professor Internal Medicine Pitt County Memorial Hospital Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Mr. Mike Gallagher

Pharmaceutical Sciences Instructor/Lab Manager Biochemistry/Analytical Chemistry B.S., Biochemistry, Pennsylvania State University

Dr. Casey Gardner

Pharmacy Practice Clinical Assistant Professor Geriatrics Resources for Seniors Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. Robert L. Garrett, Jr.

Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Pharmacology & Toxicology B.S., Biology, Harding University; Ph.D., Pharmacology, Northeast Louisiana University

Dr. Robert B. Greenwood

Pharmaceutical Sciences Professor and Associate Chair Director of BSPS/MSPS Programs Biopharmaceutics & Pharmacokinetics B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; R.Ph.

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Internal Medicine/Psychiatry Duke University Medical Center Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. Mali R. Gupta

Dr. Terri Hamrick

Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Medical Microbiology & Immunology B.A., Biology and Religious Studies, University of Virginia; Ph.D., Microbiology and Immunology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

Dr. Charles Herring

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Ambulatory Care Downtown Health Plaza B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pharm.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; R.Ph.

Dr. Thomas J. Holmes, Jr.

Pharmaceutical Sciences Professor Clinical Biochemistry Associate Dean for Academic Affairs B.S., Pharmacy, Duquesne University; Ph.D., Medicinal Chemistry, University of Michigan

Dr. Brenda Jamerson

Clinical Research Associate Professor Director, School of Pharmacy Clinical Research Center B.S. Pharmacy, St. Louis College of Pharmacy; Pharm.D., Ohio State University College of Pharmacy 


P h a r m a c y F a cul t y

(continued)

Dr. Mary Margaret Johnson

Clinical Research Assistant Professor Director, BSCR Program M.B.A., Campbell University; Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. Melissa Johnson

Pharmacy Practice Clinical Assistant Professor Internal Medicine Duke University Medical Center B.S., Biochemistry, University of Georgia; Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. Cynthia Johnston

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Internal Medicine Durham VA Medical Center B.S. Pharmacy, University of Connecticut; Pharm.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; R.Ph.

Dr. James L. Junker

Pharmaceutical Sciences Associate Professor Anatomy and Physiology B.S., Biology, Muhlenberg College; Ph.D., Pathology, Duke University

Ms. Jena T. Kelly

Pharmaceutical Sciences Instructor BSPS/MSPS Program Administrator Technical Writing & Interpersonal Skills B.A., Mass Communication, Campbell University; M.B.A., Fayetteville State University

Dr. Ronald W. Maddox

Pharmacy Practice Professor Dean B.S., Pharmacy, Auburn University; Pharm.D, University of Tennessee; R.Ph.

Dr. D. Byron May

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Internal Medicine Duke University Medical Center Pharm.D., University of Florida at Gainesville; R.Ph.

Dr. Sarah McBane

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Ambulatory Care Duke University Medical Center B.S., Biology and Chemistry, Guilford College; Pharm.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; R.Ph.

Dr. William Mark Moore

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Assistant Dean for Student Affairs and Admissions Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.B.A., Campbell University; Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. George Nemecz

Pharmaceutical Sciences Assistant Professor Biochemistry B.S., Chemistry, University of Szeged, Hungary; M.S., Chemistry, University of Szeged, Hungary; Ph.D. Biochemical Sciences, University of Szeged, Hungary

Dr. Ann Marie Nye

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Geriatrics East Carolina University Department of Family Medicine Pharm. D., Medical College of Virginia; R.Ph.

Col. William W. Pickard

Clinical Research Associate Professor Director of Student Affairs – Clinical Research B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.S., Pharmacy Practice, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, R.Ph.

Dr. Roy Pleasants, II

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Pulmonology Duke University Medical Center B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Pharm. D., Medical University of South Carolina; R.Ph.

Dr. Melanie W. Pound

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Internal Medicine Cape Fear Valley Medical Center Pharm. D., Campbell University; R.Ph. 


Mr. Robert J. Schmid

Clinical Research Assistant Professor Director of Distance Education LEARN Technology Center B.S., Business Administration, North Carolina State University; M.S., Clinical Research, Campbell University

Dr. Jennifer Schuh

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Geriatrics Durham VA Medical Center Pharm.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison; R.Ph.

Dr. Penny Shelton

Pharmacy Practice Clinical Assistant Professor Geriatrics Physicians Pharmacy Alliance Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. Daniel Shin

Pharmaceutical Sciences Associate Professor Analytical Chemistry B.A., Korea University, Korea; M.S., Western Illinois University; Ph.D, North Carolina State University.

Dr. Jennifer Smith

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Ambulatory Care Wilson Community Health Center Pharm.D., Campbell University, R.Ph.

Dr. William C. Stagner

Pharmaceutical Sciences Professor Director of Campbell University Pharmaceutical Sciences Institute B.S, Pharmacy, University of Iowa; M.S., Ph.D., Pharmaceutics, University of Iowa; R.Ph.

Dr. Gilbert Steiner

Dr. Larry N. Swanson

Pharmacy Practice Professor and Chairman Pharm.D., University of Southern California; R.Ph.

Dr. William J. Taylor, Jr.

Clinical Research Associate Professor Director of Joint Pharm.D./MSCR Program B.S., Pharmacy, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill; Pharm.D., University of Tennessee; R.Ph.

Dr. Tina Harrison Thornhill

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Geriatrics Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Dr. Mary Townsend

Pharmacy Practice Assistant Professor Internal Medicine Durham VA Medical Center Pharm.D., Mercer University; R.Ph.

Dr. J. Rick Turner

Clinical Research Associate Professor Chairman Director, Pharmacy Research Resource Center BSc, Psychology, University of Sheffield; PhD, University of Birmingham; PGCE, Sheffield Hallam University

Pharmacy Practice Associate Professor Director of the Wellness Institute Director of Community Pharmacy Residency Program B.S., Pharmacy, Pharm.D., Wayne State University, CPP; R.Ph.

Ms. Dyan Whitlow Underhill

Dr. Wendy Gattis Stough

Mr. Josiah R. Whitehead

Clinical Research Associate Professor Pharm.D., Campbell University; R.Ph.

Clinical Research Instructor Clinical Research Coordinator B.S., Psychology, College of Charleston; M.H.A, Medical University of South Carolina.

Assistant Dean of External Affairs B.S., Pharmacy, Butler University; M.B.A, Xavier University; R.Ph. 


Adjunct/Clinical Faculty Mary Ann Amarante, Ph.D. Beth McLendon Arvik, Pharm.D. Tara Bell, Pharm.D. Cassie Billings, Pharm.D. Darryl Bing, PhD Alison Bowers, M.Sc., RAC Russell Bowes, III, Ph.D. Amanda Browde Jane Brown Betsy Bryant, Pharm.D. Susan Bullard, Pharm.D. Tina Bullard, Pharm.D. Jennifer Burch, Pharm.D. Doug Call, Ph.D., PMP Dwayne Campbell, Ph.D. Jay Campbell, J.D., R.Ph. Jorge Carrillo, Pharm.D. James Clark, R.Ph. Santo Costa, Ph.D. Gigi Davidson, R.Ph. Steve Dedrick, R.Ph., M.S. Douglas Degler, M.D. Todd Durham, M.S. Melissa Durkee, Pharm.D. Angela Elliott, Pharm.D. William Elliott, Pharm.D. Nathan Erteschik, M.D. Carlos Estrada, M.D. Rick Farris Julie Faulkner, Pharm.D. Anita Flick, M.D., Ph.D. Leigh Liles Foushee, Pharm.D. Eddie Fuller, Pharm.D. Debby Futrell, Pharm.D. Anna T. Garrett, Pharm.D. Joel Glasson, R.Ph., M.S. Katrina Goddard, R.D., Pharm.D. Graham Green, Ph.D. Wendy Haines, Ph.D. Paula Harris, Pharm.D. Peter Henkel, Pharm.D., CPP Lynn Henson, Pharm.D. John Hewitt, Ph.D. Alyce Holmes, Pharm.D. Ronnie Scott Holuby, Pharm.D. Edward Jackson, Pharm.D., MBA Michelle Jacobs, Pharm.D. Shan Jiang, Ph.D. James Johnson, Ph.D. Keith A. Johnson, Ph.D. Kathleen Johnson, Pharm.D. Art Kamm, Ph.D. LeAnne Kennedy, Pharm.D. Richard D. Kiernan Rob King Todd King, Pharm.D. Vanessa King, Pharm.D. 

Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Instructor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Clinical Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Assistant Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Instructor Adjunct Professor Clinical Instructor Adjunct Clinical Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Instructor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Assistant Professor Adjunct Assistant Professor Clinical Instructor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Clinical Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor

Julienne Kirk, Pharm.D. Kelly Knapp, Pharm.D. Donald Knight Judith M. Kramer, M.D. Ramesh Krishnamoorthy, Ph.D. Tim Lassiter, Pharm.D. Joanne Kure Latour, Pharm.D. Kenneth Latta, R.Ph. Terry Laws, Pharm.D. Cathy Lawson, Pharm.D., BCPS Charlie Lineberry, Ph.D. Eric Locklear, Pharm.D. Rob Malone, Pharm.D. David Marcozzi, M.D., FACEP Thomas A. Martin, Pharm.D. Stephen McCombs, M.D. Andrea Meyers Joe Moose, Pharm.D. Ashley Morris, Pharm.D., BCPS Paul Ossman, M.D., M.P.H. Girish Pande, Ph.D. Poonam Pande, Ph.D. Alan Parr, Ph.D. Brian Peek, Pharm.D. Angela Pentecost, Pharm.D. Neil Petry, R.Ph., M.S. Angela Porter, Pharm.D. William Randall, Jr., R.Ph. Michael Riel, M.D. Johnanne Ross, Pharm.D. Clare Sanchez, M.D., FACP Ann Scates, Pharm.D. Michelle Sharpe, Pharm.D. Carl W. Sigel, Ph.D. Ronald H. Small, R.Ph., MBA Carolyn Smoak, Pharm.D. Christopher Spancake, Ph.D. Christopher Stewart, M.D. Sandra S. Stinnett, Dr.P.H. Angela Stokes, Pharm.D. Daniel W. Teat, Pharm.D. James Tyndall, R.Ph. Andrew C. Vinal, Ph.D. Anton Usala, M.D. Carmen Wagner, Ph.D. George Waterhouse, Ph.D. Jack Watts, D.Sc., R.Ph. Mickey Wells, Ph.D. Leslie Williams, Pharm.D. Angela Womack, Pharm.D. David Work, R.Ph., J.D. David Wrenn, Ph.D. Mark Yates, Ph.D. Monty Yoder, Pharm.D. Carol Young, Jr., M.D. Sammy Choi Young, M.D. Sally Yowell, Pharm.D.

Clinical Associate Professor Adjunct Clinical Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Associate Professor Clinical Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Clinical Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Associate Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Assistant Professor Adjunct Assistant Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Instructor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Professor Clinical Instructor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Adjunct Clinical Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Instructor Adjunct Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Assistant Professor Clinical Instructor Clinical Assistant Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Professor Adjunct Associate Professor Clinical Assistant Professor Clinical Instructor Clinical Instructor Clinical Assistant Professor


p r e - ph a r m a c y p r o g r a m

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re-Pharmacy is a unique non-degree program especially designed to prepare students for entry into Campbell’s highly regarded and competitive School of Pharmacy. The school offers several options for individuals who are interested in pharmacy or pharmacy-related careers: the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program, the BS and MS in Clinical Research Programs, and the BS and MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences Programs. The Pre-Pharmacy curriculum will assist a student in the completion of the requirements for entry into all School of Pharmacy Programs. During the pre-pharmacy years, each student will be assigned a School of Pharmacy Faculty Advisor. The Faculty Advisor will provide the student with appropriate advice and guidance each semester in planning the student’s class schedule. In addition, there is a Pre-Pharmacy Coordinator, who works full-time to assist Pre-Pharmacy students.

Students interested in the Pre-Pharmacy Program should contact the Undergraduate Admissions Office for application information at 1-800-760-9734, Ext. 1290. Additional questions regarding the program may be directed to the Campbell University Pre-Pharmacy Office at 1-800-760-9734, Ext. 1710.

Requirements Admission to the four-year Doctor of Pharmacy Program requires a minimum of two academic years of pre-professional education credit at an accredited college or university in the United States. Each applicant must complete a minimum of 64 semester hours of college credit with a grade of “C” or higher in all prerequisite courses. The specific requirements are as follows:

COURSE

SEMESTER HOURS

English Composition

6 hours

*Religion (Bible Based)

3 hours

Humanities (Literature, Music, Fine Arts, Foreign Languages, Philosophy)

6 hours

Social Sciences (History, Psychology, Sociology, Political Science)

6 hours

Economics or Accounting

3 hours

Physical Education (selected Health courses considered)

2 hours

Calculus I

3 hours

Physics (may be algebra-based and/or for health professions majors)

4 hours

General Chemistry

8 hours

Organic Chemistry

8 hours

**Biological Sciences (General Biology, Anatomy/Physiology, Microbiology, Immunology, Cell Biology, or Biochemistry)

8 hours

Electives (Advanced Biology/Chemistry, Business, Statistics, Computer Science)

7 hours

Total: 64 hours

*If you are attending a school that does not offer Bible-based religion courses, this requirement can be met during the professional curriculum. ** Twelve hours of Biological Sciences are strongly recommended.




Pharmacy S ch o l a r Program

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ncumbent with the remarkable success the School of Pharmacy has enjoyed is greater notoriety and a significant demand for places in the Doctor of Pharmacy class. Gaining admission to the School of Pharmacy has become decidedly more rigorous and difficult as the years have progressed.

Benefits of the Program The Campbell Pharmacy Scholar Program is designed to reward students who have demonstrated academic excellence during their high school education. Simply stated, it guarantees admission to the Campbell University School of Pharmacy for high school valedictorians, salutatorian and nominees from guidance counselors and principals who continue their legacy of academic proficiency when enrolled in the Pre-Pharmacy Program at Campbell University.

Requirements for Qualification The Campbell Pharmacy Scholar Program guarantees admission to the School of Pharmacy to students who meet the following criteria: 1.

Graduation from an accredited high school in the United States as: a. Valedictorian of graduation class. b. Salutatorian of graduation class. c. Have at least an unweighted 3.50 GPA on a 4.0 scale and be nominated by guidance counselor and principal.

2. A High School transcript must be presented which verifies the applicant is qualified in one of the categories mentioned above. 3. A Candidate must enroll as a Pre-Pharmacy major at Campbell University to complete the academic work required to be admitted to the Doctor of Pharmacy Program. (Transfer students may not participate) 4. College academic performance requirements: a. Valedictorians must maintain at least a 3.5 overall average and at least a 3.5 Science/Math average in Pre-Pharmacy coursework at Campbell University. b. Salutatorians must maintain at least a 3.6 overall average and at least a 3.6 Science/Math average in Pre-Pharmacy coursework at Campbell University. c. Nominees from guidance counselors/principals must maintain at least a 3.6 overall average and at least a 3.6 Science/Math average in Pre-Pharmacy coursework at Campbell University.

5. The applicant must obtain a score of 75 or better in both the Biology and Chemistry portions of the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) and an overall composite score of 75 or better. 6. The student’s Pre-Pharmacy advisor at Campbell must endorse the candidate’s application to the School of Pharmacy by submitting a letter to the Pharmacy Admissions Office. 7. Candidates must fulfill all requirements for admission to the School of Pharmacy successfully, including the interview. 8. The applicant must register with the Pre-Pharmacy Office at Campbell University to be considered for the program.

How to Apply Students interested in this program should contact the Campbell University Pre-Pharmacy Office at 1-800-760-9734, ext. 1710.

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Doctor of Pharmacy Admissions Policies & Procedures

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he Campbell University School of Pharmacy is committed to selecting applicants who will be an asset to the profession of pharmacy. The goals of the admissions process are to: 1) understand each applicant as a total person, 2) evaluate the potential for success in the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) Program, and 3) assess the candidate’s commitment and aptitude as a future practicing pharmacist. Each applicant’s academic background and achievement, personal statement, Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) scores, and letters of recommendation will be considered by the Admissions Committee. Each applicant must complete a minimum of 64 semester hours of college credit prior to entry into the professional curriculum. All pre-professional academic work must be done at an accredited college or university in the United States. A minimum grade point average of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in all coursework attempted will be considered for admission to the Pharm.D. Program. In addition to academic performance, the Admissions Committee places emphasis on personal merit, leadership, community involvement, maturity, communication skills, and dedication to professional goals. Beginning each fall, members of the next class are selected using a modified rolling admissions procedure. Under this system, qualified applicants are admitted to the School of Pharmacy on an ongoing basis until the class is filled. Applicants are strongly encouraged to submit all required admissions documents early in the academic year to maximize their admissions potential. Applications received after November 1st each year face significantly increased competition for admission and may be placed on a waiting list, regardless of qualifications. The final deadline for applications is March 1st. The application process for the Doctor of Pharmacy Program is a two-step process:

PharmCAS. Applicants must submit an application through the

Pharmacy College Application Service (PharmCAS), available on-line at www.PharmCAS.org. Original transcripts from post-secondary schools and Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) scores must be submitted to PharmCAS. Transcripts reflecting spring grades must be sent directly to the Admissions Office. Applicants are also required to submit three letters of recommendations to PharmCAS. At least one letter from a Science professor and a pharmacist is preferred.

Supplemental Materials. A supplemental application with required application fee must be submitted to Campbell University School of Pharmacy. The supplemental application can be found by visiting www.campbell.edu/ pharmacy. Students may also submit additional letters of recommendation directly to the School of Pharmacy. To be considered for admission, a completed application package must be filed in the Admissions Office of the School of Pharmacy. A completed package consists of: 1. All admissions information submitted through PharmCAS 2. A completed supplemental application form with required fee 3. At least three letters of recommendation.

Interviews. Each completed application package will be evaluated by the Admissions Committee to determine the applicant’s potential as a Campbell pharmacy student. Based on this evaluation, an invitation to participate in a personal admissions interview may be extended. The interview is designed as a

two-way exchange with the goal of mutually enhancing the understanding of both the applicant and the Admissions Committee. Applicants will be notified by mail of admissions decisions following the admissions interviews.

Early Decision Program. An Early Decision Program is available. Students interested in this option may only select one school as their preference through PharmCAS. All materials must be forwarded to the appropriate locations prior to the Early Decision deadline in order to be considered as an Early Decision Candidate. A decision will be rendered by the deadline specified by PharmCAS. Valid admissions decisions for an Early Decision Candidate consist of: 1) accepting the student, 2) denying the student, or 3) referring them back to the general applicant pool where they can then apply to other schools while being considered by their primary preference. The School and the student have the potential to benefit from this program by confirming admissions and enrollment for qualified applicants early in the admissions process.

Ac a d e m ic ch e c k lis t • Complete and submit a PharmCAS application available online at: www.PharmCAS.org • Submit official transcripts from all post-secondary schools and PCAT scores to PharmCAS. Information on the PCAT may be obtained online at www.pcatweb.info • Complete and submit a supplemental application and required fee to the Campbell University School of Pharmacy Admissions Office. • Submit at least three (3) letters of recommendation to PharmCAS. At least one letter from a Science professor and a pharmacist is preferred.

P LEASE N O T E : The applicant is responsible for ensuring the timely receipt and updating of all required application documentation. Your file will not be reviewed by the Admissions Committee until all application materials have been received by the Admissions Office. Inquiries, requests for more information or application materials should be forwarded to:

Campbell University School of Pharmacy The Office of Admissions P. O. Box 1090 Buies Creek, North Carolina 27506 1-800-760-9734 ext. 1690 www.campbell.edu/pharmacy 11


Doctor of Pharmacy m a t r icul a t i o n p o lici e s Students matriculating into the Pharm.D. Program are required to meet the following: A) Complete the required vaccination and immunization requirements, including the Hepatitis B series, varicella immunity and a TB test. The Hepatitis B series is delivered in three injections over a 6 month period.

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Each student must also provide Student Health Services with a completed immunization and medical history form before the first day of classes. B) Submit to a Criminal Background Check as described by the following policy: 1)  Doctor of Pharmacy applicants are requested to disclose any misdemeanors or felony convictions, other than minor traffic violations, including deferred adjudications, with the understanding that non-disclosure/falsification may lead to dismissal and disclosure may prevent enrollment. 2)  A criminal background check will be completed on all applicants accepted annually to the pharmacy school entering class. 3)  The criminal background check will be initiated at the time an applicant is accepted and has made a deposit to the school. 4)  The criminal background check is not a component of the application, interview, or decision-making process for the school. It is a mandatory component of the post-acceptance matriculation process. The letter sent by the school to each accepted applicant, as well as to selected wait-listed applicants as necessary, will include information about these requirements, with the contingency that the final decision about pharmacy school matriculation be made after institutional review of the accepted applicant’s criminal background check report. 5)  Appropriate authorization, with pertinent identifying information necessary to initiate the check, will be received from each accepted applicant prior to initiating a criminal background check. This authorization will inform the accepted applicant that he/she will have access to criminal background check data about himself/herself to ensure the accuracy of the criminal background check report. 6)  Ultimate decisions about the matriculation of an accepted applicant whose criminal background check reveals information of concern will be made by the School’s Admissions committee in consultation with University Counsel. 7)  No information derived from a criminal background check will automatically disqualify any accepted applicant from pharmacy school matriculation. A final decision about matriculation will be made only after a careful review of factors including: a) The nature, circumstances, and frequency of any offense(s) b) The length of time since the offense(s) c) Documented successful rehabilitation d) The accuracy of the information provided by the applicant in his/her application materials. 8) Information from these reports that is unrelated to decisions about admissions and continued enrollment will be maintained in the Office of the Dean and not become part of the students’ permanent file. 9) Information obtained will only be used in accord with state and federal laws. 10)  Enrolled students are required to disclose any misdemeanor or felony convictions other than minor traffic violations, including deferred adjudication, within thirty days of occurrence to the Office of Student Affairs.


Tuition and Fees

FALL 2006

Tuition (Pharm.D.)

Accident Insurance (required)

$10,700.00

SPRING 2007 $10,700.00

76.00

0.00

Yearbook (optional)

70.00

0.00

Pharmacy Student Executive Board Fee (required)

30.00

30.00

Professional Liability Insurance (required)

45.00

0.00

358.00

0.00

1260.00

0.00

20.00

20.00

85.00

0.00

Illness Insurance (optional) Illness Insurance (International Students-required) Dorm Activity Fee (if living in dorm)

Parking Permit NOTE: Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/pharmacy for the most up to date tuition information.

For Your Information: (Other fees/expense: Books and clinical tools are estimated at approximately $400.00 per semester.) Also, P-4 graduating students are responsible for the purchase of their cap/gown.

Refund Policy: “If any student attends any class and subsequently withdraws or is suspended from the School of Pharmacy for any cause, no refund of tuition or any part of the fees is made.”

For campus housing, call 910-893-1543 or 1-800-334-4111, EXT 1543 or 1542 for more information on available housing.

Meal Plan: Declining balance meal plan — pay in advance at the Business Office to have funds placed on your declining balance account ... this account may be used at Marshbanks and Shouse Dining Halls, Oasis Grill and Deli, chik-fil-a and at Starbucks.

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Financial Assistance

inancing a pharmacy education is a major concern of many students, and Campbell University provides a variety of means by which this may be accomplished. Some of the options are available to all students, while others are available only to those who have demonstrated financial need. Applications for financial aid are processed without regard to sex, age, handicap, race, color, creed, or national origin. Each student is considered for aid on an individual basis with special emphasis placed on unique situations. To determine need, Campbell University uses the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) to estimate an individual’s or family’s fair contribution toward the cost of education. In addition to the filing of a nationally accepted needs analysis form, each student is required to secure and have forwarded to the Student Financial Aid Office, Campbell University, a Financial Aid Transcript from each college or university the student has previously attended. Students and parents are reminded that a new needs analysis form must be submitted each year that the student desires to be considered for financial aid. Detailed information on requirements and procedures is available upon request from the Office of Student Financial Aid, by calling 1-800-760-9734, Ext. 1310.

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Doctor of Pharmacy C u r r iculu m First Professional Year Fall

Anatomy and Physiology Biochemistry Medical Microbiology Pharmaceutical Calculations Pharmacy in the US Healthcare System Drug Information Pharmaceutical Care Skills Lab

Spring

Second Professional Year

Course

Hours

Fall

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

Spring

Course

Hours

PHAR 421

3

PHAR 423 PHAR 406 PHAR 403 PHAR 405

4 4 2 3

Course

Hours

PHAR 302 PHAR 304 PHAR 312 PHAR 301 PHAR 305 PHAR 309 PHAR 331

4 4 4 2 2 1 1

Anatomy and Physiology Patient Counseling and Professional Communications Immunology Clinical Biochemistry Biopharmaceutics Pharmacy Marketing and Management Pharmaceutical Care Skills Lab

PHAR 306

PHAR 303 PHAR 310 PHAR 308 PHAR 314 PHAR 307 PHAR 332

2 3 3 3 3 1

Summer (one month)

Course

Hours

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

PHAR 505

4

Principles of Pharmacology and Medicinal Chemistry PHAR 412 3 Autonomic, Cardiovascular, Renal and Paracrine Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry PHAR 417 4 Biology of Disease PHAR 408 5 Pharmaceutics I PHAR 404 3 Pharmacokinetics PHAR 410 2

Endocrine and CNS Pharmacology/ Medicinal Chemistry Anti-Infective, Antiviral, Antineoplastic and Immunopharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry Pharmaceutics II with Lab Financial Management and Pharmacoeconomics Nonprescription Drug Therapy

Summer (one month)

Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience II

PHAR 507

1

1

Third Professional Year Fall

Therapeutics Experimental Design and Biostatistics Jurisprudence Top 300 Examination Electives

Spring

Therapeutics Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Introduction to Clinical Research Design and Literature Evaluation Physical Assessment Electives

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

PHAR 544 PHAR 519 PHAR 5XX

2 2 3

PHAR 501/503 PHAR 528 PHAR 511 PHAR 508 PHAR 5XX

PHAR 545/547 PHAR 509

6 4 3 1 3

6 4

Fourth Professional Year Fall/Spring

Advanced Practice Experiences (nine one-month) Professional Presentation Seminar

Course

PHAR 6XX PHAR 699

Hours 36 1

NOTE: Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/pharmacy for the most up to date curriculum information.

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Doctor of Pharmacy C O U R S E D E S C R I P T I ON S PHAR 100 – Pre-Pharmacy Seminar Credit: 1 Hour This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the profession of pharmacy, the pharmaceutical industry and to the Campbell University School of Pharmacy. this course emphasizes several key concepts necessary to build students’ skill sets for their future endeavors in college, as well as their chosen profession and upon graduation.

PHAR 308 – Clinical Biochemistry Credit: 3 Hours This course discusses the principles of quantitative analysis utilized in common clinical laboratory tests. An introduction to interpretation of abnormal clinical laboratory values is presented. Quantitative aspects of nutrition are presented, and regulatory effects of various hormones are described. Diseases such as arteriosclerosis and diabetes are discussed.

PHAR 301 – Pharmaceutical Calculations Credit: 2 Hours This course covers mathematics encountered in pharmacy practice.

PHAR 309 – Drug Information Credit: 1 Hour This course is designed to introduce the student to sources of drug information and methods of biostatistical analysis. Practical experience in the Drug Information Center will allow the student the opportunity to practice these skills, evaluate the literature, and communicate this information to other healthcare practitioners.

PHAR 302-306 – Anatomy and Physiology Credit: 4-4 Hours This two-course sequence presents a comprehensive study of the structure and function of all organ systems as well as basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cellular and membrane function. Relevance to clinical states and drug action is also presented in many areas. PHAR 303 – Patient Counseling & Professional Communications Credit: 2 Hours This interactive course is designed to guide pharmacy students in the development of effective counseling and communication skills. Emphasis will be placed on development of effective communication to the level of the patients’ understanding and education for the most commonly used drugs. Using videotape technology and role-playing techniques, students will improve their proficiency and competency in effective patient communications and counseling. PHAR 304 – Biochemistry Credit: 4 Hours A comprehensive course in biochemistry which discusses the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Principles of enzyme kinetics and regulation, bioenergetics, and macromolecular structure-function relationships are presented. PHAR 305 – Pharmacy in the U.S. Healthcare System Credit: 2 Hours An overview of the development, background, concepts and issues of the U.S. healthcare system and how pharmacy functions within this system will be discussed. Sociological and psychological concepts relating to the way a patient feels, thinks and acts, and external factors influencing the patients’ decision making process will be examined. A broad overview of the U.S. pharmaceutical industry and the manner in which drug products are marketed will be examined. PHAR 307 – Pharmacy Marketing and Management Credit: 3 Hours This course will present principles of marketing and management as they may be applied in pharmacy practice with a particular emphasis on the managed care environment.

PHAR 310 – Immunology Credit: 3 Hours This course covers basic immunology and the fundamental principles relating to the immune response in normal and disease states. PHAR 312 – Medical Microbiology Credit: 4 Hours The basic principles of bacteriology, mycology, parasitology, and virology are presented. The pathogenic properties and diseases of medically important species of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, helminths, and viruses are described. PHAR 314 – Biopharmaceutics Credit: 3 Hours The biological and physicochemical factors of the body, drugs, and dosage forms that influence drug availability, disposition, and pharmacological and toxicological responses are presented. PHAR 331/332 – Pharmaceutical Care Skills Lab Credit: 1 Hour Pass/Fail Students enrolled in the first professional year of the Doctor of Pharmacy program are provided an opportunity to shadow senior (P-4) pharmacy students at advanced practice experience sites. In lab sessions, students will learn health screening skills (e.g. taking a blood pressure or measuring blood cholesterol). Students will also get to participate in health screening of actual patients in our innovative Pharmaceutical Care Center (Kerr Drug, Benson). Additional lab sessions enable a student to recognize the application of classroom coursework in different pharmaceutical care settings and to identify postgraduate career opportunities. PHAR 403 – Financial Management & Pharmacoeconomics Credit: 2 Hours This course is designed to explore the practical applications of financial management in pharmacy practice. Emphasis is placed on quantitative aspects of effective business management and those techniques for decision making in a pharmaceutical care practice site.

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C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued)

PHAR 404 – Pharmaceutics I Credit: 3 Hours This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of medicinal products’ physical and chemical properties of and how these properties influence the design of dosage forms. PHAR 405 – Nonprescription Drug Therapy Credit: 3 Hours This course studies the various nonprescription (over-the-counter) medications commonly found in community pharmacy practice. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving processes involved in therapeutic evaluation, rational use, and recommendation of these products to patients. PHAR 406 – Pharmaceutics II with Lab Credit: 4 Hours This course enables the student to become proficient in general compounding techniques and a basic knowledge of dosage formulation. A weekly laboratory is designed to enhance the technical capability of students in this area. PHAR 408 – Biology of Disease Credit: 5 Hours This course is designed to acquaint the student with major diseases, their etiology, pathology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and prognosis. PHAR 410 – Pharmacokinetics Credit: 2 Hours This course provides the student with an understanding of basic clinically applicable pharmacokinetic formulas and the assumptions that are involved with their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. PHAR 412 – Principles of Pharmacology & Medicinal Chemistry Credit: 3 Hours First in a series of Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry courses, this course introduces the student to the basic principles of structure activity relationships and biochemical pharmacology with special emphasis placed on physicochemical properties of functional groups, acid-based chemistry, metabolism, receptor theory, and signal transduction. PHAR 417 – Autonomic, Cardiovascular, Renal and Paracrine Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry Credit: 4 Hours Second in the series of Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry courses, PHAR 417 examines the pharmacology/medicinal chemistry of drugs that modulate neuromuscular transmission and the autonomic nervous system. The course will cover drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular deseases such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias and congestive heart failure. In addition, drugs used to modulate autocoid activity including prostaglandins and histamine will be examined. PHAR 421 – Endocrine and CNS Pharmacology/ Medicinal Chemistry Credit: 3 Hours Third in the series of Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry courses, PHAR 421 examines the pharmacology/medicinal chemistry of hormone agonists, antagonists, and other drugs that modulate the endocrine system, as well as drugs used to treat mental disorders and CNS diseases with special emphasis on their mechanisms of action, structure activity relationships and major adverse effects. 16

PHAR 423 – Anti-Infective, Antineoplastic and Immunopharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry Credit: 4 Hours Fourth in the series of Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry courses, PHAR 423 examines the pharmacology/medicinal chemistry of agents used to treat infectious and neoplastic diseases. Immunomodulating agents in the treatment of organ transplantation are also discussed. Included are the broad range of antibacterial agents, antifungal agents, antiparasitic agents, antiviral agents, antineoplastic agents, vaccines and immunomodulatory agents. PHAR 444 and 454 – EMT Training I and II Credit: 3 Hours Each These courses recognize proficiency achieved in training by a certified instructor for emergency medical technician service. Both courses are required to prepare for EMT certification. PHAR 501/503 – Therapeutics I/II Credit: 3 Hours Each These courses are designed to illustrate the appropriate clinical application of pharmacodynamics, pathophysiology, and pharmacokinetics to a variety of common acute and chronic disease states. Emphasis is placed on data collection and decision making required for optimal drug therapy. Prerequisites: PHAR 400, 402, 408 and 410. PHAR 504 – Special Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences Credit: Variable (Maximum 3 Hours) The purpose of this elective course is to introduce the pharmacy student to methods of basic science and/or clinical research. This involves application of the scientific processes of hypothesis formation, literature evaluation, experimental design, development of technical skills, data acquisition and analysis, and formal presentation of results. PHAR 505 and 507 – Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences Credit: 1 Hour Each These three one-month practice experiences are designed to expose the student to the practice of pharmaceutical care in the community and institutions. These experiences emphasize the drug distribution functions of the pharmacist in the various settings. These experiences are usually scheduled during the summers following the first and second professional years. PHAR 508 – Top 300 Examination Credit: 1 Hour This examination is designed to evaluate the students’ mastery of basic facts concerning the Top 300 most commonly prescribed drug products. Prerequisites: PHAR 505, 506, and 507. PHAR 509 – Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Credit: 4 Hours This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to apply pharmacokinetic principles in the clinical arena. Emphasis is placed on therapeutic monitoring and individualization of drug therapy. Prerequisites: PHAR 301, 314 and 410. PHAR 510 – Cancer and Carcinogenesis I Credit: 1 Hour Intended as an aid to understanding the nature of cancer, this unit examines the physiologic, morphologic, and biochemical differences between normal and neoplastic tissues.


PHAR 516 – Enzyme Inhibitors as Drugs Credit: 1 Hour A study of modern techniques to design enzyme inhibitors (agents): noncompetitive inhibitors, transition state analogs, suicide inhibitors, and active-site directed inhibitors. The rationale and mechanisms of selective toxicity is also considered. PHAR 518 – General Toxicology Credit: 3 Hours This course is designed to give the student a broad appreciation of the field of Toxicology. The student is guided through the mechanisms by which toxicants enter the body and the biotransformation processes that result in the diseaseproducing entities. The various cellular mechanisms of toxicity and the major target organs affected by toxins will be treated in some detail. Didactic material may be augmented with both in vivo and in vitro experimental laboratories for assessing toxicity. Aspects of environmental, forensic, clinical toxicology, and risk assessment will also be addressed in this course. PHAR 519 – Physical Assessment Credit: 2 Hours This course introduces the pharmacy student to the basic principles and techniques of history taking and physical examination. Students in this course will have an opportunity to develop the skills necessary to adequately follow the patient using physical assessment parameters and to monitor drug therapy when appropriate. The student will also have an opportunity to use and demonstrate the skills learned in this class during his or her Advanced Practice Experience rotations.

PHAR 511 – Jurisprudence Credit: 3 Hours This course is a study of the laws that affect the pharmacist. Special attention is given to business law, Harrison and Uniform Narcotics Acts, the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act, Durham-Humphrey Act, and North Carolina law. This course also emphasizes the practical application of professional ethics.

PHAR 521 – Substance Abuse Education Credit: 3 Hours This Drug Education Program modeled after the Student Committee on Drug Abuse Education (SCODAE) program involves organizing and training pharmacy students to speak to junior high/high school students on the hazards of drug abuse.

PHAR 512 – Cancer and Carcinogenesis II Credit: 1 Hour An overview is provided of the various types of cancer including predisposing factors, clinical diagnosis, growth patterns, metastatic potential, prognosis, and etiology. (Note: PHAR 510 is recommended as a prerequisite.)

PHAR 522 – Practical Compounding Techniques Credit: 1 Hour This elective course will expose students to practice settings in which compounding is used in modern pharmacy. Practitioners and other experts will discuss and demonstrate various aspects of the art and science of compounding. Students will apply and practice their calculation and prescription-preparation skills with formulations used commonly by current practitioners. Prerequisites: PHAR 404 and 406.

PHAR 514 – Advanced Topics in Cardiovascular Pharmacology Credit: 1 Hour The mechanisms by which pharmacological agents modify the contractility of cardiac and smooth muscle will be discussed in this elective course. A special emphasis will be placed on how alteration of calcium ion concentration affects contraction.

PHAR 523 – Special Research Projects in Pharmacy Practice Credit: Variable (Maximum 3 Hours) Independent study projects performed under the direction of any individual faculty member in the Department of Pharmacy Practice. Each elective credit represents a minimum time commitment of three hours per week of laboratory research, clinical research, or project preparation.

PHAR 515 – Drug-Induced Diseases Credit: 3 Hours This course is designed to emphasize Adverse Drug Reaction(s) (ADR) knowledge and competencies necessary in patient evaluation, literature evaluation, and in the implementation of effective ADR avoidance programs: Prerequisite: PHAR 501.

PHAR 524 – Toxicology Problems Credit: 1 or 2 Hours Students will be challenged to analyze and discuss case studies of problems typically encountered in evaluating drug toxicity. The development of critical thinking skills, problem-solving capabilities, and decision-making approaches will be emphasized over specific memorization of facts. 17


C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued)

PHAR 525 – Ethics in Pharmacy Practice Credit: 2 Hours As healthcare professionals, pharmacists encounter a variety of problems which may compromise quality care and patient rights. This course is designed to enable pharmacy students to approach moral dilemmas objectively with a thorough understanding of professional moral responsibility. Students will learn skills in moral reasoning necessary to promote the dignity of clients they serve. PHAR 526 – Scientific Basis of Drug Selection Credit: 2 Hours This course develops skills needed to critically evaluate current research literature to assess the therapeutic potential of a new and improved modification of an existing drug. The course focuses on calcium channel blockers and beta adrenergic antagonists and agonists as examples of drug classes requiring such assessment. PHAR 528 – Experimental Design and Biostatistics Credit: 4 Hours This course involves the application of statistical methods in health sciences. The course is intended to provide the student with basic knowledge of descriptive statistics, probability theory, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistical methods useful in the design and evaluation of clinical research investigation. PHAR 530 – Biotechnology in Pharmacy Credit: 3 Hours This course is intended to expose students to the basic principles and practical applications of molecular biological techniques to pharmaceutical product development. Experimental, analytical, and production technologies will be discussed along with ethical implications, if appropriate. PHAR 531 – Strategic Management in Healthcare Credit: 3 Hours This course is designed to acquaint the student with the aggregation of activities involved in the planning, establishment, and continuing management of a healthcare business. A seminar-type format will encourage discussion of specific topics in healthcare management including environmental analysis, defining

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mission and objectives; strategy formulation, implementation and control; operations, marketing, and financial foundations, international operations, and social responsibilities. PHAR 532 – Introduction to Radiopharmaceuticals Credit: 3 Hours This course provides the student with basic information concerning the design and handling of radioactive pharmaceutical products for diagnostic and therapeutic use. Topics to be addressed include production and decay characteristics of radionuclides, radiation safety, dosimetry, radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques, and applications to clinical medicine. PHAR 533 – Introduction to Pharmacy Consulting Credit: 1 Hour This elective course is designed to introduce students to the practice of consultant pharmacy. Pharmacists are required by the Federal government to monitor the drug therapy of every patient in nursing homes. This drug regimen review must be performed on a monthly basis and is an effective method for monitoring the drug therapy received by patients. Studies indicate that clinical pharmacists can improve the quality of patient care in nursing homes. Students will be exposed to the elements of this specialized practice. Prerequisite: PHAR 503. PHAR 534 – Alternative Medicine Credit: 3 Hours This course discusses herbal remedies recently being used as alternative solutions to treat and prevent different diseases. The most commonly available herbs and natural products will be covered concerning their therapeutic effect and the dosage forms. In addition an overview of the Eastern therapies will be presented. PHAR 535 – HIV/AIDS Credit: 1 Hour This course will discuss the potential future effects of the AIDS epidemic on pharmacy practitioners. The nature of the disease and secondary infections, available treatment modalities, and preventative measures that involve pharmacists will be described and discussed.


PHAR 536 – Hypertension I Credit: 2 Hours This course is an in-depth discussion and literature evaluation of agents used to treat hypertension. PHAR 537 – Practical Applications in Infectious Diseases Credit: 2 Hours This course is designed to allow the student with a strong interest in infectious diseases to further develop skills necessary to make rational choices with regard to antimicrobial pharmacotherapy. These skills will be developed primarily through analysis of patient cases. Students will be presented with case problems and assigned readings for each topic at least one week prior to discussion of patient cases. Advanced concepts related to antimicrobial therapy will be emphasized. Prerequisites: PHAR 501 and 503. PHAR 538 – Hypertension II Credit: 1 Hour This course is a further discussion of agents used to treat hypertension. Prerequisite: PHAR 536. PHAR 539 – Care of the Diabetic Patient Credit: 1 Hour This series of classes will deal with specific issues which complicate the dayto-day and long-term management of diabetes. Topics covered will include diabetes survival skills; diabetes in special population groups; diseases which complicate diabetes treatment; and complications of diabetes. PHAR 541 – Advanced Medical Terminology Credit: 1 Hour This course makes use of a self-paced interactive computer program that allows the user to decipher medical terms by learning prefixes, combining forms, and suffixes, as well as learning how these word parts are used. This course is divided into eight individual units including a general information unit and specific organ systems units. PHAR 542 – Molecular Modeling Credit: 2 Hours This informal course trains students in the use of high performance computing systems to solve problems in biological modeling. Lecture topics include a review of high performance computing in molecular modeling, electron density calculations, 3D protein representation docking of molecules. We will use Silicon Graphics 2000 systems. Material is presented both in lectures and supervised lab sessions, during which students do interactive programming. The course is designed for students who are interested in viewing and taking a virtual walk through a complex molecule. PHAR 543 – Anticoagulation Management Credit: 1 Hour A detailed analysis of therapeutic options for controlling and monitoring blood coagulation in various clinical situations. PHAR 544 – Introduction to Clinical Research Design and Literature Evaluation Credit: 2 Hours This course builds upon the basic drug information and statistics skills learned previously. Evaluating the drug and medical literature to determine appropriate-

ness of study design, quality of the data, statistical test selection and application, study limitations, and implications of the study results are some of the areas that will be discussed. PHAR 545/547 – Therapeutics III/IV Credit: 3 Hours each These courses are designed to illustrate the appropriate clinical application of pharmacodynamics, pathophysiology, and pharmacokinetics to a variety of common acute and chronic disease states. Emphasis will be placed on data collection, analysis, and decision-making required to optimize drug therapy. Prerequisites: PHAR 501/503 strongly suggested. PHAR 549 – Microcomputer Applications Credit: 1 Hour This is a concentrated elective exposure to basic microcomputer applications in pharmacy practice. PHAR 551 – Legal Topics Credit: 1 Hour The course is designed to provide an overview of contemporary topics in pharmacy and healthcare law in seminar format. Class discussion will include the application of ethics and values to factual situations involving the use of drugs in healthcare. PHAR 553 – Introduction to Veterinary Pharmacy Credit: 1 Hour This course is designed to introduce students to the major differences between veterinary and human diseases, therapeutics, and pharmacy practice. Students participating in this class will be better prepared for veterinary prescription processing, customer questions, and OTC recommendations and precautions in the retail setting. PHAR 555 – Pediatric Ambulatory Care Credit: 1 Hour This course will explore the evaluation and treatment of common outpatient pediatric problems. PHAR 557 – Issues in Critical Care Credit: 1 Hour This course presents current, effective methods and procedures applicable to providing pharmaceutical care in a critical care environment. PHAR 559 – Women’s Healthcare Issues Credit: 2 Hours This is a seminar-type discussion course which focuses on topics of particular impact in providing healthcare to women. It is not intended for female students only. Topics include gender influence in drug trials, hormone-replacement therapy, contraception, osteoporosis, breast cancer, herbal medicines, and auto immune diseases. PHAR 561 – Pharmacoeconomics Credit: 3 Hours This elective course will provide basic information about the principles of pharmacoeconomics, which has been defined as the description and analysis of costs of drug therapy to society.

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C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued)

PHAR 563 – Managed Care Credit: 2 Hours This elective course presents an in-depth discussion of integrated healthcare systems with analysis of methods to provide high-quality/low-cost healthcare to large patient populations. PHAR 565 – Epidemiology Credit: 2 Hours This elective course will provide an introduction to the principles of epidemiology. The course will emphasize basic analytic techniques to investigate and prevent infectious disease outbreaks and hospital infections. Prerequisites: PHAR 310 and 312. PHAR 567 – Reimbursement for Pharmaceutical Care Services Credit: 1 Hour Different strategies utilized in the provisions of pharmaceutical care will be discussed. Students will learn how to document patient encounters and how to complete the proper forms necessary for billing and submitting claims. Students will have the opportunity to hear success stories from practicing pharmacists who have implemented pharmaceutical care services and have received reimbursement for their efforts. PHAR 569 – Healthy Choices Credit: 1 Hour This independent study course will be conducted by Dr. James Boyd. This course will discuss and encourage aspects of establishing a healthy lifestyle for participants. PHAR 570, 571, 572 – Asthma Management I, II, III Credit: 1 Hour Each The purpose of these courses is to develop the knowledge and skills of pharmacy students so they can provide a high level of comprehensive pharmaceutical care to patients with asthma. PHAR 573 – Immunizations Credit: 1 Hour This course is designed to describe the role of the pharmacist in protecting the public health by providing immunization information and convenient vaccinations. PHAR 575 – Essential Spanish for Pharmacists Credit: 2 Hours This course introduces students to basic and practical information they can use when providing pharmacy services to Spanish speaking patients. The course covers common situations, such as greeting, patient data collection, prescription dispensing information and administration instructions. Students are not required to be fluent in Spanish. PHAR 577 – Lipid Management Credit: 1 Hour Dyslipidemia is a prevalent chronic disorder that leads to significant morbidity and mortality. This course builds on the student knowledge of this disorder and identifies the role of the pharmacist in developing and maintaining a pharmacist-managed clinic to treat patients with this condition.

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PHAR 581 – Medication Errors Credit: 1 hour This course will provide the student with an understanding of the pertinent issues related to medication errors in our society. The causes and prevention of errors will be addressed and actual reported medication errors will be discussed and analyzed. PHAR 582 – Botanical Medicine Seminar Credit: 1 Hour This elective course introduces students to research evidence supporting the use of natural products in healthcare. PHAR 583 – Advanced Pharmacy Marketing and Management Credit: 3 Hours Designed for students interested in pursuing or enrolled in the joint Pharm.D./ MBA Program. Topics covered will expand upon the basic principles taught in PHAR 307 and offers a recitation and an individual project. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making from a financial management perspective. This course may replace PHAR 307. PHAR 585 – Drug-Induced Disease Credit: 2 hours This course is designed to introduce the pharmacy student to the basic principles of drug-induced disease, including appropriate recognition, management, monitoring and prevention. PHAR 587 – Advanced Financial Management and Pharmacoeconomics for Pharmacists Credit: 3 Hours Healthcare is dramatically changed and an understanding of financial management is critical in the decision making process. This course expands on the basic principles taught in PHAR 403 and offers a recitation and an individual project. Emphasis is placed on the decision-making from a financial management perspective. This course may replace PHAR 403. PHAR 589 – Advanced Patient Counseling Credit: 1 hour This course will provide the student with additional knowledge and skills to be effective patient educations, which will improve the quality of therapeutic interventions provided to the patients. A secondary goal for this course will be to increase student interest in the Annual APhA-ASP National Patient Counseling Competition and to enhance student performance at this national competition. PHAR 590 – Advanced Pharmacology & Toxicology/Laboratory Credit: 2/1 hours This course is required for the pharmacology track of the MSPS degree, and provides details on the theory and methodologies of modern pharmacology and toxicology. Class will consist of lecture and lab time to provide the student hands-on experience in a variety of techniques and data analysis. Topics covered will included radioligand binding analysis, in vitro and in vivo functional assays, and toxicological screening methods. Prerequisites: PHAR 412.


PHAR 592 – Advanced Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology Credit: 3 hours This course involves a detailed treatment of the various receptor/signal transduction systems found in mammalian systems from the perspective of developing them as therapeutic targets. Aspects of ion channel pharmacology, cyclic AMP and inositol phosphate signaling in pathological conditions will be discussed. The pharmacological control of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways and cell cycle regulation in the therapy of neoplastic disease will be addressed as well. the regulation of gene expression by inhibition of transcription or gene knockout/replacement strategies will also be discussed. The coursework for the class will entail lectures and systematic evaluation of the primary literature in the topics being covered. Prerequisite: PHAR 590. PHAR 593 – Leadership Development Credit: 2 Hours The purpose of this course is to identify and strengthen leadership skills. It uses a development approach focusing on how individuals become effective leaders by addressing the human element of enterprise within significant business situations. Students will strengthen their individual capabilities to advance their organizations strategically by rethinking their approaches to management, leadership, and leadership development. This course enables students to understand how to build and foster relationships as well as emphasizes the importance of those relationships in their professional and personal lives. PHAR 594 – Smoking Cessation Credit: 1 hour This course will provide information on smoking cessation. Topics that will be covered include the epidemiology of tabacco abuse, principles of nicotine addition, therapeutics of smoking cessation, and use of the National Cancer Institute’s counseling techniques. Practices-specific application of smoking cessation principles will be discussed. PHAR 595 – Bioterrorism and Public Health Threats Credit: 3 hours This course provides an overview of current issues related to bioterrorism and the mass threats to public health. Details of specific risks of threat entities and their treatment will be taught. An emphasis is placed on response planning and preparation. PHAR 6XX – Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences Credit: 4 Hours Each These rotations are designed to provide the students with an environment where they can integrate the academic knowledge gained during preclinical years with professional experience to develop clinical expertise in the promotion of rational and efficacious drug therapy. Each individually numbered rotation of four weeks (160 hours) duration is weighted as four semester hours. The selection, sequence and scheduling of these senior rotations will vary according to an individual student’s needs and site availability. PHAR 604 – Advanced Community Pharmacy Practice Experience Credit: 4 Hours This rotation is designed to introduce senior students to the provision of pharmaceutical care in the community pharmacy setting.

PHAR 605 – Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Practice Experience Credit: 4 Hours This rotation is designed to introduce senior students to the provision of pharmaceutical care in the ambulatory care setting. Students will be exposed to the management of several different chronic disease states such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes and anticoagulation. PHAR 606 – Geriatrics Pharmacy Practice Experience Credit: 4 Hours This rotation is designed to introduce senior students to the provision of pharmaceutical care in the geriatric setting. Students will be exposed to the management of several chronic diseases in the elderly patient population. PHAR 607 and 608 – Internal Medicine Pharmacy Practice Experiences Credit: 4 Hours Each These two months of rotations are designed to introduce senior students to clinical pharmacy practice in the inpatient setting through clinically oriented patient-specific and non-patient-specific activities. PHAR 609 – Drug Information Credit: 4 Hours This rotation is designed to introduce and develop drug literature retrieval, literature evaluation, and written and oral communication skills in senior students. PHAR 699 – Professional Presentation Seminar Credit: 1 Hour This course requires a student to prepare and present a seminar on a timely and relevant therapeutic topic utilizing the latest available electronic technology. PHAR 705 – Health Care Administration Research Project Credit: Variable (Maximum 3 Hours) This advanced independent study project incorporates aspects of pharmacy practice and business. Instructor permission is required. NOTE: Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/pharmacy for the most up to date curriculum information

P l e a s e not e : The Campbell University School of Pharmacy reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum or policies of any program as it deems necessary. 21


Joint Degree Programs

C

ampbell University School of Pharmacy provides a unique learning environment where Doctor of Pharmacy students may concurrently pursue an additional Master’s degree. Qualified students may choose to complete a Master’s in Business Administration, Master’s in Clinical Research, or Master’s in Pharmaceutical Sciences while obtaining their Doctor of Pharmacy degree. These programs provide additional work to the rigorous Pharm.D. curriculum; however, they provide a perfect opportunity for students to differentiate themselves from their peers by providing additional educational experiences. The outcome is a more diversified graduate with greater opportunities for advancement and success in a variety of healthcare positions.

Undergraduate Requirements

Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Business Administration (MBA) Degrees

A minimum of 36 credit hours must be earned from the following three categories: I. Nine core MBA Courses: BADM 710 Advanced Management Accounting BADM 722 Managerial Economics in a Global Economy BADM 730 Financial Analysis BADM 740 Legal Environment of Business BADM 742 Business Law & Ethics* BADM 750 Organizational Behavior BADM 758 Strategic Management** BADM 760 Contemporary Management Science Techniques BADM 770 Marketing Management II.  A maximum of 15 credit hours of the following School of Pharmacy courses will be recognized as MBA courses: PHAR 511 Pharmacy Jurisprudence PHAR 523 Special Research Projects in Pharmacy Practice – Pharmacy Business CLNR 525 Medical Ethics* PHAR 531 Strategic Management in Healthcare** PHAR 561 Pharmacoeconomics PHAR 583 Advanced Pharmacy Marketing and Management PHAR 587 Advanced Financial Management & Pharmacoeconomics for Pharmacists PHAR 705 Healthcare Administration Research Project In the joint program, the MBA cannot be awarded until Pharm.D. requirements are completed. * CLNR 525 Medical Ethics may be substituted for the BADM 742 Business & Law Ethics core course ** PHAR 531 Strategic Management in Healthcare may be substituted for 758 BADM Strategic Management core course

The MBA is earned through the Lundy-Fetterman School of Business. Students that have completed the undergraduate-level course requirements may seek enrollment into the MBA program before starting the Pharm.D. program, concurrently with the Pharm.D. program, or after completing the Pharm.D. program. This joint program is designed to prepare students for positions which require considerable breadth and depth of knowledge in pharmacy practice and business administration. The rapid evolution of health care systems requires not only an in-depth understanding of pharmacy, but also the principles and applications of business administration skills in pharmacy and health care and pharmaceutical industrial settings. Students in the combined program may apply the pharmacy administration credits earned in the Pharmacy School towards the requirements of the MBA program. Also, students have the option to design, in collaboration with their business and pharmacy advisors, a directed research project in a health care administration area. This allows the student to apply pharmacy and business principles to an administrative health care problem. This option is not available to students pursuing separate Pharm.D. and MBA degrees.

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Statistics (3) or PHAR 528 Experimental Design and Biostatistics Computer Science (3) (or demonstrate proficiency) Accounting (3) Economics (3) Management (3) Marketing (3) International Business (3)

Curriculum


Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (MSPS) Degrees

Advanced Topics in Industrial Pharmacy 1 Pharmacokinetics 1 Elective 2 Research Project

The Doctor of Pharmacy / MSPS joint program is especially suited to BS degree holders in either pharmaceutical sciences or natural sciences such as chemistry, biology or physics. Entry into the MSPS program a year earlier or along with entry into the PharmD program is allowed. Completion of both degrees is possible in a total of four years, but some students may take five years. Graduates from a joint program will have the background to enter research positions in the pharmaceutical sciences industries or to proceed to more advanced educational programs. The joint program allows certain courses to be applied to both the degree requirements in Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences and in the Doctor of Pharmacy Programs. The first Pharmacology module (PHSC 512) and the Biopharmaceutics courses (PHSC 474) from the PharmD program are core requirements of the MSPS program. Electives hours can be utilized for both programs, and four of the six required hours in the Master’s research project can be applied as one of the nine required one-month long senior clinical rotations in the PharmD program. Individuals completing both programs separately would not have this advantage. Background, General Prerequisites and Core Courses are shown below. Following these are the four majors in the MSPS programs, with foot-notes to special credit situations utilized in the joint program. Finally, electives are shown at the end of the list. To look at how the joint program might be structured semester by semester request a specific track listing of the area you are interested in from Program Administrator, Jena Kelly or Program Director, Robert Greenwood.

Background: BS Degree with a minimum GPA of 3.0, GRE > 1000

(verbal and quantitative), 4.0 analytical/writing & TOEFL > 550 paper-based /213 computer-based/79 internet-based.

General Prerequisites (see individual tracks for additional

prerequisites) Physics I & II, General Chemistry I & II, Organic Chemistry I & II, Biochemistry (with laboratory), Analytical Geometry & Calculus I & II, Biostatistics, Instrumental Analysis

Major in Industrial Pharmacy

Industrial Pharmacy Advanced Physical Pharmacy

2 3

PHSC 512 3 PHSC 534/536 2

Total

4 2 3 6 22

Major in Bioprocessing/Biotechnology Additional Prerequisites: Microbiology & Molecular Biology Biotechnology & Bioprocessing I PHSC 538 Biotechnology & Bioprocessing II PHSC 539 Protein Analysis & Bioassays PHSC 526 1 Elective(s) PHSC ___ 2 Research Project PHSC 610/620 Total

Major in Pharmaceutical Analysis

Industrial Pharmacy Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis-Separation Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis-Spectroscopy 1 Elective 2 Research Project

4 4 4 4 6 22

PHSC 514/515 PHSC 528/529 PHSC 530/531 PHSC ___ PHSC 610/620

Total

4 4 4 3 6 21

Major in Pharmacology Additional Pre-Requisites: Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology (>6 credit hours), Introduction to Pharmacology (PHSC 328) & Cell Biology Advanced Pharmacology & Toxicology Advanced Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology 1 Pharmacokinetics Protein Analysis & Bioassays 1 Elective 2 Research Project

PHSC 590 PHSC 592 PHSC 510 PHSC 526 PHSC ___ PHSC 610/620

3 3 2 4 5 6 23

Electives

MSPS Core Curriculum: PHSC 508 PHSC 574

Total

Total

Note: Requests for deferment, use of similar courses, or use of work experience must be obtained from the department chairman. Currently, tuition is $496 per credit hour. Federally supported financial aid requires a minimum of half-time enrollment (3.5 credit hours).

(must be completed by all students) (Course listing followed by credit hours) Product & Process Validation 1 Biopharmaceutics 1 Principles of Pharmacology & Medicinal Chemistry M.S. Seminar I & II

PHSC 542 PHSC 510 PHSC ___ PHSC 610/620

10

PHSC 514/515 4 PHSC 540 3

(Up to 3 hrs of PharmD electives will count toward MSPS requirements and up to 3 hrs of MSPS electives will count toward PharmD electives) Molecular Modeling PHSC 522 Autonomic, Cardiovascular, Renal and Paracrine Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry PHSC 577 Endocrine and CNS Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry PHSC 581 Anti-Infective, Antineoplastic and Immunopharmacology/ Medicinal Chemistry PHSC 583 Bioanalysis PHSC 525 Introduction to Radiopharmaceuticals PHSC 532 General Toxicology PHSC 518 Advanced Statistics PHSC 524 Other School of Pharmacy Courses (Committee approval)

2 4 3 4 3 3 3 2

Notes: 1These courses are co-listed in the PharmD program. 2The total of 6 hrs of credit will be composed of 4 hrs co-listed in the PharmD program as a Advanced Practice Experience (PHAR 6xx) and 2 hrs of PHSC 620.

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Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Science in Clinical Research (MSCR) Degrees Our Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Science in Clinical Research (Pharm.D. /MSCR) joint degree program allows students to apply certain credits from the Pharm.D. curriculum towards the requirements of the MSCR degree, and to apply MSCR courses to Pharm.D. elective requirements. Students in this program can earn a professional pharmacy degree and a Master of Science in Clinical Research degree concurrently. These students may elect to design their research project in collaboration with their Clinical Preceptor during an appropriate fourth year Clerkship, an option that is not available to students pursuing separate Pharm.D. and MSCR degrees. This unique joint degree program provides pharmacists with an additional qualification and a broad understanding of clinical research. Graduates will augment their clinical pharmacy practice skills with an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals required to produce and interpret medical evidence which may be utilized in a variety of practice settings. Graduates will possess the education and the necessary skills to choose from a broader range of career options. These career opportunities include clinical pharmacy roles in the community, hospital and long term care venues. In addition, graduates are well-prepared to select roles within the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry, governmental agencies (such as the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control, etc.) as well as academic careers in pharmacy and medical education. The Campbell University School of Pharmacy is preparing these students for leadership positions in their chosen careers.

Undergraduate Requirements The Anatomy & Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology requirements may be completed in the normal sequence of the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum; however, the MS degree will not be conferred until all Doctor of Pharmacy requirements have been met.

Curriculum The following MSCR courses must be taken in conjunction with the Doctor of Pharmacy curriculum for the fulfillment of the joint Pharm.D./MSCR program: CLNR 505 Principles of Clinical Research CLNR 515 New Product Development CLNR 518 Experimental Design & Biostatistics CLNR 519 Physical & Clinical Assessment CLNR 520 Advanced Data Management CLNR 525 Medical Ethics CLNR 530 Regulatory Affairs CLNR 552 Scientific Communications CLNR 559 Managing & Monitoring Clinical Trials CLNR 566 Advanced Study Design & Analysis CLNR 568 Project Management CLNR 606 Clinical Research Seminar CLNR 690 Research Project I CLNR 695 Research Project II In the joint program, the MSCR cannot be awarded until the Doctor of Pharmacy requirements are complete.

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P o s t- B S i n P h a r m a c y

T

he Campbell University School of Pharmacy has a program that allows pharmacists licensed in the United States who hold the Bachelor of Science Degree in Pharmacy to pursue academic work to earn the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree. The program consists of one academic year of didactic study followed by an additional six to nine months of clinical rotations. Depending on the individual’s background, variations in the curriculum may be necessary. Interested individuals should contact the Office of Admissions at 1-800-760-9734, ext. 1690.

Curriculum Third Professional Year First Semester Therapeutics Experimental Design and Biostatistics Religion* Electives

Second Semester

Therapeutics Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Intro. to Clinical Research Design & Drug Literature Evaluation Physical Assessment Immunology*

Course

Hours

PHAR 528 RELG 101 PHAR 5XX

4 3 3

Course

Hours

PHAR 544 PHAR 519 PHAR 310

2 2 3

PHAR 501/503

PHAR 545/547 PHAR 509

6

6 4

Fourth Professional Year First/Second Semester

Rotations (Four)** Rotations (Five)** Professional Presentation Seminar

Course

PHAR 6XX PHAR 6XX PHAR 699

Hours 16 20 1

* Electives must be substituted for these courses if previously completed. * * Request for exemption from up to three rotations based on prior experience may be submitted to the Chairman of Pharmacy Practice.


Introductory and Advanced Practice Experiences

D

uring experiential training, students are responsible for travel expenses and securing their own housing arrangements. In addition, incidentals expenses such as parking at hospitals, etc. may be incurred. Information regarding expenses associated with each training site may be obtained from the Director of Experiential Programs. While every attempt is made to satisfy the “special needs” of individual students in assigning both Introductory and Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience training sites, pharmacy students must be prepared to fulfill training requirements wherever they are assigned. Each year students are divided into three major geographic areas to complete their required advanced practice experiences (APPE). Approximately twenty percent of students complete their required rotations in the WinstonSalem area, 10 percent of students complete their rotations in the Buies Creek/ Raleigh/Durham/Fayetteville/Lumberton areas. Introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPE) occur in the summer between academic school years. Between the P-1 and P-2 school year, students will complete a one month community rotation. Between the P-2 and P-3 school year, students will complete a one month hospital rotation. Students may enter three preferences for rotation sites/preceptors for these rotations as well as enter one vacation month. Once these preferences have been entered, a random “spin” is done to assign all students to their required IPPEs. Once rotation assignments are made, student requests for changes will not be accepted unless there are extreme circumstances that would require such consideration. Once geographical areas have been established, students may enter three preferences for rotation sites/preceptors for each of the six months of their required rotations. Once these preferences have been entered, a random “spin” is done to assign all students to their required APPEs. Once rotation assignments are made, student requests for changes will not be accepted unless there are extreme circumstances that would require such consideration. These changes are approved by the Director of Experiential Programs and/or the Chairman of the Department of Pharmacy Practice. Students may have the opportunity to complete an additional APPE elective rotation to gain more experience in pharmacy. The addition of this rotation will

depend upon the scheduled required rotations as well as preceptor availability. If the addition of a fourth elective can be scheduled, students must complete all the previously scheduled elective rotations and requests to drop any of the elective rotations will not be granted.

Clinical Rotation Sites

W

ithin the eight-county area surrounding Campbell University, there are over 225 community pharmacies and approximately 15 hospitals. The hospitals range in size from a 78-bed community hospital to the 1,008-bed Duke University Medical Center for a total of 6,400 beds. These pharmacies and hospitals, plus several nursing homes and pharmaceutical manufacturers in the Research Triangle Park, provide the facilities for the Campbell University clinical training program. Advanced Community Pharmacy* Ambulatory Care* Cardiology Drug Abuse & Alcoholism Drug Information* Emergency Medicine Family Practice Gastroenterology Geriatrics* Hematology Hospice Care Industrial Pharmacy Infectious Disease Intensive Care Medical Missions

Internal Medicine I/II* Neonatology Neurology Nuclear Pharmacy Oncology Parenteral & Enteral Nutrition Pediatrics Pharmacokinetics Pharmacy Administration Psychiatry Pulmonary Medicine Renal Medicine Rheumatology Surgery Toxicology *Required Rotations

D ru g I n f o r m at i o n C e n t e r

T

he Drug Information Center, supported by a grant from GlaxoSmithKline, was established in 1987. It has been an invaluable asset to the School of Pharmacy. The center has two major goals: to service healthcare professionals and provide experiential training for pharmacy students. Healthcare professionals (e.g., physicians, pharmacists, nurses, veterinarians) in a variety of practice settings utilize the services provided by the Drug Information Center. Currently, the Center is receiving approximately 400 inquiries monthly on therapeutic uses of drugs, toxicity, interactions, side effects, and dosage recommendations. Access to the Drug Information Center is crucial to practitioners in rural areas without adequate information resources to provide optimal healthcare. Our services are provided at no cost. In the Drug Information Center, students obtain valuable experiential training during a four-week clerkship in the Doctor of Pharmacy program. During this time, students become competent in data retrieval, literature evaluation, and written and oral communication skills. They respond to inquiries from healthcare professionals regarding contemporary therapeutic regimens in humans and animals. These varied experiences equip the students with an approach to the use of computerized references which will be needed regardless of their future practice environment.

Purpose • Serve the health professions community by answering drug-related questions • Provide training for pharmacy students • Aid in the promotion of the School of Pharmacy by offering services throughout the state • Aid in the promotion of the profession of pharmacy

Hours of Operation 8:30 a.m.–5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (Closed Holidays) Phone (800) 327-5467 (NC) or (800) 760-9697 Ext. 2701 (US) Fax (910) 893-1476 25


R e sid e n c y P r o g r a m s

T

Internal Medicine/ Infectious Disease/Academia

he pharmacy residency in Adult Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases/ Academia at Campbell University School of Pharmacy and Duke University Medical Center is designed to prepare role-model practitioner/educators for entry into academic clinical pharmacy practice positions. A major focus of this program is to prepare the resident to function effectively as a pharmacy practitioner-educator by emphasizing patient care, service, teaching (clinical & didactic), scholarly activity, and research. The service component consists of rounding with one of the eight general medicine teams for a minimum of four months. Additional time will be spent with the Infectious Disease (ID) consult service, working on scholarly/research activity, participating in clinical/didactic teaching, and in other School of Pharmacy activities. Teaching activities will consist of serving students as a preceptor on the internal medicine and ID consult services. During his/her internal medicine rotation the resident will also serve as a primary preceptor for up to two Campbell Doctor of Pharmacy candidates each month. Didactic teaching experience will be obtained through participation in the Therapeutics course series and the Infectious Disease elective course on campus. Additional instruction and supervision in the essentials of effective clinical and didactic teaching will be provided.

T Internal Medicine Infectious Disease/Academia

Primary Care/Diabetes

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Primary Care/Diabetes

he residency in Primary Care with an emphasis in Diabetes is designed to develop the knowledge, attitudes, and skills needed to provide exemplary pharmaceutical care in the ambulatory care setting. The residency focuses on the monitoring and management of diabetes and diabetic complications within an interdisciplinary structure, in an effort to reduce the burden of diabetes for patients and their families. The Diabetes Outcomes Management Program (DOMP) is not solely a glycemic control program, but includes many other pharmacist-coordinated management programs, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, weight reduction, and smoking cessation. The resident will also have involvement in the didactic and clinical training of pharmacy students and other healthcare professionals and will contribute to the literature by completing an original research project which will be presented at the annual Southeastern Residency Conference. The resident’s months are spent primarily at the Wilson Community Health Center. In addition, up to three elective rotations are available in this residency program.


T

Geriatrics

he Geriatric Residency program is designed to develop a pharmacist practitioner with advanced skills in working with the elderly population as a clinical pharmacy specialist, pharmacy consultant, or educator. Training is provided in basic areas of geriatric internal medicine, including acute, ambulatory, and long-term care practices. Flexibility in the program permits the resident to specialize in one practice setting or to obtain a balanced experience in several settings. The resident is involved in the didactic and clinical training of Pharm.D. students and other healthcare professionals and is encouraged to contribute to the professional literature. In particular, the resident participates in Campbell’s extensive training program in geriatrics, which includes: presenting topics in geriatric therapeutics, participation in a consultant pharmacy elective and required clerkship geriatrics rotation for Pharm.D. students. The resident also develops and conducts an original research project which is then presented at the annual Southeastern Residency Conference and elsewhere as appropriate.

T

Primary Care

T

Community Pharmacy

Geriatrics

he Primary Care residency provides the resident with advanced skills in primary care patient management, therapy modification for special patient groups, acute care triage, chronic disease management, etc. The development of these advanced skills occurs in primary care clinics and pharmacy-managed anticoagulation, diabetes, lipid, and pharmacotherapy clinics in two distinct practice environments. The first is the private practice environment based at Cary Health Associates in Cary and the second is in a teaching environment at the Southern Regional Area Health Education Center in Fayetteville. The resident participates in the didactic and clinical training of Pharm.D. students and other healthcare professionals. In addition, the resident contributes to the literature by completing an original research project in the area of primary care.

wo community pharmacy residencies are sponsored in conjunction with recognized leaders in community pharmacy practice in North Carolina. Kerr Drug in Benson and Kroger Pharmacy in Fuquay-Varina, each offer a residency opportunity for a pharmacist to develop state-of-the-art community pharmacy practice skills. Experiences will include disease state management for asthma, diabetes, hypertension, and cholesterol; medication therapy management (MTM) services; clinical trials; and teaching. The primary goal of this residency is to develop pharmacy leaders who are capable of practicing an advanced level of pharmaceutical care. In this way, it is believed that we can advance the practice of pharmacy while furthering the academic mission of the School, and enhancing the clinical and business programs of our participating sites.

Primary Care

Community Pharmacy

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Pharmaceutical Sciences

T

he objective of these majors is to prepare students for careers in the biomedical sciences with particular emphasis on pharmaceutical sciences. Graduates will be prepared to enter research and technical positions in the health science industries or to pursue postgraduate studies. Candidates for the BS degree with a major in pharmaceutical sciences must satisfy all College of Arts and Sciences requirements as set forth in the General College Curriculum section of the university catalog. Prior to entering the major, students must have completed a minimum of 64 semester hours of college credit taken from the core liberal arts curriculum and must include the following courses or their equivalents: Basic Biology, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology and Immunology, General Chemistry (2 semesters), Organic Chemistry (2 semesters), Calculus, and General Physics (2 semesters).

Program Contacts: Campbell University School of Pharmacy Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences P.O. Box 1090 Buies Creek, NC 27506 (800) 760-9734, Ext. 1838 www.campbell.edu/pharmacy

I n t e r n ship S i t e s f o r S e n i o r B S P S S t ud e n t s

N

orth Carolina has one of the largest concentrations of pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries in the United States. It is also one of the most rapidly growing areas in the state. Currently, there are hundreds of pharmaceutical research and manufacturing sites in North Carolina. A majority of these pharmaceutical and biotechnical companies are located in the Research Triangle Park, but many others are situated within a one-hour drive of Campbell University. Additionally, there are several major research universities and government agencies nearby. Students may choose an internship site based upon their future career goals including academic, research, manufacturing, or regulatory sites. Many of these sites not only host senior BSPS students for their internship experience, but also provide opportunities for summer employment and permanent positions upon graduation.

Internship Sites GlaxoSmithKline; Pharmaceutical Solutions, Inc.; Cardinal Healthcare; Wyeth Vaccines; Carolina Medical Products; DioSynth; AAI; Environmental Protection Agency; Novo Nordisk, Inc.; North Carolina State University; Banner Pharmacaps; Novopharm; Serentec; Integrated Project Services; PCI; DSM ; O’Neal; Harmony Laboratories, Biogen Idec, Gilead Sciences, Tyco Healthcare, Cirrus Pharmaceuticals, and Talecris.

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BS in Pharmaceutical Sciences C u r r iculu m Freshman Year Semester 1

General Chemistry I Basic Biology Freshman Composition I Intro. to Art, Music, or Theater Introduction to Christianity Campbell University Worship

Course CHEM 111 BIOL 111 ENGL 101 A/M/T 131 RELG 125 CUW 100

Hours 4 4 3 3 3 0.5

Semester 2

General Chemistry II Human Anatomy & Physiology Freshman Composition II Calculus I Lifetime Wellness Campbell University Worship

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

CHEM 113 BIOL 221 ENGL 102 MATH 122 PE 185 CUW 100

4 4 3 4 2 0.5

Sophomore Year Semester 3

Organic Chemistry I Microbiology and Immunology General Physics I Western Civilization I Exercise Activity Campbell University Worship

Course CHEM 227 BIOL 334 PHYS 221 HIST 111 PE 111 CUW 200

Hours 4 4 4 3 1 0.5

Semester 4

Organic Chemistry II General Physics II Literature I (Brit/Amer/World) Western Civilization II Economics/Soc Science Elec Campbell University Worship

CHEM 228 PHYS 222 ENGL 20_ HIST 112 ECON 200 CUW 200

4 4 3 3 3 0.5

Junior Year Semester 5

General Biochemistry General Biochemistry Lab Laboratory Safety Intermediate Foreign Language Experimental Design & Biostatistics Scientific and Technical Writing Quantitative Lab Techniques Literature II (Brit/Amer/World)

Course

PHSC 323 PHSC 325 PHSC 210 LANG 201 PHSC 324 PHSC 451 PHSC 220/220L ENGL 20_

Hours 3 1 1 3 4 1.5 2 3

Semester 6

Introduction to Pharmacology Analytical Instrumentation Analytical Instrumentation Lab Product & Process Validation Molecular Biology Molecular Biology Lab Interpersonal Skills Scientific Literature Seminar I

PHSC 328 PHSC 410 PHSC 411 PHSC 338 PHSC 326 PHSC 327 PHSC 442 PHSC 334

4 3 1 2 3 1 2 1

Senior Year Semester 7

Course

Hours

Industrial Pharmacy PHSC 418 3 Industrial Pharmacy Lab PHSC 419 1 Pharmaceutical Meth. & Bioprocess. PHSC 438 3 Pharm. Meth. & Bioprocess. Lab PHSC 439 1 Scientific Literature Seminar II PHSC 336 1 Social Science Elective UNIV ___ 3 Religion Elective RELG ___ 3

Semester 8

Senior Internship* Senior Seminar

PHSC 420 PHSC 416

12–14** 1

* Internship sites may require a criminal background check before beginning the internship. ** Summer internships earn 12 credit hours rather than 14 credit hours. NOTE: Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/pharmacy for the most up to date curriculum information.

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BS & MS Pharmaceutical Sciences Program 5 years + research Program BSPS/MSPS 5 + Research Program Preferred Background BS Degree with a minimum of GPA of 3.0 GRE > 1000 (verbal & quantitative) + 4.0 analytical writing

Senior Year (Provisional acceptance) Semester 7

Industrial Pharmacy Industrial Pharmacy Lab Pharm. Methods & Bioprocessing Pharm. Methods & Bioprocessing Lab Scientific Literature Seminar II Social Science Elective Religion Elective

Summer

Senior Internship Senior Seminar

Course

Hours

PHSC 420 PHSC 416

12 1

PHSC 514 PHSC 515 PHSC 438 PHSC 439 PHSC 336 UNIV ___ RELG ___

3 1 3 1 1 3 3

Semester 8

Advanced Physical Pharmacy Biopharmaceutics Calculus II University Elective

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

PHSC 540 PHSC 574 MATH 223 UNIV 5XX

3 3 4 2-3

BSPS degree conferred / GPA & GRE Qualification required for continuation

Semester 9

Course

Hours

M.S. Seminar I PHSC 534 1 Principles of Pharmacology PHSC 512 3 & Medicinal Chemistry Pharmacokinetics PHSC 510 1 Scientific Literature Seminar II PHSC 336 1 Elective PHSC 6XX 3 Research Project PHSC 610 2

30

Semester 10

Advanced Physical Pharmacy Advanced Topics in Industrial Pharmacy Biopharmaceutics Calculus II M.S. Seminar II Research Project University Elective

PHSC 540 PHSC 542 PHSC 574 MATH 223 PHSC 536 PHSC 620 UNIV 5XX

3 4 3 4 1 4 2-3


Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences Admissions Policy Admission Requirements: BS Degree with a minimum GPA of 3.0, GRE > 1000 (verbal and quantitative) and 4.0 analytical writing, TOEFL > 550 paper-based, 213 computer-based, or 79 internet-based. General Prerequisites (see individual tracks for additional prerequisites): Physics I & II, General Chemistry I & II, Organic Chemistry I & II, Biochemistry, Analytical Geometry & Calculus I & II, Biostatistics, Instrumental Analysis Note: Students must complete all prerequisites. Requests for deferment, use of similar courses, or use of work experience must be obtained from the department chairman.

Application Process: Students should submit: a. a completed application form and fee, b. official transcripts of all college/university work completed, c. three letters of recommendation, and d. GRE and TOEFL (if applicable) scores.

Policies: 1. Students who meet the GPA & GRE requirement, but who lack other prerequisites may receive “conditional acceptance,” conditional on completing the prerequisites. Students may enroll in MSPS courses before they have completed all program prerequisites, but they must complete all prerequisites before they can receive full acceptance into the program. We recommend submitting applications for Fall Semester by April 1st and for the Spring Semester by November 1st. 2. Students who do not meet the GPA and/or the GRE requirement may be eligible for “provisional acceptance.” A student may be in the “provisional acceptance” category for no more than one academic year. They may be considered for full acceptance into the program after achieving a GPA > 3.0 in the first nine credit hours of course work in the program. 3. Those who have earned a Ph.D., M.D., Pharm.D. (Terminal doctoral degrees listed by NIH) or a prior Master of Science degree in another chemical or biomedical discipline at an accredited institution in the United States are not required to submit a GRE or other test score. 4. Late applications: Late applicants can receive approval to register for courses for the current semester if they: a. submit a completed application form and application fee b. submit official transcripts of all college/university work completed c. appear to meet the criteria for conditional acceptance Before taking any courses in subsequent semesters, these students are expected to complete their application and to receive conditional or provisional acceptance.

5. Students not seeking a masters degree: Students not seeking a degree can receive approval to register for courses if they have: a. A Bachelor of Science Degree b. Completed MSPS application (including supplemental materials such as official transcripts and GRE scores) c. Permission of the Instructor d. Permission of the MSPS Admissions Committee Note 1: A maximum of 4 credit hours of graduate level courses numbered 500 or higher may be taken before acceptance. Note 2: In cases where demand for a class exceeds the enrollment capacity, degree seeking students will have priority over students not seeking a degree. Non-degree seeking students can only register during the first week of classes and may not pre-register for courses. 6. Students taking a leave of absence of greater than one semester must notify their advisor and Department Chairman in writing.

International Students 1. International Students requiring student visas are not eligible for a provisional or conditional acceptance as described above. 2. International Students begin the program only in the Fall semester each year. Students must complete their application for admission by the April 1st deadline to be considered for the Fall Semester.

31


MS in Pharmaceutical Sciences C u r r iculu m

T

he Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences enhanced research and contract service capabilities by recently initiating a graduate program in the pharmaceutical sciences. Four areas of study are identified in the course listings which follow.

MS Core Curriculum (must be completed by all students)

Product & Process Validation Biopharmaceutics Graduate Principles of Pharmacology & Med. Chem. M.S. Seminar I & II

Course

PHSC 508 PHSC 574 PHSC 512 PHSC 534/536

Total

Hours

PHSC 514/515 PHSC 540 PHSC 542 PHSC 510 PHSC ___ PHSC 610/620

Total

Course

Industrial Pharmacy Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis-Separation Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis-Spectroscopy Elective Research Project

PHSC 514/515 PHSC 528/529 PHSC 530/531 PHSC___ PHSC 610/620

Hours

Total

10

Additional Pre-Requisites: Mammalian Anatomy & Physiology (>6 credit hours), Introduction to Pharmacology (PHSC 328) & Cell Biology Advanced Pharmacology & Toxicology PHSC 590 Advanced Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology PHSC 592 Pharmacokinetics PHSC 510 Protein Analysis & Bioassays PHSC 526 Elective PHSC___ Research Project PHSC 610/620

3 3 2 4 5 6

Total

23

4 3 4 2 3 6 22

Major in Bioprocessing/Biotechnology Additional Prerequisites: Microbiology & Molecular Biology Biotechnology & Bioprocessing I PHSC 538 Biotechnology & Bioprocessing II PHSC 539 Protein Analysis & Bioassays PHSC 526 Elective(s) PHSC___ Research Project PHSC 610/620

4 4 4 4 6

Total

22

21

Major in Pharmacology

Electives Molecular Modeling PHSC 522 Autonomic, Cardiovascular, Renal and Paracrine Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry PHSC 577 Endocrine and CNS Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry PHSC 581 Anti-Infective, Antineoplastic and Immunopharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry PHSC 583 Bioanalysis PHSC 525 Introduction to Radiopharmaceuticals PHSC 532 General Toxicology PHSC 518 Advanced Statistics PHSC 524 Other School of Pharmacy Courses (Committee approval) Federally supported financial aid requires a minimum of half-time enrollment (3.5 credit hours). NOTE: Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/ pharmacy for the most up to date curriculum and tuition information.

32

4 4 4 3 6

2 3 3 2

Major in Industrial Pharmacy Industrial Pharmacy Advanced Physical Pharmacy Advanced Topics in Industrial Pharmacy Pharmacokinetics Elective Research Project

Major in Pharmaceutical Analysis

2 4 3 4 3 3 3 2


Pharmaceutical Sciences C O U R S E D E S C R I P T I ON S PHSC 210 – Laboratory Safety Credit: 1 Hour An introduction to chemical, physical, and biological hazards associated with laboratory work. Students are introduced to laboratory worker regulations, methods for laboratory and personnel monitoring, and personal protective equipment and clothing. Note: PHSC 210 is a prerequisite (or corequisite) to all laboratory courses in pharmaceutical sciences. PHSC 220/220L – Quantitative Laboratory Techniques Credit: 2 Hours An introductory laboratory course concentrating on the basic terminology and mathematical skills needed to perform routine laboratory procedures. Students learn the theory and application of appropriate techniques involved in gravimetric and volumetric analysis. Laboratory skills are honed through a series of exercises culminating in a comprehensive practical examination designed to test the student’s ability to accurately formulate complex biochemical solutions.

PHSC 334 and 336 – Scientific Literature Seminar I & II Credit: 1 Hour Each Students are introduced to literature searching and critical analysis techniques in this series of courses. The courses promote the formulation of critical thinking approaches. Special emphasis is placed on communication techniques. Students apply their knowledge and skill in the form of written and oral presentations developed by researching the current pharmaceutical and biomedical literature. Prerequisite: PHSC 451.

PHSC 323/325 – General Biochemistry/Lab Credit: 3/1 Hours This introductory lecture and laboratory course provides an overview of the synthesis and metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; enzyme kinetics; bioenergetics; and macromolecular structure and function. Students must attend a weekly pre-lab session. Prerequisite: PHSC 220/220L, CHEM 227/228. PHSC 324 – Experimental Design & Biostatistics Credit: 4 Hours The application of statistical analyses to the design, conduct, and interpretation of pharmaceutical research, development, testing, and manufacturing is provided in this comprehensive course. This course is co-listed as CLNR 324. PHSC 326/327 – Molecular Biology/Lab Credit: 3/1 Hours Fundamental principles of recombinant DNA technology are presented with an emphasis on pharmaceutical applications where appropriate. The application of this technology to the discovery, development, and production of new treatment modes for human and animal diseases is also addressed. The laboratory course seeks to provide a basic understanding of the techniques involved in biotechnology and to provide practical laboratory experience in the use of these techniques. The lecture and laboratory courses are designed to complement one another and work in tandem to give an overall view of biotechnology. Students must attend a weekly pre-lab session. Prerequisite: PHSC 451. PHSC 328 – Introduction to Pharmacology Credit: 4 Hours The basic principles of pharmacology and toxicology are covered through discussion of the responses of biological systems to drugs and chemicals. The course also considers the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics and how these factors relate to drug action. Prerequisite: BIOL 221.

33


C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued)

PHSC 338 – Product & Process Validation Credit: 2 Hours This course introduces students to the principles of good manufacturing practices (cGMP), quality control and quality assurance. The basics of regulatory compliance, the global nature of regulations and the importance of validation in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Industries are discussed. Students learn about the validation of facilities, equipment, utilities, cleaning procedures, computer systems, assays, and processes. The course also illustrates the importance of the team approach to validation and the need for thorough documentation of all associated activities. PHSC 404 – Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences Credit: Variable (Maximum 3 Hours) The purpose of this elective course is to introduce pharmaceutical sciences students to methods of basic science and/or clinical research. This involves application of the scientific processes of hypothesis formation, literature evaluation, experimental design, development of technical skills, data acquisition and analysis, and formal presentation of results. Requires permission of instructor. PHSC 410/411 – Analytical Instrumentation/Lab Credit: 3/1 Hours A comprehensive introductory course that provides students with an in-depth study of the theory and operation of scientific instrumentation typically found in pharmaceutical, chemical, and biotechnical research and analytical facilities. Students gain hands-on experience with a variety of spectroscopic and chromatographic instrumentation through structured laboratory experiments and student-initiated research projects. Students must attend a weekly pre-lab session. Prerequisite: PHSC 220/220L, PHSC 324 or by the permission of the instructor. PHSC 414 – Research Seminar Credit: 1 Hour Used in conjunction with research courses PHSC 404 and 504, research seminar provides students with an opportunity to present original research work. PHSC 416 – Senior Seminar Credit: 1 Hour Senior Seminar provides a forum through which students chronicle their internship experiences. Students present an overview of the companies in which they worked and provide a synopsis of their roles in the organizations. PHSC 418/419 – Industrial Pharmacy/Lab Credit: 3/1 Hours This survey course introduces student to the preformulation and manufacturing of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Students gain hands-on experience in the laboratory setting performing a variety of USP tests and unit operations. Prerequisites: PHSC 220/221 and 323/325. Credit cannot be received for both PHSC 514/515 and PHSC 418/419. PHSC 420 – Senior Internship Credit: 12-14 Hours This internship provides practical experience in the pharmaceutical, chemical, or biotechnology industries. Students and participating industrial facilities are matched to provide a comprehensive work experience. Prerequisites: Completion of all BSPS courses and at least a 2.0 cumulative and major GPA.

34

PHSC 430 – Drug & Chemical Regulatory Affairs Credit: 1 Hour This elective course provides more advanced exposure to Food and Drug Administration and Environmental Protection Agency regulations. It also includes discussion of the regulatory affairs specialist’s role in industry. PHSC 434 – Statistical Computations Credit: 2 Hours This elective applications course provides hands-on experience in the analysis and presentation of experimental data through the use of commercially available programs. PHSC 438/439 – Pharmaceutical Methodology and Bioprocessing/Lab Credit: 3/1 Hours In this advanced analytical techniques and instrumentation course, students are exposed to the current state-of-the-art procedures for the isolation, purification, derivatization, and characterization of complex chemical and biological samples. These techniques are then applied to practical analytical situations. Students are also provided with practical hands-on experience in USP methodology and with a comprehensive overview of bioprocessing. Prerequisite: PHSC 410. PHSC 442 – Interpersonal Skills Credit: 2 Hours In this course, students will learn about the various factors involved in developing good interpersonal skills including: self-awareness, goal setting, listening and feedback, teamwork, leadership development, motivating others, delegation, negotiation, conflict resolution, interviewing and presentation skills. The course provides a forum for group discussions and team exercises. PHSC 450/450L – Spreadsheet/Data Analysis Credit: Variable (Maximum 2 Hours) This course introduces students to advanced functions within commercial spreadsheet programs. Emphasis is placed on the utilization of macros and embedding functions as they apply to data analysis. PHSC 451 – Scientific & Technical Writing Credit: 1.5 Hours This required course is presented to assist students in skill enhancement in the areas of scientific and technical writing. PHSC 452 – Pharmaceutical Utilities Systems Credit: 1 Hour This course gives students a basic overall understanding of the utility systems used in pharmaceutical manufacturing facilities. By using piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&IDs) to teach these systems, students also become familiar with one of the most commonly used types of engineering documentation in the industry. This course also covers the basic requirements for commissioning and validation of these systems. PHSC 462 and 466 – Anatomy & Physiology Credit: 4 Hours Each This two-course sequence presents a comprehensive study of the structure and function of all organ systems as well as basic biochemical and biophysical principles of cellular and membrane function. Relevance to clinical states and drug action is also presented in many areas. The courses are co-listed as PHAR 302 and 306. Permission of instructor.


PHSC 464 – Biochemistry Credit: 4 Hours A comprehensive course in biochemistry that discusses the metabolism of amino acids, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Principles of enzyme kinetics and regulation, bioenergetics, and macromolecular structure-function relationships are presented. This course is co-listed as PHAR 304. Permission of instructor. PHSC 468 – Clinical Biochemistry Credit: 3 Hours This course discusses the principles of quantitative analysis utilized in common clinical laboratory tests. An introduction to interpretation of abnormal clinical laboratory values is presented. Quantitative aspects of nutrition are presented, and regulatory effects of various hormones are described. Diseases such as atherosclerosis and diabetes are discussed. This course is co-listed as PHAR 308. Permission of instructor.

diagnosis, and preventative measures are emphasized. Prerequisite: Immunology (PHAR 310/PHSC 470). This course is co-listed as PHAR 312. PHSC 474 – Biopharmaceutics Credit: 3 Hours The biological and physicochemical factors of the body, drugs, and dosage forms that influence drug availability, disposition, and pharmacological and toxicological responses are presented. PHSC 504 – Advanced Research in Pharmaceutical Sciences Credit: Variable (Maximum 3 Hours) This research course is intended for the advanced student. It continues the basic science research experience. This course is colisted as PHAR 504.

PHSC 470 – Immunology Credit: 4 Hours This course covers basic immunology and the fundamental principles relating to the immune response in normal and disease states. This course is co-listed as PHAR 310. Permission of instructor.

PHSC 508 – Product & Process Validation Credit: 2 Hours The principles of good manufacturing practices (cGMP), process troubleshooting, quality control, and quality assurance are introduced. Federal regulations and documentation requirements are discussed throughout the course also covering in detail the theory and practices by which pharmaceutical and biotechnology processes are validated. Credit cannot be received for both PHSC 508 and PHSC 338.

PHSC 472 – Medical Microbiology Credit: 3 Hours The basic medical microbiology concepts are presented. Information necessary to diagnose and manage infected patients are covered. Current, important bacteriologic, virologic, mycotic, and parasitic pathogens and their related diseases are discussed. Clinical presentations, principles of laboratory

PHSC 510 – Pharmacokinetics Credit: 2 Hours This course provides the student with an understanding of basic, clinically applicable pharmacokinetic formulas and the assumptions that are involved with their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. This course is co-listed as PHAR 410. 35


C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued)

PHSC 512 – Principles of Pharmacology & Medicinal Chemistry (Graduate) Credit: 3 Hours This course is required for MSPS students. Students will attend lectures, complete assignments and take exams given in PHAR 412, which introduces the basic principles of structure activity relationships and biochemical pharmacology with emphasis on physicochemical properties of functional groups, acid-base chemistry, metabolism, receptor theory and signal transduction. Supplemental lectures and/or assignments will provide depth appropriate to graduate students. Topics will include ligand/receptor interactions, relationship of receptor occupancy to efficacy, and structure and function of the four classes of receptors. PHSC 514/515 – Industrial Pharmacy/Lab Credit: 3/1 Hours This survey course introduces student to the preformulation and manufacturing of pharmaceutical dosage forms. Students gain hands-on experience in the laboratory setting performing a variety of USP tests and unit operations. Prerequisites: PHSC 220/221 and 323/325. Credit cannot be received for both PHSC 514/515 and PHSC 418/419. PHSC 518 General Toxicology Credit: 3 Hours This course is designed to give the student a broad appreciation of the field of Toxicology. The student is guided through the mechanisms by which toxicants enter the body and the biotransformation processes that result in the diseaseproducing entities. The various cellular mechanisms of toxicity and the major target organs affected by toxins will be treated in some detail. Didactic material may be augmented with both in vivo and in vitro experimental laboratories for assessing toxicity. Aspects of environmental, forensic, clinical toxicology and risk assessment will also be addressed in this course. This course is co-listed as PHAR 518. PHSC 522 – Molecular Modeling Credit: 2 Hours This informal course trains students in the use of high performance computing systems to solve problems in biological modeling. Lecture topics include a review of high performance computing in molecular modeling, electron density calculations, 3D protein representation docking of molecules. We will use Silicon Graphics O2 and Cray T90 systems. Material is presented both in lectures and supervised lab sessions, during which students do interactive programming. The course is designed for students who are interested in viewing and taking a virtual walk through a complex molecule. This course is co-listed as PHAR 542. PHSC 524 – Advanced Statistics Credit: 2 Hours This course extends the Experimental Design and Biostatistics course to more advanced topics including meta-analysis, multivariate ANOVA, canonical, correlation, multiple regression, logistic regression, survival analysis, factor analysis, and other data reduction techniques. Prerequisite: PHSC 324. PHSC 525 – Bioanalysis Credit: 3 Hours An advanced course that provides an overview of the chemical, biological, pharmacological and toxicological aspects of metabolism of xenobiotics in mammalian systems. Students integrate a variety of analytic techniques to determine structure and quantity of metabolites formed from various in vitro and in vivo model systems. 36

PHSC 526 – Protein Analysis and Bioassay/Laboratory Credit: 3/1 Hours This course covers advanced analysis of proteins from a theoretical standpoint and introduces the bioassay with both lecture and lab exercises. The analytical techniques covered are commonly used as part of the QC of industrial production of proteins and include protein sequence determination, amino acid composition, proteolytic digestion and fingerprinting. Bioassay topics will cover the use of both cells and whole organisms as the means of quantifying the biological activity of protein products, particularly those isolated from cultured cells. Statistical requirements for assay development and data analysis will be covered. Prerequisites are biochemistry with lab and biostatistics. PHSC 528/529 – Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis – Separation/Laboratory Credit: 3/1 Hours Emphasizes separation techniques used for the analysis of drugs, drug metabolites, toxic substances, and biological fluids and tissues. Theory and applications of liquid chromatography, sample preparation, method optimization, and process validation are discussed. Students learn the current state-of-the art procedures for the isolation, purification, derivatization, and characterization of complex chemical and biological samples.


PHSC 530/531 – Advanced Pharmaceutical Analysis – Spectroscopy/Laboratory Credit: 3/1 Hours Applications of spectrophotometric methods of analysis (ultraviolet/visible, infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, fluorescence, and atomic absorption/emission) to pharmaceutically important materials. It covers physical principles, theories, instrumentation, and interpretation of spectrometric data. PHSC 532 – Introduction to Radiopharmaceuticals Credit: 3 Hours This elective course will provide the student with basic information concerning the design and handling of radioactive pharmaceutical products for diagnostic and therapeutic use. Topics to be addressed include production and decay characteristics of radionuclides, radiation safety, dosimetry, radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques, and application to clinical medicine. PHSC 534 AND 536 – Masters of Science Seminar I/II Credit: 1 Hour Each These two seminar courses will involve scheduled meetings of students and faculty to review and discuss the literature in the students’ area of specialization. Presentations by students and faculty will be made related to their research and current projects. PHSC 538 – Bioprocessing I Credit: 4 Hours This course provides an introduction to the theory and application of bio-technology procedures to the development of biopharmaceutical products. Students are provided with an overview of fermentation and cell culture principles, bioprocess design and validation, and pharmaceutical product generation. Prerequisites: PHSC 323 and 326 (or demonstration of experience). PHSC 539 – Bioprocessing II Credit: 4 Hours This course continues the introduction to the theory and application of biotechnology procedures to the development of biopharmaceutical products begun in PHSC 538. Students are provided with an overview of protein purification, biopharmaceutical formulation, storage and administration, and pharmacokinetics of protein therapeutics. Prerequisite: PHSC 538. PHSC 540 – Advanced Physical Pharmacy Credit: 3 Hours A comprehensive course in the physical and chemical properties of drugs and other pharmaceutical substances. This course will cover thermodynamics, solubility theory, interfacial phenomena, adsorption and absorption, micrometrics, complexation, viscoelasticity, advanced kinetics theory, and targeted drug delivery systems. Discussion involving issues related to the above topics will be supplemented with journal articles. Prerequisite: PHSC 418/419 or PHSC 514/515.

PHSC 574 – Biopharmaceutics Credit: 3 Hours This course presents the biological and physiochemical factors of the body, drugs and dosage forms that influence drug availability, disposition, and pharmacological and toxicological responses. This course co-listed as PHAR 314 and PHSC 474. Permission of instructor. PHSC 577 – Autonomic, Cardiovascular, Renal and Paracrine Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry Credit: 4 Hours Part of the series of Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry courses, PHSC 577 examines the pharmacology/medicinal chemistry of drugs that modulate neuromuscular transmission and the autonomic nervous system. The course will cover drugs used in the treatment of cardiovascular deseases such as hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias and congestive heart failure. In addition, drugs used to modulate autocoid activity including prostaglandins and histamine will be examined. Prerequisite: PHSC 512. This course is co-listed as PHAR 417. PHSC 581 – Endocrine and CNS Pharmacology/ Medicinal Chemistry Credit: 3 Hours Part of the series of Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry courses, PHSC 581 examines the pharmacology/medicinal chemistry of hormone agonists, antagonists, and other drugs that modulate the endocrine system, as well as drugs used to treat mental disorders and CNS diseases with special emphasis on their mechanisms of action, structure activity relationships and major adverse effects. Prerequisite: PHSC 512. This course is co-listed as PHAR 421. PHSC 583 – Anti-Infective, Antineoplastic, and Immunopharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry Credit: 4 Hours Part of the series of Pharmacology/Medicinal Chemistry courses, PHSC 583 examines the pharmacology/medicinal chemistry of agents used to treat infectious and neoplastic diseases. Immunomodulating agents in the treatment of organ transplantation are also discussed. Included are the broad range of antibacterial agents, antifungal agents, antiparasitic agents, antiviral agents, antineoplastic agents, vaccines and immunomodulatory agents. Prerequisite: PHSC 512. This course is co-listed as PHAR 423. PHSC 590 – Advanced Pharmacology & Toxicology/Laboratory Credit: 2/1 Hours This course is required for the pharmacology track of the MSPS degree, and provides details on the theory and methodologies of modern pharmacology and toxicology. Class will consist of lecture and lab time to provide the student hands-on experience in a variety of techniques and data analysis. Topics covered will include radioligand binding analysis, in vitro and in vivo functional assays, and toxicological screening methods. Prerequisites: PHSC 512.

PHSC 542 – Advanced Topics in Industrial Pharmacy Credit: 4 Hours This is a project-oriented course in the design and manufacture of phar-maceutical dosage forms. This hands-on course places emphasis on the application of cGMPs in the preparation of dosage forms. Prerequisite: PHSC 418/419 or PHSC 514/515.

37


C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued) their organizations strategically by rethinking their approaches to management, leadership, and leadership development. This course enables students to understand how to build and foster relationships as well as emphasizes the importance of those relationships in their professional and personal lives. PHSC 610/620 – Research Project Credit: 2/4 Hours The research project is intended to provide students with a practical, hands-on application of previously obtained knowledge from the didactic setting and will be conducted under the guidance of a major advisor and a Research Project Committee of at least two other faculty members. Projects must be pre-approved and guided by the Committee. Students will provide a written research report and present their project upon completion.

For Students in the MSPS program: 1. Maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 in the MSPS courses. Failure to maintain the cumulative GPA will result in a probationary period, not exceeding one semester, and will result in dismissal at the end of the probationary period if the student has not achieved the required cumulative GPA. 2. Earning any credits of D or F will result in dismissal. 3. Students must complete all coursework within seven (7) years of entering the MSPS program. 4. Students dismissed from the program may appeal to the MSPS Academic Performance and Standards Committee to be reinstated. The Chairman of the Committee will review periodically students files and forward his/her findings to the Director of Pharmaceutical Sciences Programs. The Director in turn will notify the student in writing concerning his/her standing in the program. Students may appeal the Director’s decision to the Committee (see Rule 4 above). The Committee’s recommendations are forwarded to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy for a final review. The Dean’s Office will notify the student in writing concerning the Committee’s recommendations. The student can appeal the decision to the Dean for a final review. The Dean’s decision is final. PHSC 592 – Advanced Cellular & Molecular Pharmacology Credit: 3 Hours This course involves a detailed treatment of the various receptor/signal transduction systems found in mammalian systems from the perspective of developing them as therapeutic targets. Aspects of ion channel pharmacology, cyclic AMP and inositol phosphate signaling in pathological conditions will be discussed. The pharmacological control of tyrosine kinase signaling pathways and cell cycle regulation in the therapy of neoplastic disease will be addressed as well. The regulation of gene expression by inhibition of transcription or gene knockout/replacement strategies will also be discussed. The coursework for the class will entail lectures and systematic evaluation of the primary literature in the topics being covered. Prerequisite: PHSC 590. PHSC 593 – Leadership Development Credit: 2 Hours The purpose of this course is to identify and strengthen leadership skills. It uses a development approach focusing on how individuals become effective leaders by addressing the human element of enterprise within significant business situations. Students will strengthen their individual capabilities to advance

38

P l e a s e not e : The Campbell University School of Pharmacy reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum or policies of any program as it deems necessary.


D E P ARTMENT OF C L I N I C A L RE S EAR C H Mission Statement The mission of the Department of Clinical Research is to teach and conduct clinical research in a student-focused environment, to demonstrate that clinical research provides the foundation for Evidence-based Clinical Practice, and to support the broad mission of Campbell University and its School of Pharmacy.

T

he term clinical research embraces all research that is conducted to provide clinicians with information to help them decide which course of treatment best suits each individual patient in their care. Clinical research therefore provides the evidence that is the basis for Evidence-based Clinical Practice. In this manner, everyone involved in clinical research helps provide clinicians with critical information that has a direct impact on their patients’ well-being. The Department of Clinical Research is headquartered in North Carolina’s Research Triangle Park (RTP), and teaches classes at this campus and the University’s Buies Creek campus. The RTP is one of the world’s largest and most dynamic research centers. Many companies involved in clinical research are located here, and we have excellent relationships with world leaders in their respective fields. The department’s LEARN Technology Center is equipped with cutting-edge educational technology, including the ability to broadcast lectures live to the Buies Creek campus. Digital recording of lectures also facilitates our video-streaming of on-line courses.

Educational Programs The department offers three degree programs, each uniquely tailored to provide appropriately structured student-focused education: • Bachelor of Science in Clinical Research (BSCR) • Executive Master of Science in Clinical Research (MSCR) • Doctor of Pharmacy/MSCR Joint Degree Our Bachelor of Science in Clinical Research degree is ideally suited to prepare students for entry-level jobs in the Contract Research Organization (CRO) industry. CROs conduct clinical research for pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, and have many employment opportunities that are very well suited to these graduates. Our Executive Master of Science in Clinical Research is well suited for several student populations, and classes are held in the evening to allow all of these students access to this degree program. First, students can enter this program having completed the Bachelor of Science in Clinical Research degree, or any other suitable undergraduate degree, and continue their education in clinical research. Some of our BS graduates defer their entry into industry to pursue this graduate degree first. Second, professionals already working in the industry who would like to earn this graduate degree are very welcome. Some of these students already hold terminal degrees in other health-related disciplines, e.g., medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and allied health fields, but enroll in this program to gain a wide knowledge of all key aspects of clinical research. It is our goal to prepare our graduates for leadership positions in their respective fields within clinical research.

Our Doctor of Pharmacy/Master of Science in Clinical Research (Pharm.D. /MSCR) joint degree program allows students to apply certain credits from the Pharm.D. curriculum towards the requirements of the MSCR degree, and to apply MSCR courses to Pharm.D. elective requirements. Students in this program can earn a professional pharmacy degree and a Master of Science in Clinical Research degree concurrently. These students may elect to design their research project in collaboration with their Clinical Preceptor during an appropriate fourth year Clerkship, an option that is not available to students pursuing separate Pharm.D. and MSCR degrees. This unique joint degree program provides pharmacists with an additional qualification and a broad understanding of clinical research. Graduates will augment their clinical pharmacy practice skills with an in-depth understanding of the fundamentals required to produce and interpret medical evidence which may be utilized in a variety of practice settings. Graduates will possess the education and the necessary skills to choose from a broader range of career options. These career opportunities include clinical pharmacy roles in the community, hospital and long term care venues. In addition, graduates are well-prepared to select roles within the pharmaceutical/biotechnology industry, governmental agencies (such as the Food and Drug Administration, Centers for Disease Control, etc.) as well as academic careers in pharmacy and medical education. The Campbell University School of Pharmacy is preparing these students for leadership positions in their chosen careers.

The School of Pharmacy Clinical Research Center In addition to these degree programs, students also have the opportunity to participate in research at the Campbell University School of Pharmacy Clinical Research Center (CRC), which is housed in this department. The purpose of the CRC is: to provide training of students and fellows in the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical studies; to provide scientific resources to support various clinical studies conducted within the School of Pharmacy; and to collaborate with government, pharmaceutical, academic and hospital/medical institutions to support and conduct patient-oriented research.

Contact: Campbell University School of Pharmacy Department of Clinical Research Research Triangle Park Campus 808 Aviation Parkway Morrisville, NC 27560 (919) 463-7869

39


BS in Clinical Research C u r r iculu m Freshman Year Semester 1

General Chemistry I Basic Biology Freshman Composition I Intro. to Art, Music, or Theater Introduction to Christianity Campbell Univ. Worship

Course CHEM 111 BIOL 111 ENGL 101 A/M/T 131 RELG 125 CUW 100

Hours 4 4 3 3 3 0.5

Semester 2

General Chemistry II Human Anatomy & Physiology Freshman Composition II Algebra or Calculus* Lifetime Wellness Campbell Univ. Worship

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

CHEM 113 BIOL 221 ENGL 102 MATH ___ PE 185 CUW 100

4 4 3 3/4 2 0.5

Sophomore Year Semester 3

Organic Chemistry I Microbiology and Immunology Intermediate Foreign Language I Western Civilization I Exercise Activity Campbell Univ. Worship

Course CHEM 227 BIOL 334 LANG 201 HIST 111 PE 111 CUW 200

Hours 4 4 3 3 1 0.5

Semester 4

Organic Chemistry II Cellular & Molecular Biology Literature I (Brit/Amer/World) Social Science Elective Western Civilization II Campbell Univ. Worship

CHEM 228 BIOL 201 ENGL 20_ UNV ___ HIST 112 CUW 200

4 4 3 3 3 0.5

Junior Year Semester 5

Course

Hours

General Biochemistry PHSC 323/325 4 Laboratory Safety PHSC 210 1 Quantitative Lab Techniques PHSC 220/220L 2 Scientific & Technical Writing CLNR 451 1.5 New Product Development CLNR 463 1.5 Principles of Clinical Research CLNR 464 1.5 Experimental Design & Biostatistics CLNR 324 4

Semester 6

Introduction to Pharmacology Physical & Clinical Assessment Regulatory Affairs Economics Interpersonal Skills Scientific Literature Seminar I Elective

CLNR 328 CLNR 479 CLNR 430 ECON 200 CLNR 442 CLNR 334 UNIV ___

4 2 3 3 2 1 3

Senior Year Semester 7

Managing/Monitoring Clin. Trials Data Management Scientific Literature Seminar II Christian Ethics Electives Literature II (Brit/Amer/World)

Course

CLNR 459 CLNR 450 CLNR 336 RELG 224 UNIV ___ ENGL 20_

Hours 3 2 1 3 5 3

Semester 8

Senior Internship** Senior Seminar

CLNR 420 CLNR 416

14 1

* S tudents may take math 122 or 2 math courses numbered 111 or higher. ** Internship sites may require a criminal background check before beginning the internship

NOTE: Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/pharmacy for the most up to date curriculum information.

40


MS in Clinical Research C u r r iculu m

G

raduate lectures are offered in the evenings in the RTP area so that persons employed full-time may participate. Research projects are performed independently in conjunction with our industry and academic partners. The masters degree program is intended to provide training for individuals who hold bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degrees in biological or chemical sciences and in health-related professions such as human and veterinarian medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, nursing, and the allied health fields. Graduates of this master’s degree program will assume a variety of roles depending on their prior educational training and interests. We envision that graduates of this program may progress from project leader/manager to clinical directors and higher level positions.

Master’s Year 1 Fall

New Product Development Principles of Clinical Research Advanced Data Management Experimental Design & Biostatistics

Course

CLNR 515 CLNR 505 CLNR 520 CLNR 518

Hours 1.5 1.5 2 3

Spring

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

Course

Hours

Elective Courses (continued) Course

Hours

Regulatory Affairs Managing & Monitoring Clinical Trials Medical Ethics Advanced Study Design & analysis

Summer

Scientific Communication Physical & Clinical Assessment Healthcare Economics Project Management

CLNR 530 CLNR 559 CLNR 525 CLNR 566

CLNR 552 CLNR 519 CLNR 561 CLNR 568

3 3 3 3

2 2 2 2

Master’s Year 2 Fall

Course

Clinical Research Seminar CLNR 606 Research Project I CLNR 690 Elective*

Hours 2 3.5 3.5

Spring

Research Project II

CLNR 695

3.5

*Students are required to take a minimum of 3.5 credit hours in elective courses.

Elective Courses

Special Research Clinical Research Pharmacokinetics Pharmacogenetics Epidemiology Medical Genomics Behavioral Medicine

Course

CLNR 504 CLNR 510 CLNR 528 CLNR 529 CLNR 539 CLNR 541

Hours 0.5-2 2 2 2 2 2

Preclinical Drug Development Evidence-Based Medicine Biopharmaceutics Pharmaceutical Compliance & QA Leadership Development

CLNR 562 CLNR 573 CLNR 574 CLNR 581 CLNR 593

2 2 3 2 2

PHAR courses may serve as electives. Federally supported financial aid requires a minimum of half-time enrollment (3.5 credit hours). NOTE: Please refer to our website at www.campbell.edu/pharmacy for the most up to date curriculum and tuition information.

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Clinical Research Policies Admission Requirements Bachelor’s Degree with a minimum GPA of 3.0; GRE/PCAT/MCAT; TOEFL >550 (paper-based), 213 (computer-based), 79 (internet-based); Completed application and fees, official transcripts of all college work attempted, 3 letters of recommendation Prerequisites: General Chemistry I & II, Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry, Anatomy and Physiology, Pharmacology

Policies 1. Students who meet the GPA & GRE requirement, but lack other prerequisites may receive “conditional acceptance,” conditional on completing the prerequisites. Students may enroll in MSCR courses before they have completed all program prerequisites, but they must complete all prerequisites before they can receive full acceptance into the program. We recommend submitting applications for Fall Semester by April 1st and applications for Spring Semester by November 1st. 2. Students falling below the GPA requirement are expected to have a minimum combined GRE score of 1000 verbal & Math, and a 4.0 analytical writing. Furthermore, these students receive “provisional acceptance.” They will be considered for full acceptance into the program after achieving a GPA > 3.0 in the first nine credit hours of course work in the program. 3. Those who have earned a Ph.D., M.D., or Pharm.D. (Terminal doctorals listed by NIH) at an accredited institution in the United States are not required to submit a GRE or other test score. 4. Late applications: Late applicants can receive approval to register for courses for the current semester if they:

a. submit a completed application form and application fee b. submit official transcripts of all college/university work attempted c. appear to meet the criteria for conditional acceptance

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Before taking any courses in subsequent semesters, these students are expected to complete their application and to receive conditional or provisional acceptance. 5. Students not seeking a degree: Students not seeking a degree can receive approval to register for courses if they:

a. b. c. d.

submit a completed application form and application fee submit official transcripts of all college/university work attempted submit one letter of recommendation receive permission of the MSCR Admissions committee.

Note: A maximum of 4 credit hours of graduate level courses numbered 500 or higher may be taken before acceptance.

In cases where demand for a class exceeds the enrollment capacity, degree-seeking students will have priority over students not seeking a degree. Non-degree seeking students can only register during the first week of classes and may not pre-register for courses. 6. Students taking a leave of absence of greater than one semester must notify their advisor and Department Chairman in writing.

International Students 1. International Students requiring student visas are not eligible for a provisional or conditional acceptance as described above. 2. International Students begin the program only in the Fall semester each year. Students must complete their application for admission by the April 1st deadline to be considered for the Fall Semester.

Note: Requests for deferment, use of similar courses, or use of work experience must be obtained from the department chair.


Clinical Research C O U R S E D E S C R I P T I ON S CLNR 223 – Principles of Biochemistry Credit: 2 Hours Concepts in basic Biochemistry will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the following topics: 1) structure, function, and their relationship: 2) proteins: 3) enzymes; 4) metabolism: and 5) biological information flow. CLNR 324 – Experimental Design & Biostatistics Credit: 4 Hours The application of statistical analyses to the design, conduct, and interpretation of pharmaceutical research, development, testing, and manufacturing is provided in this comprehensive course. CLNR 328 – Introduction to Pharmacology Credit: 4 Hours The basic principles of pharmacology and toxicology are covered through discussion of the responses of biological systems to drugs and chemicals. The course also considers the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of xenobiotics and how these factors relate to drug action. Prerequisite: BIOL 221. CLNR 334 and 336 – Scientific Literature Seminar I & II Credit: 1 Hour Each Students are introduced to literature searching and critical analysis techniques in this series of courses. The courses promote the formulation of critical thinking approaches. Special emphasis is placed on communication techniques. Students apply their knowledge and skill in the form of written and oral presentations developed by researching the current pharmaceutical and biomedical literature. Prerequisite: CLNR 451. CLNR 416 – Senior Seminar Credit: 1 Hour Senior Seminar provides a forum through which students chronicle their B.S. internship experience. Students present an overview of the clinical site at which they worked and provide a synopsis of their role in the organization. Students present findings from their internship to the faculty and other students. Corequisite: CLNR 420. CLNR 420 – Senior Internship Credit: 14 Hours The full-time internship provides practical experience at one or more clinical research sites. Students and participating institutions are matched to provide a comprehensive work experience. Prerequisite: Completion of all BSCR courses and at least a 2.0 major and cumulative GPA. Corequisite: CLNR 416. CLNR 430 – Regulatory Affairs Credit: 3 Hours This introductory course will provide the student with an overview of the regulatory requirements and the underlying principles for gaining approval of worldwide marketing applications. Students may be assigned to groups in order to develop an understanding of the teamwork necessary to effectively function in the regulatory process. Information on late phase clinical investigations, subsequent to IND filing, marketing considerations, and periodic safety reporting will be presented. Student groups will be expected to make presentations, which

will include the incorporation of a variety of realistic issues and unexpected developments that arise during the review of their applications. Prerequisites: CLNR 463 and 464. CLNR 442 – Interpersonal Skills Credit: 2 Hours In this course, students will learn about the various factors involved in developing good interpersonal speaking and writing skills including: self-awareness, understanding individual differences, goal setting, listening and feedback, teamwork, leadership development and motivating others, delegation, negotiation, conflict resolution, interviewing, and presentation skills. The course will provide a forum for group discussions and writing exercises. CLNR 450 – Data Management Credit: 2 Hours This introductory course covers topics such as the role of data management in clinical trials and the duties of the Clinical Data Coordinator. Topics include organization, collection, review, and tracking of data. Coding of adverse drug experiences, drugs and disease states, and standardized terminology are also considered. Prerequisites: CLNR 463 and 464. CLNR 451 – Scientific & Technical Writing Credit: 1.5 Hours This required course is presented to assist students in skill enhancement in theareas of scientific and technical writing. 43


C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued)

CLNR 459 – Managing & Monitoring Clinical Trials Credit: 3 Hours This introductory course is designed to provide a theoretical and practical overview of the principles of managing and monitoring clinical trials. The multiple practice environments in which clinical research is conducted will be described and the various roles of involved personnel will be discussed. Managing & Monitoring Clinical Trials will introduce students to the elements of clinical trial protocols and data collection strategies (e.g. case report forms), and will provide an overview of regulations relevant to clinical trials including responsibilities of sponsors, investigators, institutional review boards, and contract research organizations. In addition, the course will cover selection of investigators, conduct of investigator meetings, site monitoring visits (for study initiation, periodic monitoring, and study termination), patient enrollment issues, safety monitoring, case report form review, and data management. Students will become familiar with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs), Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), the quality assurance process (QA), and FDA audits. Prerequisites: CLNR 463 and 464. CLNR 463 – New Product Development Credit: 1.5 Hours This introductory course provides an overview of the broad field of new product development. While primarily designed to give students the basic knowledge required for subsequent courses in clinical research, it will also support the students’ consideration of subsequent career choices. The course will cover the process of development from early research, discovery, and product formulation, through the requirements for proving safety and efficacy. Marketing and promotional considerations necessary for the successful introduction of a product into the marketplace will be discussed, as will the external influences that may alter the development process in the global market place of the twenty-first century. CLNR 464 – Principles of Clinical Research Credit: 1.5 Hours This introductory course will provide a broad understanding of Clinical Research-definition, methodology, conduct and applications. The course will explore basic elements of clinical research including the hierarchy of clinical trials, clinical trial design, clinical trial conduct, and safety surveillance. Application of clinical trial knowledge to specific medical practice issues will also be explored. CLNR 479 – Physical & Clinical Assessment Credit: 2 Hours This course is designed to introduce students to the basic principles and techniques of history taking and physical and clinical assessment. Students in this course have an opportunity to develop the basic skills necessary to understand lab values and assessment parameters. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 CLNR 504 – Special Research in Clinical Research Credit: Variable (Maximum 2 Hours) The purpose of this elective course is to introduce the MSCR student to methods of basic science and/or clinical research. This can involve the application of the scientific inquiry process, literature evaluation, development of teaching skills, data acquisition and analysis, and formal presentation of results. Two credits are equivalent to 6-8 hours per week of course activity.

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CLNR 505 – Principles of Clinical Research Credit: 1.5 Hours This advanced course will provide a broad understanding of Clinical Researchdefinition, methodology, conduct and applications. The course will explore the elements of clinical research including the hierarchy of clinical trials, clinical trial conduct, and safety surveillance. Application of clinical trial knowledge to specific medical practice issues will also be explored. CLNR 510 – Pharmacokinetics Credit: 2 Hours This course is designed to provide an understanding of basic, clinically applicable pharmacokinetic formulas and the assumptions that are involved with their use in therapeutic drug monitoring. This course is co-listed as PHAR 410. Permission of instructor required. CLNR 515 – New Product Development Credit: 1.5 Hours This advanced course provides an in-depth analysis of the broad field of new product development. The course will explore the detailed process of development from early research, discovery, and product formulation, through the requirements for proving safety and efficacy. Marketing and promotional considerations necessary for the successful introduction of a product into the marketplace will be discussed, as will the external influences that may alter the development process in the global market place of the twenty-first century. Topics covered include drugs, devices, crop science, biotechnology, and others. CLNR 518 – Experimental Design & Biostatistics Credit: 3 Hours This course is intended to provide students with the basic knowledge of descriptive statistics, probability theory, hypothesis testing, and other selected statistical methods including parametric and non-parametric tests for differences in central tendency, paired comparisons, simple linear regression and one-way analysis of variance. Also discussed is the importance of appropriate statistical design in the development of experimental protocols. CLNR 519 – Physical & Clinical Assessment Credit: 2 Hours This course is designed to provide students to the principles and techniques of history taking and physical and clinical assessment. Students in this course develop the necessary skills to follow patients by understanding lab values and assessment parameters. Prerequisite: BIOL 221 CLNR 520 – Advanced Data Management Credit: 2 Hours This advanced course covers in detail topics such as the role of data management in clinical trials and the duties of the Clinical Data Coordinator. Topics include organization, collection, review, and tracking of data. Coding of adverse drug experiences, drugs and disease states, and standardized terminology are also considered. Prerequisites: CLNR 505 & 515. CLNR 525 – Medical Ethics Credit: 3 Hours As health care professionals, clinical researchers encounter a variety of problems that may compromise quality care and patient rights. This course is designed to enable students to approach ethical dilemmas objectively with an


understanding of professional ethical responsibility. Students will learn skills in ethical reasoning necessary to promote the dignity of the patient. Ethical issues relevant to the clinical researcher such as selection of subjects, compensation, confidentiality, informed consent, termination of clinical trials, conflict of interest, and scientific integrity will also be covered. Students are expected to review current media issues that can impact class discussions. CLNR 528 – Pharmacogenetics Credit: 2 Hours Population genetics, disease state prevalence, and population variances in response to drug therapy are covered in this course. The impact of pharmacogenetics on the future of clinical trials will be considered. Prerequisites: CLNR 328, 505, 515 and 518. CLNR 529 – Epidemiology Credit: 2 Hours This course presents an overview of classic epidemiology and basic pharmacoepidemiology and how these fields augment clinical research. The course emphasizes introduction to the application of epidemiological methods in assessing pharmacological effectiveness and safety. The primary goal of the course is to orient students to the field of pharmacoepidemiology and foster an appreciation for the methods used to study drug exposure in “real world” settings. Prerequisites: CLNR 505 and 518. CLNR 530 – Regulatory Affairs Credit: 3 Hours This course will provide the student with in-depth coverage of the regulatory requirements and the underlying principles for gaining approval of worldwide marketing applications. Students will be assigned to groups in order to develop an understanding of the teamwork necessary to effectively function in the regulatory process. Emphasis will be placed on late phase clinical investigations, subsequent to IND filing, marketing considerations, and periodic safety reporting. Student groups will be expected to make presentations, which will include the incorporation of a variety of realistic issues and unexpected developments that arise during the review of their applications. Students will be expected to use the Internet as a research resource, and to communicate with fellow teammates by e-mail. Prerequisites: CLNR 505 and 515. CLNR 539 – Medical Genomics credit: 2 hours This course starts by teaching basic genomics and molecular biology. Attention then focuses on the benefits of this knowledge in biomedical research and medicine. The interdisciplinary scientific field of Medical Genomics combines knowledge generated from the Human Genome Project (HGP) with the data processing and analytical methods of Bioinformatics to enhance medical practice. Examples of topics discussed include pharmacogenomics and toxicogenomics, an awareness of the ethical, legal, and social implications of genomic research, and the potential future implementation of Precision Medicine and Information-based Medicine.

influences in disease prevention and health promotion. Behavioral Medicine is the interdisciplinary scientific field concerned with the development and integration of behavioral and biomedical knowledge. This knowledge can then be applied to prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease, and to preventive medicine strategies such as health promotion and wellness programs. CLNR 552 – Scientific Communications Credit: 2 Hours This course applies principles of communications as they relate to scientific data as well as communications in a scientific environment. Areas of study include negotiation skills, abstract development, poster development and presentation, communication barriers, professionalism, leadership, and others.  Team and individual assignments as well as in and out of class activities are a requirement for the course. CLNR 559 – Advanced Managing & Monitoring Clinical Trials Credit: 3 Hours This advanced course is designed to provide an in depth knowledge of the principles of managing and monitoring clinical trials. The multiple practice environments in which clinical research is conducted will be described and the various roles of involved personnel will be discussed. Managing & Monitoring Clinical Trials will introduce students to the elements of clinical trial protocols and data collection strategies (e.g. case report forms), and will provide an overview of regulations relevant to clinical trials including responsibilities of sponsors, investigators, institutional review boards, and contract research organizations. In addition, the course will cover selection of investigators, conduct of investigator meetings, site monitoring visits (for study initiation, periodic monitoring, and study termination), patient enrollment issues, safety monitoring, case report form review, and data management. Students will become familiar with Good Clinical Practices (GCPs), Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), the quality assurance process (QA), and FDA audits. Course uses both lecture and in class laboratory formats. Prerequisites: CLNR 505 and 515. CLNR 561 – Healthcare Economics Credit: 2 Hours This course will help participants understand how to apply economic principle to health care problems. The class will concentrate on factors that distinguish the medical care market from other markets, including uncertainty, government regulation, insurance, and externalities. Students will pay particular attention to the way in which economists measure the costs and benefits of drug discovery and development. Furthermore, the demand for medical care and the supply and demand of health insurance will be analyzed. Finally, students will contrast medical care in the United States with care offered in other nations.

CLNR 541 – Behavioral Medicine Credit: 2 Hours Behavior is a major contributor to many serious and chronic illnesses in society today, including heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and stress-induced diseases. The human and health costs of these diseases are enormous. Fortunately, behavioral factors and interventions can also be very powerful

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C o u r s e d e sc r ip t i o n s

(continued)

CLNR 562 – Preclinical Drug Development Credit: 2 Hours This course provides students with an overview of the process of classical and modern drug development. The course will also provide a perspective of the interaction of research, development and marketing activities in a regulated environment. Particular emphasis is placed on promising approaches expected to lead to novel therapies and drug delivery systems within the next decade. A focus on illustrating future therapeutic targets and drug delivery systems is included. Prerequisites: CLNR 505 and 515. CLNR 566 – Advanced Study Design & Analysis Credit: 3 Hours Building on the foundations laid by the first-year MSCR course in Experimental Design and Biostatistics, “Advanced Study Design and Analysis” gives students a greater understanding of Medical Statistics and the methodological considerations underlying study design. This facilitates their understanding of the central role of study design and statistical analysis in clinical research, which provides the evidence for Evidence-based Clinical Practice. A primary goal of the course is to highlight students’ awareness of the central importance of statistical thinking in clinical research, including initial conceptualization of the study, design considerations, statistical analysis, and clinical interpretation of results. Prerequisite: CLNR 518

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CLNR 568 – Project Management Credit: 2 Hours This course will introduce the concepts of project management that are utilized broadly in industries as diverse as aerospace and agriculture. The full life cycle of a project will be studied including planning, conducting, monitoring, analysis, and reporting. The project manager’s role will be defined in developing and maintaining the timeline, budget, and quality of a project. Students will be exposed to project management as it applies specifically to clinical research. While management of an individual clinical trial will be covered, the broader perspective of management of a new drug project in the pharmaceutical industry will be a major focus. In the latter, the project manager integrates basic research, secondary pharmacology, toxicology, chemical development, analytical development, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, clinical research, and marketing aspects for delivery of a new product to the marketplace. Prerequisite: CLNR 559. CLNR 573 – Evidence-Based Medicine Credit: 2 Hours This course will trace formulation of relevant questions from clinical cases through the methodology required to search the clinical literature for critical information. Students will be exposed to the process of evaluating the validity and usefulness of this information in order to incorporate it into clinical practice. Prerequisites: CLNR 505, 518 and 566.


CLNR 574 – Biopharmaceutics Credit: 3 Hours This course presents the biological and physiochemical factors of the body, drugs and dosage forms that influence drug availability, disposition, and pharmacological and toxicological responses. This course is co-listed as PHAR 314. Permission of instructor required. CLNR 581 – Pharmaceutical Compliance and Quality Assurance Credit: 2 Hours This course will provide the student with in-depth knowledge of compliance and quality assurance issues and regulations in the drug development process. Students will work in groups on a variety of case studies and role-playing situations. Emphasis will be placed on Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP), Good Laboratory Practices (GLP) and Good Clinical Practices (GCP). Students will also gain knowledge of FDA enforcement tools such as “Recalls,” “Warning Letters,” and restrictions placed on Clinical Investigators, and of problems with Direct to Consumer advertising, Internet Pharmacies, and other topical issues. Active FDA investigators will also make presentations. Prerequisites: CLNR 505, 515, 530 and 559. CLNR 593 – Leadership Development Credit: 2 Hours The purpose of this course is to identify and strengthen leadership skills. It uses a development approach focusing on how individuals become effective leaders by addressing the human element of enterprise within significant business situations. Students will strengthen their individual capabilities to advance their organizations strategically by rethinking their approaches to management, leadership, and leadership development. This course enables students to understand how to build and foster relationships as well as emphasizes the importance of those relationships in their professional and personal lives. CLNR 606 – Clinical Research Seminar Credit: 2 Hours This seminar is intended to assist the student in developing critical thinking skills in clinical research design and analyses of data. The course will reinforce learning of experimental methods in clinical research by analyzing manuscripts in the published literature. Students will learn criteria for quality that will allow them to distinguish those studies with the strongest validity. They will apply statistical methodology and knowledge of study design that they acquired in previous courses. Prerequisites: CLNR 505, 515, 518 and 566. CLNR 690 – Research Project I Credit: 3.5 Hours Research Project I is the first of two components that comprise the Research Project Course, the final component of the MSCR degree program. In this course, students utilize all of their previous learning and experiences to plan and execute a clinical research project under the supervision of the Course Director and a team of expert researchers. Students are offered the opportunity to collect original data or to work with an existing data set to answer a specific research question. Having decided on the nature of their research project, students will prepare a Research Protocol detailing the nature of their investigation, the research question, their plan for conducting the study, and the analytical strategy that will be employed to provide the answer

to their research question. A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required in all MS in Clinical Research required courses. Corequisite: CLNR 525 & CLNR 606. Full acceptance status in the program and completion of all core courses is required before beginning the research project. CLNR 695 – Research Project II Credit: 3.5 Hours During Research Project II, students conduct their research project and prepare a Research Report detailing all aspects of the investigation they have conducted. During the execution of their study, students can seek guidance from the team of expert researchers that work closely with the Course Director. Additionally, students prepare a short PowerPoint presentation of their study and results and, with appropriate guidance, give this presentation to a small audience of students and the faculty and research experts with whom they have worked with during their project. Prerequisite: CLNR 690.

P l e a s e N ot e : The Campbell University School of Pharmacy reserves the right to make changes in the curriculum or policy of any program as it deems necessary.

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Student Organizations Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy (AMCP)

Clinical Research Student Advisory Board (SAB)

If you are interested in a career that ties all the branches of pharmacy such as clinical pharmacy retail/community pharmacy, industry or pharmacy benefit managers, you may find interest in a career in managed care pharmacy. The Academy of Managed Care Pharmacy or AMCP is a national organization whose vision is to “improve the quality of life of patients through appropriate and accessible medication therapy”. In order to achieve their goals and objectives, the organization wants to develop close ties with future pharmacists in order to help bring awareness to the career and educational opportunities in managed care pharmacy. Our Campbell University chapter will be involved in community service projects, career/education opportunities, and social events. In addition, the national AMCP office sponsors two conventions during the year where they provide activities such as a residency showcase and P&T committee competitions for students interested in managed care pharmacy.

The Student Advisory Board (SAB) for Clinical Research, was established with the primary objective of instituting and maintaining open lines of communication between the Clinical Research master’s degree students in Research Triangle Park and the university administration in Buies Creek. Today, the board consists of nine student members, many of whom hold full-time positions with pharmaceutical companies and contract research organizations (CROs) in RTP. In addition, students from the Pharm.D. and B.S. in Clinical Research programs are represented. The SAB serves as the liaison for the clinical research students and meets with members of the administration to discuss issues facing the students. Through these discussions, the SAB works with the faculty & administration to provide programs for all clinical research students.

American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP) Senior Care Pharmacists promote safe and effective medication therapy for older patients. The organization sponsors speakers to discuss careers and issues in consultant and senior care pharmacy. Opportunities are available to learn about senior care pharmacy practice through site visits to pharmacies and long term care facilities. Student projects focus on the needs of elderly patients. The chapter works closely with North Carolina Association of Pharmacists (NCAP) Chronic Care Forum and the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (ASCP). Students have the opportunity to attend state and national meetings.

Academy of Student Pharmacists (ASP) ASP is the student branch of the American Pharmaceutical Association (APhA). This is the largest student organization on campus, with up to 80% of each class enrolled. There are many opportunities to serve on committees and interact with other students of pharmacy at regional and national meetings. Our chapter had the distinct honor of hosting the 1996 Midyear Regional Meeting in Raleigh. This brought regional as well as national attention to Campbell University. ASP also has a close relationship with the North Carolina Association of Pharmacists (NCAP). Locally, the chapter sponsors a Wellness Fair on campus each fall, and offers programs to foster professional development for pharmacy students. Campbell has one of the leading chapters in the nation and is recognized each year at the National APhA convention.

Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International (CPFI) CPFI is an interdenominational group open to all pharmacy students and faculty. The goal of the fellowship is to share the gospel of Jesus Christ and encourage fellow believers. As such, dedication to spiritual growth, fellowship among pharmacy students, and serving the Lord through the practice of pharmacy is emphasized. The organization meets biweekly to hear such speakers as Campbell pharmacy faculty, CPFI board members, community members, or classmates. Other functions include visiting the Mission Demonstration Farm, sponsoring an angel tree at Christmas, providing a special Easter service for all students and faculty, participating in mission opportunities, and attending the CPFI national annual retreat.

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International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE) The International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineering is a nonprofit organization whose purpose is to promote the interests of engineers and other professionals in the pharmaceutical and biotechnical industries. The goal of the student chapter of ISPE is to familiarize students, faculty, and other interested individuals with the many aspects of the pharmaceutical, biotechnical, and related biomedical disciplines. Through meetings, conferences and seminars, ISPE promotes educational exchanges, the development of career opportunities, and networking with professionals in the pharmaceutical and biotechnical industries. Student members who are interested in pursuing careers in the pharmaceutical or biotechnical industries may apply for academic scholarships from the Carolina Chapter of ISPE.

Kappa Epsilon (KE) Kappa Epsilon is a national professional fraternity that promotes women in pharmacy. This organization was founded in May of 1921, and the Alpha Rho chapter at Campbell began in 1987. KE fosters five purposes or ideals: to unite women in pharmacy, to cooperate with the faculties of colleges where chapters are established, to stimulate in its members a desire for high scholarship, to foster a professional consciousness, and lastly to provide a bond of lasting loyalty, interest, and friendship. Our chapter participates in community, professional and university activities. Alpha Rho strives to promote breast cancer awareness as our national professional project by participating in community health fairs as well as providing information to campus faculty.

Kappa Psi Pharmaceutical Fraternity Kappa Psi is the oldest pharmacy fraternity in the nation. On April 23, 1987, the Delta Lambda Chapter of Kappa Psi was established at Campbell University School of Pharmacy. The fraternity sponsors many activities within the university and the community including blood pressure screenings, a fall and spring blood drive, and a Halloween Carnival for the children at Falcon Children’s Home. Kappa Psi holds an Annual Cadet Ball in the spring at Myrtle Beach, SC, as well as various social events throughout the year. During its relatively short existence here at Campbell, Delta Lambda has received many prestigious awards including the National Scholarship Tray in 1991 and being named Province II Chapter of the Year in 1991, and continuously from 1993–1999. Delta Lambda’s highest award was recognition as Kappa Psi’s Best Collegiate Chapter in the Nation in 1993 and second in 1994 at the Grand Council Convention.


National Community Pharmacists Association (NCPA) The student chapter of NCPA is an organization established to promote community pharmacy. It stands for those interested in independent retail pharmacy. NCPA represents many different specialties within pharmacy such as compounding, long term care consulting, home infusion, and disease state management in areas like diabetes and respiratory care. The organization is also very active in political issues that face community pharmacists. Our chapter often sponsors speakers to come and raise our awareness of what direction independent pharmacy is headed. In the past, we have had visitors from the National NCPA headquarters, compounding pharmacists, and Campbell graduates who now practice in their own community pharmacies. NCPA has coordinated blood pressure screenings and patient counseling clinics with independent pharmacy owners. This is one way members can experience pharmaceutical care in a retail setting. Other community service projects have been Hurricane Mitch relief donations, canned food drives, sponsoring families at Thanksgiving, and many others throughout the past. Annually, we have two large fund raising drives: selling Halloween candy bags and Valentine’s Day candy bags. Opportunities in NCPA are endless. Each year, fifteen scholarships from the national association are offered to pharmacy students from each pharmacy school in the nation. Campbell is proud to have had students receive this award in the past. There is a yearly mid-year meeting of NCPA where students are encouraged to network with other students and potential employers. In addition, NCPA hosts student interns at its national headquarters in Alexandria, Virginia.

Pharmacy Legislative Interest Group (PLIG) The focus of Campbell University’s Pharmacy Legislative Interest Group is for students to learn and be engaged in the legislative process in order protect the future of pharmacy. Members do this by learning about current issues facing pharmacy and thus becoming a resource for other pharmacy school organizations. PLIG’s intention is to educate pharmacy students and others on how pharmacists will be able to be a more politically engaging group of professionals.

Pharmacy Student Executive Board (PSEB) The Pharmacy Student Executive Board oversees student activities of the School of Pharmacy as a whole. The Board consists of representatives from each of the many student organizations, including a representative from each class of the School of Pharmacy. Meetings are held, at least, once per month. Any student from the School of Pharmacy, including Pharm.D., pharmaceutical sciences, and clinical research students, are invited to voice their opinions at all meetings. PSEB meetings provide a forum for students to voice concerns, make funding requests, and enhance student and organizational relations. Beyond the meetings, PSEB sponsors many social events such as a Back-to-School Dance, the Winter Formal, and various cookouts throughout the year. We hold a fundraising auction and also maintain the student photocopier. We look forward to seeing you at the Campbell University School of Pharmacy. Please come and voice your opinion.

Phi Delta Chi Fraternity Phi Delta Chi is a professional coed organization that was established to advance the sciences of pharmacy and to promote a sense of fraternalism among its members. The Beta Kappa Chapter of Phi Delta Chi, founded in

1988 at Campbell University serves pharmacy and the Buies Creek community through various activities. This chapter has a strong Christian foundation, but is open to all religions.

Phi Lambda Sigma Phi Lambda Sigma is the national society for the recognition of those students, alumni, and faculty of pharmacy who have exhibited outstanding service and leadership for the advancement of the profession of pharmacy. The goal of the Alpha Zeta Chapter, established in 1990, is to encourage, recognize, and promote leadership within the pharmacy profession. Special attention is given to developing leadership qualities among students. Member selection is based on a student’s ability to demonstrate exemplary leadership, dedicated service to the advancement of the profession, and scholastic achievement.

Rho Chi Pharmaceutical Honor Society Rho Chi is the national honor society for pharmacy and as such is recognized in national and international academic circles. The fundamental objective of Rho Chi is to promote the advancement of the pharmaceutical sciences through the encouragement and recognition of sound scholarship. High standards of intellectual and scholarly achievement are requisites for election to membership. The Gamma Iota Chapter, established at Campbell University School of Pharmacy on April 15, 1994, seeks to increase the awareness of pharmacists about the ethical and social responsibilities of the profession of pharmacy. In part, this is accomplished by public recognition (symbolized by the awarding of the Rho Chi pin) of high intellectual and scholarly achievement among the students, alumni, and faculty of the School of Pharmacy.

Student National Pharmaceutical Association (SNPhA) SNPhA is the student affiliate of the National Pharmaceutical Association (NPhA). SNPhA is an education and service association concerned about pharmacy and health care issues and the need for greater minority representation in pharmacy and pharmaceutical science. The purpose of SNPhA is to plan, organize, coordinate, and execute programs geared toward the improvement of the health, social, and educational environment of the community while providing opportunities for professional development. The organization strives to develop leadership skills, provide education about national health care issues, develop a positive image of minority health professionals, educate minority communities about better health care practices, and increase their awareness and understanding of diseases, and develop the role of minority health professionals as vital members of the health care team.

Student Society of Health-System Pharmacists (SSHP) Campbell University School of Pharmacy became one of the first pharmacy schools in the nation to begin a student forum of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). We serve the students in various ways to inform them of all the career opportunities in health-system’s pharmacy. The student society works closely with its ASHP-affiliated state chapter, North Carolina Association of Pharmacists (NCAP), as well as with ASHP Pharmacy Student Forum. These organizations work together to present speakers, provide services, and conduct activities which improve relations between pharmacy students and practitioners.

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Academic Regulations for the School of Pharmacy A. Degrees Awarded: The professional degree awarded by the School of Pharmacy is the Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.). Master of Science degrees are also offered by the School of Pharmacy. The B.S. degrees in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Clinical Research are awarded and regulated by the College of Arts and Sciences.

B. Course Requirements (Pharm.D.):

1. Completion of all required courses with a passing grade in each course and a 2.20 cumulative GPA. 2. Thirty-six months of residence in an accredited school of pharmacy, the final eighteen months of which must be completed at the Campbell University School of Pharmacy. 3. Graduation recommendation by the faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 4. Payment of all financial obligations to the School. 5. Compulsory attendance at the graduation exercises.

C. Requirements for Internship: Regulations regarding internship require that this experience be obtained after acceptance to the School of Pharmacy. Information pertinent to internship licensing among the various states is available from the School of Pharmacy. However, it should be noted that the School of Pharmacy’s clerkship program will suffice for the internship requirement in North Carolina.

D. Criminal Background Check Policy for Enrolled Students Introduction and Purpose The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) has developed Standard HR.1.20 for staff, students, and volunteers who work in the same capacity as staff who provide care, treatment, and services. This standard requires criminal background checks or pre-employment verification (both hereinafter “background check(s)”) when required by law, regulation, or organization policy. This means that if state law, regulation or organization policy requires background checks on all employees, volunteers, and students, then JCAHO expects them to be done on all three categories. If the state law is ambiguous as to the definition of employee, the organization can define the scope of background checks to fit its own definition. As such, they may include or exclude students and volunteers. In the absence of state law on criminal background checks, each organization can develop its own expectations. Criminal Background Check Policy Campbell University School of Pharmacy requires and will contract for the performance of criminal background checks of all students enrolled or accepted in the Doctor of Pharmacy program, as well as those students enrolled or accepted in the Clinical Research program and the Pharmaceutical Sciences program who will be participating in activities at various sites or organizations. This policy was developed in response to requirements in the professional practice environment stating that facilities providing care to patients must minimize the risk to patients that may be presented by persons with prior criminal activity. 50

A copy of the student’s criminal background check may be provided to a School of Pharmacy rotation or internship site that is participating in the academic training of that School of Pharmacy student. The health care facility or internship site will make a determination whether the student may participate in that setting. The site has the right to refuse to allow the student to complete a rotation at the respective site. Certain offenses may result in the student not being able to be placed at practice sites. In such cases, the student may not be able to meet the requirements for graduation. Applicants to the Doctor of Pharmacy program and the Master’s programs will be notified of the background check requirement as part of the application process. A copy of the Policy will be sent to them if they are offered an interview for acceptance into the Program. In subsequent years, a background check on enrolled doctor of pharmacy students will be done during the second professional year (P2), prior to the introductory hospital rotation, and during the third professional year (P3) prior to beginning advanced practice experiences. Student fees will cover the cost of the background check. Students who are not willing to allow the release of the required personal information may not be able to be placed at an affiliated pharmacy site, and thus cannot meet the requirements for graduation. An outside vendor will perform background checks based on information provided by each student. Background checks will be performed as necessary on other School of Pharmacy students, including students in the Clinical Research and Pharmaceutical Sciences programs. All criminal background data will be maintained in a secure place to assure confidentiality. Procedures for Review 1.  Students will be notified in writing if their background check reports any offenses beyond minor traffic violations. Students will then have 10 business days in which to submit an explanatory statement. P2, P3 and Masters level students should submit a letter of explanation to the Chair of the Student Affairs Committee. Undergraduate students in the Pharmaceutical Sciences and Clinical Research programs should submit an explanatory statement to the director of the program. 2. Any criminal activity that might impact the ability to be placed in rotation sites will be referred to the Student Affairs committee for review as described below. 3. The Student Affairs Committee will initiate criminal background checks and conduct reviews of explanatory statements provided by P2, P3, and Masters level students on a thoughtful case-by-case basis for any situation involving any offenses beyond minor traffic violations discovered by the background check. The committee will conduct its reviews as soon as possible after the disclosure or discovery of the information. All offenses (excluding minor traffic violations) will then be reported to the Director of Experiential Programs or Program Director so that rotation and internship arrangements can be made when possible. The site has the right to refuse to allow the student to complete a rotation or internship at the respective site. Certain offenses may result in the student not being able to be placed at the practice site(s). In such cases, the student may not be able to meet the requirements for graduation. 4. The explanatory statements submitted by undergraduate students in the Pharmaceutical Sciences and Clinical Research programs will be reviewed by the director of the program and other departmental faculty representatives selected by the director of the program and/or the chair of the department.


Standard of Academic Performance A. Retention and Promotion Criteria Students enrolled full-time in the professional program of the School of Pharmacy are expected to make satisfactory academic progress toward completion of the degree requirements. Satisfactory academic progress is defined as successful completion of the prescribed time; maintenance of a 2.2 semester grade point average (SGPA), professionally required course grade point average (PGPA), and accumulative grade point average (AGPA); and, completion of any professional deficiencies and/or required remedial courses in the time and manner prescribed by the faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Students who fail to maintain satisfactory academic progress in the professional program are placed automatically on academic probation. Students on academic probation may be required to participate in academic counseling and/or enroll in a remedial program of study; or, they may be suspended or dismissed according to the policies described in subsequent sections. Such actions will be recommended by the Academic Performance and Standards Committee, subject to review by the Dean. Notification of such actions will be made to the student by the Office of the Dean. The actions taken in these matters are not to be viewed as punitive, but as a recognition that it is unrealistic to continue in a course of study where there is little probability of success. These same standards will be applied to students enrolled in an approved part-time course of study.

B. Academic Probation Academic probation is the initial action for a student failing to make satisfactory academic progress. A student will be placed on academic probation for: 1. Failure to maintain a minimum semester grade point average (SGPA) of 2.20; 2. Failure to maintain a professionally required course grade point average (PGPA) of 2.20; 3. Failure to maintain an accumulative grade point average (AGPA) of 2.20; 4. A failing grade in a professionally required course; 5. Unauthorized failure to complete any degree requirement at the prescribed time. Depending on the nature of the academic deficiencies and overall academic record, a student placed on academic probation may or may not be permitted to continue in the regular sequence of the professional curriculum. A student failing a course in sequence may be permitted to take the next course in the sequence after gaining written permission from the course coordinator, appropriate department chairman, and the Dean’s Office. If a student fails in a professionally required course, it must be repeated during the next term the course is offered. A student placed on academic probation will normally be given one semester in which to correct any grade point deficiencies. The Academic

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Ac a d e m ic r e g ul a t i o n s Performance and Standards Committee will review the student’s record at the end of the term of probation. 1. If the SGPA and PGPA for that term are 2.20 or above, and the AGPA is 2.20 or above, the student will be released from academic probation. If SGPA and PGPA are 2.20 or above, but the AGPA is below 2.20, the student will remain on academic probation. A student remaining on academic probation for more than two consecutive semesters will be subject to suspension or dismissal. 2. If a student fails to make satisfactory progress during the period of academic probation, and/or fails to correct academic deficiencies, within the prescribed time, that student will be subject to automatic suspension and may be dismissed from the School of Pharmacy.

C. Academic Suspension Academic Suspension from the School of Pharmacy occurs when a student: 1. Has failed to make satisfactory progress during a period of academic probation; 2. Has academic deficiencies which preclude continuation in a normal program of study, but may be expected to be able to complete the requirements for the degree under a modified program of study with or without remedial courses; 3. Has received a failing grade in any two professionally required courses. Suspensions are imposed for a specified period of time, not to exceed one year. A student on academic suspension will not be allowed to continue the normal course study. The Academic Performance and Standards Committee will specify the length of time of the suspension, and remedial work required for reinstatement, and the program of study required upon reinstatement.

D. Academic Dismissal Academic dismissal from the School of Pharmacy may be recommended to the Dean by the Academic Performance and Standards Committee if a student: 1. Fails to make satisfactory progress during a period of academic probation or suspension; 2. Has academic deficiencies which preclude continuation in the prescribed program of study, and may not reasonably be expected to complete the requirements of the degree. Except under very extenuating circumstances, academic dismissal will be recommended if a student: 1. Was previously suspended from the School and again failed to make satisfactory academic progress; 2. Is on academic suspension under a remedial course of study and again fails to make satisfactory academic progress; 3. Fails a single professionally required course more than one time, or accumulates more than two failures in professionally required courses; 4. Accumulates a grade point deficiency which reasonably precludes the possibility of completing the degree requirements. A student dismissed from the School may seek reentry by applying for readmission.

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(continued)

E. Academic Status Appeals At the end of each academic term, the Office of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs reviews the academic performances of all students enrolled in the School of Pharmacy. The Office of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs notifies each student and the Academic Performance and Standards Committee regarding each student who does not meet the academic standards as defined by the Academic Regulations of the School of Pharmacy. The Academic Performance and Standards Committee evaluates each student with substandard academic performance and makes a recommendation whether to retain and/or promote the student in the professional program. The student may appear in person before the committee. Upon approval by the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, the Chairman of the Academic Performance and Standards Committee notifies students in writing regarding any decision by the Academic Performance and Standards Committee to require a modified course of study, to suspend enrollment, or to dismiss the student from the School. Any student in the School of Pharmacy has the opportunity to appeal any decision made by the Academic Performance and Standards Committee. Students desiring to appeal a decision rendered by the Academic Performance and Standards Committee shall submit a written petition to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy within seven days of the student’s receipt of notification of the decision. The petition must contain the specific variance requested, a description of any extenuating circumstances intended to justify granting the variance, and a proposed course of study and/or conditions for consideration should the variance be granted. The decision of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy is final.

F. Grade Appeals Students who feel that they have a just reason for appealing a grade in a School of Pharmacy course must first appeal to the course instructor. If the issue cannot be adequately resolved with the instructor, then the student should appeal to the course master. If no resolution is achieved at that level, the student should appeal to the appropriate Department Chairman. After efforts within the department, a student may appeal to the Academic Performance and Standards Committee to seek resolution. If the student feels that the resolution is not just, the student must submit a written petition to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy within seven days of the student’s receipt of notification of the Academic Performance and Standards Committee decision. The petition must contain the specific variance requested and a description of any extenuating circumstances intended to justify granting the variance. The decision of the Dean of the School of Pharmacy is final.

G. Advancement to a Higher Class Advancement to a higher class requires faculty approval with the following requirement: To a Second Professional Year 1. A cumulative grade point average of 2.20; 2. Completion of all First Professional Year courses; 3. Completion of all preprofessional requirements. To Third Professional Year 1. A cumulative grade point average of 2.20; 2. Completion of all Second Professional Year courses. To Fourth Professional Year 1. A cumulative grade point average of 2.20; 2. Completion of all Third Professional Year courses.


H. Delayed Graduation Policy If a pharmacy student is required to re-take courses in our curriculum as a result of specific course failure or a deficiency in overall academic performance, then a delay in scheduling Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs) will occur and the student’s graduation will be delayed. Voluntary course withdrawals or temporary leaves of absence will also cause a delay in scheduling APPEs and a delay in graduation. Any alteration in the normal curriculum progression may affect a student’s financial aid status or qualification for education-based financial aid. Specific counseling and advice should be sought from the School’s Office of Academic Affairs and the University’s Office of Financial Aid for a particular situation. FOR EXAMPLE: a) If a student is forced to withdraw from any or all courses in the fall semester, then he or she usually will return to a delayed schedule in fall of the next year (delaying graduation by one year). To prevent entering financial aid repayment, or “grace period”, a student may be able to register for six credits (half-time) of elective or required courses in the spring semester. Specific approval of this modified course plan must be obtained from the School’s Office of Academic Affairs and the University’s Office of Financial Aid. b) A single course in each semester of the P-2 year may be repeated simultaneously with full-time registration as a P-3 student. Approval must be obtained from the School’s Office of Academic Affairs. A need to repeat two or more courses in either semester of the P-2 year will prevent enrollment in any P-3 courses simultaneously. Progression to the P-3 year will be delayed and graduation will be delayed by one year. Counseling with respect to financial aid considerations must be obtained. c) If a student earns less than a C-grade in any single P-3 course in the fall semester, he/she may be permitted to continue enrollment in P-3 courses in the spring semester (subject to successful completion of required pre-requisites). However, no student can complete any P-4

APPE until he/she has successfully completed all P-1, P-2, and P-3 courses, including Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPEs), and the Top 300 Examination (PHAR 508). Assuming that all courses are passed successfully in the P-3 spring semester, a student would be able to begin APPEs after repeating necessary fall courses. This would allow the student to begin APPEs in January of the following year, possibly qualifying for graduation in December depending on available APPE sites. In order to forestall educational loan repayment, a student must enroll at least half-time (six credit hours) when repeating fall courses. d) If a student fails any P-3 course(s) in the spring semester, he/she will be prevented from starting his/her APPEs until he/she has successfully repeated the course(s) the following spring. After the student has successfully completed the required course(s), he/she may begin his/her APPEs immediately subject to preceptor and site availability. If a student begins these Experiences in March, he/she may be able to graduate in December. If the student begins these Experiences in May, he/she cannot graduate until the following May (one year later). If a student fails any P-3 course, any APPE schedule in place at that time will be entirely cancelled and re-scheduling of all APPEs will be necessary (without exception). e) If a student fails one or more courses or Pharmacy Practice Experiences (IPPE or APPE), it may be necessary to delay his/her graduation due to limited course offerings or unavailability of appropriate training sites. It currently is not possible for a student to complete a pharmacy practice experience during the months of May or December and also graduate during that month because University graduation certification occurs in the middle of each month.

I. Withdrawal A student may withdraw from a course without penalty at any time prior to the end of the fourth week of a semester. Withdrawal from a course after that period will result in a grade being assigned, and that grade will be used

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in determining the student’s grade point average. The grade of W may only be awarded after the fourth week of a semester in cases of serious illness, injuries, or extreme circumstances which normally would require the student’s withdrawal from the School. In the event a student must withdraw from the School, he/she will be responsible for obtaining the required form for withdrawal from the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. It is also the student’s responsibility to complete the prescribed administrative procedures to assure notification to all individuals and offices that require this information.

WP Withdrew Passing. May only be awarded through the fourth week of a semester. WF Withdrew Failing. W Withdrew. May only be assigned when the student withdraws after the no-penalty period for reasons beyond his/her control or at the discretion of the Dean of the School. A grade of W will not be used in computing an individual’s GPA.

J. Attendance

A report of grades attained by a student in the School of Pharmacy will be mailed to the address designated by the student, at the time of registration, at the end of each semester. Students enrolled at Campbell who are fulfilling pre-pharmacy requirements will also be provided with a mid-term report. The official records of each student in the School of Pharmacy will be secured in the Office of the Registrar. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (PL93-380) will govern the release of information for this record which contains the transcript from Campbell University, transcripts and transcript evaluations from other educational agencies attended by the student, secondary school transcripts, scholastic aptitude, and other standardized test scores. The application for admission, general correspondence with the student and, if applicable, letters concerning misconduct or disciplinary actions at Campbell University are kept in the Dean’s Office. The transcript and contents of the permanent record may be examined by the student upon appointment with the Registrar. The first copy of a student’s transcript will be provided by him/her at no charge. Requests for a second or subsequent copies should be made in writing by the student to the Registrar and must be accompanied by a remittance of $5.00 for each copy desired.

To receive credit for any course, a student must attend at least 80% of the hours prescribed for the course. Individual professors have the prerogative of imposing a more restrictive policy consistent with the following exceptions: 1. Absence due to serious illness, injury, or death in the student’s immediate family; 2. Authorized representation of the School or of the University. In the above cases, a student may be permitted to make up work missed. It is the student’s responsibility, whenever possible, to notify School officials in advance that he/she will be absent.

K. Transfer Students An individual who wishes to transfer into the four-year program from an ACPE accredited college or school of pharmacy must comply with the normal application procedure. In addition, the Director of Admissions must receive a letter from the Dean of the previous school stating that as of the date the student left the former school, he/she was a student in good standing and eligible to continue or return to the previous school. All Campbell University pre-pharmacy requirements must have been completed prior to admission to the Campbell University School of Pharmacy.

L. Grading System The following grading system is used by the Campbell University School of Pharmacy: A Excellent work of highest professional quality (4 quality points per semester hour) B Good work of professional quality (3 quality points per semester hour) C Passing work (2 quality points per semester hour) D Below average work (1 quality point per semester hour) F Failing (no quality points assigned) I Incomplete. Incomplete work must be completed within the first 30 days of the subsequent semester or the grade becomes an F.

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M. Grade Reports, Records, and Transcripts

N. Counseling Upon registration in the School of Pharmacy, students will be assigned a faculty advisor to provide assistance during his/her enrollment in the School. This faculty member, the Dean, and the staff are available to discuss personal and academic problems that may arise.


Campbell University School of Pharmacy Honor Code

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e, the students and faculty of Campbell University School of Pharmacy, recognize that pharmacy and its related professions are among the most noble and honorable callings to which one may aspire. These are professions that demand of their members the highest degree of professional competence, ethical behavior, and morality. They require continuous educational development, constant personal and professional self-examination, and an ever-present awareness and sensitivity to human problems. It is the responsibility of every pharmacy related professional, from the day that his/her professional career begins, to seek to achieve the highest aspirations and goals inherent in the profession; to exhibit honor and integrity in the use of his/her special skills for the betterment of humankind; and to act at all times in a manner which will instill public confidence in the profession. We therefore adopt this Honor Code in an attempt to set forth the minimum standards by which our conduct should be governed.

Article 1: Academic Matters A. General Statement Recognizing that it is impossible and inadvisable to set forth with specificity a range of conduct that is prohibited, we nevertheless realize that questions arise occasionally with respect to what a student may or may not do in connection with an academic matter. This Honor Code therefore sets forth the minimum standards of conduct with the hope and expectation that a Campbell University pharmacy program student will never approach, and certainly never fall below, these minimum standards. It is the obligation of the students and faculty to participate in making the honor system viable by reporting violations of all academic matters.

B. Definition An academic matter means any one of the following: any activity which may affect a grade in a course; any activity which in any way contributes to satisfaction of the requirements of a course, or requirements for graduation, or cocurricular activities of an academic nature including student publication and competitions.

C. Prohibited Activities With Respect to Academic Matters Campbell University pharmacy program students shall not: 1. Use materials during an examination other than those specifically authorized by the instructor. To avoid even the appearance of impropriety during an examination, all books, notebooks, briefcases, and the like should be placed in the front or rear of the examination room. 2. Use of materials in any research or assignment that are specifically forbidden by the instructor. This includes reuse of the student’s own work. 3. Engage in any form of plagiarism. Plagiarism is using the words or ideas of another source directly without proper acknowledgment of that source. While it is often necessary to obtain information from other sources, the willful or inadvertent use of information from

another source without acknowledging it (including all types of commercial term paper preparation services; Internet or electronic database sources for term papers, journal clubs, or case presentations; and other students’ work) is considered plagiarism. Ignorance is NOT an excuse. The student bears the responsibility to learn from the individual instructor the procedure for acknowledging sources and indicating quotations as required for each assignment. 4. Give, solicit, or receive information or assistance to or from any person or source during an examination, makeup examination, or written assignment unless specifically authorized to do so by the instructor. 5. Submit modified or changed tests, answer sheets, or assignments for regrading. 6. Intentionally deface, remove without authorization, or secrete any material from the Campbell University School of Pharmacy, Drug Information Center, or any other library. 7. Make an unauthorized or improper use of a computer or computer program, including unauthorized use of programmable calculators during an examination. 8. Fail to report to the Student Affairs Committee any first hand knowledge of any violation to any of the aforementioned provisions of this Honor Code. 9. Willfully conceal or misrepresent information material to an investigation of any alleged violation of this Honor Code when the information is sought by the Student Affairs Committee, faculty, Dean, or the Dean’s designee.

Article 2: Non-academic Matters A. General Statement Campbell University School of Pharmacy students are hereby informed that in their personal and professional lives they represent not only themselves, but also the School of Pharmacy and the pharmacy profession. Therefore, while they have the right and freedom to exercise individual autonomy, they also have the responsibility to exercise that autonomy in a manner that will bring honor to themselves, their pharmacy school, and their chosen profession.

B. Prohibited Activities with Respect to Nonacademic Matters Pharmacy program students are subject to the same level of conduct as all Campbell University students; students residing in university housing are subject to the rules for all students who reside in university housing. Any infractions of these rules will be handled by the Student Affairs Committee. All students are encouraged to study the sections concerning these violations in the current Campbell University Student Handbook. In addition, the Campbell University pharmacy program student shall not: 1. Fail to conform his/her conduct to the ethical and moral standards of the pharmacy profession as articulated in the Student Clinical Code of Conduct (Article 9). 2. Intentionally make misrepresentation on a resume or curriculum vitae concerning class rank, grades, academic honors, work experi ence, or any other matter relevant to job placement. 55


3. Purposely furnish false information. 4. Perpetrate any form of theft, forgery, falsification, or fraudulent use of university or work-site property. 5. Willfully conceal or misrepresent information material to an investigation of an alleged violation of this Honor Code when the information is sought by the Student Affairs Committee, faculty, Dean, or the Dean’s designee. 6. Use or remove unauthorized prescription or nonprescription drugs or appliances from the site of a clinical rotation.

Article 3: Violations: Civil Law The School of Pharmacy shall direct all cases concerning violations of civil laws to the Student Affairs Committee. Any violations will be handled by the faculty of the Student Affairs Committee as described in the University Handbook. All students are encouraged to study the section concerning these violations in the Campbell University Student Handbook.

Article 4: Penalties A. T he Dean of the School of Pharmacy may impose the following penalties

for any of the violations listed above. Recommendations to the Dean are submitted by the Student Affairs Committee. Following proper procedures listed in Article 5 of this Honor Code, the Student Affairs Committee may recommend to the Dean ONE OR MORE of the following penalties:

1. Separation: Separation is a state in which the student is not permitted to continue his/her program at the university. The student shall be withdrawn from all uncompleted courses in which he/she is currently enrolled. The student will not be permitted to reenter the School of Pharmacy’s educational programs. 2. Suspension: Suspension is a temporary state of separation for a definite period from the university including the programs, facilities, and activities. The completion of the period of suspension does not guarantee reinstatement. The decision to readmit a student will be the responsibility of the Dean. 3. Probation: Probation can be of two types: Level One: probation for a stated period carrying with it a loss of eligibility for: a) holding or running for elected office in student professional organizations; b) representing the University in any capacity both on campus and away from campus; c) competing for honors and distinctions, and d) active participation as an elected representative or member of an honorary organization. Violation of the terms of level-one probation may result in extended probation, level-two probation, or in the students suspension. L evel Two: probation for a stated period carrying with it a loss of eligibility for attendance at any and all School of Pharmacy sponsored activities. A student who is placed on level two probation will automatically be placed on level one probation. Violation of the terms of level two probation may result in extended probation or in the students suspension.

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The terms of probation will be enforced by the Student Affairs Committee. Other persons may be appointed by the Dean or the Student Affairs Committee to help enforce said terms. 4. Pharmacy School Community Service: Community service for a stated number of hours will require a student to perform tasks that will benefit the community or the School of Pharmacy. Tasks will be assigned and administered by the Associate Dean for Student Affairs. Failure to perform required service in an appropriate fashion may result in probation. 5. Loss or Lowering of the Course Grade: All students who are found guilty of the act of cheating or plagiarism shall receive a score of zero (0) on that specific component of the course (quizzes, tests, projects, assignments, etc.) Specific penalties for these violations may also include, but are not limited to, course failure, probation, suspension, and/or separation from the program and the University. A second act of cheating or plagiarism by the student will result in the SEPARATION of the student from the University. 6. Reprimand: An official reprimand will be given by the Student Affairs Committee when the charges are not dismissed. A summary of the offense and the reprimand will be placed in the students file in the Dean’s Office of the School of Pharmacy.

B. A ny professor may define penalties for a student who violates particular course regulations. The professor must clearly state these regulations and penalties in his/her course syllabus. The student has the right to appeal such penalties to the Student Affairs Committee.

Article 5: Student Affairs Committee A. General Statement The Assistant Dean for Student Affairs is responsible for the administration of the School of Pharmacy’s disciplinary system. This responsibility is exercised on behalf of the President of the University and entails the supervision of several bodies. Alleged violations of the University Student Code of Conduct or Civil Laws will be handled by the University policies as written in the “Campbell University Student Handbook.” Alleged violations of the Pharmacy School Honor Code will be evaluated by the Student Affairs Committee.

B. Organization The Student Affairs Committee is composed of four faculty members, four pharmacy students (one from each class) and the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs (ex-officio). An ad-hoc member will be chosen to replace any member who cannot or chooses not to attend the proceedings. The Dean will appoint this member. This committee serves as a hearing board for incidents of misconduct involving violations of the Pharmacy School Honor Code. The Pharmacy School Honor Code includes standards for academic, nonacademic, and clinical behavior. The Student Affairs Committee will make recommendations to the Dean of the School of Pharmacy. The Dean will then notify the student in writing of actions concerning alleged violations. Records of disciplinary action normally are maintained by the Dean’s Office until the student graduates or leaves the School of Pharmacy. Students may examine the contents of their file by appointment with the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs.


C. Instigation of Hearings When there is a suspicion of academic misconduct, investigation and appropriate actions may be pursued by either the professor of the course in which the alleged misconduct occurred or by the Student Affairs Committee. In either case, the matter must be promptly resolved. If the professor decides to deal with the incident on his/her own, he/she should report his/her actions to the Chairperson of the Student Affairs Committee. Individual faculty policies concerning misconduct should be clearly stated in the course syllabus. The accused student has the right to appeal any action by the faculty to the Student Affairs Committee, in which case normal Committee procedures will be followed. Charges of misconduct may arise from a student (or group of students), professor, adjunct professor, or preceptor. Within three (3) days of the alleged misconduct or discovery of alleged misconduct, the accuser(s) should discuss the situation with either the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs or the professor in charge of the course. Dated notes should be taken to describe the discussion. Every effort should be made to maintain confidentiality in these discussions. If the accuser(s) has (have) opted to bring the matter before the Assistant Dean for Student Affairs, the Assistant Dean should meet with the professor and the Chairperson of the Student Affairs Committee to explore options. This meeting should take place no longer than five (5) days after the matter was brought to the attention of the Assistant Dean. The options available for resolution of the situation include: 1. The professor can opt to deal with the situation, in which case the student(s) must be informed of allegations and afforded an opportunity to defend him/herself. 2. The case can be referred to the Student Affairs Committee for resolution. Referral to the Committee must be by a written memo which names the student, describes the alleged misconduct (including pertinent dates and times), and summarizes the content of earlier meetings regarding this case. 3. The case may be dismissed. Within five (5) days of referral of the case to the Student Affairs Committee, the Chairperson of the committee will provide a copy of the referral memo to the accused student(s). In addition, the Chairperson will schedule an initial hearing for any charged student with the Committee. This hearing should be held within ten (10) days of the referral of the case to the Committee.

D. Proceedings The Chairperson will begin preliminary investigation of the allegations. Whenever possible, this should include a personal interview with the student, witnesses, and professor involved. Preliminary findings shall be presented at the initial meeting with the Student Affairs Committee. The Chairperson shall objectively present his/her findings to the Committee. The accused student(s) shall meet with the Committee and be informed of the allegations and afforded an opportunity to defend him/herself. Although the purpose of this hearing is exploratory and fact finding in nature, the accused student does have the right to solicit advice and to offer witnesses to support his/her position. The Committee shall vote on whether or not preliminary findings warrant a full hearing by a simple majority vote. If a hearing is deemed necessary, the Chairperson will notify the student and witnesses of the hearing date in writing at least three (3) days prior to the hearing. A waiver of his/her notice may be made if the student so chooses. A full hearing should be held within ten (10) days of the preliminary investigation.

If the Committee votes that no hearing is warranted, the case will be dismissed. The chairperson will file the minutes in the permanent files of the Student Affairs Committee and a copy shall be placed in the Dean’s Office until the student graduates or leaves the School of Pharmacy. Should additional information become available, the chairperson may reopen the case and ask the Committee to consider the new information. All sessions of the Committee will be closed to all individuals except those immediately concerned in the case, except by the expressed wish of the accused that the hearings be open. No attorney shall be present, as this is not a court of law. In case of a closed hearing, all persons present at the proceedings shall be bound to disclose no more than the Committee does in its official report on the case. Revelation of such details will be considered a violation of the Honor Code. In the case of closed hearings, the testimony of each witness shall be given while the other witnesses in the case are out of the room. In open hearings, the witnesses of both parties shall be present during the entire proceedings. The Committee may allow introduction of evidence other than testimony of witnesses provided that the evidence is relevant to the question before the Committee on any matter. The Committee shall set rules for the conduct of all cases and all arrangements connected with the taking of evidence. Time frames for instigation of hearings and proceedings may be altered if circumstances warrant. Votes on all matters shall be a simple majority. Deliberation of the Committee shall take place in private and remain secret. Voting on decisions of guilt shall be by secret ballot. If the Committee determines that the student was in violation of the Honor Code, it will consider and recommend the appropriate penalty. The student should be informed immediately of the judgement and the recommended penalty in case of guilt. The Dean of the School of Pharmacy may uphold or reject any decision or penalty recommended by the Committee. A letter from the Dean’s office will serve as the official notice of judgement and sentence. All minutes and evidence shall be placed in the permanent files of the Student Affairs Committee, and a copy will be sent to the Dean’s Office where it shall remain until the student graduates or leaves the School of Pharmacy.

Article 6: Rights of the Student With respect to violation of the student Honor Code, a student of Campbell University is guaranteed the following rights: 1. The right to a reasonable amount of time to prepare for his/ her hearing; 2. The right to a prompt hearing; 3. The right of being presumed innocent until proven guilty; 4. The right to solicit advice; 5. The right to appeal; 6. The right to know his/her accuser; 7. The right to expect that the Student Affairs Committee will deal with his/her case in a confidential manner.

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Article 7: Appeals Process Any decision reached by the Student Affairs Committee may be appealed to the Dean. An appeal shall be requested by the student in writing, within three (3) days following the date the student receives the decision of the Student Affairs Committee. All appeals to the Dean should be delivered in person or by Registered Mail to: Campbell University School of Pharmacy Dean’s Office P.O. Box 1090 Buies Creek, NC 27506

Article 8: Notes and Definitions

1. The word “student” in this manual refers to any person who is enrolled in any course offered by the Campbell University School of Pharmacy. 2. The words “professor” or “instructor” in this manual refer to any person who is authorized by the university to hold and teach a class sponsored by the university or precept a student during an off-campus practice experience. 3. The words “university” and “school” refer to Campbell University and the School of Pharmacy of Campbell University, respectively. 4. The phrase Student Affairs Committee refers to that committee that is assigned by the Dean of the School of Pharmacy to review situations in which pharmacy program students are involved in academic or professional misconduct. 5. The word “handbook” in this manual refers to the current edition of Campbell University Student Handbook. 6. The word “day(s)” refers to official school days — not holidays, weekends or summer session. 58

Campbell University School of Pharmacy reserves the right to change, delete or modify any item in this document at any time. Proper notification concerning changes, deletions or modifications of said document will be sent to all students within four weeks.

Article 9: Student Clinical Code of Conduct The Campbell University School of Pharmacy students and faculty have adopted the following code of conduct to guide ethical behavior in hospitals, community pharmacies, research and production facilities, and various rotation sites included as clinical practice experiences. We feel that the magnitude of our responsibility as healthcare professionals necessitates the establishment of the highest standards of professional conduct. This code of conduct represents general standards of behavior and illustrates ideals for which to strive; however, specific infractions reported by students, preceptors or faculty to the Chairperson of the Student Affairs Committee may be investigated by this Committee with respect to both the magnitude and chronicity of incidents considered. It should also be understood that these general standards may not afford guidance in every conceivable situation or anticipate every possible infraction. The Student Affairs Committee will be charged with the responsibility of promptly investigating alleged infractions of this code. All cases will require the submission of a report of findings and appropriate recommendations to the Dean’s Office in a timely manner. Students should read, discuss and sign the School of Pharmacy Honor Code prior to enrollment in the School of Pharmacy. This code of conduct was created by the students and faculty of the School of Pharmacy. Modifications of this code will require majority approval of both the faculty and student body.


Respect and Concern for the Welfare of Patients The pharmacy program student will: • Treat patients and their families with respect and dignity both in their presence and in discussions with others. • Recognize when one’s ability to function effectively is compromised and ask for relief or help. • Recognize the limits of student involvement in the medical care of a patient and seek supervision or advice before acting when necessary. • Not use alcohol or other drugs in a manner that could compromise themselves or patient care.

Respect for the Rights of Others

The pharmacy program student will: • Deal with professional, staff and peer members of the health care team in a considerate manner and with a spirit of cooperation. • Act with an egalitarian spirit toward all persons encountered in a professional capacity regardless of race, religion, gender, sexual preference or socioeconomic status. • Respect the patients modesty and privacy.

Trustworthiness The pharmacy program student will: • Be truthful in communication to others. • Maintain confidentiality of patient information. • Admit errors and not knowingly mislead others to promote one’s self at the expense of the patient. • Not represent himself/herself as a pharmacist, physician, physician’s assistant, or other health professional. • Accurately acknowledge the sources for all information reported. Failure to do so will be considered plagiarism.

Responsibility and Sense of Duty The pharmacy program student will: • Participate responsibly in patient care or research to the best of his or her ability and with the appropriate supervision. • Undertake clinical duties and persevere until they are complete.

• Notify the responsible person if something interferes with his or her ability to perform clinical or academic tasks effectively.

Professional Demeanor

The pharmacy program student will: • Maintain a neat and clean appearance, and dress in attire that is accepted as professional to the population served. • Be thoughtful and professional when interacting with patients and families. • Strive to maintain composure during times of fatigue, professional stress, or personal problems. • Avoid offensive language, gestures, or inappropriate remarks. • Adhere to the School of Pharmacy’s Professional Dress Code

Student Rights In addition to the standards we have adopted for the conduct of ourselves, we expect to be treated with respect as participants in the delivery of healthcare. The pharmacy program student: • Should be challenged to learn, but should not be belittled, humiliated or abused in front of patients, peers or other health professionals. • Should not be sexually harassed, either verbally or physically. • Should not be discriminated against on the basis of gender, race, religion or sexual preference. • Should be a participant in patient care decisions whenever possible. • Should have his or her pharmacy-related education take priority over routine menial tasks. If a preceptor feels a student lacks adequate knowledge or skills, he or she has the responsibility to inform and instruct that student so he or she can improve his or her performance. If a student feels that a preceptor has committed infractions against the above standards, he or she has the responsibility of informing that preceptor, whether by direct contact or by way of an honest preceptor evaluation at the end of a rotation, of such feelings so that the preceptor can improve his or her performance. NOTE: The above standards of conduct are based on the Code of Conduct for Duke University Medical Students and have been adapted to meet the individual needs of the Campbell University School of Pharmacy.

Article 10: Pledge PLEDGE: A student’s signature indicates that he/she agrees to uphold the following pledge. This pledge must be signed prior to entry into the School of Pharmacy. I _____________________________________, having read and having a clear understanding of the basis, spirit and interpretation of the Honor Code of Campbell University School of Pharmacy, pledge my personal honor. I will uphold this Code and it’s standards in all matters. If at any time I should violate the letter or the spirit of this Pledge, I shall accept full responsibility for my actions. _______________________________________________________________ Student’s Signature

_____________________ Date 59


School of Pharmacy T e l e ph o n e n u m b e r s School of Pharmacy ......................................................................................................................... 1-800-760-9734 Dean’s Office .................................................................................................................................................................. Ext. 1686 Associate Dean . .......................................................................................................................................................... Ext. 1685 Admissions Office ..................................................................................................................................................... Ext. 1690 Pre-Pharmacy Office . ............................................................................................................................................. Ext. 1710 Department of Pharmacy Practice Chairman . ......................................................................................................................................................................Ext. 1708 Experiential Programs . ............................................................................................................................................Ext. 1709 Drug Information Center..........................................................................................................................................Ext. 2701

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Chairman ........................................................................................................................................................................Ext. 1695 K–12 Science Education Outreach and Wellness Program . .......................................................................Ext. 1842 Pharmaceutical Sciences Programs .....................................................................................................................Ext. 1838

Department of Clinical Research

Chairman . ............................................................................................................................................................(919) 463-7869 Clinical Research Programs ...................................................................................................................................Ext. 4769

Continuing Education . ............................................................................................................................................Ext. 4784 Alumni Affairs.................................................................................................................................................................Ext. 4788

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School of Pharmacy Academic Bulletin 2007 - 2009  

Campbell University School of Pharmacy was established in 1986 as the firstnew school of pharmacy to open in the United States since 1951. T...

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