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Scott County Times WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 2019

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Times

NEWS

Transcontinental runner makes way through Scott. See page A2

Davis family welcomes baby girl. See page A3

Did you say cotton candy?! See page A3

SPORTS

Wolverines excel at state. See page A4

West Central tricksters compete at sectional, DeJaynes heads to state.

WINCHESTER, IL 62694

Floods and field work not compatible By BETH ZUMWALT Scott County Times Keep Sunday in sight. “If we don’t have any problems by Sunday, I will feel like we dodged a major bullet,� Justin Daws, emergency coordinator for Scott County, said. “We are still patrolling watching for any problems spots, seepage and boils.� Daws said the advantage to the flood,if there was one, is that the water came up quickly. “The levees were not saturated going into this,� he said.�The levees were not soft from the beginning. They are soft now and will get softer as long as their is water on them.� Daws said area farmers are starting to get impatient with the delays in spring planting. “There will be some fields, those that have a lot of seepage, it will be a long time,� he said. “A lot of that is gumbo which doesn’t dry out as quickly as other soils.� Mean while Scott County residents continue to patrol the levees.

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U.S. Representative Ray LaHood visited the Illinois River levee on the Scott County side Monday afternoon. LaHood was joined by Blake Roderick, Pike-Scott Farm Bureau Executive Director; Justin Dawes, Scott County Emergency Management Director; and several Big Swan Drainage District leaders. The group toured damage along the Scott County side of the Florence Bridge and then surveyed flood damage on the levee.

“There is still water on the levee,� Blake Roderick, executive director of the Pike Scott Farm Bureau, said. “The levee on the Mississippi River has a clay core, it’s not just sand. It can tolerate water being on it better than a sand levee.� Roderick said just because the river is going down, doesn’t

mean planting will start anytime soon. “There is a lot of seepage that has to dry up as well as low spots,� Roderick said. “If we get a lot of rain north of here, it could jump right back up.� Roderick said the Illinois River on the west side of the county (See, FLOODS, A2)

WEEKEND WEATHER FRIDAY, MAY 17

85 64 Low

SATURDAY, MAY 18

84 67 High

Low

SUNDAY, MAY 19

73 56 High

Low

Scott County Times

&KXUFK         $ /RFDOV          $ 0DUNHWSODFH     $ 1HZV    $$ 5HDO(VWDWH      $ 6SRUWV          $ © 2019

Scott County Times Obituaries listed in this issue: None.

All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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VOLUME NO. 152 NUMBER 20

See page A4

High

Serving our readers for more than 151 years

CLAYTON

Submitted photo

TAKES HOME STATE TITLE IN DISCUS

Winchester 8th grader Josie Clayton took home the top honors in the state of Illinois in the discus at the State Meet this past weekend. Clayton took home the State title with a throw of 101 feet 4 inches almost two foot farther than the second place finisher who threw 99 feet 9 inches. Clayton was tops among 35 throwers. She now holds the WGS record for discus. She also received a 7th place medal as an alternate on the 8th grade 4x100meter relay.

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Chaz Walker and Kacie McCleery hold the five fish that were good enough to win them first place in the Bass Fishing Sectional Tournament on May 6 at Sangchris Lake. The fish weighed a total of 10.7 pounds and Walker also caught the biggest bass at 4 pounds. The two compete in Greenfield this weekend at Lake Carlyle in the state tournament.

Winchester Bass Fishing team wins Sectional – advances to State By CARMEN ENSINGER Scott County Times In its inaugural year at Winchester High School the Bass Fishing Team is sending two students to the state tournament in Greenville at Lake Carlyle this weekend. Kacie McCleery and Chaz Walker qualified to compete in the state tournament by winning the sectional tournament May 6 at Sangchris Lake, which sits just west of Pawnee. They had the highest weight of fish with a total weight of 10.7 pounds and Walker also caught the biggest bass which weighed in at a whopping four pounds. “With this being our first year, this has been an excellent year for us,� Head Bass Fishing Coach Wes Lashmett said. “The sectional was only our fourth tournament this year. We ended up with a second place finish at Jacksonville out of 26 boats and a fifth place finish at Springfield out of 40 boats.� Each team consisted of two students and a coach. “There were 18 teams in our sectional and you could only take two teams so out of a possible 36 teams, there were 27 teams that showed up,� Lashmett said. “You had to be in the top three boats to qualify and it goes by your best five fish weight. We had the highest weight of all the boats competing.� Lashmett was coach of the winning boat with the other Winchester boat consisting of Coach Steve Hoots and students Schuyler Whicker and Nick

Foster. Lashmett said starting out it looked like they were going to be at a disadvantage. “One issue with this lake is the 25 horsepower limit, meaning that any boat with an outboard motor over 25 horsepower is illegal to use,� Lashmett said. “None of our coaches have boats with less than 150 horsepower motors so we would have to use a trolling motor, which would put us at a disadvantage from the beginning.� But, as luck would have it, a friend from Jacksonville lent Lashmett his boat, which had a qualifying motor, and they ended up winning the tournament. Lashmett is no stranger to bass fishing. “I started bass fishing when I was around 13 or 14 when Kacie’s (McCleery) dad would take me to tournaments to fish with him,� Lashmett said. “I was just a kid and every dime I got was put into fishing tackle and rods and reels.� After graduation, he went off to college and had the opportunity to join the bass fishing team his freshman year, but opted to concentrate on his studies that year. However, it all changed his sophomore year. “I decided I would like to give it a shot and fished in my first tournament and placed 8th out of 150 boats at LaCrosse, Wis. and qualified for Nationals,� Lashmett said. “So I thought that I was obviously going to (See, BASS FISHING, A2)

Winchester students digging up the past By CARMEN ENSINGER Scott County Times It’s hard to talk about archaeology without the obligatory “dig� pun but that is just what Winchester High School students are doing right now in Dr. Claire Coonrod’s Anthropology/Archaeology class as they excavate an area on the east side of the high school looking for pieces of history. This is the first year for the class and Dr. Coonrod said she discovered the area last year by accident. “Last year we put in a pollinator garden on that side of the school and when we tilled it up I realized that there were a bunch of artifacts in the dirt,� Dr. Coonrod said. “I thought it would be a perfect spot for a test excavation site for the kids.�

Dr. Coonrod teaches Chemistry 1 and 2, Anthropology/Archaeology and Earth Science but before coming to Winchester High School as a teacher she worked at the University of Illinois as an archaeologist. “I am currently doing some background research on the land title to try and find out who lived there,� Dr. Coonrod said. “But we do know there was a house there prior to the high school being built in 1921.� Dr. Coonrod said most of the artifacts they are finding are from the mid to late 19th century, between 1850 to 1880 or 1890. “We are finding a lot of broken glass and ceramics, nails and other construction materials – things you would typically find on a historical archaeological site,� she said.

“But we have also found some more unique items such as a shell button, a marble, a bullet casing, a decorative ladies hair comb made out of tortoise shell and some buckles.� Dr. Coonrod noted that many of the items they found were just fragments – not the entire item, such as the buckles and ceramics. “These artifacts have been in the ground for more than 100 years,� she said. “Many of the items we are finding are what we call ‘trash’ items because the way people dealt with their trash 150 years ago is a lot different than the way we dispose of it today.� She said the custom back then was to basically just chuck the trash out the back door into the yard. “There was no trash pickup (See, DIG., A2)

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Maggie Cockerill lifts off a small amount of dirt from the excavation site on the East side of Winchester High School recently as part of the end of the year program in the Anthropology/Archaeology class taught by Dr. Claire Coonrod. Dr. Coonrod said there used to be a house on the site prior to the erection of the Winchester High School in 1921 and the students have been uncovering artifacts that date back 150 years and more.


A2

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

OPINION/NEWS

Winchester, Illinois

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Transcontinental runner makes way through Scott Robbie Balenger recently ran through Scott County on his transcontinental run from Los Angles to New York City, though Flagstaff, Ariz. Balenger created this campaign to educate and inspire athletes of all levels what’s possible for their performance on a plant-based diet. He was in Scott County on his 49th day of running average of 45 miles per day. He stopped along the way to discuss goal-setting, nutrition and his attempt to run across the country without consuming any animal products.

Bomb joke goes bad at WES

By BETH ZUMWALT Scott County News A threatened practical joke wreaked havoc Wednesday morning at Winchester Elementary. According to Becky Lashmett of the superintendent’s office, an eighth grade student told another student he was going to take a phone charger and disguise it as a bomb to be placed in the principal's office.

Once the revelation of the plot was revealed, Andy Stumpf, principal of the building, located the charger in the student’s locker. The student was to be suspended for three days, but as is district policy, police officers are called to walk the student of the building and take them home. As a precaution, law enforcement called in a bomb sniffing dog from

the Illinois State Police and the bomb squad from the Illinois Secretary of State’s office. No further explosives or look-a-likes were discovered. The school evacuated with older grades going to the high school, other grades to the Baptist Church and others having an extended period on the playground. The incident started around 11 a.m. and lasted about one and a half hours.

Bass fishing

Dig (Continued from A1) back then – most people either disposed of it in a hole or just threw it out the back door,� she said. “We find a lot of things within what I call ‘chucking distance’ because that is what they would do – open the door and chuck it out.� Dr. Coonrod said they are currently digging through a midden. “A midden is best described as a living surface,� she said. “Right now, grass is our living surface but back then the living surface would have been about six inches below the present surface we live on so we are digging through that. The items we are finding would have been on that living surface 150 years ago.� But what they are really hoping to find is a feature – such as a privy, well or cistern. This was long before indoor plumbing and toilets, so every house – even in town, had its own outhouse, which was basically a hole in the ground covered by a small building that was used for the elimination of body waste. “If you lived in town, you might be lucky enough to get your privy cleaned out periodically,� Dr. Coonrod said. “But, typically, when it got full they just covered it up and then dug a new one, disposing of their household trash in the old one before it was covered over.� The excavation site is roughly 30 meters by 50 meters but the students are concentrating on two test spots roughly two meters by two meters. In addition to the above items, they have also found medicine bottles, part of a really large gothic pickle jar, utility bottles, part of a tumbler, pieces of plates, saucers, tea cups and bowls. “We have gone down about 25 centimeters to find most of these items,� Dr. Coonrod said. “As we dig down deeper to get to the subsoil, if we see any stain that appears on the ground at that level, it will be considered a feature, but we haven’t found any yet. I was hoping to find a cellar, privy, cis-

tern or anything associated with an old house lot.� The course was very popular this year, with 36 students in two classes. “This was the first year so I think there was a lot of excitement about it,� Dr. Coonrod said. “It was open to freshmen through seniors so I think most of them who wanted to take it went ahead and took it this year because next year we will only have one session.� Dr. Coonrod said that even though the course is approved through the Illinois State Board of Education – there is no high school textbook to go along with the course. “The book we are using is the same book that Parkland Colleges use in their course,� she said. “That makes it a challenge for the students, especially the younger ones, because the vocabulary and the concepts are completely new to them and they really have to think about them.� Dr. Coonrod said throughout the semester she has taught from the book but has also tried to create a lot of her own labs that support the concepts in the book. “We did a unit on forensic archaelogy which a lot of the kids really liked,� Dr. Coonrod said. “We ran a lab called ‘The Case of the Lost Skull’ where the students did blood typing, hair analysis and chromatography. The other unit they really liked was where they looked at a skeleton and tried to determine age and different things about the way they lived, such as their nutrition.� With a large area to excavate, the dig will continue with next year’s class. “We will be doing a similar excavation out here next year but we will probably dig in a different spot,� Dr. Coonrod said. “Hopefully, we will be able to find some features. Like I said, right now I am working on trying to find out who might have lived here or at least who owned the land prior to the high school being built.�

(Continued from A1) college to get an education but maybe I can make fishing my second priority.� Lashmett said that ever since his college days it has been his dream to become involved in the fishing industry in some sort of way. “I really don’t know what made me want to coach – I think it is just my competitive nature,� he said. “I played sports all through high school and now that I’m 24 years old I can’t put on the football pads anymore, though I can still shoot a basketball. I think my competitive nature has been transcribed into my coaching and now the kids are taking advantage of that and they are succeeding in tournaments.� There are 10 students on this year’s team – four seniors, one junior, one sophomore and four freshmen along with seven coaches. “We have to have a coach in each boat but not all of my coaches are available every weekend,� Lashmett said. “If they have another tournament they are fishing in or just can’t make it, we have others who are able to step up and take the kids.� Faced with a winning season right out of the gate, Lashmett said that wasn’t his first goal. “My main goal out of this was not to win – it was to get these kids on a boat and get them experienced in fishing and the outdoors,� he said. “There are some really good scholarships out there for bass fishing being offered by colleges all over the United States.� It is an opportunity for students who don’t choose to play basketball, softball, baseball, volleyball or football an opportunity to receive a scholarship for something they are good at. “There are just some kids out there who don’t like basketball or football or any other physical sports so they would miss out on all the scholarship opportunities offered by colleges,� Lashmett said. “This, however, is a co-ed sport and the opportunity is there for anybody that wants to take advantage of it.� The program also teaches character and teamwork. “This program is making these kids better people every time we go out fishing and every time we have a get together and work as a team,� Lashmett said. “When we got to a tournament, we work as a team – one kid catches a fish and the other one is there with the net to bring in.� Lashmett, McCleery and Walker will leave Wednesday for Greenfield, practice Thursday and the tournament will be Friday and Saturday with the students fishing from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Outdoor Truths: Gary Miller

Y

WEATHER IS OFTEN UNPREDICTABLE

ou never know how the weather will be around here. It changes often. During turkey season we can go from morning temperatures in the 20’s to the 50’s. And because of the spring storms, the winds can be an irresistible force. Even though I try to hunt when the wind is blowing; it is almost futile, especially when it comes to turkey hunting. There’s an old Irish blessing that reads, “May the roads rise to meet you, and may the wind be at your back.� Now I’ve been in enough small airplanes and cycled enough miles to know the difference between a headwind and a tailwind. When the wind is at your back the trip is much quicker, less exhausting, and just overall

easier. But anyone who hunts knows if the wind is at your back, you’ll probably have a very little chance of success because the game will smell you. That’s why hunters want to always hunt against the wind. I must admit that I’ve not let the wind keep me out of the turkey woods. It’s been GLI¿FXOWEXWWKHUHœVQRGRXEW I have become a better hunter because I hunted in less than favorable circumstances. Instead of the status quo, I was challenged, and pushed, and made to think. I don’t like these circumstances and I wish that things would get back to normal, but I don’t become better when things are easier. In this same way, we learn most of the lessons God has

for us. It’s not with the wind at our back, do we become better. But it’s when the wind is against us. It may be harder, but I’m not sure God’s is always interested in our comfort, but I know he is in our change. His desire is to make us stronger so that we can face the difficulties of life. And his desire is to make us better at who we are and what we do. Those things don’t only happen when things are easier; they happen when we are faced with new challenges and when it seems the circumstances are too great for any success. Now I’ll admit I still enjoy those easy and quick hunts. In fact, I’ve never hoped or prayed for a difficult one. I never will. I will also never pray for a

more difficult life. But when things are tough, I don’t have to think everything is wasted. I can know, when God has me facing the wind, he is building my spiritual muscles to handle what he knows is up ahead. ––––––––––––––––––– Q Gary has three books that are compilations of the articles he has written for nearly 15 years. He also speaks at game dinners and men’s groups for churches and associations. You can contact him at gary@outdoortruths.org.

TIMELYMatters

WHS Class of 2019 Baccalaureate Service,Sunday, May 19, 3 p.m. Winchester UMC. Reception to follow in Sibert Hall. Graduates of the Class of 2019 are invited along with family and friends. QScott County Alzheimer’s Caregiver Support Group. Q

Letter to the editor Two successful events for local 4-H club The Neighborhood Guys and Gals 4-H Club would like to thank the Winchester and surrounding communities for the generous support for our two recent fundraiser/ donation projects. Our first project, the Honor Flight soup supper and dessert auction, netted $3,254. Two “hubs� of the Land of Lincoln Honor Flight and the Great River Honor Flight were the recipients of $1,627 each. This donation will provide free trips to Washington D.C. for approximately seven veterans. The project was made possible through various businesses’, organizations’, and individual’s generous contributions. We’d like to thank Nate Davis of Country Financial for paper products; the University of Illinois extension office for use of the Funk building; LakampGotschall Farms for donated beef; and the dozens of folks who contributed by attending and buying desserts at our meal. This was a tremendous effort of hard work for our 4-H members and their parents. The second project we sponsored was an Easter basket food/ toy collection for some families in our community. Through referrals and an outpouring of donated items from

our community we were able to provide five families, including 15 young people, with a brighter Easter. Our “baskets� consisted of food items for a hearty meal; healthy snacks and breakfast items; fresh fruit; hygiene items; toys/ books/chalk/bubbles/coloring books, etc; 4-H promo items; and of course, candy. We especially want to thank our local Dollar General store and staff for doing an “in-house� promotional event that collected two giant boxes of goodies. We’d also like to thank our area churches and businesses for being collection spots for us. Many generous monetary donations were also received, including one from an outof state, former 4-H club member. What a generous network we have in Scott County! Thank you doesn’t seem enough to express our appreciation for our community’s giving spirit. We appreciate your support! Neighborhood Guys and Gals 4-H Club LARRY AND PAM HEMBROUGH, Leaders SUE GUTMANN, Leader GERLADINE MCGUIRE, Leader Emeritus

Floods (Continued from A1) is still critical and will be until at least next week, if there is no more rain. “They are still patrolling the levees to make sure there are no animals burrowing or any leaks or boil spots,� Roderick said. The Mississippi and Missouri Rivers, both having been at major flood stage the last two weeks, could stop the Illinois River from flowing freely into the Mississippi River at Alton, according to Roderick. “Right now we are getting a good flow on the Mississippi and the Illinois is starting to flow a little,� he said. The flood fight prevented

The Scott County Times is published weekly by Campbell Publishing Co., Inc., USPS 686-060, Timothy F. Campbell, president. Periodicals postage paid at Winchester, IL Phone: 217-742-3313 E-mail: circulation@campbellpublications.net Publisher: Nichole Liehr. Executive Editor: Julie Boren Reporters:

many farmers from planting crops and the wet, soggy fields near the levee for the most part remain unplanted. State officials predict that as many as 75 percent of acreage remains unplanted. The levee system along the Illinois River was visited Monday afternoon by U.S. Congressman Ray LaHood, who said is is imperative to visit sights such as the sandbagging operation to know what is needed to be done legislatively. He said a rebuild in the levee system would most likely be a joint effort between landowners and multiple layers of government.

Beth Zumwalt Carmen Ensinger Subscription Rates: $31 per year in Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Morgan, Pike and Scott Counties, IL and Lincoln, Pike and Ralls Counties, Mo. $62 per year elsewhere. $87 per year outside the continental United States. College Rates: $26 nine months in Illinois. $34 nine months elsewhere Single copy: 75 cents. Postmaster: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to Scott County Times, PO Box 407, Jerseyville, IL 62052

Scott County Times is published for the whole of Scott County. Any worthwhile program that will benefit the county will be backed by the Scott County Times. The Scott County Times welcomes letters to the editor. They must be signed and include your address. Letters without an individual’s signature will not be published. The Scott County Times will accept only letters to the editor that are written in good taste. Libelous remarks will not be published. The editor reserves the right to make the decision of acceptance. Letters may be edited for clarity, brevity and fairness. Opinions expressed in columns are those of the writer and do not necessarily reflect the views of this newspaper.

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A DVERTISE WITH S COTT C OUNTY T IMES 217-285-2345

Saturday, May 18, 2019, 9 a.m. – 10:30 a.m. Winchester United Methodist Church. Free and open to all caregivers in the surrounding area who help care for Alzheimer’s and Dementia affected persons. Questions: 217-7423610 or Pam Hembrough at 217-743-6427.

2019

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LOCALS/NEWS

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

A3

Winchester, Illinois

Carmen Ensinger/Scott County Times

Enjoying the moment Jake Morris, Peyton Anders and Jordan Price sit together and enjoy the band Smashtag, who performed at a special concert Thursday afternoon for all of the junior high students in Winchester who did well in school for the past year.

Births Davis family welcomes baby girl Nate Davis and Megan (Barfield) Davis of Winchester welcomed a baby girl into the world March 21, 2019. Brooklynn Rhea Davis, born 3:18 p.m. at Memorial Medical Center in Springfield,weighing 7 lbs. 14 oz., 20 1/2 inches

long. Grandparents are Don and Mary Barfield and Jeff and Genia Davis all of Winchester. Great-grandmothers Joyce Davis of Winchester and Theresa Timpe of Hillsboro. Great-grandfather Cy Determan of Belleville.

Illinois Wesleyan announces candidates for graduation Illinois Wesleyan University honored 410 candidates for graduation during Commencement on May 5. Doctor Stephen L. Ondra ‘80, the founder and CEO of North

Star Healthcare Consulting, LLC, delivered the Commencement address. Kinsey VanDeVelde Summa Cum Laude, Phi of Winchester graduated.

WINCHESTER BY IRENE TREECE 217-371-1386

Carmen Ensinger/Scott County Times

Introducing‌Smashtag

Junior High teacher Robin Varner introduces the band Smashtag to students last week as part of a celebration for the junior high students who excelled throughout the year in their school work. Out of 142 students, 113 of them qualified to attend the concert. Originally scheduled to take place on the Winchester Square, the concert was moved to the pavilion at Monument Park because of the rainy weather.

Carmen Ensinger/Scott County Times

Enjoying lunch Tysyn Flanigan, 11, enjoys his lunch prior to the concert Thursday afternoon in Winchester for the junior high students who did well at school this year. The threat of rain moved the concert from the square to the pavilion at Monument Park but prior to the move, local businesses provided $5 lunches for students to purchase.

Hello Scott County: Another Mother`s Day is over I hope all the mothers had a wonderful day with their families. The flood waters around prevented some families getting together Sunday to celebrate. I have no idea how people that are in the flooded areas can enjoy anything. I would be worried about the flooding. I would have to move to a much higher area. I have no idea how they cope with the flood water situation in Hardin, Grafton, Naples and all the other places along the river that seem to flood out almost every year. The news is so depressing I try not to watch it on TV. If shooters keep shooting people and kids continue to murder their parents and family members the american people will eventually cease to exist. Surprisingly how so many family members of violent murders try to convince the public that it was a mental breakdown. No one wants to admit it was

done in a fit of anger and had nothing to do with a mental break. We had less episodes before our younger generation was placed on medication for ADHD and drugs were so easy to acquire on the streets. Mental institutions housed mental patients and kept them off the streets and away from innocent people in the past but now living on their own and trusted to take their medication is the American way . I don`t feel it is working too well. Last Week`s Trivia - -English is a Germanic Language of the Indo-European family and can be traced to three Germanic tribes who arrived in the British Isles during the AD fifth century. Before this time a Celtic language was spoken. Next Week`s Trivia - -How Did the Game of Soccer Originate?

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Scott County Times

Carmen Ensinger/Scott County Times

Waiting patiently Gracie Howard and Bell Brown wait patiently for the concert to start last Thursday as part of their reward for doing good in class all year at Winchester Elementary. The concert, which was set to take place on the Winchester Square had to be moved to the pavilion at Monument Park because of the rain.

Carmen Ensinger/Scott County Times

The beat goes on Samuel Smith, a member of the band Smashtag, performs on the drums last Thursday in a special concert for the junior high students at Winchester Grade School. The concert was for the students who excelled all year in their school work.

Bluffs announces March and April students of the month March high school student of month Keenly Spencer is the daughter of Shelly and Jeremy Tweedy. Her actives include high school softball and travel softball, Mac League volleyball and high school volleyball. Her hobbies are four wheeler riding and gardening.

Kenley Coats is the daughter of Clay and Becky Coats. She enjoys tumbling, cheerleading and volleyball.

KEELY SPENCER

April high school student of the month Nathan Barnett is the so of Roger and Michelle Barnett. His hobbies/interests include sports, hanging with friends, baseball an student council.

March junior high student of the month KENLEY COATS

April junior high student of the month Rylen Shaw is the son Ryan and Maryon Shaw. He participates in Fortnite, baseball, basketball, soccer, track and football.

RYLEN SHAW

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A4

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Assembly of God Church

Glasgow Baptist Church

27 West Cherry Street Pastor Cindy Colbert 217-742-3311 Sunday School – 9:30 am Morning Worship – 10:30 am Everyone welcome

217-473-4110 Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship - 6 p.m. Wednesday Prayer & Bible Study - 6 p.m. Office open 3rd Wednesday of each month from 2:30-5:30 p.m.

Alsey Baptist Church Sunday School-9:30 a.m. Worship Service-10:30 a.m. Youth Group-7 p.m. on Wednesday Grades 6th-12th Pastor Jeff Daak

Bloomfield Baptist Church

Grace Baptist Church Terry Beauchamp- Pastor 224-326-4551 Corner of Cherry and Maple Winchester, IL 62694 Sunday Services 9:30 a.m. and worship 10:30 a.m.

Pastor Mark Norris 217-473-1967

Manchester Baptist Church

Bluffs Baptist Church

404 East Street Manchester, IL 62663 Pastor Shawn at 217-587-2761

112 S. Rodgers St. P.O. Box 231 Bluffs, IL 62621

Christ Lutheran Church 125 W. Jefferson 217-742-3919 Rev. Richard Harre, Vacancy Pastor Sunday, May 19: Divine Service, 10:30a.m. Council Meeting after the service Wednesday, May 22: Confirmation Classes at Trinity Lutheran Church, Bluffs: Beginning Class - 2:45p.m. Returning Class - 4p.m.

Cornerstone Baptist Church 226 Cornerstone Drive Winchester, IL 62694 Church Phone: 217-742-8000 Pastor Ted Rhoades: 217-742-5841

First Baptist Church of Winchester Church: 217-742-3480 Email: fbcwinchester@frontier.com Website: fbcwinchester.com Office hours: Monday – Thursday 8 a.m. - 12 p.m.

First Christian Church 20 N. Main 8JODIFTUFS *-t fccwin@irtc.net Pastor Alan Bradish First Sunday Fellowship with coffee and donuts 9 a.m. Children’s Sunday School during service Sunday Worship 10 a.m. Bible Study 2nd-5th Sundays 9:15 (while interest continues)

Freedom Family Worship Center 428 N. Commercial, Winchester 217-883-3763 Pastor Gary Wells (Non-Denominational) Morning Worship 10 am Children's Sunday School during Service Country Gospel (Potluck 1st and 3rd Sundays) Come Expecting a Blessing! Everyone Welcome

Make plans to attend the church of your choice today! Alsey Baptist Church Jeff Daak, Pastor Barrow Baptist Church Gerald Day, Pastor Bloomfield Baptist Church Cornerstone Baptist Church 742-5841 Friendship Primitive Baptist Church Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Eric Kirgan, Pastor Manchester Baptist Church (217) 587-2761 or 4211 Sandridge Baptist Church

New Song Ministries 1465 Exeter Road Bluffs Pastor David VanGiesen 217-754-3718 Morning Worship - 10:30 a.m. Childrens Church - 10 a.m. Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study - 6:30 p.m.

Pleasant Hill Baptist Church Route 106 - One mile south of Alsey Pastor Eric Kirgan 217-742-3202 Sunday School 9:30 a.m. Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday Evening Worship 6 p.m. Everyone Always Welcome

St. Mark’s Catholic Church Winchester, IL

Winchester United Methodist Church at Work! 20 N. Walnut Rev. Robin R. Lyons: 217-742-3610 Email: winchesterumc@frontier.com Parsonage: 217-742-3320 This Week’s Opportunities Wednesday, May 15, 2019 6 p.m. Disciple Fast Track Final lesson till the Fall 7 p.m. Choir Rehearsal Thursday, May 16, 2019 10 a.m. Weekly Bible Study 7 p.m. Civic Group Meets @ Sibert Hall Saturday, May 18, 2019 9 - 10:30 a.m. Scott County Alzheimer’s Support Group in Overflow Room 2 - 4 p.m. Sibert Hall reserved for Paul and Kaye Stice’s 50th Anniversary Sunday, May 19, 2019 Graduation Recognition Sunday 8:15 a.m. Coffee and Fellowship Time 9 a.m. Worship 10:05 a.m. Sunday School 3 p.m. WHS 2019 Baccalaureate @ Winchester UMC with Reception to follow Monday, May 20 10 a.m. SCNC Advisory Board Tuesday, May 21 6:15 p.m. Parsonage Task Force IF

YOU

WOULD LIKE

YOUR

Winchester, Illinois

West Central tricksters compete at sectional, DeJaynes heads to state By KENT COULTAS Scott County Times Madi DeJaynes won the 100 hurdles to lead West Central at the Rushville-Industry Sectional May 9 in girls’ track and field. DeJaynes advanced to this weekend’s IHSA State Track and Field meet at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston. The first and second places finishers in each event advanced to the state meet along with those that met qualifying standards. DeJaynes won the 100 hurdles with a time of 17.59. She finished sixth in the long jump with a distance of 15-2. Zoe Evans finished third in the shot put at 35-11 and finished eighth in the discus at 82-9.

Laura Garrett finished fourth in the discus at 92-9 and eighth in the shot put at 31-9. Anna Sellars finished eighth in the 100 in 14.13 and eighth in the 200 in 29.38. Bailey Mason finished eighth in the 100 in 14.88 and 13th in the 200 in 31.39. Camree Coats finished eighth in the high jump at 4-8. Tristan Lashmett finished 11th in the 1600 in 7:32.38 and 11th in the triple jump at 26-3ž. Lydia Ballard finished 11th in the 400 in 1:27.20. Whitney Kunz finished 14th in the long jump at 12-6Ÿ. West Central finished sixth in the 4x800 relay in 13:52.31 and seventh in the 4x200 relay in 2:02.25. It finished 11th in the 4x400 relay in 5:37.67 and 13th in the 4x100 relay in 59.49.

Wolverines excel at state By KENT COULTAS Scott County Times Winchester’s Josie Clayton won the eighth grade girls discus at the IESA State Girls Track and Field Meet last weekend at the Eastside Centre in East Peoria. Clayton had a winning distance of 101-feet, 4-inches to take home the championship. Jaiden Oleson from Prophetstown PLT finished second at 99-9. Brylee Lawson finished fifth in the seventh grade girls discus at 79-8. The Wolverines’ 4x100 seventh grade relay finished fourth with a time of 56.34. Emy Martinez, Brooklyn Gregory, Olivia Bingeman and Jaelyn Likes each ran in the relay. Winchester’s 4x100 eighth grade finished seventh in 55.81. Gabby Sievers, Rylee

Roberts, Lily Little and Elise Brown each ran in the relay. Bingeman finished tied for 15h in the seventh grade high jump at 4-4. Annabell Schafer finished 31st in the seventh grade discus at 63-1. Brown finished 11th in the eighth grade 200 in 28.81 and 15th in the 100 in 13.88 Winchester’s seventh grade girls’ 4x400 relay finished 19th in 4:50.25. The eighth grade girls’ 4x400 relay finished 10th in 4:41.23 and the 4x200 relay finished 26th in 2:02.40. Connor Turner finished 12th in the seventh grade boys’ 110 hurdles in 18.48. The Wolverines’ seventh grade boys’ 4x400 relay finished 28th in 4:39.11. The eighth grade boys’ 4x400 relay finished 29th in 4:25.55.

More students using summer courses With college costs rising, more students from fouryear universities want to decrease the amount of time and money it takes to earn a degree. That is why more students from four-year universities are taking summer classes offered in three and eight week sessions at John Wood Community College. In the last four years, the number of students from other schools taking summer classes at JWCC has more than doubled. In 2015, 63 students from other colleges enrolled in summer courses compared to 155 in 2018. “Many students are starting to view the summer just like the fall or spring semester,� Andy Happekotte, John Wood Community College director of advising and retention, said. “They see it as an opportunity to save

money and complete courses in a shorter amount of time and in ways that make the most sense for their schedules.� Tuition for a summer classroom-based course at JWCC costs approximately $489 for an in-district resident, compared to $1,125 at an Illinois four-year public university or $2,594 at a private university. Students can earn three credits in just three weeks in the subject areas of speech and psychology by attending classes five days a week from 9 a.m. to noon. Threeweek courses begin May 20. JWCC also offers dozens of other classes in eight week classroom, open learning and online formats that begin June 10. The most popular summer classes taken at JWCC are in math, speech, biology, Eng-

LISTED PLEASE CALL

US!

742-3313

New Beginnings Church 742-3459 Winchester United Methodist Church Rev. Robin Lyons Church: (217) 742-3610 Home: (217) 742-3320

JWCC to offer CNA courses this summer Students interested in getting a head start on becoming a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) will have that opportunity this summer. John Wood Community College will offer classroom CNA courses during the summer semester at its Quincy Campus, located at 1301 S. 48th Street, and the Southeast Education Center, located at 39637 260th Avenue, one mile north of Pittsfield on Route 54. Classes will also be offered at the North Adams Home, located at 2259 East 1100th Street, Mendon. The eight week-program will run from June 10-Aug.

2, Mondays through Thursdays, 8 a.m.-noon, at all three locations. Clinical will also be offered as part of the program at various locations. For more information about the Certified Nursing Assistant program visit www.jwcc.edu/academics/degrees/nursingcna/. For registration information, call JWCC in Quincy at 217.641.4355 or the Southeast Education Center at 217.285.5319.

with us! Manchester Methodist Church Rev. Robin Lyons 217-742-3320 First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) First Baptist Church Church: (217) 742-3480 East Union Baptist Church

Winchester Assembly of God Pastor Cindy Colbert 217-742-3311

Grace Baptist Church Terry Beauchamp

Glasgow Baptist Church (217) 742-3680

Notice of Budget Hearing Notice is hereby given that the tentative amended budget for Scott-Morgan School District #2 will be placed on public display beginning May 10,  LQ WKH &HQWUDO 2I¿FH ORcated at 100 West Rockwood Street, Bluffs, Illinois. The budget may also be viewed on the school district’s website at www.bluffs-school.com. Further the Board of Education will conduct a public hearing on the 2018-2019 tentative amended budget at 6:45 pm on June 10, 2019 in the Board 2I¿FH Terry Kunkel, Secretary Scott-Morgan School District #2

Christ Lutheran Church 742-3919

PUBLIC NOTICE Pursuant to Section 17-40 of the Property Tax Code (35 ILCS 200/17-40), the percentage to be added to the assessed valuation of locally assessed property other than that assessed under Sections 10-110 through 10-140 and 10-170 through 10-200 of the Property Tax Code (35 ILCS 200/10-110 through 10-140 and 10-170 through 10-200) LQ6FRWW&RXQW\DVFHUWLÂżHGE\ the Department of Revenue for the assessment year 2018 is 0.00% by the application of an equalization factor of 1.0000. David Harris Director of Revenue 5.15

ADVERTISE WITH

Scott County Times NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY The Alsey-Glasgow Water Commission has available upon request this year’s &RQVXPHU&RQÂżGHQFH5HSRUW &&5 7KH&&5LQFOXGHVEDVLF LQIRUPDWLRQ RQ WKH VRXUFH RI \RXU GULQNLQJ ZDWHU WKH OHYHORIDQ\FRQWDPLQDQWVWKDW ZHUH GHWHFWHG LQ WKH ZDWHU GXULQJ  DQG FRPSOLDQFH ZLWKRWKHUGULQNLQJZDWHUUXOHV DVZHOODVVRPHHGXFDWLRQDO LQIRUPDWLRQ 7KH &RQVXPHU &RQÂżGHQFH5HSRUWVZLOOQRWEH PDLOHG WR HDFK LQGLYLGXDO ZDWHU FXVWRPHU XQOHVV UHTXHVWHG 7R REWDLQ D IUHH FRS\ RI WKHUHSRUWRUWKH6RXUFH:DWHU $VVHVVPHQW SOHDVH FDOO WKH Alsey-Glasgow Water ComisVLRQ DW  RU \RX PD\SLFNXSDFRS\DW9LOODJH +DOO$OVH\,/ 

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT SCOTT COUNTY IN PROBATE IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF GARY GENE HATCHER, DECEASED NO. 2019-P-2 NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION -- WILL AND CLAIMS Notice is given of the death of GARY GENE HATCHER, of Glasgow, Illinois. Letters of RIÂżFH ZHUH LVVXHG RQ$SULO  2019, to DANNY R. HATCHER,  1RUWK ([FKDQJH :LQFKHVWHU ,OOLQRLV  ZKRVH attorney is THOMSON, Mc1((/<  &5(:6 3&  :HVW 6WDWH 6WUHHW 3 2 %R[ 970, Jacksonville, Illinois 62651. Notice is given to MICHELLE +$7&+(5&52: DQG -(11,)(5 +$7&+(5:22'6 heirs or legatees who are QDPHGLQD3HWLWLRQÂżOHGLQWKH DERYHSURFHHGLQJWRSUREDWHD will and whose names or addresses are not stated in the Petition, that an Order was enWHUHGE\WKH&RXUWRQ$SULO  DGPLWWLQJ WKH ZLOO WR SUREDWH:LWKLQGD\VDIWHUWKH effective date of the original orGHURIDGPLVVLRQ\RXPD\ÂżOHD SHWLWLRQZLWKWKH&RXUWWRUHTXLUH SURRIRIWKHZLOOE\WHVWLPRQ\RI WKHZLWQHVVHVWRWKHZLOOLQRSHQ &RXUW RU RWKHU HYLGHQFH DV SURYLGHGLQ6HFWLRQRIWKH Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/6-21). <RX DOVR KDYH WKH ULJKW XQGHU Section 8-1 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/8-1) to contest the YDOLGLW\RIWKHZLOOE\ÂżOLQJDSHWLWLRQZLWKWKH&RXUWZLWKLQVL[   months after admission of the ZLOOWRSUREDWH Claims against the estate PD\EHÂżOHGLQWKHRIÂżFHRIWKH &OHUN RI WKH &RXUW DW WKH 0RUJDQ &RXQW\ &RXUWKRXVH  :HVW 6WDWH 6WUHHW -DFNVRQville, Illinois 62650, or with the UHSUHVHQWDWLYH RU ERWK RQ RU EHIRUHWKHWKGD\RI1RYHPber, 2019, and any claim not ÂżOHGZLWKLQWKDWSHULRGLVEDUUHG &RSLHVRIDFODLPÂżOHGZLWKWKH &OHUN PXVW EH PDLOHG RU GHOLYHUHG WR WKH UHSUHVHQWDWLYH DQG to the attorney within ten (10) GD\VDIWHULWKDVEHHQÂżOHG 'DWHG$SULO DANNY R. HATCHER, Administrator with the will DQQH[HGRIWKH(VWDWHRI GARY GENE HATCHER, Deceased THOMSON, McNEELY &5(:63& Attorneys for said Estate 5.1, 5.8, 5.15

Constancy in a Rapidly Changing World

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St. Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church 742-5224

www. WinchesterAssemblyOfGod. Weebly.com

lish, music and psychology. Registration for JWCC summer classes is currently underway. More information is available at www. jwcc.edu/summer or by contacting the advising office at 217.641.4355.

5.15

CHURCH NEWS

CHURCH/SPORTS/NEWS/PUBLIC NOTICE

Pat Van DeVelde Peak Insurance Agency 16 S. Hill, 742-3316 First National Bank of Winchester 26 W. Cherry 742-3134 Buck & Jo's Too Winchester 742-3628

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.â&#x20AC;? Hebrews 13:8 NIV

T

he first time I heard about the concept of â&#x20AC;&#x153;future shock,â&#x20AC;? a state of distress or disorientation due to rapid social or technological change, I was relatively young, still in high school, and I recall thinking that change isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that hard to deal with, and in fact can be exciting. As we age, however, there can be too much change in too short a period of time for us to adjust in a healthy way. While the young may adapt easily to their new phones or computers, many of us â&#x20AC;&#x153;old-timersâ&#x20AC;? feel like every time our phone or computer is updated it is an annoyance, and we have to relearn how to do things that were simple yesterday. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do much good to tell yourself that this is an opportunity to grow and learn something new, or that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helping to keep us mentally flexible. It is still annoying. One consolation is that

there are always things to go back to which feel constant in this rapidly changing world, and the greatest of these is God. God, and Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s word, never changes. He is the immutable One which contains all of this change. Reading the Bible and saying our prayers is comforting, in part, because it never changes, and we realize that even if we live a hundred years, God will be there for us. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Christopher Simon

Church of the New Song Church 217-754-3617

These religious messages are published each week in the Scott County Times as a service to our churches and are sponsored by the listed business firms.


CAMPBELL PUBLICATIONS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 2019

900A NO TRESPASSING Calhoun County

200 BUSINESS FORD SMALL Engine Repair, Glasgow, IL. Hours: Friday, 8-5; Saturday, 8-1; Monday, 8-5. Call 217-370-2293. 5.22.19 IF YOU need parts for mowers and tillers, Dorseyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hardware and Western Auto has a large selection of belts and parts and service. New equipment sales available. Winchester. Call 217-742-9241. tfn

NO TRESPASSING no hunting on property owned by Martha Knight (also known as Marty Aderton), Lincoln Valley Road, Hardin. 7.24.19 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Steve and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.30.19 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown 400 owned by Marcy KlockenkemFOR RENT per, Judy Lamer, Jeremy Russell, Bonnie Stepanek, and Cindy OFFICE SPACE. Prime location. Meszaros. Violators will be prosAmple parking. West Washington ecuted. 5.30.19 St., Pittsfield. Call 217-285-2848, 217-285-5925 or 217-653-0212.

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike County

TFN

2 AND 3 bedroom mobile homes for rent in Griggsville. Lyndle Ellis. 217-833-2107. 6.12.19

500 FOR SALE BED QUEEN pillow top mattress set. New in the plastic. $195. Can deliver. Call 618-772-2710. 7.10.19 STAMP COLLECTION. Lots of old ones plus comic book on stamps. Baseball cards in album, approx. 500 old cards. 217-7301272. 5.15.19

600 HELP WANTED PITTSFIELD MACHINE in Payson, IL is looking for production workers. Starting pay is $12/hr. Please apply in person at 609 N. Fulton St., Payson, IL. 5.29.19 DOT FOODS is hiring Warehouse Material Handlers. Starting pay up to $20.05/hr plus a $1/hour raise after six months! DotFoodsJobs. com/Illinois. 5.15.19

ABSOLUTELY NO swimming/no hunting on land owned by Fred Smith at Valley City Falls. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.22.19 MAYFAIR FARMS ground North of Highway 10 East of Nebo is private property. Trespassing is forbidden. Violators will be prosecuted. NO TRESPASSING and no hunting of any kind, is permitted on any property owned by Double Creek Farms. Can be prosecuted. 1.2.20

12.19.19

NO HUNTING, ATV-ing or trespassing on our property without permission. Section 4 of Derry Township and Section 34 of Hadley Township. Frank & Ruth Armistead. 6.26.19 NO TRESSPASSING ads are 20 words for $60 and the ads print for one year. Call us today to place your no trespassing ad today!

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike County MY LAND located in Section 18 SW of Pearl is private property. Hunting, fishing, trapping, trespassing, for any purpose, without the written, signed permission of the owner, is strictly forbidden. Violators will be prosecuted. Timothy Brinkmann. 6.12.19

1200 SERVICES FREE ESTIMATES! now that spring is here, time to get necessary tree work done (trimming, removal, etc.) Trust the local Tree Guys that have many years' experience and the best rates. Call 217-320-8389 or 217-320-8438. tfn

1500 YARD SALES PITTSFIELD: 1269 W. Washington St. Huge Little family yard sale. Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18. New furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, household. Something for everyone. 5.15.19 PITTSFIELD: 24328 US Hwy. 54 West at Sue Cox's. One mile past Farm and Home Supply. Garage and barn sale. Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18, 8-5, rain or shine. 5.15.19 PITTSFIELD: 326 W. Washington St., Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Children's clothing 0-2T, women's clothing, home furniture, children's toys. 5.15.19 PITTSFIELD: BACK alley at 310 W. Adams St. May 17 and 18, 9-? Girl's 14/16 to women's 2X, young men's, books, scooters, dools, wooden swingset, chests of drawers, etc. 5.15.19

1500 YARD SALES LARGE FLEA market, yard sale at McAllisters in Detroit. Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, May 19, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Inside building-namebrand clothes boys, girls, women sm-3XL, shoes, purses, pictures, "stampin-up", decorations, etc. 5.15.19

GRIGGSVILLE: 316 E. Walnut St. Friday, May 17, 8 am.m-6 p.m. Saturday, May 18, 8 a.m.6 p.m. Boys clothes 7/8, adult clothing, linens, holiday decor, Longaberger baskets, kids booksJunie B. Jones set, small child's roll up desk, vintage rolling pins, Star Wars rugs, lots of toys, most clothes 50¢. 5.15.19 GRIGGSVILLE: 110 S. State St. Friday, May 17, noon-6 p.m. Saturday, May 18, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Children's clothes 6-12, adult clothes, DVDs, household goods, old windows. Cheap, cheap, cheap! WANTED: YOUR classified ads! May special! Buy 1 week, get the second week FREE! List your used items for sale with us. Call one of our offices today: 618-576-2345, 217-942-9100, 618-498-1234 or 217-285-2345. All classified ads appear on our websites for FREE.

THE PEOPLEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MARKETPLACE CLASSIFIEDS

Classified ads are only $6...up to 20 words! Call one of offices today! &DOKRXQÂ&#x2021;*UHHQH -HUVH\Â&#x2021;3LNH

AUCTION LISTINGS


A6

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

NEWS

Winchester, Illinois

Landscaping: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for the birds! Creating a landscape that welcomes birds by providing critical pieces of habitat will not only benefit birds, but other wildlife as well. And it is a great way to introduce young people to nature and have something the whole family can share. According to Cornell, with nearly 80 percent of wildlife habitat owned privately and 2.1 million acres converted each year to residential use â&#x20AC;&#x201C; it is critical we create bird-friendly landscapes. When designing a bird-friendly space, it is always best to start with a plan. As you begin to put pencil to paper one of your goals is to have a diverse landscape. The typical foundation planting, often comprised of yews and daylilies, fails at providing the three things birds need: water, shelter and food. Utilize native or well-adapted plants and design for year-round attractors. You need to visualize your landscape in layers! Birds donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t simply live in the tree tops. In fact, most species of birds require a variety of layers during their lifecycle from the low to medium to high. You can categorize these layers as groundcovers, herbaceous plants, understory shrubs and trees, and overstory trees. Layering provides cover for birds and protects from predation both from the ground and from above. Leaving dead limbs and tree snags and brush piles are all great sources of food and shelter for certain birds. What a great excuse for the messy gardener! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tidy up the planting beds in the fall. Leave those seed heads for birds to eat over the winter. Instead of bagging up your fall leaves, shred them and place them beneath your shrubs as mulch. Fall leaves harbor overwintering insects that birds will find delectable and come spring your leaf mulch will become a flurry of birds as they search for nesting material. What plants are recommended? Cornell has a wonderful website called All About Birds and is a wealth of information. Here

is a sampling of their recommended birdattracting plants: Q Overstory- Oaks (Quercus sp.), hickories (Carya sp.), walnuts (Juglans sp.), beeches (Fagus sp.) Q Understory â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Serviceberries (Amelanchier sp.), native dogwoods (Cornus sp.) QConiferous â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana), spruces (Picea sp.) Q Shrubs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Shrub dogwoods (Cornus sp.), winterberry holly (Ilex verticillata) Water is another critical component to have in a bird-friendly landscape. Incorporating a birdbath or water garden in your landscape can provide a wonderful focal point or pleasing space in your yard. Birds are attracted to moving water. Installing a small pump in a water feature will add interest in the garden for both you and the birds as the sound of moving water attracts species of all types. Birdbaths should be 2 to 3 inches deep and 2 to 3 feet wide with an edge for perching. Clean the birdbath once a week with soap and a thorough rinse of water. Keep your birdbath full of fresh, cool water and sit back and enjoy the sight of birds making your backyard their home. There are many wonderful resources to help you create a bird-friendly backyard. University of Illinois Extension can help get those resources in your hands. Contact your local county Extension office today! Another great resource would be your nearest Illinois Audubon Society group. Check Illinois Audubonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s state website for local chapter information. Good Growing Tip of the Week: Evergreens are an important source of cover for songbirds, especially in winter when predators like sharp-shinned hawks or housecats are known to stalk bird feeders for a meal. According to Cornell, place your feeders within 10-feet of protective cover. This distance can be adjusted depending on what common predators are in your yard.

REAL ESTATE ACTIVE SINCE 1961 Rick Barton

Robin Callihan

(217) 473-8303 Managing Broker

(217) 370-3451 Broker Associate

WADE AGENCY www.wade-real-estate.com

2)),&(   10LVVLVVLSSL6W3LWWVILHOG,/ EQUAL HOUSING

LENDER

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NEW LISTING: 609 E. Quincy St., Griggsville: Beautiful home at the edge of town with 3-4 bedrooms, 1 ž baths, gorgeous wood ďŹ&#x201A;ooring, amazing kitchen, 2 car attached garage and so much more. $119,500 NEW LISTING: 503 S. Federal St. Griggsville. Very nice 2 bedroom ranch home with family room, bath and additional bedroom in basement. Kitchen appliances and situated on ž approx. acre. $79,500 New Listing: 1605 Elm St., Quincy: Two story brick home with brand new roof! 4 bedrooms, main ďŹ&#x201A;oor laundry, newer windows, and updated furnace and central air. Detached 2 car garage. $64,900 NEW LISTING: 105 W. Chestnut St., Mt. LDSterling: Beautiful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath SOcondition. brick ranch with a 1 car garage. Near perfect $112,000 GRIGGSVILLE: (South Side) Very niceO2Lbedroom ranch home with lots of updates, full D S more. basement, attached garage, deck and much New Listing: 29343 Jim Town Hollow, Rockport: 2 bedroom ranch home on 1 SOLD acre with creek. Needs some work but great getaway. 3 Hope Ave., PittsďŹ eld: Very nice 2 bedroomDduplex located next to the golf course. New L paint, new carpet, full ďŹ nished basement,S &O attached 2 car garage. 316 N. Chandler St., Griggsville: Attractive two bedroom ranch home located close to schools. Neat, clean, & in move-in condition. Partial hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors, partial undated windows, central air, & some much more. Detached 2 car garage with heated workshop. This is a must see! Call today for your viewing. $66,900 IMMEDIATE POSSESSION 115 N. Federal St., Griggsville: Recents improvements to this two bedroom home: new furnace and central air units, Hot water heater, roof. Delighful open kitchen/dining area with SOL& D abundance of cabinets, main ďŹ&#x201A;oor laundry room with hand sink & ideal storage. Big deck. Big lot with 2 car garage with workshop and storage. $68,000 114 S. Stanford St., Griggsville: Cute and cozy two bedroom with lots of nice updates and move in ready. Attractive updated metal roof, updated window, newer ďŹ&#x201A;ooring, all new paint, & much more. Detached one car garage. Priced to sell. $44,000 313 E. Quincy St., Griggsville: 3-4 bedroom SOLD 1.5 story home. Central air and updated kitchen. Detached 2 car garage. 305 Congress St., Perry: Small town living is what you are looking for then you need to take a look at this one. Open ďŹ&#x201A;oor plan with kitchen, dining, & living area. Family room, bedroom, & more in lower level. Partial fenced yard & deck. $52,000 204 Mill St., Chambersburg: Sprawling 3 bedroom ranch home on nice shaded lot. Spacious eat-in kitchen, living room with hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;oors and ďŹ replace, and 1.5 baths. Room for storage or to expand in the ďŹ&#x201A;oored attic access. Unique 5 car garage. Call today. $89,500 808 N. Dutton St., PittsďŹ eld: Good 2 bedroom rental property with big kitchen, & mud room with laundry area. Detached garage. Immediate Possession! $29,500 130 E. PittsďŹ eld St., Milton: 2-3 bedroom home with open kitchen/dining area, partial hardwood ďŹ&#x201A;ooring, & more. Garage. $29,500 918 W. Jefferson St., PittsďŹ eld: Two bedroom SOLD starter home with detached 2 car garage. 1132 N. 9th St, Quincy: Two story home with 1.5 baths, updated kitchen, & more. OLDranch home in good location. Open ďŹ&#x201A;oor 627 Edgewood Drive, Quincy: S Spacious plan and newer family room addition, ďŹ replace, & more. Detached newer 2 car garage with SOLD workshop.

Wanting to sell? We have been in business over 31 years. We know this business. We can handle nearly all the details of selling. We prequalify potential buyers saving you and us much time. Sales have been good and we need more properties. Call us for a no obligation market analysis of your property.

200 S. Madison Pittsfield, IL 62363 217-285-2774

COURTNEY WADE 217-285-2774 CELL: 473-1289 ROGER HALL CELL 248-0231 BARBARA GOERTZ 217-257-7865

SALES STAFF KAREN FOX 217-285-5481 CELL: 473-3755 TAMI WEBEL 217-285-1441 CELL 242-5193

TERRY RUSH CELL: 242-0075 BRIAN RUEBUSH 217-370-1590

COURTNEY WADE - MANAGING BROKER

Licensed in Illinois & Missouri

PITTSFIELD Q NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 430 N. JACKSON ST. Remodeled 2-story home. Newer siding, roof, deck, furnace, air conditioning, water heater, plumbing, electrical and landscaping. 3-4 BR, 1.75 BA. Attached garage. Entrance and exit from side street if desired. Energy efficient and move in ready. CALL KAREN FOR MORE INFO. PRICED $119,500. Q NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 651 W. FAYETTE ST. 894 sq. ft. ranch style home with 3 BR, 1 BA, detached garage and newer roof. This home comes fully furnished including washer and dryer. Move in ready! PRICED AT $79,500. CALL BARB. Q NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 445 OAK HILL ROAD aka BARROW FAMILY PROPERTY. Absolutely a beautiful 4,000 sq. ft. home on approx. 5 acres. 11 rooms, 5 bedrooms (2 suites), 4 1/2 baths, study, family room, garden room, fireplace, basement, 2 car att. garage and much more. IMMEDIATE POSSESSION. PRICED AT $450,000. CALL COURTNEY. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - PIKE COUNTY GLASS - 115 N. MISSISSIPPI ST. - Turn-key business comes with the 30x100 building, tools, equipment, and good reputation. The owner is retiring and ready to go fishing. The building also comes with a two-bedroom rental apartment that is currently rented. PRICED $225,000. CALL COURTNEY. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 27548 390th ST. On 3-5 acres approx. 2800 sq. ft. 2 story home, 1 1/2 miles North of Pittsfield. Remodeled in 2005 with 11 rooms, 3 BR, 3 BA, Family Rm., fireplace, sunroom, geo thermal, 2 outbuildings and more. PRICED $230,000. CALL 217-285-2774. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 115 LASHMETT LANE - Brick ranch home, 2260 sq. ft. 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA, full basement, 2 fireplaces, att. 2 car garage, central heat and A/C. INGROUND POOL AND MORE. PRICED $199,000. CALL KAREN. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 721 S. MEMORIAL ST. - 2408 sq. ft. 4-5 BR, 2 full baths, (2) 1/2 baths, family room, vinyl siding, thermo windows and more. REDUCED. MOTIVATED SELLER. $189,500. $174,500. CALL ROGER HALL. QPITTSFIELD - 420 N. Jackson St. - Remodeled 2 story home, 9 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, new kitchen, new electrical. All thermo w/d, NEW heating and cooling, NEW 16x32 IN GROUND swimming pool and more. MOTIVATED SELLER CALL COURTNEY FOR MORE INFO. PRICED $137,000. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 311 S. MADISON ST. 7 RM, 3 BR, 1 BA brick home in a great location. 1561 sq. ft., attached one car garage, full basement with kitchenette and lots of storage. PRICED $117,000. CALL KAREN. QPITTSFIELD - 309 W. PERRY ST. - 1272 sq. ft. ranch style home. 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, sunroom and partially ďŹ nished basement. Gas furnace and C/A. 1-car attached garage and one car detached garage w/workshop. Nice location. MOTIVATED SELLER. PRICED $90,000. REDUCED TO $88,000. CALL KAREN. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 957 CONROY ST. - 1150 sq. ft. ranch style home, 5 RM, 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA, with main ďŹ&#x201A;oor laundry. Several updates, C/A. All appliances stay. One car att. garage. Utility shed. PRICED $86,000. CALL ROGER. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 340 MASON ST. Very nice and unique ranch style home. 1100 sq. ft. 5 RM, 1 BR, large bath, full part. basement, gas furn., C/A. Large garage. Beautiful, all handicap accessible. Move-In ready. CALL COURTNEY. PRICED $85,000. Q PITTSFIELD- 125 S. CLINTON ST. - 1 story frame home, 1168 sq. ft. 6 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, HW ďŹ&#x201A;oors, gas furn., C/A, basement, alum. siding, new roof, large carport, large lot. PRICED $79,500. CALL COURTNEY-SELLER CONCESSIONS. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 224 S. MEMORIAL ST. 1200 sq. ft. 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, home close to town. HW ďŹ&#x201A;oors, thermo replacement windows, vinyl siding and a newer roof. Covered front porch. Selling â&#x20AC;&#x153;As Isâ&#x20AC;?. PRICED $38,500. CALL COURTNEY. GRIGGSVILLE/PERRY/BAYLIS//BARRY/KINDERHOOK QNEW LISTING - BARRY - 585 BAINBRIDGE ST. REO - 1094 sq. ft., story and a half frame home. 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA. Vinyl siding, gas heat, C/A. PRICED $26,000. $24,700. CALL BARB. QREDUCED - 490 MAIN ST., BARRY - 1719 sq. ft. 2 story home, 3 BR, 2 BA, newer kitchen with appliances. Hi-eff GFA heat with wood furnace backup, C/A, 24x41 3-car garage, 2 sheds plus woodshed. PRICED $85,900. $79,900. CALL BARB. QNEW LISTING - 27959 230TH ST. KINDERHOOK Newly constructed 3 1/2 year old cabin on 1 acre. 1024 sq. ft. 5 rooms, 2 BR, 1 BA. Built with native oak, cottonwood and walnut. All thermo, metal siding and shingle roof. VERY UNIQUE, CALL COURTNEY. PRICED AT $132,000. QBARRY - 262 TREMONT ST. 1 story frame home, 1000 sq. ft., 5 rooms, 2 BR, 1 BA, aluminum and vinyl siding. TO BE SOLD â&#x20AC;&#x153;AS ISâ&#x20AC;?. PRICED AT $12,000. CALL COURTNEY. QNEW LISTING-CALHOUN COUNTY - 2450 INFIDEL HOLLOW On 1 acre, 1 story frame home, 1000 sq. ft. 6 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, gas furnace, vinyl siding, det. car garage. CALL COURTNEY. PRICED $68,000.

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NEWS

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Winchester, Illinois

A7


A8

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Winchester, Illinois

JACKSONVILLE

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LAST 2018 MODEL - HUGE SAVINGS! 2018 Ram 2500 Laramie Crew Cab Diesel

2019 Dodge Journey

2019 Dodge Grand Caravan

Loaded

#76454

#76584

#76539

MSRP $67,245

MSRP $24,490

MSRP $28,285

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $55,933

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $18,926

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $21,924

2019 Jeep Cherokee Latitude

2019 Jeep Wrangler Sport

2019 Jeep Renegade Limited 4x4

Leather Loaded

#76588

#76443

#76528

MSRP $29,390

MSRP $26,815

MSRP $34,920

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $24,921

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $21,940

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $32,920

2019 Chrysler 300 Touring AWD

2019 Dodge Challenger SXT

2019 Ram 1500 Quad Cab 4x4

Leather

5.7 Hemi

All Wheel Drive

Express package

#76519

#76538

#76502

MSRP $39,830

MSRP $29,535

MSRP $45,900

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $31,830

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $25,952

JACKSONVILLE PRICE $36,900

Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram

JACKSONVILLE

1600 W. Morton Jacksonville, Illinois

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

2014 CHRYSLER TOWN AND COUNTRY LIMITED

2014 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN R/T

2014 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED 4X4

#76572A

#11851A LEATHER DVD

#76351B LEATHER

#76591A LEATHER

$10,900

$14,900

$13,900

$16,900

2014 RAM 1500 CREW CAB 4X4 LONGHORN

2015 DODGE JOURNEY

2015 JEEP WRANGLER SAHARA

2017 BUICK ENCORE SPORT TOURING

#76575A LEATHER LOADED

#76533A SXT ALL WHEEL DRIVE

#76484A CHRYSLER CERTIFIED LOCAL TRADE

#11836A ALL WHEEL DRIVE

$24,900

$14,900

$19,900

$29,900

2017 HYUNDAI SANTA FE SPORT

2017 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LIMITED

2017 RAM 1500 REBEL 4X4

2018 DODGE CHARGER R/T DAYTONA

#76523A LEATHER LOADED

#11788 CHRYSLER CERTIFIED

#11808 LOADED CHRYSLER CERTIFIED

#11814 CHRYSLER CERTIFIED

$21,900

$29,900

$32,900

$36,900

2018 DODGE JOURNEY SE

2018 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

2018 JEEP COMPASS LIMITED

2019 RAM 1500 CREW CAB 1500 BIGHORN

#11830 4CYL

#11823 SE V6 DEALER DEMO

#11857 LOADED CHRYSLER CERTIFIED

#11852 CHRYSLER CERTIFIED 4X4

$15,900

$19,900

$23,900

$33,900

All Payments are with approved credit with Tax, License, Title and doc fee as down payment. 4.9 for 60 months on 2009 model, 4.9 for 72 months on 2010-2016 Models. No Payments for 90 days requires Bank Approval. All The ew N TULLIS

JACKSONVILLECHRYSLERDODGE.NET

JACKSONVILLE CHRYSLER DODGE JEEP RAM

217-243-3371

217-243-3333

*All Prices are plus tax, title, license and doc fee.

800-851-6039

Dealer not responsible for errors in this ad

All Prices are plus tax, title, license and doc fee. All Prices have all rebates, bonus cash and dealer discount applied. Pictures are for advertising purposes only, actual colors may differ. Dealer not responsible for errors.

Chad Tullis

Monte Keltner

Dave Miller

Justin Degroot

Jacob Shelby

Jay Landers

Tom Pranger

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Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram

Jacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram aJacksonville Chrysler Dodge jeep ram

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