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Clam gardens have been harvested for millennia along BC’s coast, but archaeologists have only recently begun to study them. Dr. Dana Lepofsky, an archaeologist at Simon Fraser University, Jocie Ingram explained some of the mysteries of clam gardens during a recent presentation at the Museum at Campbell River. In 1995 Dr. John Harper, a marine geomorphologist, was mapping BC’s coast by helicopter when he noticed rock walls snaking along the coastline that looked distinctly human made. The walls were near the 0 tide line— submerged for all but a handful of days during extreme low tides. Water covered the walls most of the year, which partly explains why they went undetected by archaeologists for so long. Native peoples constructed the boulder walls on select beaches to increase shellfish productivity. The initial building of the walls was not a casual act, but a highly organized feat of engineering, “it was like a barn raising,” said Lepofsky. Work parties had only a slim window to get the job done, when the tides dropped low. The brute strength and manpower necessary to make metres-high walls of boulders along kilometres of coastline is impressive. Some of the walls date back over a 1,000 years. After construction sediments See Clam Gardens on page 4 Above, a clam garden on Quadra Island.

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Good news - coho showing signs of rebuilding Several weeks ago I suggested that the chinook fishing on south side of Campbell River had slowed down last month, as it usually does as the winter progresses, however I’m happy to say that was likely a premature comment and fishing continued to be quite good for the time of year. A number of acquaintances caught some nice fish in later February and into March and my luck held up too. One location in the readership area of this newspaper that has consistently produced good chinook fishing this winter is around the southeast corner of Hornby Island near Tribune Bay. I haven’t fished there myself but by all accounts the chinook fishing has been impressive for the time of year. Perhaps the fishing there has been sustained in part because of its proximity to the big herring spawnathon now under way, although I’m told the best lure has been a small green and white spoon so who knows! DFO is estimating approximately 60,000 tons of herring have gathered in Area 14 to spawn, with another 15,000 tons down in Area 17 near Ladysmith. It sounds like a lot - and it is – but the amount is between one-

early marine survival of young quarter to one-third lower than salmon. the last two years. Declining Anglers at different times trends in any fishery abundance Jeremy Maynard may have seen a large fishing are never a good thing! vessel in the bright red colour of One persistent additional the Coast Guard working around feature from the chinook fishthe Strait of Georgia and woning reports I’ve heard out of the dered what it is up to. In June central Strait of Georgia area this and then again in September winter is that anglers are seeing it conducts trawling exercises and hooking coho salmon, blueto assess the number and size backs as they used to be known of juvenile coho and the good as. Once a feature of the late news is that last September it winter fishery around much of encountered the highest number the inner south coast, with the of these fish in the 16 year history of this decline of the coho population and the outside distribution of those remaining fish coho program. Having made it that far the chances have infrequently been encountered until late are good they’ll make it into the summer summer in the Strait of Georgia during much fishing season to come. Every fisherman I know is pleased that the coho resource is of the past two decades. finally showing signs of rebuilding, but even Of course all that changed last year and better is the prospect that once again they news that young coho are over-wintering may actually be present in the summer fishin inside waters is a positive signal for the summer fishing season to come. These coho ery around the inner south coast. Recently the first draft of what is called encounters and sightings this winter are a follow-on from a more scientific confirmation the Salmon Integrated Fishing Management of the same, courtesy of one of the relatively Plan (IFMP) was released by DFO for review by interested parties and the language sugfew surveys conducted by DFO to assess

Ardent Angler

gesting change to the central feature of coho management around southern BC is encouraging. I won’t believe it until any change is formally announced but it seems likely that the long sacred three per cent maximum allowable exploitation rate on the Interior Fraser coho stock will be increased, the real question is by how much. This measure has been used since 1998 as a proxy for wild coho management more broadly across the southern BC coast and which in practical terms, with few time and area exceptions, has meant non-retention of wild coho since then. Hope springs eternal! DFO has set an upper recovery plan goal for Interior Fraser coho of 40,000 fish and this goal has been exceeded in each of the past two years, albeit in the absence of any directed harvest. The multi-million dollar question – literally – now is how much harvest can this stock sustain in the current ocean productivity regime without unduly compromising the rebuilding trend. Quite apart from any economic benefits to the recreational fishery infrastructure that See Ardent Angler on page 6.

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Of Two Minds - Part 2 of 3: The Left Hemisphere Iain McGilchrist, a practicing psychiatrist, argues in his book, The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World, that the dominance of the left hemisphere over the right hemisphere in the thinking part of our brain — the cerebral cortex — predisposes our modern culture to particular understandings and behaviours that do not serve our long-term interests. Because the left hemisphere concerns itself with details and the processing of them in a logical and systematic manner, it functions to solve the practical problems of the moment. Without the right hemisphere’s comprehensive insights, it has little awareness of generalities and strategies. It is so intent on solving immediate problems that it fails to recognize the cumulative consequences of its solutions. And, unfortunately, it doesn’t know that it doesn’t know. If we can educate ourselves to become aware of the unbalanced relationship presently existing between these two hemispheres, perhaps we can reach important insights into our thinking, note our obliviousness to nature’s deteriorating condition, realize why we are doing so little to avert a looming ecological catastrophe, discover the necessary corrective measures, then resolve to implement them. Indeed, the problem is so serious that McGilchrist’s line of thought follows one presented by Louis A. Sass in Madness and Modernism: Insanity in the Light of Modern Art, Literature, and Thought. Madness and insanity may prove to be harsh but honest appraisals of the left hemisphere’s

dominance. Because of the left hemisphere’s propensity to experience Ray Grigg in specific and segregated parts rather than in whole and complex patterns, it perceives ourselves as separate and distinct from nature. And its inclination to control puts us in an adversarial relationship with our natural surroundings. The utilitarian character of the left hemisphere wants to use nature for practical purposes — to exploit its resources and to bring it into submission in the service of human needs. This narrow focus makes it unaware of the devastating environmental consequences of its behaviour. Indeed, the biggest environmental problems facing our civilization will go unnoticed by the left hemisphere because it lacks the capability of thinking on a scale large enough to perceive them. This explains why habit loss, species extinction, ocean acidification, depleted ocean fish stocks, eroding soils, rising levels of pollution and — perhaps the biggest of them all — global climate change are so slow to be effectively noticed and systematically remedied. The left hemisphere is too busy drilling, digging, growing, inventing, building, making, buying, selling and consuming to notice that the biosphere is collapsing because of its feverish enthusiasm. The comprehensive insights and awareness of the right hemisphere have been displaced,

according to McGilchrist, by a narrow thinking that is methodical, pragmatic and rigid. The left hemisphere’s reality is certainty, simplicity, routine, stasis and order. Its focus is problem solving, dealing with the immediate and the present rather than the distant and the uncertain. The left hemisphere doesn’t understand context and perspective. It is interested in getting oil rather than considering the implications of exhausted supplies, in catching fish rather than conserving stocks for tomorrow, in extracting the required minerals rather than worrying about future needs, in killing weeds rather than fretting about toxic residues, in cutting down forests rather than replanting trees, in generating energy rather than caring about the carbon cycle. Its strategy is to make specific products to address specific needs rather than examining the wisdom of its objectives. The left hemisphere is perfectly suited to generating a modern consumer economy with the challenge of meeting an endless parade of invented demands that must always be gratified. So, according to McGilchrist, a culture dominated by the left hemisphere should result in a rise of bureaucracy, depersonalization, vicariousness, superficiality, faddism, selfishness, vanity, indulgence, fragmentation and alienation. Without a sense of perspective and a structure of direction to provide daily liv-

Shades of Green

ing with an overarching purpose and meaning, cultures of the left hemisphere should be less contented and happy. And, indeed, this is precisely what is happening. “What makes us happy,” McGilchrist writes, “is not wealth but the reciprocal relationship between ourselves and one another, ourselves and the world. This is something the right hemisphere alone understands, since it is the ground of empathy and interconnectedness, where the left hemisphere is concerned with manipulation and sees the world atomistically.” McGilchrist is justifiably concerned that this manipulative and atomistic way of thinking is fundamentally unbalanced and unhealthy. When his ideas are applied to the seamlessly integrated ecosystems that comprise the actual functioning of our planet’s biosphere, then the amplification to global proportions of this narrow mode of thinking and behaving creates bigger problems than our left hemisphere is capable of either recognizing or solving. “The left hemisphere has evolved to help us use the world to achieve our ends,” McGilchrist explains. “But it is a specialist in denial.” He cites examples from medical records of subjects who have had severe right hemisphere strokes. As their bodies lie useless and paralyzed, their left hemisphere refuses to recognize that anything is amiss, or it attributes the problem to someone else in another bed. “The left hemisphere, ever optimistic, is like a sleepwalker, whistling a happy tune as it ambles toward the abyss. Let’s wake up before we free-fall into the void.” Next week, Part 3 of 3.

CR Art Gallery AGM to feature film screening, special guests Artists who journeyed hundreds of kilometres up the coast by boat to interpret BC’s wild coastline are the subject of a fascinating film, ‘Reflections: Art For An Oil-Free Coast,’ to be shown at the Campbell River Art Gallery’s Annual General Meeting Thursday, March 20. The short AGM will be followed by the 22-minute film, which is a coproduction of Strongheart Productions and the Raincoast Conservation Society. The film follows a number of BC’s most celebrated artists who took part in a journey into a remote landscape facing the threat of a proposed oil pipeline and increased oil tanker traffic. ‘Reflections’ weaves together the artists’ work and their response to a region at potential risk. Special guests for the evening will include Ross Campbell of Mothership Adventures, a local family-run busi-

A scene from ‘Reflections: Art For An Oil-Free Coast.’ ness dedicated to providing ocean wil- ators who took a group of artists up the coast for the film project. derness adventures in a socially and Also in attendance will be artists environmentally responsible manner. Esther Sample and Kevin Johnson. Campbell was one of the boat oper-

Clam Gardens from page 1. would begin to build up on the landside of the wall, creating a flattened beach or “garden” and ideal conditions for growing and harvesting clams, especially the meaty, proteinrich butter clam. Women worked the gardens, harvesting the clams with ironwood (yew) digging sticks and collecting them in cedar baskets. Harvesting was a highly social activity that connected the generations: toddlers, mothers, aunts and grandmothers work alongside each other. Native elders, who have retained traditional knowledge of clam gardens, known as lo-xwi-we (lo-kehway) have told us that clam gardens were not just harvested, but also carefully maintained. Like any garden, they were cultivated, tilled and weeded—unwanted rocks were removed to keep the garden clear; small clams were dug back and protected from exposure to hungry seagulls. Clams

were harvested year round and were a dietary staple. Stored clams (smoked and braided) were a critical emergency food that could protect villages from starvation when other food supplies ran low. There were strict rules about who could harvest what and when, and harvesting was done in a specific way, to ensure sustainability of the resource upon which survival depended. Lepofsky stressed that clam harvesting was inextricably linked to social structure, relationships and identity—it wasn’t just about food supply. The practice of intensive mariculture (marine agriculture) in the intertidal radically changes old views of natives as passive hunter-gatherers. It also changes how we perceive the landscape; instead of wilderness we are often looking at altered landscapes that have been highly managed for millennia. Clam gardens are particularly

abundant on Quadra Island and in the Broughton archipelago. In Waiatt Bay alone, on the north side of Quadra, 49 clam gardens have been identified, and there are hundreds more up the coast. Scientific studies on Quadra undertaken by Lepofsky and her team indicate that clams from terraced gardens are “staggeringly productive” compared to natural beaches. Gardens have higher survivorship, denser populations, faster growth rates, and produce bigger clams. The productivity of the gardens, and abundance of sites suggest that populations of native peoples pre-European contact may have far exceeded what was previously thought. Early archaeologists focused largely on fish as the cornerstone of native diets. The ubiquitous clamshell middens of old village sites were sifted through “to find more interesting things.” In what seems like an

Pacific Salmon Foundation’s Salmon Stamp award for her painting ‘Hunger Strikes.’ Johnson is a self-taught pencil artist who lives on Quadra Island. He finds inspiration for his photo-realistic works here on the coast. ‘Reflections: Art for An OilFree Coast’ premiered at the 2012 Vancouver International Film Festival and has screened throughout BC and around the world, however, this screening of ‘Reflections’ will be the first in Campbell River. Admission is by donation and everyone is welcome. The Annual General Meeting is set for 7 p.m. and the film will begin at 7:30 p.m. Photo submitted Mark Thursday, March 20 on your calendar for this fascinating evenSample’s passion for the sea and love ing. For more information, call the for the shoreline inspires her acrylic Campbell River Art Gallery at 250paintings. A former commercial fisher, 287-2261 or email contact@crartgalSample was the first woman to win the lery.ca. incredible oversight, the role of clams on the north west coast was largely overlooked. Part of the reason for the oversight may have to do with gender bias. Early archaeologists such as Franz Boas concentrated their studies more on men’s activities, while clam digging, plant harvesting and other women’s work were not given as much consideration. Scientists are just beginning to understand the historic importance of clams on the northwest coast, and there is still much to learn about clam ecology. Clam gardens with rock terrace walls have no precedent in the world; they are globally unique. Such mariculture was successful here due to the extreme tides of the Pacific Northwest. Some clam gardens continue to be harvested and maintained by native peoples today; many other gardens are ghostly reminders of villages that were abandoned during the smallpox epidemic over a century

ago. Whether out-of-use clam gardens could be restored and returned to productivity is an interesting question. Warmer ocean temperatures, acidification and several invasive shellfish species have had detrimental effects on native clams. But on a small scale, there may potential to renew harvests and revive some former sites. We have a lot to learn from ancient peoples, who understood the value of sustainability and local food security. Perhaps the wisdom of the past can help guide us, as we navigate an uncertain future. Sources for this article include Dr. Dana Lepofsky’s lecture at the Campbell River Museum and Judith William’s book Clam Gardens. Special thanks to all First Nations peoples, who have shared their knowledge of clam gardens with scientists. Jocie Ingram can be reached at knowingnature@telus.net.


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Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Campbell River students take top honours in North Island Festival of Performing Arts North Island Festival for the Performing Arts encompasses Parksville and north on Vancouver Island. This year Campbell River can be very proud of her young people. All the students representing the North Island in Musical Theatre and four of the six representing the North Island in piano come from Campbell River. Campbell River will be very well represented at the BC Provincials for the Performing Arts in Penticton June 2014. Students were chosen at the recent North Island Festival of Performing Arts held in Courtenay at the Sid Williams Theatre and the Little Red Church in Comox. The whole community of Campbell River is a part of these students success. Not only do they often perform together at the same events, many of them take classes together, accompany each other and study and collaborate with each other’s teachers. The following groups in CR can be proud to be a part this success: RainCoast Creative Performing Arts, CR Friends of Music, Shoreline Musical Theatre Society, Rivercity Players, CR Children’s Choir, Young Theatre, CR Singers, CR Rotary Showcase Performance, Crow Theatre, Carihi, Timberline, CR Christian School, CR Arts

Photo submitted

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Campbell River Musical Theatre students, from left, Brielle Kelly, Hudsen Campbell River piano students, from left, Heather Spetifore, Carter Johnson, Matthew Krell and Towa Stewart. LeRoy, Nathan Glum, Beth Miller, Yani Indrajaya and Hollis Matheson. Council, CR Art Gallery, and the Tidemark Theatre. Musical Theatre Junior Rep Nathan Glum, Alternate Hollis

Matheson, Intermediate Rep Brielle Kelly, Alternate Hudsen Leroy, Senior Rep Beth Miller, Alternate Yani Indrajaya. Nathan, Hollis and

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Rep Carter Johnson, Senior Rep Matthew Krell, Alternate Heather Spetifore. All the piano students are taught by Shelly Roberts.

Find a job at NIC’s Fourth Annual Career Fair Learn what employment opportunities are available in your community at North Island College’s Fourth Annual Career Fair, on Wednesday, March 12, at the Crown Isle Resort. Students, alumni and community members are invited to network with employers to discover the job options available in the Comox Valley, on the North Island and beyond. While most employers are now accepting on-line applications for employment, attendees are encouraged to bring a copy of their resume to discuss with prospective employers. Attendees are also encouraged to dress for success as they will be meeting prospective employers for the first time and leaving a positive, first impression is always important. Treena Nadon, NIC’s Employment Services

Advisor, explains “The Career Fair provides a venue for job seekers to connect face-to-face with potential employers and make valuable connections. This event is a perfect opportunity to connect with professionals who can answer your questions about a particular industry and/ or employment opportunities.” Employers have also shared their top three tips for applicants wishing to get hired: 1. Research the organization; 2. Customize your application; and, 3. Be confident, positive and professional Employers attending this year’s Fair include: BC Construction Association, STEP, BCAA, BC Hydro, Catalyst Paper, Canadian Armed Forces, CIBC, City of Courtenay, Communitas Supportive Care Society, Construction Maintenance and Allied Workers Union

Local 2020, Coast Realty Group Comox Valley, Costco, Crown Isle Resort and Golf Community, Custom Gourmet Catering, Daryl Robbins, CGA, Daryl Robbins Notary Public, International Forest Products (INTERFOR), International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 230, Investors Group Financial Services Inc., John Howard Society of North Island, MNP LLP, Mount Washington Alpine Resort, Nootka Wilderness Lodge, North Island College, OmniCare for People, Presley & Partners Chartered Accountants, Remax Ocean Pacific Realty, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Sanjel Canada Ltd., School District No. 71, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Tim Hortons, United Association Local 324 – Plumbers, Pipefitters and Sprinklerfitters, and Island Health (formerly VIHA). Supporting community partners

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cash prizes throughout June – $2,500 each day and $5,000 on Fridays – with a special prize of $10,000 awarded on Father’s Day. There’s also an early bird draw on Mother’s Day (May 11) for $7,500 (the early bird ticket purchase deadline is April 27).

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Ardent Angler from page 3. would result from even limited wild coho retention (e.g. one per day starting mid-way through the season), the question of increasing the allowable mortality on these fish is being driven by the prospect of a very large sockeye return to the Fraser River this year. Wild coho will inevitably be caught as by-catch in large commer-

cial fisheries for sockeye so an allowance for inadvertent coho mortalities is critical for the ability to prosecute a directed fishery for sockeye. To give scale to the question it has been said that the seiners were prevented from harvesting an additional five million pink salmon from the very large return to the Fraser last year for want of an extra 300

Interior Fraser coho allowable mortalities, this on a return of about 52,000 coho. Would the loss of the few hundred coho made any real difference to the future prospects of this stock? Seems unlikely but with the prospect of many more millions of sockeye, the real money fish, to be harvested in 2014 it has pushed the question of increasing the allowable

exploitation rate on coho onto the front burner with the heat turned up high. A decision isn’t expected right away, probably a month or two yet, but when it comes it will be one of the most anticipated outcomes in salmon management for many years, with big implications for salmon fishermen of all kinds in southern BC. Stay tuned!

include: Comox Military Family Resource Centre, Chartered Professional Accountants (CPA), Creative Employment Access Society, Immigrant Welcome Centre, Service Canada, North Island Employment Foundations Society, and Volunteer Comox Valley. The Career Fair will be held at the Crown Isle Resort, located at 399 Clubhouse Drive, just off of Ryan Road in Courtenay. The event is free to attend, open to the public and will run from 1-4:30 p.m. North Island College wishes to thank their major sponsor, Crown Isle Resort and Golf Community for hosting the Career Fair. For more information about the Career Fair or NIC’s Employment Resource Centre, please contact Treena Nadon at treena.nadon@nic. bc.ca.

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Time Out

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

North Islander 11

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Celebrate spring at the Pearl Ellis Gallery during Members’ Show The Pearl Ellis Gallery will kick off the first Members’ show of the 2014 season on Tuesday, March 11 showcasing over 50 local artists. A reception will be held Saturday, March 15th, from 1-4 pm to celebrate the opening. It will be a great opportunity to meet the artists in the show and view the fabulous art. Several donated works of art are featured along with the members’ exhibit. Proceeds from each donated piece will help raise the $1500.00 needed for the gallery’s high school bursary fund. In addition to the sale of fundraiser pieces, 50% of all donations made to the gallery during the year go to the bursary fund. For a bursary application form and further information go to the gallery website at www.pearlellisgallery.com. Bursary applications may also be picked up at the gallery. Visitors can expect to see quality pieces of work by both established and emerging local artists. Many of these artists belong not only to the Pearl Ellis Gallery but groups such as Brushworks, Monday Bunch and the Art Group of the Comox Valley. One can count on being able to see a great selection of art in various styles and media. The Pearl Ellis Gallery is always a great place to visit and to shop for that unique new

piece of art for one’s home, business or as a gift. The gallery also carries a good selection of art cards suitable for all occasions. The gallery has been solely run and operated by volunteers who believe in the importance of a public art gallery in Comox that provides a venue for our vast pool of local artists. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the Town of Comox, the CVRD (areas A, B and C), Comox Valley Lions Club, our many members, donors and sponsoring businesses. The Pearl Ellis is located at 1729 Comox Avenue in downtown Comox. We are wheel chair accessible. Admission is free and more information and a virtual tour of the show can be obtained by visiting our web site at www.pearlellisgallery.com or phoning the gallery at 250-3392822 during opening hours, which are Tuesday to Saturday from 10 am - 4 pm and Sundays from 1 - 4 pm. New members are always welcome and membership fees are only $20.00 a year. A large number of our members are not artists themselves but rather are enthusiastic supporters of art. With a membership, all purchases of art at the opening reception are reduced by 10%. Come out and enjoy the show!

DRAW YOUR PENCILS AND LET’S DO BATTLE! One of the most useful foundation skills you can have is drawing, which is simply an ability to communicate your ideas visually via the basics: paper and pencil. Drawing doesn’t have to be precise and laboured, but it helps to be able to see and interpret correctly. And it doesn’t hurt to know a few tricks to avoid and correct mistakes. If you’ve had some basic training in drawing or even if you’ve just practised a lot on your own, you’re probably ready to hone your skills to the next level. Starting March 18th, local artist and teacher Sandra Lamb will be running a six-week afternoon class geared to review the basics, upgrade skills and dive into new challenges. Because the class size is limited, Sandra will be customizing the lessons according to student preferences. Topics likely to be included are perspective, negative/positive spaces, foreshortening, portrait and figure proportions, body language, centre of gravity, shading, composition and more. Much of the practise will involve working from photographs, but some still life and possibly a live portrait will be included. Sandra has been teaching in the Valley for

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over fifteen years, always with amazing groups of enthusiastic students, old and new. “A Few Tips for Better Drawing” class will take place at her usual haunt, the Aquatic Room at the Sports Centre in Courtenay. Time is Tuesdays, 1:00 to 3:30 pm, March 18 to April 22 and cost is $120. You can call Sandra for more information at (250) 337-5487 or email her at sandra@twolambs.ca. A brief recap of details is available on her website: www. twolambs.ca.

$

2011 HONDA

2010 DODGE

The Man From Spiritual Revenue, bySandra Lamb

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$

2003 Honda

Members’ works by Yvonne Maximchuk, left, and Elsie Griffiths

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1.8L 4cyl 5 spd

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$

2005 Honda

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8,500

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$

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12

Time Out

North Islander

WHAT’SON

Chris, 339-0194 VANCOUVER ISLAND BRAZILIAN EMBROIDERY STITCHERS • Meet every Tuesday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Black Creek Community Hall. Please bring a bag lunch. FMI: Darlene 897-1345.

In the Comox Valley 11 TUESDAY PEARL ELLIS GALLERY • In Comox presents: “MEMBERS SPRING SHOW & SALE” From Mar 11th - Apr 6th. Open Tues - Sat from 10 am - 4 pm, Sun 1 - 4 pm, Closed Monday. Free Admission. Located at 1729 Comox Avenue. FMI see www.pearlellisgallery.com or see our virtual gallery on our web site or our Facebook page FREE DOCUMENTARY FILM • Bottled Life: The Truth About Nestlé’s Business With Water on Tues. March 11, 7:30 pm at Stan Hagen Theatre, North Island College. Hosted by the North Island Students’ Union, the Comox Valley Chapter of the Council of Canadians and Cinema Politica. COMOX VALLEY FAMILY HISTORY RESEARCH GROUP • Are looking forward to a most interesting and informative meeting when Wayne Schaad presents ‘s “ BLACK SEA GERMANS FROM RUSSIA - Crimean Trip 2012”. Meeting to be March 11, 2014 at 7pm in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 1901 20th St. Courtenay. New Members and Visitors welcome FMI contact Marlene 250 334 3080 NORTH ISLAND RHODODENDRON SOCIETY • For its Tuesday, March 11 meeting, the North Island Rhododendron Society (NIRS) will take a plunge into botanical history to hear about the evolution of rhododendrons and why they developed unique species in so many different locations. Research scientist Dr. Glen Jamieson is a keen botanist and grower of hardy rhododendrons and tender vireyas. He is also the current editor of the Journal of the American Rhododendron Society (JARS). The club holds its meetings at the Comox United Church, 250 Beach Avenue on the second Tuesday of each month. Doors open at 7 pm followed by a business meeting at 7:30 followed by the presentation. Anyone interested in membership is welcome and refreshments are served. MEDITATION CIRCLE • Every Tuesday morning, 11-12. We are a healing consciousness, sending light to troubled areas to effect peaceful change in our world, praying for those who are struggling, healing ourselves and raising our vibration in the process. Everyone welcome - no meditation experience necessary. No charge. FMI call 250-3349412. JUST BY CHANTS • Mystic Valley Voices, universal chanting community, meets 6:45-8:30 pm every Tuesday at the Little Red Church (house), 2182 Comox Ave. FMI: 250-218-1688. COMOX GLACIER WANDERERS • Join the Wanderers every Tues. to Fri at the South East end of the Comox Mall, near Travel Agent. Walk starts at 9 a.m. sharp. Experience the picturesque Filberg Park, Mac Laing woods, beach town of Comox etc. FMI: Karen Fraser 250-890-0608 KNITTING FUN AT THE COMOX LIBRARY • Our new kitting group, A Good Yarn: Knitting & Crochet Circle, warmly invites people of any age and ability to join our weekly meetings at the Comox Library, 1720 Beaufort Ave. on Tuesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. Attendance is free and no registration is required. For more information please contact the library at 250-3392971, comox@virl.bc.ca, or visit the website at: www.virl.bc.ca. DROP-IN, ONE HOUR MEDITATION • DropIn meditation, every Tuesday 7PM sharp, Ocean Resort in Oyster Bay, $$donations to CV and CR food banks, 250 792-3165. ROYAL PURPLE DROP-IN BINGO • Every

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

12 WEDNESDAY TOPS (COURTENAY) • 9am-11:30am every Wednesday, St Georges United Church, 505 6th St., Courtenay. TOPS is a nonprofit support weight loss group. We are one of many in Comox Valley. FMI: 250331-0276 ruthirene1950@gmail.com tops. org COURTENAY LEGION • Every Wednesday: Drop-in Darts 1:00, Masters’ League Darts 7:30. COMOX VALLEY NEEDLEARTS GUILD • Meets at Berwick Comox Valley Retirement Residence, 1700 Comox Avenue, 7:009:00pm, every Wednesday. New members are welcome; we do crossstitch, canvaswork, Hardanger, Huck embroidery, etc., bring your stitchery! Call FMI 250-3340935.

13 THURSDAY

English folk icon performs March 15 at house concert Gardeners Green Folk Music Club in Merville is excited to announce our upcoming house concert on Saturday March 15th with Vin Garbutt, who has been an icon of the English folk music scene for over forty years, and remains one of its most soughtafter performers. His songs are inspired by his Irish mother’s genes combined with the rich folk tradition of his native Middlesborough, on the banks of the Tees in North Yorkshire. Over the years his songs have transformed into gritty social comment and comical life observations. He is renowned for his hilarious intros, but for him his song lyrics are the crux of his performance. Vin grasps those he meets firmly by the hand and shakes them up with a dose of laughter and tears. And besides his songs, his brilliant tin whistle playing never ceases to amaze his audiences. Vin tours extensively every year, and has performed all over the globe at large and small events, and in parts of countries that other big stars will never bother to see. Indeed he prefers small, outof-the-way venues and intimate settings where he can fully engage on a personal level with his audi-

Tuesday night, 7 p.m., at the Elks Home on Sixth St. COMOX VALLEY WOOD CARVERS • If you are interested in any type of wood carving please join us at the Royston Community Hall every Tuesday from 9:30 AM to 3 PM for a day of carving and learning about carving. No experience necessary. FMI call Al at 250-331-0156 or Jim at 250339-5350. CUMBERLAND LEGION BINGO • Every Tuesday night, guaranteed 22 games per night. Doors open 6 p.m., first game 7 p.m. Come out and support your community.

ences, and Gardeners Green fits the bill perfectly. Vin is not just a superb musician, he is a truly gifted entertainer. His success has happened without the hype from big recording companies, and without the usual publicity from the mass media. His popularity has occurred solely by word of mouth, spread by people who have come across him, and known they wanted to share this unique experience with their friends. In fact, there are only a small number of tickets left for this house concert because Vin’s fans from as far away as Vancouver and Victoria have already heard about it by word of mouth and are bringing their friends. Vin is only in Canada for a week, and only doing two gigs here — one in Edmonton, and one right here at Gardeners Green! Lucky us! You can peruse more about Vin at his website: www.vingarbutt.com So let us know as soon as possible if you’d like to attend. Tickets are $20, and as always, all the money taken in goes directly to the performer. Tickets include hot drinks and a dessert buffet. They can be reserved by ringing us at 250-337-5337. - Gardeners Green Folk Club

TRACK WORKOUTS • The Comox Valley Roadrunners hold track workouts at the Vanier track every Tuesday at 5 p.m. Come out, meet fellow runners and be prepared to run a total of 5 km in a fun, enthusiastic environment. Rain or shine. FMI visit www.cvrr.ca COURTENAY LEGION • Every Tuesday: Fun Euchre 1:30, Pub Darts 7:00. BABY TALK • Courtenay Lewis Centre, Tuesdays, 10-11:30 a.m. All families with infants aged newborn to six months welcome. Socializing, support, refreshments, guest speakers and resource library. Free drop-in, no registration required. FMI:

CANADIAN HARD OF HEARING ASSOCIATION • March meeting of the local CV Branch will be held at the Tsolum Building Courtenay (behind Lewis Center Ctny- near tennis court) at 10 AM March 13. Mike Fournier from Emergency Response will lead a round table discussion on ‘Meeting your Hearing Needs in an Emergency’. FMI call Mary 250 339 4706. New members and visitors welcome COURTENAY LEGION • Every Thursday: Crib & Gucci 6:30, Men’s Darts 7:00. FMI: Courtenay Legion office at 250-334-4322. THERAPEUTIC RELAXATION PROGRAM FOR PERSONS WITH CANCER IN THEIR LIVES • Thursdays, 3-4 p.m., Nursing Centre, 615 10th St., Courtenay. Free. Sponsored by BC Cancer Foundation, BC Cancer Agency, Pacific Therapy and Consulting. FMI: Diane Davies 250-338-2700. THERAPEUTIC RELAXATION PROGRAM FOR PERSONS EXPERIENCING CHRONIC PAIN OR ILLNESS • Thursdays, 1:15-2:30 p.m., Nursing Centre, 615 10th St. Free. Sponsored by the Nursing Centre. FMI: Diane Davie 250-338-2700. TOPS BC 4893 COMOX • Meets on Thursdays at Comox United Church 250 Beach Ave., from 1:00-2:30. FMI: Margaret 339-9858. COMOX VALLEY SCHOOLHOUSE QUILTERS GUILD • Meets every Thursday, from 9 A.M. till 9 P.M. at the Cumberland Cultural Centre (Buchanan Hall). For further information please contact - Carol 871-6671 or Nerissa 941-1809.

14 FRIDAY EVERGREEN CLUB FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE • Let’s celebrate St. Patrick’s Day by being as green as we can. Dance and listen to a variety of music played by REISS VINK tonight in the Rotary Hall at Courtenay Recreation’s Filberg Centre tonight Friday March 14th from 7:30-10:30 p. Members and Non-members welcome to a very pleasant time to be had by all. CELEBRATE SAINT PADDY’S DAY • At the Courtenay Legion this Friday, March 14th! At noon we will serve “Leprechaun Burgers” (quarter pounders with cheddar, sweet onions and guacamole) for only $4.50. In the evening Cross Town Express will play their lively dance tunes right after the Meat Draw. We’ll serve a fabulous Irish Dinner of Corned Beef, Colcannon (Google it!) and Soda Bread for just $10 at 6:30. There will be costume prizes and spot dances, so please grab a friend and come on down! Legion members and bona fide guests are welcome. COMOX LEGION • Meat draws every Friday, 3 p.m. Open to all Legion members and

signed in guests.

15 SATURDAY OCEAN WAVES SQUARE DANCE CLUB IRISH MIST DANCE • 7:30 - 10:00 p.m. Saturday, March 15 at Filberg Centre with caller Fran & Roger Archambault and cuer Lorna & Carmen Corbet. FMI phone Cathy or Guy at 250-338-7942. COMOX GLACIER WANDERERS VOLKSWALK CLUB • Is hosting a 5/10 kms walk on Saturday, March 15th. Starting from the Salmon Point Pub parking lot. Registration beginning at 9:30 am and the walk starts at 10:00 am. Lunch to follow in the Salmon Point Pub. For further information please contact Shirley @ 250-3394145. OPEN JAM • With Pete and Jamie from the Jagsters at the King George Hotel in Cumberland every Saturday from 3 to 6. AFTERNOON JAM • With Gord Kruger and “The Amigos”. Enjoy a lively afternoon of dancing and relaxing with Gord Kreuger and his band every Saturday, 2pm to 6pm in the Courtenay Legion Lounge. 367 Cliffe Ave., Courtenay. rclbr17@shaw.ca Maureen Watson, 250-334-4322 COMOX VALLEY FARMERS MARKET • 9-12 every Saturday, Native Sons Hall, downtown Courtenay. Come for the freshness, stay for the fun! FMI: Mkt. Mgr. Vickey 250.218-0321 or or www.comoxvalleyfarmersmarket.com & keep in touch on Facebook.

16 SUNDAY COURTENAY LEGION • Every Sunday: Crib 1:00, Gucci 1:30, $5 Sunday Supper 4:00. It’s only $5 for a delicious home-made meal. Bring your favourite friend or fill up a table! Birthday parties welcome! Legion members and bona fide guests. FMI: Please contact the Courtenay Legion office at 250-334-4322 MEAT PACK BINGO • The RoystonCumberland Lions Club is hosting a meat pack Bingo every Sunday at the Cumberland Hotel from 1-3 pm. There will be a total of 10 games at a cost of $1 per game, with a maximum of two cards, plus a 50-50 draw. Once a month there will be one game on the 10-game card for a mega-pack at a cost of $2 for this one only. All are welcome to come and support us, must be 19 years and older, all proceeds used in the community. FMI: Lion Mary or Bob at 250-334-3014.

17 MONDAY COMOX VALLEY OSTOMY SUPPORT GROUP • Meets Monday, March 17th at 7 pm at the Comox Valley Community Health Centre, Cedar Room, 961 England Ave., Courtenay. Guest speaker will be Convatec product representative Rob Hill. He will be showing the Convatec product line and meeting one on one with ostomates to discuss individual needs. Ostomates and their spouse/support person are welcome. FMI: Betty at 250-871-4778 or Susan at 250-339-6528. CRIBBAGE • Every Monday night, 7:00, at the Royston Hall, corner of Old Island Highway and Royston Road. No need to bring a partner. FMI: 250-334-1883. LADIES AUXILIARY DROP-IN BINGO • Comox Legion Ladies Auxiliary Drop-in Bingo, upper hall. Doors open 6 pm, bingo 7 p.m. All money goes to charities. Free coffee and tea.

18 TUESDAY ST JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL AUXILIARY • Regular monthly meeting of the St Joseph’s General Hospital Auxiliary Society will be held Tuesday March 18 at 1:30 pm in the upper hall of the Comox Legion.


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14

Time Out

North Islander

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Crossword New York Times

TOIL AND TROUBLE

BY DICK SHLAKMAN AND JEFF CHEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 1

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Luzna performs Thursday night at jazz club

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It’s jazz with a Latin beat on Thursday, March 13th. Luzna, a Latin quintet, is the Georgia Straight Jazz Society’s latest offering at the Avalanche Bar and Grill on 8th in Courtenay. Luzna, which is a play on two Spanish words, “luz” (light) and “luna” (moon) was hatched in the Comox Valley in 2008 as an acoustic Latin trio composed of Mexican-born Oscar Robles Diaz, bassist Britt Bowman and multi-instrumentalist Jim Papp. As time passed, Luzna grew in its members, as well as followers, quickly becoming known as Luzna Latin-soul Orchestra. In 2009 the band played at the grand finale of the outdoor Comox Valley Latin Festival , sharing the stage with Victoria’s Son de Cuba band, as well as internationally-acclaimed percussionist from Mexico, Candido Hernandez. Over the years Luzna has participated in festivals such as Tofino’s Pacific Rim Whale Festival, Campbell River’s Latin Festival and Cumberland’s Big Time Out. Band members Oscar Robles Diaz, Britt Bowman and Kelly Thomas performed in Taiwan as part of Keelung City’s Ghost Festival, and Britt and Oscar have performed in festivals in the Mexican Republic. Now, in 2014, Luzna has recently regrouped as a quintet. Band members are Oscar Robles Diaz on lead vocals, Cuban tres, Mexican requinto, Spanish guitar and conga; Brittany Robles Bowman on the fretless bass; Jim “Juancito” Papp on lead vocals, guitar, Cuban tres, and bongo; Kelly Thomas on keyboard; and Michael “Miguelito” Johnson on trumpet, trombone, guitar and backing vocals. The band’s repertoire focuses predominantly on Cuban style son which originated in Cuba and in the 1930’s gained worldwide popularity. In addition, Luzna’s repertoire includes a fair share of Mexican and Cuban boleros, a sprinkling of Columbian cumbias, also chachacha, Latin Jazz and salsa. Recently the group has brought another style into the mix: Son Jarocho - a unique style of son that originates in the Veracruz region of Mexico. Son Jarocho is typically heavily vocal, beautifully poetic and in a 6/8 time feel. It is played on traditional, handcrafted Jarocho instruments - one of such Oscar Robles plays in the ensemble, the requinto Jarocho (a small, Mexican guitar of four strings which are plucked, traditionally with a special pick carved of bull horn). The Luzna Quintet cites such musical influences as Miguel Matamoros, Tito Puente, Ibrahim Ferrer and Celia Cruz, and their high energy Latin rhythms will transport you to the sunny, palm lined beaches of Mexico in no time! Music starts at 7:30 and cover charge is $5.00. The Avalanche serves great food and a wide variety of beverages so plan to make a night of it. Luzna has a large and loyal following so it is a good idea to arrive early in order to get a good seat. Oh, and there will be a dance area, so put your dancing shoes on! And a request - as seating is limited please share your booth with others so that no one is turned away. For more information check out our website at www. georgiastraightjazz.com or find us on Facebook.

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Jazz with a Latin beat for Thursday jazz club at The Avalanche bar

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63 Key of Bach’s most famous Mass 65 Furniture style of Louis XV 67 Dupe 68 ___ the Explorer 70 “That’s all folks,” for Mel Blanc 72 Batman : Robin :: Green Hornet : ___ 74 Strand, somehow 76 Girl’s name meaning “happiness” 77 Squirm 80 John Cusack’s co-star in “Say Anything …” 82 Dir. of the Missouri between S.D. and Neb. 83 Like leftovers, often 85 Born 86 Actor Richard who played Jaws in Bond films 87 Some A.L. (but not N.L.) players 88 It may be indicated with a ring 89 More than pique 90 Too smooth 92 Dudley Do-Right’s love 94 Second place? 95 Part of N.R.A.: Abbr. 96 Email button 98 Erne or tern 102 Baloney, in Bristol 104 Entitle to wear vestments 106 Headstrong 107 East Asian stew 110 “Ta-ta!” 112 It may be radical

114 119 124

113 Places where polar bears fish 115 They may be sprayed on 116 HBO competitor 117 Bill’s partner 118 Pro 119 Major, for example 120 Poetic rhapsody 121 Soak (up) 122 Summer White House setting: Abbr. 123 “Lady” of the lea 124 Rocky shout-outs Down 1 Biblical peak 2 Actress Vega of “Spy Kids” 3 Expand 4 Mortimer of old radio 5 Contributors to The Paris Review, e.g. 6 First of 12 in South America 7 Muffs 8 Band with the 1994 album “Monster” 9 “He” and “she” follower 10 Not perform as expected 11 Dance popularized by Michael Jackson 12 “Yep” 13 Iraqi P.M. ___ al-Maliki 14 Like one of the arm bones 15 Destined (for) 17 Like vino de Rioja 19 Gobs 21 Compassion, figuratively

23 Start of many jokes 25 Dos x tres 27 Latin “others” 31 Blue-green 32 Part of many an anniversary celebration 33 Tax-free bond, for short 35 Pair of cymbals in a drum kit 36 Ceaselessly 37 Tautological statement of finality 38 Cavs, on a scoreboard 41 Elbow-bender 42 Superstitious thespian’s name for a work of Shakespeare … from which 21-, 23-, 37-, 58- and 60-Down all come 43 Take care of 44 Cause of an insurance investigation 46 One of 17 on a Monopoly board: Abbr. 48 What a goner has 49 Army threats? 51 Mendoza Mrs. 53 “___ get it!” 55 System prefix 58 A single stroke 60 What the lucky person leads 63 Lively 64 Piqued 65 500 events 66 Equipped to row 69 Have debts 71 “The Addams Family” nickname 73 ___ Maria 74 Rat 75 Carol 78 Towel designation 79 Elysium 81 Cry before “haw” 84 Big stretch? 91 Moccasin decorations 93 You might bow your head to receive one 94 Play about Capote 95 Famous Titanic victim 97 Zilch 99 One of “The Honeymooners” 100 Drippings appropriately positioned under the circled letters 101 Alternatively 103 “Lo-o-ovely!” 104 Director Preminger 105 You may find a fork in it 108 Prefix with -phile 109 Some reproaches 111 Palindromic cry 114 Intimidate

ANSWERS TO LAST PUZZLE S C R I B E

L A I C A L

A S P E L L

P O N I N O S A W N A D Y E J G L O A M B R O S T R E E L E N E W E L O D I T H E M O C C U P Y B E H E A D I R E D E T A D W A N A D A B S O R B S T A N D O K E N N E D A N T O N Y

Y O U B E T C H A S A R I N Y M

S T R E S H E R W E A S G R E K U M A N N S R U F O R E A S R E M E A L S G I B S N O O G R I S T E N T H O G N E S H I E E D W A L E T E N

E P E E E D G E L A Z E D E L O G E

T A L K T O Y O U L A T E R A N D O U T

S E G A P I N E B R A D P S

E L N O L O U S S C A T K N E X A C O E N E R D A S K E T E N T B Y A N A S S L E S T E C H I N O E R S A L E C T S H E M R E T E N C D U M

R I T A

T E E D

E R R S

E X C E S S I V E

S E H R

E D Y S

A G E S

D O Z E

T H E T O P

N O M O R E

A T O N E D


North Islander 15

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

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16

North Islander

Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Crni20140311  

March 11, 2014 issue of the North Islander

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