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Page 1

50¢ July 18, 2018

Pittsfield, IL Thank you,

Pike Press

pikepress.com

Vol. 176, No. 29

Pig Days royalty

Robert Bixby of New Salem, for subscribing to Pike Press!

News Pike County Fair starts today.

See page A2

Western monitors summer projects.

See page A2

Thomas gets ‘a round tuit’.

See page A3

News

Pike hosts Pig Days.

See page C1

WEEKEND WEATHER friday, july 20

87 67 High Low

Saturday, july 21

84 64 High Low

Sunday, july 22

84 63 High Low

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Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

Jase Risley, left, son of Lance and Gayla Risley of Pittsfield, was first runner-up in the Little Mr. Pork Chop pageant Friday night at Pig Days in Pittsfield. Raylan Smith was the winner of the pageant. He is the son of Amy Davis and Keenan Smith of Pittsfield. For more photos from Pig Days, please see page C1.

Lyla Sanderson, daughter of Jimmy and Tiffany Sanderson of Pittsfield, was Little Miss Piglet at last weekend’s Pig Days. She was crowned Friday night after her pigtails were determined to be the longest at 13-1/2 inches. First runnerup was Carson Walker, daughter of Morgan Walker of New Canton, who had pigtails measuring 12-1/2 inches.

Is there a replacement for Fall Color Drive? By O. ETHAN BROWN Pike Press Following lawsuits concerning a tainted cider case in recent years, the Pike County Fall Color Drive was dissolved as a committee, as well as an event. But something new may be appearing on the horizon. Jamie Kattelman of Griggsville said she was sorely disappointed when she heard that the long tradition of the Color Drive would no longer continue. She resolved not to give up. After speaking with some friends and tossing a few ideas to and fro, “Fall Pickin’ Days” was born. The “Fall Pickin’ Days”

Facebook page is an unorganized venue for businesses around Pike County to announce their versions of the Color Drive. The page references Oct. 20-21 as the projected dates for the new creation. Each town is responsible for its own event, which prevents another onslaught of lawsuits to one organization or committee, Kattelman explained. “I first called the Chamber of Commerce and talked to Kaye [Iftner] about the idea to make sure I wasn’t stepping on anyone’s toes,” she said. Kattelman posted the page on Facebook at 4 p.m, Monday, July 16. Within less than 24 hours there were approximately 752 likes and

765 followers. She has even been asked to speak on one of the local TV channels on the idea. “I don’t want to have the focus on me,” Kattelman said, because she doesn’t want “people to come back and say they got sick from an apple.” This page, she explained, is merely a place for people who are setting up stands to spread the word of their whereabouts. Kattelman wanted to make it very clear that this event does not have a committee or anything to do with the Fall Color Drive. Although she wants to keep it as decentralized as possible, she will be publishing a brochure that (See, replacement, A2)

Our Town . . . . . . . D3 Sports . . . . . . . . . . C1 Obituaries in this issue: Fagaen, Fudge, Galloway, Hall, Mackeldon, Maguire, Paxton, Sanders, Sippel, Wagener.

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Outdoor accident results in fatality and injuries By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press An afternoon of summer fun turned deadly Thursday, July 12 in Belleview Hollow just west of Hillcrest Lane. Calhoun County Sheriff Bill Heffington said his department was notified at approximately 2:31 p.m. of the accident which sent the Calhoun County Sheriff’s Office, Calhoun County EMS and North Calhoun Fire Department to the scene. Upon arrival, emergency workers learned three juveniles were riding an electric golf cart and were westbound, going down a hill, when they lost control of the unit, went over a guardrail and overturned in the hollow. Heffington, who also acts as the Calhoun County Coroner, pronounced one juvenile dead at the scene. Another was taken by private vehicle for medical assistance and the third was transported by ambulance.

Heffington said that he did not know the current condition of the two minors but it is believed their injuries are non-life threatening. Illinois State Police were on scene to assist with traffic crash reconstruction. In a release by the Calhoun County’s Sheriff’s Office, it was stated the minor’s names will not be released. Dawn F. Funeral services for Dawn F. MacKelden MacKelden, 11 of Nebo, were held Tuesday, July 15 at Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill. She would have been a sixth grader at Pleasant Hill Elementary this fall. She is the daughter of a daughter of Russell A. and Jessica M. Hanlon Mackelden of rural Nebo.

Pike County Farm Bureau and Hull community hosting flood gathering By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press The Pike County Farm Bureau and the Hull community will host a commemorative pork chop cookout July 25 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Hull Community Center. The Hull Community Center is located at 215 S. Elm Street, Hull, in the old Hull elementary school. “This is an opportunity for those who, in any way, experienced the 1993 flood to gather, share stories, and have a delicious pork chop dinner,” Blake Roderick of the

“This is an opportunity for those who, in any way, experienced the 1993 flood to gather, share stories, and have a delicious pork chop dinner.”

Blake Roderick Pike County Farm Bureau Pike County Farm Bureau, said. “Twenty-five years ago, our Two Rivers area faced a slow moving natural disaster now known as the

Great Flood of 1993.” Pike County experienced flooding on both the Mississippi and (See, Flood, A2)

Hull to head Pike Chamber

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Charlie Hull of Pittsfield has been picked to hold the office of executive director of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce. Hull’s appointment was announced Monday and he started the same day. Charlie Hull He will replace Kaye Ifnter who announced her retirement earlier this year. July 13 was her last day. Hull is a lifelong resident of Pike County and has previously served on the Chamber Board of Directors. He is a graduate of Pittsfield High School and holds a bachelor’s degree in communication from Illinois College and a master’s degree in education from Quincy University. “The Board of Directors has selected Charlie Hull to serve as the new executive director for the Chamber,” Beth White, Pike County Chamber of Commerce board

“I want to start focusing on existing businesses and see what the Chamber can do to benefit them.”

Charlie Hull Executive Director Pike County Chamber of Commerce

president, said. “Charlie brings a wealth of marketing and community knowledge that we felt fits this position very well.” Hull said he was excited about his new position and feels he is stepping into a quality organization. “I think Kaye Iftner has been on the job the last 10 years and has left the Chamber in a good spot,” Hull said. “I think with the way she has left things, it will be an easy transition.” Hull said the Chamber has always done a good job of promoting tourism. “I think we promote our history, our landmarks, our outdoor activities really well,” Hull said. “I want to start focusing on existing businesses and see what the Chamber can do to benefit them.” Hull said his plans are to visit one-on-one with each business owner and see what they would like to happen. “I’d like to know if they know of any ideas that we could use,” he said. “Maybe they have an idea or have seen something work in another area that would work here. I’m excited to see what they have to say.” Hull and his wife, Jessica, have three children and are involved in a number of community organizations, including the Pike County Little League. He and his family operate their own T-shirt printing business.


A2

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

Flood

News

Pittsfield, Illinois

Replacement (Continued from A1) contains a list of towns participating, as well as a breakdown of each one’s participating businesses. “It takes a little bit of money out of my pocket, but it’s worth it for Pike County,” Kattelman said. Towns and private landowners all around the county

Submitted photo

A group of dedicated volunteers kept the sandbagging operation at Pittsfield High School going as officials estimate more than a million sandbags were filled at that location during the Flood of 93. The sandbagging started July 10, 1993 and volunteers filled bags while other donated water and food for the volunteers in a community effort to save the west side of the county.

(Continued from A1) Illinois rivers that summer. Unprotected lowlying areas as well as farm fields protected by levees were impacted by historic flooding. Roads and bridges were closed. People moved out of their homes as flood waters threatened. When faced with impending disaster, a call went out for help and help arrived. People from across Illinois of all ages and professions answered our call for help. They

arrived in Pike County to help sandbag, work the levees, deliver supplies, provide security, keep the roads open, and to help out in any way they could. Pike County residents were there helping their neighbors move out of their homes, cook meals, do laundry, fill sandbags, drive trucks, work the levees, deliver supplies, and in so many other ways to provide aid and assistance.

are providing both free and paid locations for stands to setup, she said. Cindy and David Forshey of the Pike County Fairgrounds in Pleasant Hill, for example, will be opening the area to vendors for a small fee. Atlas, Summer Hill, and Time are also jumping on the bandwagon, and are some of

the first few to join. “I think it’s a great idea. Pike County needs to keep the Color Drive going. It brings a lot of business to [this area]. I am [always] booked a year in advance [for this event],” Krystal Musgrove of Monroe Street Suites in Pittsfield said.

Western monitors summer projects

By SHELBY STROEMER Pike Press Summer projects are in full swing and were the main talk of the Western school board at its July 16 meeting. The Barry campus is the main site of renovations. “The steps are torn out of here,” Superintendent Jessica Funk said. Concrete steps are being installed at the Barry campus to replace previous steps which were cracked. As for the elementary gym floor, a huge update

was presented. Last month moisture was found under the floor after the wood was pulled up. The school hired someone to come check out the water problem. They found the water was sitting on a slope within the memorial garden area. The cheapest solution presented is to sandblast the floor and add an epoxy. The epoxy will have a onepercent seepage rate and an added fan system. The bid for this process came in at $23,900. The original thoughts were that the concrete was going to have to

be busted out and replaced. That cost was going to be $168,000. Jeremy Walston asked if he could use softball account funds to level out the softball field while the new waterline is being connected. Funk mentioned to the board about having Saturday detentions as another tier of punishment. The board agreed to move forward with the new punishment. Closed session began a 6:15 p.m. to address personnel. The meeting adjourned at 6:28 p.m.

Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

Sweet corn delivery at Crossing Thrift Store Hundreds of ears of sweet corn were delivered to The Crossing Thrift Store in Pittsfield last week by the Thomas family of rural Pittsfield. The corn was donated to those who utilize the food pantry associated with the store. Unloading the corn were, left to right, Jonathan Thomas, Betsy Roderick, Tressa Zabel and Joseph Thomas. Also assisting was Jonah Thomas. The Thomases will be taking another load of sweet corn to a food pantry in the Chicago area later this month, most likely to Representative Art Turner’s district. Turner is the adopted legislator of Scott County, a sister Farm Bureau of the Pike County group.

Recycling progam will continue with changes

Pike County Economic Development Corporation was sad to learn that the Mental Health Centers of Western Illinois has made the difficult decision to terminate Community Day Services (formerly referred to as Day Training) and Home and Community Based Support Services at the Pike County recycling site. These two programs serve individuals with an intellectual or developmental disability. The former Counseling Center of Pike County/MHCWI has provided services to persons with a developmental disability for more than 45 years, so this is a huge and very sad loss for the Pike clients and staff. The decision was made due to the consistent inability of the agency to recruit and retain qualified and caring staff. Over the last three years, MHCWI has struggled to hire and retain Direct Support Persons (DSP’s) and Qualified Intellectual Developmental Professionals (QIDP’s). MHWCI remains financially solvent and administration continues to guard the money in their reserves to provide job security for staff and services for clients. MHWCI is committed to maintaining all other services and to continuing the great work within our rural communities. July 13 was the last day for the MHCWI

Day Training clients to assist with the recycling program, but the program will continue. Recycling donors are asked to deposit their items in the rollouts provided by Area Disposal and please be careful to not leave any trash outside of the receptacles. Anyone unable to deposit the items without assistance, 4-H members will be present on the first Saturday of the month from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. from April through October. The assistance that the Development Day Training clients have provided over the last seven years has been very appreciated. This was an opportunity for them to earn extra money while providing a community service and they have performed their work in an excellent manner. Also appreciated is the community’s involvement with the recycling efforts and the individuals who are dedicated to recycling and understand the many benefits recycling offers. The City of Barry has recently joined the program and has seen a great response in their community. For any questions or additional assistance, please feel free to contact Pike County Economic Development Corporation, 217491-2401.

Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

Who will be Little Mr and Miss Pike County Fair? The pageant begins tonight at 6 p.m. Contestants are, back row, Rhoni Edwards, Myley Niehaus, Bella Vincent, Cortlynne Malone, Kaylee Gunder, Bryleigh Frieden, Logan Boehmer, Jaici Yanczer, Gracie Evans. In front are last year’ s Little Mr and Miss, Lucas Zenk and Alyssa Baresis. Also in this year’s pageant are: Kolton Martin, Piper Lewis, Sophie Rennecker and Jaclyn Cooley.

Pike County Fair starts today By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press The Pike County Fair starts today with a full slate of excitement and entertainment for four nights. Starting off the events will be the Miss, Junior Miss and Little Mr and Miss pageants. Those begin at 7 p.m. Thursday night will be the tractor pull and action will start at 6:30 p.m. A full rodeo will take the grandstand area Friday night at 7 p.m. “This a full rodeo,” Dave Forshey, fair board president, said. “It’s not just a bull rider, it’s bronco riders, calf-roping, barrel racing. A whole rodeo.”

Morning events start Friday with the sheep and goat show. Saturday morning the baby contest will kick off at 10 a.m. and the cattle show will also take place. A Mike Brown Production Derby will begin at 6 p.m. and promises a night of hard hits and fun times. It will be Jim Jacques' last derby to emcee and several former derbiers have indicated they will attend to wish Jacques well on his retirement. Come out and see your old favorites. Conner Amusements will be at the fairgrounds all four nights and will begin their activities at 6 p.m. each evening. “They say they will bring 20 units,” Forshey said. “Rides, games, food, etc." The carnival will run from 6-10 p.m. each night and the fairgrounds will open each day at 5 p.m.

Griggsville city budget approved By O. ETHAN BROWN Pike Press The Griggsville Council began their meeting at 7:01 p.m. and moved right along at a rather quick pace through the short agenda. The 2018-2019 city budget, which had been post-

poned during the June meeting due to some discovered inaccuracies, was approved. It was also announced that the new control panel for the main well had finally been installed at 2 p.m that afternoon, July 11. Just before the meeting went into closed session, at 7:10 p.m, Mayor Kent

Goewey mentioned that the office has been needing a new printer for some time. While no decision was made, Mayor Goewey did say that “...it has done very well for 200 years, I mean, $200.” No action was taken during the closed session, and the meeting adjourned at 7:45 p.m.

Submitted photo

PCSD taking back meds Ethan Brown/Pike Press

Charitable

entrepreneurs

Young entrepreneurs Presley Brown, left, and Kelsey Yelliott, right, support the Pike County Animal Shelter with their 50 cent lemonade stand, July 12, at the end of West Fayette Street in Pittsfield.

The Pike County Sheriff’s Department is now participating in a Take Back Meds Program (P2D2 Program) that was originally initiated by a group of Students from Pontiac. The Illinois Sheriff’s Association is a proud partner of P2D2 and has taken charge to work with all of the Sheriff’s Departments in Illinois to manage the Take Back Meds Program.People can now drop unused medications off anytime, 24/7, in the green drop off box located in the corridor of the Pike County Sheriff’s Department. 204 E. Adams St., Pittsfield. Medications that are accepted are: prescription medications, prescription ointments and liquids, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, and medications for pets. If you have any question concerning the types of medications accepted, you may contact Sandy Schacht, office coordinator, at 217-285-5263. Left to right, Deputy Matt Frazier, evidence and med collector, Jordan Gerard, jail administrator and Sandy Schacht, office coordinator.


News

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

A3

Pittsfield, Illinois

What causes towns to dry up?

Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

Here John Thomas is doing what he has done for the last 55 years, cutting hair in his shop in Pleasant Hill. Micheal Thomas stopped by for a trim last week and enjoyed his time in Thomas’ chair. Dan Galloway was Thomas’ first customer.

Thomas gets ‘a round tuit’

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press John Thomas, owner of the barber shop in Pleasant Hill, always intended to celebrate his 50th anniversary of having a business in Pleasant Hill. The Thomas family has been involved in the business scene in Pleasant Hill for 169 years and Thomas wanted to celebrate his own anniversary. “I just never got ‘around to it’”, he said. But now, on the 55th anniversary, Thomas is ready to mark the milestone. A mail carrier by day and a barber by evening, Thomas is taking the day off from mail carrying, Monday, July 23 and the barber shop will be open all day, just like in 1963 when he opened his shop on Quincy Street. And to further commemorate the day, he will give haircuts for $1, the same price as in 1963. “A lot of my old customers are at Crescent Heights Cemetery now but I invite anyone who wants to take advantage of this unusual deal to stop by that day and get yourself a real bargain even if you have never been in my barber shop before,” he said. Thomas said he remembers the day he opened his shop, in the middle of a thriving business community in Pleasant Hill. “There was a general

years before I opened. I have used that same chair for 55 years. I found another one almost identical from a barber at Barry. I don’t remember his first name but his last name was Snyder.  He had also cut hair in Pleasant Hill years ago for a short time.” Thomas knew the barber Snyder from a previous encounter, a few years earlier. “Joe Crowder was my neighbor when we were kids and Dad gave me 50 cents to go up to Denny Pearson’s and get a haircut,” Thomas said. “Joe went with me and told me if I would get a Mohawk he would get one the next time he got his hair cut.  Denny wouldn’t do it because he knew my mom and dad would be really be upset so I went to this Snyder guy. He gave me a Mohawk which I have a picture of and sure enough my mom and dad weren’t happy.  Come to find out, this Snyder was the same guy who had given me the Mohawk when I was a kid.” Thomas says a lot of his original customers have died, but he still has his regulars who come by for a trim or just to chat. “There are a lot of funny stories that have happened here in this shop,” Thomas said. “There was a woman who used to come in here every day and she’d start a conversation and end up

“A lot of my old customers are at Crescent Heights Cemetery now but I invite anyone who wants to take advantage of this unusual deal to stop by that day and get yourself a real bargain even if you have never been in my barber shop before.”

John Thomas Pleasant Hill barber

store next door, five grocery stores in town, a pharmacy, another barber shop, doctors, banks,” Thomas said. “Business was good.” As the ‘70s hit, business quietly left town or shut down for good. “Business took a dive then,” Thomas said. “The Beatles brought long hair and there weren’t as many people to get hair cuts.” Thomas, trying to keep up with the times, invested in a Roffler Sculpter, a machine that helped style some of the hair of the ‘80s. “If I used that, I could charge more and that helped out,” Thomas said. Thomas had always tried to keep the shop on the forefront. “Before I opened I went all over the country looking for a couple of barber chairs. They were really hard to find and I couldn’t afford to buy even one new one, let alone two,” Thomas said. “In the beginning my shop was set up for two chairs.  I finally found one over at Louisiana that Maurice Brinker had in his back room  He had been a barber in Pleasant Hill

getting so mad, she’d leave and swear she’d never come back. But then the next day she’d be here. One time I told her about Ratchet Bowman and the way he voted. Ratchet was sitting by the soda machine and she went over there and ran her fingers through his hair and said she would like to figure out how his mind works. He left, went to the drug store, bought medicated shampoo and made me wash his hair.” The Thomas Barber Shop has not only provided haircuts to the scraggly but a place for the lonely to find companionship and that is a main focus of Monday’s celebration. “I also hope some of the old loafers who are still with us will stop by and reminisce about the good old days,” Thomas said. “There have been a lot of fun times in here.” The barbershop and its crew of regulars have often been a part of the community, especially when it comes to the 4th of July parade. “We took first place several years,” Thomas said. “One year we fixed

Submitted photo

The young John Thomas as he looked when he first opened his shop. This photo was taken by Jerry Dee Springer, a friend of Thomas’, who was taking photography classes at SIU Edwardsville at the time. Springer went on to be a photographer for a major airline company.

up a float that looked like a paddle boat and we all sat around a table looking like we were playing cards. We had Ratchet pedaling a bicycle that kept the paddle turning.” Another year, the gang dressed Ratchet up like a glamour girl and the big accomplishment for the floats was the replica of the F17A stealth fighter. Thomas had seen the picture of the fighter in a magazine and knew his son, who was in he military was working losing with the news piece of equipment. “We did cave men one year and had music that played Ally Oop,” Thomas said, smiling at the memories. Thomas said when he retires from barbering, it will be the end of the Thomas businessmen in Pleasant Hill. Thomas’s have been involved in the grocery store business, the banking industry, doctors, the first mayor of Pleasant Hill, a postmaster and numerous other business adventures along the way. Thomas is hoping for a big turnout Monday whether anyone needs a haircut or not. “I know everyone has scattered to the four winds but I would love to see some of the guys who almost made the barber shop their second home that played on those great basketball and football teams Pleasant Hill High School had in the mid-1960’s,” Thomas said. “Guys like Denny Wombles, Larry Forgey, Bob Robertson, Terry Johnson, Bill Franklin and Randy Hubbard, to mention a few. I remember some of those guys who played on those teams would come to the barber shop before a game because they thought it would bring them good luck. I don’t know, maybe it did because they hardly ever lost a game. I hope those of you who are still with us and used to come to the barber shop every Wednesday and Saturday night will drop by, too. Some names that come to mind are Joe and John Springer, Mick and Kathy McBride, Stan Weir, Joe and Jack Coultas and John Miller.”

By O. ETHAN BROWN Pike Press Back in the days when small towns were popping up throughout the states, people didn’t have an efficient method to travel long distances, historian Michael Boren of Pittsfield said. Boren was raised in Nebo and assisted his father, Bruce Boren, in running the family grocery store. He taught social studies for many years at the Pittsfield High School and is an avid historian. “Nebo at the beginning of the 20th Century was a thriving village of around 520 population. The village had two banks (the First National and the Minier State Bank), four or five physicians, one or two dentists, two hotels, six general stores, two hardware stores, one furniture and undertaker’s establishment, three restaurants, three barber shops, one livery stable, two poultry firms, two mills, a vinegar factory, two blacksmith shops, three harness shops, one newspaper, one millinery store, one lumber yard, one veterinary surgeon and a good two-story frame school building,” Boren said. In the 1930s following the stock market crash of Black Tuesday, the Great Depression hit the cities hard. While rural areas were not exempt from the hit, people from surrounding cities were able to return to their hometown and survive on the farm, Boren said. So, for a time, small towns actually began to grow. When World War I broke out, residents moved away again to get jobs in wartime manufacturing and the military. This was the final hit that has caused population and business numbers to go down, he said. “The Louisiana Bridge had a [50 cent] toll booth in those days and people wouldn’t go across because they wouldn’t pay it. 50 cents was hard to come by in that time, as they were just coming out of the Depression,” Pleasant Hill resident June Springer said. This prevented people from Pleasant Hill, in particular, from giving their business to larger towns and cities. Transportation was so unreliable, Springer said, and Pleasant Hill had everything they needed, including banks, grocery stores, dry-goods, and a movie theater. Once vehicles started to become more reliable and the toll was taken down, a drastic change started to occur in their overall economy,

she continued. People started driving to Quincy or Pittsfield to watch movies. They would drive to Louisiana, Missouri to fill up their tanks with gas. Overall, the general cause of shrinking of towns can be placed at two doors: technology and national politics.

“People move away and see the crime in these big cities. When it comes time to raise their kids, they want to come back to where they grew up. I think it’s good memories that keep bringing people back [to Pike County],”

Kaye Iftner retired Pike County Chamber of Commerce director

Whether it was in Pleasant Hill or Nebo, people said that when transportation became cheaper and easier, people had a new way to expand their horizons. Furthermore, war and the national economy affected Pike County in a dramatic sense. From the information above, it seems that in almost all cases, Pike County is not an exception case to the rest of the country. The question is...what keeps these small towns alive today? Why do they continue to be inhabited and visited by tourists from all around? Kaye Iftner, recently retired director of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce, says that small towns in this area have been able to survive over the years by an unwillingness to die. Creating new attractions and businesses that are popular to tourists are just two examples, she said. “People move away and see the crime in these big cities. When it comes time to raise their kids, they want to come back to where they grew up. I think it’s good memories that keep bringing people back [to Pike County],” Iftner said.

Submitted photo

Legion

receives cupcake funds

The Pittsfield Haymakers presented a check of $950 to the Pittsfield American Legion from the proceeds of its cupcake fundraiser, held July 3 and 4. At the presentation, from left to right, were store director Karen Griggs and Legion members Rick Peile, John Gleckler, Rear Bruce Rush, Jim Griffeth, Rick Kremer and Carl Blacketer.


OPINION Pike Press

A4

Wednesday, July 18, 2018, Pittsfield, Illinois

Our View REMEMBERING THE ’93 FLOOD

Is our spirit undiminished?

As cartoonist Bill Beard reminds us and as “Pickings from Pike’s Past” records, a memory is hanging over Pike County this month. Many are here today who can recall the Great Flood of 1993 which consumed our work and prayers 25 years ago. The scenes of heat, humidity, sandbags and tension are still in our minds. It was a time of coming together for a common cause, a lesson our nation could sorely use in these times of partisan division. Pike County weathered that flood and has seen floods since. We live between two great rivers; we are an agricultural community; the current state of the weather, and what it may produce tomorrow, are always on our minds. What would happen if a similar natural disaster were to strike Pike County today? It wouldn’t have to be a flood. We’ve seen our share of tornadoes here, as well. What would happen? Well, we can sincerely hope that the neighborliness and willingness to do your part to help a stranger would be undiminished. We can hope that the best of the Pike County spirit would emerge once again and we could take pride in what we accomplish when we work together.

That’s what we hope.

This Week's

Poll Question Week of July 18, 2018

is the 25th anniversary of the Q: JulyGreat Flood of 1993 in Pike County. 1. I lived in Pike county during the flood. 2. I lived elsewhere but remember reading about it. 3. I helped fill sandbags. 4. I experienced personal loss from the flood waters.

Share your answer at pikepress.com

Last week's poll results Pike County’s 50th annual Pig Days celebration is this weekend. 0% 25% 50% 25%

A. I attended the very first Pig Days 50 years ago. B. I remember the crazy costumes and sidewalk sales. C. I remember the Prince Pig statue on the courthouse lawn. D. This will be my first Pig Days – can’t wait!

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

More on socialism, Marxism, communism

I read with interest the letters to the editor in the 7/11 Pike Press. In the letter, “Another view of President Trump” by Mr. Hubbard, I was very intrigued that in order to support his positions he used many facts that were -yes - established facts. I find this very refreshing. In the letter, “Supplies more information” by Mr. Boren, I take exception to his use of the terms socialism, Marxism, and communism. I believe a couple of his statements were “communism is just an extreme form of socialism” and paraphrased “some democrats are avowed Marxists— that is by definition a Communist.” Socialism in simple terms is an economic concept in which there is no elite class but rather all people work for the common good and share in the fruits of labor equally. It seems impractical for pure socialism to exist in anything but a perfect society (or world) due to the inherent greed and/ or quest for power that at least some if not many people possess. Marxism is more of a political theory that purports to transfer the existing economic systems at play in society to those based more on socialist principles, bringing the rich and the poor closer together in economic terms and again eliminating the elite classes. It also relates to class struggle and revolutionary change. The term “communism,” as used today, has a much different general meaning than that used by Karl Marx. Communism in practice is more subjugation than socialism. Communism, in practice, is just another form of dictatorship, with a very elite class that controls the wealth and power

through force and intimidation. The workers are in essence forced to work for the good of the “state,” which in this case means the elite ruling class, which again rules by extreme measures of brute force. The fact that the government collects the goods produced for the benefit of the ruling class and redistributes goods as they see fit hardly seems to be socialism in its true sense. Capitalism can have its faults, also. Take for example the USA in the late 1800s and early 1900s. The Vanderbilts, Rockefellers, Carnegies, and others built fortunes from workers laboring 10-12 hour days, six days a week, for enumeration at far less than the work’s economic value, and much of the time in relatively unsafe conditions. Granted, they did not have the complete force that exists under communism or other dictatorships, but they did take advantage of situations existing in the economic, political, and cultural forces of the period that were not available to everybody. To call some of the present day democrats as being communists or Marxists as stated in Mr. Boren’s letter seems to be a blatant and incendiary misrepresentation of the facts. The fact that a person may believe in more government entitlements than other people might, does not seem to qualify him or her to be labeled as a Marxist or communist, at least by today’s common accepted meanings. But back to socialism. I hope those people out there that cringe at the term socialism do not, or do not intend to, receive Social Security checks. Social Security as well as Medicare, Medicaid, federal subsidized housing, agricultural subsidies, and federal agricultural set aside programs, are all forms of socialism. As for Social Security, please don’t put forth the argument

that you only receive what you paid into the program. Social Security benefits are based on a complex formula. Your benefit level is based on a calculated amount, AIME, or the Averaged Indexed Monthly Earnings. The National Average Wage Index (which is close to the national average wage for those contributing) the year you turn 60, as determined by the Social Security Administration, is used for an index. For each year prior, the average wages for that year are divided into the index to arrive at an index factor which is then multiplied by actual wages to arrive at index wages. The highest 35 years of index wages is divided by 420 (35 years of 12 months) to determine AIME. Using 2015 bend points (another computing factor) your benefit would be 90 percent of the first $826, 32 percent of the next $4,980, and 10 percent of the amount above that. If you worked from 1971 to 2015, turned 60 in 2013, turned 62 in 2015, and earned an amount equal to the national average wage index, you would have earned $1,246,979.14 during your working years. The national average wage index ranges from $12,513.46 in 1980 to $41,673.83 in 2010. At the percentage rate of 6.2 percent withholding (which was actually lower in past years), you would have paid in $77,312.71. If you want to add in Medicare payments, and use an approximate average of 7 percent, you would have paid in $87,288.54. Benefits would be based on an AIME of $3,740.68 and would equate to $1,676.10 a month or $20,113.17 a year. It is easily seen that within four or five years all your payments would have been returned. After that, you are collecting unearned monies from the government. Socialism? GLEN PHILLIPS Pittsfield, Ill.

Staff Column: By O.Ethan Brown

The peril of the seed A

journey most will never know or understand. Mighty discs crushed the rebellious earth as they bore the burden of such a onerous load. It shook the earth with an utmost violence that split its very foundations. With each second that elapsed a feeble seed of hope was dropped from the edge of anticipation, falling to its haven of despair among the dust and ruble. Just as life seemed to reach its fullest extent of pain and anguish, a wall of blackness pressed upon our fateful friend, drowning its presence from the face of the deep. Unknown to passing masters of rod and stone, a tiny, miraculous and perilous adventure had been embarked. Its portrayal of omnipotent Craftsmanship can only be truly appreciated by those who journey along this treacherous road of life. It is not an easy journey by any stretches of

the imagination. However, it seems to be forgotten and dismissed as a natural phenomena. Passing creatures never see the magic and beauty beneath the barrier of earthly understanding. Hours elapse. Days pass. With the presence of the moon come terrible dark and cold nights. The powerful light of day, a great battering of heat upon our poor friend, even more so beneath the cracked abyss. But then, what is this? Out of a small crack within the dust and filth arose an almost insignificant dot of color. A small green plant begins to emerge. So minute, yet, so strong and bright a creature. For a moment, its future seems as though it reaches to the utmost expansion. These miracles of nature transpire every day. They begin, they live, they die. It is a cycle which seems to never

conclude till the end of earth’s days. But why is such a magnificently complex cycle rarely considered in the daily discussions of man? Why are the inventions of our own hands of greater importance than what is natural and indescribable in a basic level conversation? The answer is twofold. First, it is due to the mortal’s lack of ability to focus on more than one dimension of complexity. As is the phrase of the chemists of the world, “We cannot tell both position and speed at one moment in time.” All reading must admit to at least one instance where it was apparent that the further a complex topic was searched, the more difficult it was to stay focused on the original question. The second has even more an implication than the first, if rightly discovered within our daily lives. More specifically, the stepping away from

the current obstruction of fog and chaos to see the greater picture. To see what is truly occurring, both past, present, and future. It can be easily said that most of our anticipated destruction is not truly as devastating when reality sets in. “He who fears what he shall suffer, already suffers what he fears,” Michel de Montaigne once said. This is simply an abstract example, you say. Please, return to the matter at hand. It is just this, we shall understand the nature of the universe and our heavenly Craftsman much the better when we further respect and examine the great majesty his creations bring to our view. “None preaches better than the ant, and she says nothing,” Benjamin Franklin said. n O. Ethan Brown is a reporter for Campbell Publications.

Guest Column: By Matthew R. Bailey

This poll is not scientific and reflects the opinion of those who chose to respond.

“Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter.” -- Thomas Jefferson, 1787

Animal lovers should support animal research S

cientists just discovered a drug that could save millions of dogs -- and humans -- from cancer. Veterinarians at Tufts University administered the experimental treatment to Dover, a 7-year-old dog suffering from lymphoma. The cancer had caused him to go blind, and his days were numbered. In desperation, Dover’s

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Publisher & Editor

General Manager and Advertising Director: Nichole Liehr Reporters: Beth Zumwalt, O. Ethan Brown Sports: Office: Aubrey Henderson, Michael Boren

owner enrolled him in a clinical trial testing the early-stage therapy. The results were amazing. The treatment restored Dover’s sight overnight. Now, his cancer is in remission. Such innovative research saves and improves animals’ lives -- and can lead to treatments for humans. Consequently, aniE-mail: publisher@campbellpublications.net

Commercial printing: Linda Schaake Independent contractor, artist: Bill Beard Subscription rates: $30 per year in Adams, Brown, Calhoun, Greene, Jersey, Macoupin, Madison, Morgan, Pike and Scott Counties, IL and Lincoln, Pike and Ralls Counties, Mo.

mal lovers support animal research. More than 43 million U.S. households have a dog. Over 31 million have a cat. Ninety percent of Americans consider their pets members of the family. Unfortunately, our beloved pets -- just like humans -- are susceptible to a host of

(BAILEY, CONTINUED ON A5)

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2018


OP-ED Pike Press

Wednesday, July 18, 2018, Pittsfield, Illinois

A5

The Coonridge Digest: Freida Marie Crump

Digging into ‘Down Under’ Greetings from the Ridge Pity the poor Aussies. They don’t know whether we like them or not. Although last week our president said that he never changed his mind because in his words, “I’m a very stable genius,” they can’t help but be confused. Long before we began cozying up to authoritarian regimes while slapping democracies in the face, the Commander in Chief attacked the land down under. Shortly after his inauguration he ended a phone call with Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull by saying, “I have had it. I have been making these calls all day and this is the most unpleasant call all day. Putin was a pleasant call. This is ridiculous.” Two months ago our president spoke of Turnbull saying, “The relationship we have with Australia is a terrific relationship and probably stronger now than ever before, maybe because of our friendship.” Who am I to argue with a stable genius? Although our nation’s bond with Australia wasn’t my Top Ten Reasons to Worry last week, I thought that if the president of the U.S. could generalize so freely, I’d take a whack at it myself. Herb and I joined an intrepid little band of travelers to the Land Down Under with a brief excursion to New Zealand a few years ago so I’ll submit my non-political generalizations about the nation-continent.

Australia is dangerous. Although some snake experts might disagree, Aussies claim to harbor 21 of the world’s 25 most toxic snakes. I didn’t see a single snake in Australia so my vote would go to the vicious Emu. It’s the world’s second tallest bird, topped only by the ostrich, reaching over six feet in height and able to travel at 30 mph if they’ve a notion to do so. In our two-week stay in Australia, the Emu was the only creature intent on killing me, and I should note that I don’t stand over six feet and I can’t run at 30 mph. We were touring an animal reserve and had just come around a corner when I was nearly run over by a frightened baby kangaroo, followed closely by a giant Emu intent on taking him down. I thought this animal chase to be interesting so I followed the two with my camera. The Emu had the poor little joey cornered against a wire fence so I crept up closer to get a shot of the encounter. It was at that moment that the Emu sensed my presence and came after me. The little kangaroo was no doubt thankful for the distraction, but I was not and now the most dramatic picture of our Australian adventure is that of an Emu’s beak about to torpedo the lens of my camera. Australians are odd ducks. To my knowledge it’s the only country in the world that can tolerate vegemite, that thick, black gook that Aussies love to spread on their toast.

TT

o my knowledge it’s the only country in the world that can tolerate vegemite, that thick, black gook that Aussies love to spread on their toast. … The British have their own version called Marmite that’s not one bit better.

It’s made from leftover brewer’s yeast and a single drop of it on a North American tongue can lead to a crisis in international relations that could out-Trump Trump. The British have their own version called Marmite that’s not one bit better. On the other hand, when the first shipment of American peanut butter was shipped to Australia, the Aussie kiddies thought it was pretty disgusting. Guess it depends which end of the kangaroo you’re scratching. Aussies howl. The commonly told story is that Australia was colonized by England by sending convicts there as a sort of island prison. Actually, it was too expensive to send a prison halfway around the world so most of these convicted men were also skilled tradesmen or laborers. But it holds true that a good many Australians today can trace their lineage back to someone convicted of a crime in England. And I must confess that among the strange ducks we’ve met in our travels, some of the oddest claimed Australia as their home. Herb and I were staying at a lodge in

Illinois last summer when we were awakened by a howling noise outside our cabin. We went out to discover an Australian man and his son making strange noises at the night’s full moon. They apologized, explaining that it was an old Australian custom. They made Herb seem plumb normal. “No worries” is more than a phrase in “Crocodile Dundee.” Perhaps its their distance from anyone else other than New Zealanders, but the population of Australia seems to have a laid back attitude that I came to envy. As one Australian shopkeeper told me, “No matter what God-awful thing happens in the world it’s going to take a hell of a long time for it to get here.” Maybe that’s why they keep tolerating our insults and smiling back at us. You ever in Coonridge, stop by. We may not answer the door but you’ll enjoy the trip. ■  The imaginative commentary of Freida Marie Crump comes to us from Coonridge – a town that’s a lot like your own.

PICKINGS FROM PIKE’S PAST

25 YEARS AGO: ILLINOIS NATIONAL GUARD INVADES PIKE COUNTY 150 Years Ago July 16, 1868 Some of our young folks have recently visited Perry Springs, and speak in flattering terms of things there. The grounds have been greatly improved and while the dust and heat prevail, it is a very pleasant retreat. Their charges are very liberal, much more so than any place we know of, where anything like the same accommodations are furnished. A session of the Illinois State Teachers Institute to continue two weeks, will commence Monday, Aug. 3, 1868 in the State Normal University, Normal, Ill. There will be no charge for tuition. The instructors give their services gratuitously. In his letter accepting the Republican nomination for President, Grant concluded by saying, “Let us have peace.” What he means is we radical Republicans are comfortably situated—we tax the people and steal their money—“Let us have peace.” The fall term of the Pittsfield public schools will commence September 14th. Students from abroad should secure boarding places early and present themselves during the first week of the term, that there may be no delay in their classification. 125 Years Ago July 19, 1893 Perry Springs is having a good many visitors now, and mine host, Parke McDaniel and wife, know just how to make them feel at home. Our beautiful, well-shaded park affords a delightful retreat for Milton’s over-heated business men and loafers these hot days. By pressure, the grass is prevented from growing too rank, and by consumption, the water in the park wells is kept at cooling depths, and the loafers themselves are rested and reinvigorated for “fall work.” Thus everyone is benefited. The WCTU held their conference in Milton last Saturday. Mrs. Crow delivered an address at the M.E. Church in the forenoon, and in the evening Mrs. Orr spoke at the Christian Church. Burglars seem to be getting in their work all around since hot weather set in, and screens

have taken the place of windows. We note by exchanges that they have been at work in Louisiana, Roodhouse, Naples, Griggsville and other adjacent points. The great play entitled “777” will be produced at the opera house in Pittsfield next Saturday evening by the Criterion Dramatic Co. The Chicago World’s Fair will be close on Sundays hereinafter. Sunday opening proved a financial failure, and has accordingly been abandoned. The Chicago and Alton railroad company will issue free transportation to all their employees and families to attend the World’s Fair. The death of Justice Samuel Blatchford, of the Federal Supreme Court, leaves a vacancy that President Cleveland will have to fill. The court now stands three Democrats to five Republicans, and will then be four Democrats to five Republicans. 100 Years Ago July 17, 1918 The weather has been ideal for threshing, stacking and hay making the past week. Wheat is in fine quality and is running from 20 upward to 40 bushels on good land, and is unusually clean of weeds. Women’s Societies and social clubs that serve refreshments during afternoons or evenings, and particularly those who have been in the habit of serving ice cream, are expected by the United States Foods Administration to desist from such practice. A man found a half pint of whiskey hid in the weeds he was mowing on East Washington Street Saturday, which, it was predicted, would cause many to apply to the street committee for work this week. Repair your old shoes. What you have in your closet contain better leather than the manufacturer can supply you in the new shoes you intend to buy. We were shown a handful of something yesterday, and asked to guess what it was. We did not know, but were told it was a lump of corn sugar now being used extensively by bakers. The Pittsfield school board has announced that school will open in this city Monday, Sept. 2. The board has levied a tax of $14,000

for general school purposes and $1,300 for building purposes. Elzie H. Moore of Milton is the first casualty of a Pike County man reported from the battle fields. His name is written on the Roll of Honor and the little town of Milton will be the first to be honored with a gold star on its service flag. 75 Years Ago July 21, 1943 Route 104 that crosses the Illinois River at Meredosia was opened Sunday. Eight inches of water stands at some places on the road near the bridge, and driftwood has lodged along the roadway, but cars are able to pass without difficulty. The highway was closed at Meredosia the last week in May. Showers, which started Friday noon and continued off and on until late Saturday morning, were estimated at being worth a million dollars to crops in the county. Flat ceiling prices on approximately 75 per cent of the food items that go into the family food basket went into effect Monday, July 19. All gasoline rationing books received and approved have been issued and mailed, a total of 3,482 in all. There is plenty of clothing for everyone, and it will not be necessary to ration clothing, providing the public does not go on a buying spree and buy a lot more clothes than they need. Dr. Maynard S. Nighbert, Pike County veterinarian for more than a third of a century and twice mayor of the city of Pittsfield, died at his home on the Griggsville road Thursday afternoon. He was in his 61st year. Miss Athene Hill Zimmerman, second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Zimmerman, became the bride of A. W. Schimmel, Jr., only son of Mr. and Mrs. A.W. Schimmel, in a candle-light ceremony performed at the Methodist Church at 7:30 o’clock Thursday evening. The pastor, the Rev. Preston E. Horst, officiated. Sgt. Victor H. Callender of Camp Bowie, Texas recently spent a 12-day furlough with relatives and friends here. He is married to the former Florine Main, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Main of Milton.

50 Years Ago July 17, 1968 Pittsfield can soon offer winged travelers municipal airport facilities—if George Schuster accepts the terms of an agreement approved unanimously by the city council at its regular meeting Tuesday night. Pittsfield’s big day was a Pig success. The event could become a tradition. Some 850 pounds of pork were consumed by shoppers who lined up a half-block long in the courtyard for the barbecue pork sandwiches. A 155 lb. pig was roasted over night by Gaylord Rhodes of Aldrich Drug and Dick Alspaugh and young Ricky Alspaugh of Alspaugh’s Bear Barn. The roasted pig was carved by Dick Bergman, Jr., who also gave onlookers a commentary on various cuts of pork. The pig provided sandwiches for 325 persons who watched the show. Marvin Paxton was the champion cook at the all-male cook-out contest at Pig Day, and Ralph Kern was runner-up. Ed House and Mrs. Florence Metternich were the judges. 25 Years Ago July 14, 1993 Many volunteers in many parts of Pike County are assisting the fight between the overflowing Mississippi River and the county. Harry Wright estimates that 2,000 to 3,000 volunteers have arrived at Pittsfield High School to help out. National Guardsmen are stationed at Pleasant Hill and New Canton and other places in the county. Flooding has swamped efforts to hold the Pike County Fair in July. The fair’s 47th celebration has been bumped back from July 1924 to Aug. 23-28. This is the first time in the fair’s history that it has ever been postponed. In 1958 the fair cancelled because of rain and was never rescheduled. Fair coordinator Bob Dempsey stated, “The people we turn to for volunteer help are just physically and mentally drained.” The new sanctuary of the Pittsfield Church of the Nazarene will be dedicated Sunday, July 18, at 2 p.m. The Pittsfield Penstone Airport opened a full-time operator office this weekend.

Pike County Sheriff Mike Lord had the honor of kissing the piglet, Rosie, after being named the winner of the Kiss the Pig Contest. Although Lord’s smooch was shortlived, it left Rosie squealing for a long time. Airman James R. Fox, Jr. graduated from Air Force basic training at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio. Fox, a 1992 graduate of Pittsfield High School, is the son of James R. and Judith A. Fox of Pittsfield. 10 Years Ago July 16, 2008 Many people gathered to make the county’s biggest pork burger Friday evening at Pig Days. Some of the people who helped with the biggest burger are Robin Oitker, Randy Bleich, Vern Sevier, Mike Spann and Bob Oitker. The pork burger ended up weighing 189 pounds. Ali Merryman, the daughter of Mike and Kim Merryman of Nebo, is the 2008 Miss Piglet. She was crowned Friday evening at Pig Days. The girl with the longest pigtails becomes Miss Piglet, and Ali’s pigtails were 13 and onequarter inches long. Kevin Dyer and Jennifer Fray of the Pike Theatre Guild will perform “Love Letters” in dinner theatre July 24-27 at the Pittsfield Community Center. A big crowd attended the groundbreaking ceremony at the Baylis Baptist Church Sunday, June 22. The church is going to build a 40x60 addition on the back of the church building, which will be the educational center. John R. Birch, Pike County Republican Chairman, was elected Saturday in Decatur to be the next Illinois Republican State Central Committeeman for the 18th Congressional District. Paul Adams Grote graduated with departmental honors from Northwestern University Friday, June 20. Paul is the son of Steve and Loretta Grote of Pittsfield and the grandson of Dan and Pat Dobbins and the late William and Jane Grote. He will attend Washington University School of Law in St. Louis in the fall. ■ Pickings from Pike’s Past is compiled by Michael Boren.

BAILEY (CONTINUED FROM A4) dangerous diseases. Every year, 12 million dogs and cats get cancer. Pets also suffer from diabetes, kidney disease, and heart disease. Many scientists are developing more effective treatments and cures for these diseases. Consider how University of Pennsylvania scientists are saving dogs with osteosarcoma -- a type of bone cancer. Researchers injected a genetically-modified bacteria into dogs that enabled their immune systems to identify and destroy tumors. Nearly seven in ten who received the therapy survived at least two years. Typically, only three in ten dogs with the disease live that long. Or consider research conducted at the University of California, Davis. Experts recently tested a treatment for an incurable form of

heart disease that afflicts one of every seven cats. The condition obstructs the left ventricle, thereby inhibiting proper blood flow and sometimes resulting in sudden death. Researchers gave five cats the new treatment, and the obstructions vanished. In December, UC Davis and Kansas State University scientists teamed up to defeat feline infectious peritonitis -- a fatal disease that plagues kittens. The disease was untreatable -- until now. They gave 20 diseased cats a new antiviral drug. Almost half are already in remission. Despite this, about half of Americans oppose animal testing. Many animal rights organizations want to eliminate animal research. That’s short-sighted. Many cats and dogs who participate in this research have run out

of other treatment options. Experimental therapies are their only hope. And they may yield insights that can save millions of other animals from early death. Ending animal research would also prevent us from discovering cures for human diseases. Human, dog, and cat immune systems respond to diseases in similar ways. So treatments for pets can save people’s lives, too. The California Veterinary Medical Association argues that “nearly every major medical breakthrough in the last 100 years has been achieved by research with animals.” Consider just one cancer treatment emerging from the University of Illinois. Years ago, scientists discovered a compound that had the potential to cure brain cancer. Last year,

researchers tested the treatment on three dogs who had little chance of survival. All three experienced at least a 30-percent reduction in the size of their tumors. One dog’s tumor disappeared entirely. Now, scientists are evaluating the therapy’s potential to cure brain cancer in humans. Currently, only 5 percent of people suffering from the most common malignant brain tumor will survive for five years. Research that started in animals could change that. Thanks to animal research, the furry members of our families are living happier, healthier, and longer lives than ever before. Pet lovers should support such research. ■ Matthew R. Bailey is president of the Foundation for Biomedical Research.

Letters to the editor can be emailed to publisher@campbellpublications.net


A6

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

News

Pittsfield, Illinois

Submitted photo

FSB donates to Pittsfield High School Saukees Paula Hawley, middle, superintendent of Pittsfield High School, receives the $950.74 donation from Farmers State Bank employees Amber Martin, left, Assistant Sales and Customer Development Manager, and Barb McTucker, right, Vice President for the Pittsfield High School. The donation is a result of the funds generated from the Saukee Loyalty Card Program. This program offers FSB customers the opportunity to show their school spirit and raise money for their school at the same time. A percentage of each debit card purchase made with the loyalty card as a credit is donated back to the school.

Submitted photo

Rotary

commends retiring president

President Cindy Prentice, left, presented past-President Nathan Painter, right, with a plaque and pin for his presidential year of service.

Cooley-Jones receives degree Mary Cooley-Jones, formerly of Pittsfield has received her master of science in nursing - education (RN to MSN) degree from from Western Governors University (WGU). The online, nonprofit university held its commencement ceremonies earlier this year to celebrate the recent graduation of more

than 15,000 students from across the country. Cooley-Jones is the daughter of Theresa and David Cooley of Pittsfield and is married to Alan Cooley. She is the granddaughter of Mike Irving of Pittsfield and Eileen Cooley of Griggsville Estates.

Ethan Brown/Pike Press

Just

a wee bit of water

City workers Steve Watkins, right, and Chad Knight, left, perform an annual “hydrant flush” at the corner of Chestnut and Memorial streets. Approximately five city workers were out early Wednesday morning, July 11, at work on the project.

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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

B1

Pittsfield, Illinois

Barber Family Foundation announces 2018 Pike County scholarship recipients The Barber Family Foundation is awarding scholarships to 11 Pike County students for the 2018-2019 academic year. The Foundation was formed in 2004 in recognition of the Barber family that has been in Pike County since Austin Barber settled there in 1833.  The Foundation’s scholarships are available to any Pike County student for both educational and recreational endeavors [including but not limited to college tuition, course books, camp fees (sports, arts, language, etc.), study abroad programs, summer school, etc.]. Michael Eli TenEyck has been awarded the Charles and Frances Barber Scholarship. He is the son os Michael and Renita TenEyck and will be attending Washington University this fall. This $2,500 college scholarship is awarded annually to a Pittsfield High School graduating senior in memory of Charles and Frances Barber.  Charles was a lifetime resident of Pike County and a graduate of Pittsfield High School.  Frances was a long-time resident and taught in the Pittsfield school system.  The 2018 recipient is: The K.C. and Eleanor Barber Scholarship$1,500 college scholarship is awarded annually to a Pittsfield High School graduating senior that participates in the school’s golf program in memory of K.C. and Eleanor Barber. They were avid golfers and

long-time residents of Pittsfield. The 2018 recipient is Lauren Hawley, daughter of Kent Hawley and Paula Hawley. Hawley will attend Columbia College in Columbia, Mo., this fall. The other 2018 recipients, high school and their intended college choices are: Joseph Feenstra, Pittsfield, Monmouth College; Layne Gregory, Pittsfield, Illinois College; Derek Neupauer, Pittsfield, Missouri Western State University; Paige Borrowman, Western, University of Illinois Champaign: Jackson Borrowman, Western, University of Texas at Austin; Easton Billings, Western, John Wood Community College; Hanna Allen, Pleasant Hill, SIU Carbondale; Deme Batchelor, Pleasant Hill, SIU Edwardsville; Hanah Koeller, prior Western graduate, attending SIUE  The Barber Family Foundation accepts donations on an ongoing basis and 100% of all donated dollars go directly to Pike County students.  Donations can be mailed to: Ruth Barber, Barber Family Foundation, 1165 N. Clark St, Ste 300, Chicago, 60610  The Barber Family Foundation is a 501 (c)(3) tax-exempt non-profit organization. Established in 2004, the Foundation supports the achievement of students in Pike County, Illinois.  For more information, see www. barberfamilyfoundation.org.

Submitted photo

G-P

ag students help with classroom

Several Griggsville-Perry Ag students braved the heat in the ag classroom at Griggsville-Perry High School Sunday, July 15 to replace some paneling and trim that had several water damage. According to Evan Sheppard, ag teacher the project had needed to be done for a long time. The boys hope to meet next Sunday and finish the two worst walls and hope funding becomes available for the next two. LEFT, Sage Martin and Lane Spencer measure a piece of trim to the exact length, while Zack Martin, right, measures for the exact length.

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Joanne Galloway Joanne E. Galloway, 91, of Quincy and formerly of Pleasant Hill, died Friday evening, July 13, 2018 at Bradford Villa in Quincy. Graveside services will be held Wednesday, July 18 at 11 a.m. at Crescent Heights Cemetery in Pleasant Hill. There is no visitation, however, friends

are invited to the graveside services. Memorials may be made to the Crescent Heights Cemetery Association, the Fairfield Library in Pleasant Hill or to a local animal shelter. Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

Dawn Mackelden Dawn F. Mackelden, 11, of rural Nebo, was fatally injured in an accident Thursday afternoon, July 12, 2018 on the Belleview Hollow Road in Calhoun County. Funeral services were held Tuesday, July 17 at 2 p.m. at the Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill. Burial was held at

Crescent Heights Cemetery in Pleasant Hill. Visitation was held Monday evening from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to an animal shelter of the donor’s choice in memory of Dawn. Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

Curtis Fudge Curtis Lee Fudge, 74, of rural Pittsfield died Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at Blessing Hospital in Quincy. Funeral services were held at 10:30 a.m. Monday, July 16 at the Pittsfield United Methodist Church with Mick Laflin as officiate. Interment will be held privately at a later date. Visitation was held

Sunday, July 15 at Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. with Masonic services at 7 p.m. Memorials are suggested to the Pittsfield United Methodist Church or the Pleasant Grove Cemetery. Online condolences may be left to the family at www.nieburfh.com. Niebur Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.

Dewel Sippel Dewel M. (Bagby) Sippel, 92, of Springfield, passed away June 28, 2018. Born July 14, 1925 in Martinsburg to William and Eva Bagby. Dewel graduated Pittsfield High School in 1943. She married Charles B. Sippel June 24, 1949 in Wood River. Dewel worked for the Federal Government as a clerk for 46 years; retiring in 1992. She is survived by daughter, Patricia Sovanski (Curt Baumann), Brynes Mills, Mo. and son, Gregory Sippel (Mary Ellen), Overland

Park, Kan. Also surviving are grandson, Richard Sovanski, Richmond Heights, Mo. and stepgrandsons, Brandan Baumann, St. Louis, Mo. and Travis Morris, Lawrence, Kan. Brother, Donald Bagby, Bethalto and sister, Virginia Heeren (Edward), Mission Viejo, Calif. She will also be remembered by many cousins, nieces and nephews. A family celebration of life will happen at a later date. Interment in Valhalla Memorial Cemetery, Godfrey.

Forrest ‘Marvin’ Paxton, Jr. Forrest “Marvin” Paxton, Jr., 79, of Jacksonville, formerly of Pittsfield, passed away Sunday, July 15, 2018 at Memorial Medical Center in Springfield. He was born March 18, 1939 in Quincy to Forrest Marvin and Barbara L. Peacock Paxton, Sr. Marvin married Stacia Ann Woods Jan. 11, 1964 in Zanesville, Ohio, and she survives. Marvin graduated from Pittsfield High School in 1957, and from University of Illinois in 1961. While attending U of I, he was a manager of the football team and also went through ROTC. Marvin served Active Duty in the United States Army for 2 years and several years in the Reserves. After his honorable discharge from the Army, he came back to work on the family farm with his dad and continued doing that until retiring in 1994. He then went on to become a Certified General Appraiser. Marvin had a passion for airplanes and flying them. He had a partner ownership of several planes with area pilots and also built his own plane in his garage. Marvin was active in the community serving as the Pike County Zoning Commissioner, a Board Member of the Pleasant Grove Cemetery, and in the Pittsfield Rotary. He was also a member of the Pittsfield United Methodist Church, the Pike County Farm Bureau, Griggsville Masonic Lodge, Pike County Pork Producers, and Jacksonville Elk Lodge. Marvin was

also in the Shriners, EAA, Experimental Aircraft Association, and the U of I FarmHouse Fraternity. He is survived by his wife of 54 years, Stacia; two sons, Joel (Heather) Paxton of Pittsfield and John (Julie) Paxton of Frisco, Texas; a daughter, Julie (Mike) Sullivan of New Berlin; eight grandchildren, Brett Paxton, Paige Paxton, Ian Paxton, Nolan Paxton, Tara Sullivan, Shea Sullivan, Kyle Paxton, and Riley Paxton; one great grandchild, Eli Paxton; a sister, Pat Sprague of Hull; and two nephews, Mark Sprague and Andy Sprague. He was preceded in death by his parents, and a nephew, Randy Sprague. Visitation will be held Friday, July 20 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield. Interment will be held privately at a later date. Memorials are suggested to Pleasant Grove Cemetery. Online condolences may be left to the family at www. nieburfh.com. Niebur Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.

Pike Press

OBITUARIES

Pittsfield, Illinois

Marilyn Sanders Marilyn J. Sanders, 73, formerly of Hardin, died at 5:53 p.m. Thursday, July 12, 2018 at her home. She was born Oct. 16, 1944 in Pike County, the daughter of the late Charles and Bernice (Givins) Neff. She married Ronald Sanders Dec. 22, 1962; he died in Nov. of 1974. She retired from Home Depot (Service Desk) in Georgia and was a member of the Hardin Presbyterian Church. She loved gardening, flowers and sewing. Surviving are two daughters, including Sandra (Bill) McNabb of Falls church, Va. and Beth (Barry) Pruitt of Jerseyville; grandchildren: Austin (Kelsey), Meghan, Gavin, and Torrie McNabb, Amy (John) Perdun, Sarah and Laura Pruitt; one greatgrandchild: Luke Perdun;

three sisters: Dorothy (Greg) Pressey of Jonesboro, Ark., Carolyn Lawber of New Salem, Susie (Phil) Craven of Pittsfield; and her longtime companion, Charles Maxwell of Jerseyville. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband, five brothers: Paul Jr., Ray, Roy, Sonny, and Charles Neff, sisters: Madelyn Gress and infant: Margie Neff. Visitation will be from 1:30 p.m. until the time of funeral services at 3:30 p.m. Sunday, July 22 at the Presbyterian Church in Jerseyville. Pastor John Beehler will officiate. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to BJC Hospice or The American Lung Association. Alexander & Gubser Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

Evelyn Maguire Evelyn A. Maguire, 97, died peacefully at home Tuesday, July 10, 2018. She was born Sept. 13, 1920 in Augusta, the daughter of Floyd and Lena Gray Allen of Pearl. She married William R. Maguire of Macomb Dec. 25, 1938. Evelyn worked 22 years with her husband in the Boy Scouts of America Organization, as well as for the Singer Sewing Machine Company, where she shared her talent and ability as a clothes designer and seamstress. She also worked many years as a bookkeeper for the Osco Drug Co. She is survived by her children; Patricia Propper of Oregan, Jon Maguire of Texas, and Jane Maguire of Indiana. Also four grandchildren; Phillip and Rhea Broyles, Stephanie Summerill, and William Keeney, as well as five great grandchildren; Madison Summerill, Erin Hazel, Michael Broyles, Gabrielle Godino, and Josh Hager. Lastly, three great great grandchildren sur-

vive; Melody, Caleb, and Madelyn Hazel. She was preceded in death by her parents; brother, Albert Allen; husband, William; one grandson and one great grandson. The funeral was held Friday, July 13 at the Greenpond Christian Church near Pearl, with Reverend Jerry Edison officiating. Burial is in the Greenpond Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to the Greenpond Christian Church. Online condolences may be left to the family at www.nieburfh.com. Niebur Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.

Melinda Fagan Melinda D. Fagan (Melton) of Dardenne Prairie Mo., 74, passed away at her home surrounded by family July 14, 2018. She was born in Mexico, Mo. Dec. 13, 1943 the daughter of Lowell and Hazel (Brown) Shepard Melton. She was married to Kenneth Jr. Fagan Aug. 1, 1964 in Hull. Melinda taught science for 30 years in public education in Illinois and 9 additional years in Missouri and Kansas. During her time teaching at Barry High School, she also taught courses for John Wood Community College and, while teaching in Missouri, also taught at Moberly Area College. Mrs. Fagan loved teaching science, working with students in class and sponsoring their science fair projects. She was a frequent presenter at teaching conferences, recipient of numerous awards in science education and was proud to be recognized as a student sponsor with regional, state and international science fair award winners. She earned her Undergraduate Degree in Biology at Quincy University as well as Graduate Degrees in Biology at Truman State University and Chemistry Education from Quincy University. After retiring, she continued her passion for teaching, voluntarily coordinating a jewelry making class in St. Charles, Mo. She continued to enjoy traveling, couponing, yard sales and dining out with friends and family.

Melinda enjoyed being with her family. She follows her husband and parents in death. She is survived by two sons and a daughter, Kennan D. Fagan (Lisa) of Troy, Kevin D. Fagan (Angela) of Mt. Sterling, Kimberly S. Bogue (Jody) of Hannibal, Mo., seven grandchildren Kenna, Cameron and Connor Bogue, Alec and Caleb Fagan, Ethan and Skyler Fagan; sister Nancy Koertge (Walt) of Olney; cousins Chris Stewart and Brenda McCay; nephew Brent Koertge and Niece Shelli Wright. A visitation will be held in Barry Friday, July 20 from 5-8 p.m. Friday at Niebur Funeral Chapel in Barry. A family visitation will start at 3 p.m. and funeral services will be held at 3:30 p.m. at Shawgo Memorial Home in Astoria Saturday, July 21. Pastor Aaron Foster will officiate. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Mercy Virtual Care Center in care of Mercy Health Foundation or to the Jewelry Crafters Connection in care of Ann Womack.

Email us with your news: ppnews@campbellpublications.net

Richard Hall Richard G. Hall, 84, of Pittsfield passed away Wednesday night July 11, 2018 in Pittsfield. He was born May 23, 1934 in Pittsfield the son of the late Winfred and Lillie M. Lanhum Hall. He married Barbara Carter. Richard was a graduate of Pittsfield High School where he played basketball and football. He was a farmer. He also worked for Art Crowder Trucking, Arrow Farm Supply, in sales with Columbiana Feeds and Webel Feeds and retired from Pike County Service Company in 1999. He was an active member of the Pittsfield Assembly of God where he served on the church board and taught adult Sunday school. Richard loved his family and knew the value of hard work. He enjoyed farming, raising his livestock, cattle, hogs, and Oxford sheep which he would show at the county fairs. He also loved to hunt, fish and hunt mushrooms. After his retirement he kept busy working in his garden and growing flowers. Surviving is his dear wife Barbara, son Roger (Tina) Hall, daughter Teresa (Danny) Roberts, son Randy Hall (friend Lori Decker Johnson) brother Wendell (Donna) Hall, sister Margaret Butler, all of

Pittsfield. Also surviving are eight grandchildren, twelve great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. Preceding him in death were his sisters Betty Graham and Marie Powell and his infant brother William Hall. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. Saturday, July 14 at the Airsman-Hires Funeral Home in Pittsfield. Burial was held in Pittsfield West Cemetery. Friends called Saturday from 10 a.m. until the time of the service at the funeral home. Memorials can be made to the Benevolent Fund at the Pittsfield Assembly of God or to the Eastside Health and Rehab Staff. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.airsman-hires.com The Airsman-Hires Funeral Home in Pittsfield is in charge of the arrangements.

Mary ‘Jewell’ Wagener Mary “Jewell” Wagener, 77, of Pittsfield, passed away Tuesday, July 17, 2018 at Illini Community Hospital in Pittsfield. She was born Feb. 11, 1941 in Metropolis to Reverend Robert and Truby Hamilton Wagener. Jewell graduated from Carrollton Community High School and was a 1969 graduate of Evangel College in Springfield, Mo. She began teaching in Pittsfield in 1969 and retired in 2005. As a teacher, Jewell always “encouraged children to do the best they can and loved when the child would understand something and the lightbulb would go off in their head.” She was also a recipient of the Golden Apple Award. She loved playing Bingo and going to lunch with her fellow retired teachers. Jewell made greeting cards for service men and especially enjoyed reading and watching safaris on her computer. She also liked attending the Manchester Gospel Sing in the park with her sister, Janet. She is survived by her siblings, Ronald (Sue) Wagener of Sun Lakes, Ariz., Carolyn (Donald) Mills of Choctow, Okla., Janet (Dr. Russell) Proesel of Shipman, and Robert (Linda) Wagener of Swansea; and her special

friends, Sharon Lloyd and family, Nancy Peebles, Eva Rowley, and Ron Lash. She was preceded in death by her parents; brothers, Larry Wagener and Donald Wagener; a halfbrother, Gene Wagener; and nephew, Timothy Hansen. Funeral services will be held Saturday, July 21 at 10 a.m. at Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Clint Weir officiating. Interment will follow the service at Carrollton City Cemetery in Carrollton. Visitation will be held Friday, July 20 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the funeral home in Pittsfield. Memorials are suggested to Pikeland Snack Pack Program. Online condolences may be left to the family at www.nieburfh.com. Niebur Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.

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SOCIETY/COMMUNITY

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

Rockport

New Salem

Congratulations to Brenlee and Brian Brenlee Damon and Brian Black will be married in 2020. Congratulations to the happy couple Nathan Pence and his finance’, Kathy, visited with us over the weekend. Preston was able to come visit also. it was nice to visit with them.

My sister, who lives in Colorado, who I hadn’t talked to in over a year, called me last week. It was sure good to hear from her. Cathy Pence is home and doing good. She has a ways to go, but she is doing good. That’s all for this week.

By FRANCES  PENCE 217-242-3511 Have a good one and God Bless!

Milton

Milton Christian Church VBS at the ball park

MIlton Christian Church will be having VBS, July 24-25, at the Milton Ballpark from 6 - 8:15 p.m. for ages 4 years old and up. Join them for a great time learning about Jesus, snacks, fun, and games. MIlton Christian Church will be hosting a community pool party July 27 from 6-8 p.m. at the King Park Pool. The pool party and food are free to everyone in the community. Come hang out and have fun! The Redemptions will be in concert Friday evening Aug. 25 at Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the Chapel. The Camp will be hosting concerts Aug 25

(The Redemptions) and Sept. 7 (Fourgiven Quartet) this summer. The address to the camp is: 24201 State Highway 100, Pittsfield - one mile south of Detroit, on State Highway 100. Plan now to attend these concerts! Everyone is welcome! For Information Contact: Camp: (217) 723-4337; Jim Dain: (573) 324-4676 or Steve Haskins: (217) 891-7616. This summer, Milton Lunch Bunch provides a free lunch for any school aged child in the Milton area Wednesdays. Lunches are July 18, 25 and August 1, 8, 15 from 11:30-12:30 in the Milton Christian Church annex. To volunteer to help, please contact Nanette Bess 217-370-9575.

EPFPD Ladies Aux. will By KARRIE SPANN 217-723-4262 be sending in another brick order. Anyone that missed out on the first order and would like to purchase a brick, please contact a member of the fire dept. or ladies aux. Sizes available are 4x8, 8x8 and 12x12. If you would like to see what the bricks look like, they are on the north wall at the Milton Firehouse. Any questions, please contact Deb Moore 217-7234228. Deadline for this order is 7/27/18.

Griggsville

Annual ice cream social July 22 The North Pike Fire Department will host an ice cream social this Sunday, July 22 from 2-5 p.m. at the firehouse in Perry. Choices will be vanilla, chocolate, or lemon. Come enjoy some homemade ice cream and support the local fire department! You never know when you may need them! Jenny Tate will host the Griggsville Day Unit of HCE Thursday, July 19. This will be the new recipe potluck, which will begin at 11:30 a.m. Jenny will provide the meat. Are you interested in just singing praise to God with other believers? You are invited to join with others at the Griggsville Church of the Nazarene on Sunday nights from 6-7 p.m. Start with prayer, end with prayer. Singinig praise to God in

between. No preaching, no offering. Come as you are and draw close to Him. Chad Smart of Los Angeles, Calif., Skylar and Hunter Stanley of Missoula, Mont. and Rob and Camille Stanley of Seffner, Fla. were recently home visiting family and friends and helping to celebrate July 4th. Chad flew into St. Louis and traveled to Carbondale Thursday night and visited with his friends there Friday. He spent Saturday and Sunday visiting with his parents, Donnie and Linda White and his sister Kelli Jones. He also enjoyed spending time with his grandmother Doris Smart of Eastside Nursing Home. He picked Doris up and brought her to Griggsville Sunday to attend church with him at the Nazarene Church. After lunch, he took her home on

By NADINE  KESSINGER 217-407-4502 kessy@casscomm.com

his way back to St. Louis as he returned home Sunday night. Saturday night everyone celebrated the Fourth of July at the Stanley, Brawdy, and Northenders cookout and fireworks. The Stanleys returned to their homes Monday. Steve and Jeannie Kessinger and daughter Lexi travelled to Glenarm Friday to visit Cory and Kyra Koltveit. They enjoyed supper in Springfield to celebrate Steve’s birthday. When you feel dog-tired at night, it may be because you’ve growled all day long.

Pleasant Hill

Check your homes for Fairfield Library books An exciting fair week begins on Wednesday night, come out and enjoy the fun. John Thomas barbershop was opened at 8 a.m. on July 23, 1963. To celebrate his 55th year in business, Thomas will be open all day July 23 and welcomes current and past patrons to come and join in the celebration. In 1963, Dan Galloway was his first customer so who will be the first one this next week? Monday July 23, Thomas is going to take off work from his mail route and roll back the time to July 23, 1963 and again open the Barber Shop at 8 a.m. He plans to be open all day long. He is also going to roll back the price to what a haircut was back then so everyone who gets their haircut on July 23 will just have to pay $1.00. Everyone is welcome. It doesn’t matter if you have ever been in his shop or not. Through the years many a story has been told their some are legend, you won’t want to miss out. The taco salad fundraiser for Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp is July 27. Please text or call Shelly at 217-473-4118 if able to vol-

unteer. If your business has not received order forms for salads in Pittsfield, Griggsville, Barry, Pleasant Hill, or Milton, please contact Shelly at the above number by July 20. Aug. 4 at 3 p.m., the family of Donald Paul Gulledge is having a memorial service at the Pleasant Hill Christian church. Per Paul’s wishes for some of his ashes will be spread in his hometown of Pleasant Hill. This will take place one year after Paul lost his fight with heart disease and a few days from his birthday. We welcome anyone who would love to join Paul’s family in celebrating his life and remembering his generous heart. They’re holding a benefit coed softball tournament for Rick White Aug. 11. Rick is fighting cancer. It is $200 for a team. They are raffling the following guns: Mossberg 500 slugster 12 gauge 3 inch chamber and Henry 22 Maverick 12 gauge 28 inch barrel 3 inch chamber. They are also taking orders for t-shirt and the cost is $20. For more information contact Becky Hobbs, Cam Little, Rod or

By DEBBIE  MILLER 217-734-2845 Phoebe Collins, or David or Cindy Yokem. The Fairfield Library board spent considerable time trying to find a solution to the overwhelming issue we have with overdue books. We are a lending library, which means the book is borrowed for a specified time. Many times there are patrons waiting to read the book you may have checked out and not returned.
Could we ask you to check your shelves; check the back seat of your vehicles; check your book bags? They have actually extended hours to make it easier for you to have access to the library. Many people do not realize that Fairfield Library is not subsidized by taxpayer money in any way, therefore we simply do not have the budget to replace the nonreturned books. 
The library hours are: 9-11 a.m. and 1-8 p.m. Monday through Thursday with an additional morning shift Saturday. 
 


Geiselman named to Iowa Wesleyan University Spring dean list Ellen Geiselman, of Pittsfield, and daughter of Jimmy and Rachel Geiselman, was named to the Iowa Wesleyan University Spring 2018 Dean’s List. Geiselman is majoring in Biology with a concentration in Chemistry. Geiselman was among more than 140 students

named to the Spring 2018 Dean’s List. Students exemplifying academic excellence represent the United States and multiple countries. Criteria to be a part of the Dean’s List include degree-seeking students taking 12 or more hours per semester with a grade point average of 3.5 or higher.

Our readers today are your customers tomorrow

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B3

Pittsfield, Illinois

ELLEN GEISELMAN

and other area news Check out the area activities “The world is chamged by your example, not by your opinion." Facebook. Great gospel music by Anticipation is on the menu for Saturday evening from 6 - 8:30 at the Pike County Senior Center in Pittsfield which is right behind the Public Library and very easy to find. Not sure what food to purchase is on the menu that evening but I can guarantee it will be good, and serving of that starts at 5 p.m..  Come on out for a great evening!! Continuning activities Adult Water Aerobics at King Park in Pittsfield, Mondays and Thursdays, 11a.m. - 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. - 6 p.m.  Cost is $1 pool admission. Farmers’ Market at the Sunset Park on Georgia Street in Louisiana, each Wednesday, from 3 p.m. - 6 p.m.  This is for produce or crafts within a 50 mile radius of Louisiana. East Pike Lending Library in Detroit, most Saturdays, from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.  No cost to check out books and there are gobs of books to give away. Stock up on your winter reading early. Birthdays and anniversaries for This Week: July 18 -- Amy Williams, Ivan Shafer July 19 -- Dakota Henry, Jerry Garner, Max Flowers July 20 -- Bill Hurst, Sandy Garner, Adah and Dusty Helm July 21 -- Everett Dean July 22 -- Ann Rine, Lori Orr, Tammy Harshman, Bob and Eve Rue July 23 -- Dan McCall, Toni and John Daniels July 24 -- Paige Syrcle, Robert Manard Family reunions coming up: Saturday, July 28 -- Don and Josephine Hull Family -- New Salem Town Hall -starts promptly at noon Sunday, August 12 -Grimsley Family Reunion -King Park in Pittsfield -starts promptly at noon Prayer Requests (Edited my list.  Anytime anyone else would like to have someone put on this list, please give me a call.): Brad Bennett, Christine Henthorn, Connie McFall, Darold Garner, Dianna Ruble, Frances Larson, Jack Kirk, Jerry Gully, Josh Bennett, Milo Klein, Mike Peters, Phillip Dice, Pastor Gary Dice, Richard Kindle, Radar Grim, Roger and Sue Robbins, Roger Bonnett, Roger Woods, Ted Patton, Wayne Robbins. He that walketh with wise men shall be wise: but a companion of fools shall be destroyed.  Proverbs 13:20. July activities at the senior citizen center: Wednesday, July 18 -Yoga from 6:30p-7:45p. Thursday, July 19 -Bible Study from 10:00-

11:00. Craft Club is this day also from 1:00-3:00. Saturday, July 21 (read above at the beginning of this article) -- Gospel Music Show by Anticipation— from 6-8:30. Always plenty to do at the Pike County Senior Center. Trivia Answers from Last Week: 1. In all, how many of Job’s servants came to give him bad news? (4) 2. After everything happened to Job, three friends of Job’s came to comfort him.  How many days did the four of them sit on the ground and never said a word? (7 days) 3. Where in the world can a person see the sun rise on the Pacific Ocean and set on the Atlantic Ocean? (Panama) 4. What famous eastern college was first known as Cambridge? (Harvard) 5. What college in New England was the only one to remain open during the entire Revolutionary War? (Dartmouth) May God give each of us the courage to face each and every day, and to live life to the very best of our ability. July 2 at 6 p.m. Country Couples met for their monthly get together at the Cardinal Inn in west Pittsfield.  Those in attendance were:  Emily Forgy, Betty Shive, Ann Ward, Debbie Rueb, Harry and Helen Wright, Keith Bradbury, Elmer Bradbury, Mildred McCartney, and Joyce Dyer. They missed those of the group that were not able to come and hope that they will be able to make it for the next meeting. Timothy and Kirsten Blacketer, Dylan, and Evelyn of Cheyenne, Wyo., arrived Thursday, July 12, at his parents Carl and Wanda Blacketer and enjoyed several days of spending time in Pike County. The weekend of July 13 was the 45th Pittsfield High School Class Reunion. Events happened both Friday evening and all day Saturday. Even though I do not have a total of names, I believe quite a few attended. Mention of reunions, makes me think of something important.  Do you all realize that we have a great facility in Pike County that is perfect for reunions, weddings, wedding receptions, weekend retreats, after church get-togethers, after funeral potlucks, baby showers, bridal showers, business work shop or meetings, etc... Possibilities are limitless!!  And this place is Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp which is located between Detroit and Milton. Prices are very reasonable, and the setting is beautiful with plenty of privacy. There is even a lake, and if a lifeguard or two are scheduled,

By WYVETTA DAVIS 217-285-4880 w9yti@irtc.net

plenty of water activities can easily happen there...swimming, paddleboats, kayaks, etc. Take the time to make an appointment (call 1-217723-4337 or message the place on Facebook) and go check out this wonderful place. This could be the best event you ever planned at the best place to have it. Steve and Nathan went to Ohio recently to attend the visitation and funeral of our aunt Donna DeLong of Kenton, Ohio. Finished a book recently that I highly recommend called The Compromise.       Always enjoy chatting with Ginger Whitlock at the Royal Manor in New Salem.  As I was talking to her the other day, she said she has been busy upgrading there in hopes that a new client would come and need a nice place to stay.  Ginger is very accommodating and takes excellent care of people and does her very best to help people. Not sure where I got this little goodie, but it says something about “The Echo”.  Hope you enjoy. Things you never regret Showing kindness to an aged person; Destroying the letter written in anger; Offering the apology that saves a friendship; Stopping a scandal that is wrecking a reputation; Helping a boy find himself; Taking time to show consideration to your parents; Remembering God in all things. Check out our Briday Registry at casteelcolorwheel.com

WEDDING rEGIstry Allison Kirk and Isaac Rogers August 4

MaKayla Whitaker and Nathan Wiese August 11 Katie Zumwalt and Buster McDonnell Oct. 13 Stephanie Still and Drew Klingele Nov. 3 Need to add to your bridal collection? China, Fiesta, Noritake, stemware, or silverware. We have rock bottom prices.

We Have Cards For All Occassions! Stop by & check out our baby clothes and accessories. Know someone having a baby? Have them sign-up for our baby registry!

CASTEEL’S

110 W. Adams • Pittsfield 217-285-2822 • 217-285-4488


B4

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

Pittsfield, Illinois

Pike County Real Estate Richard Smith ..............................217.473.3286 John Borrowman...........................217.430.0645 Chris Nichols..................................217.473.3777 Tere Boes.......................................217.491.2267 Barb Goertz...................................217.257.7865

Elaine Smith ..................................217.473.3288 Todd Smith....................................217.285.4720 Chris Little......................................217.653.3697 Robert Evans.................................217.491.2391 Rodney Borrowman .................... 630-247-0667

Nikki Fish ...................................... 217-371-2858 Cyndi Borrowman Kamp ............ 217-779-1861 Sonya Little................................... 217-653-2943

FARM LISTINGS n NEW LISTING - Pike County 140 acres +/- New Salem TWP. Highly productive farm with 109 acres tillable with a PI of 117 and the remainder in marketable walnut timber. n Adams County 66 acres +/- Keene TWP. Great investment farm currently earning $300 per acre cash rent along Interstate 72. n PRICE REDUCED - Calhoun County 390 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Huge hunting farm with 70 acres tillable, secluded on dead end road with older home and outbuildings. n Calhoun County 275 acres +/- Belleview TWP. Prime farm land with 190 acres highly productive soil and remainder consisting of great deer hunting and duck hunting. n Calhoun County 93 acres +/- Salt Spring. Beautiful hunting farm with custom built 3BR log cabin with attached 2 car garage and ¾ acre fully stocked pond. n Calhoun County 80 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Excellent hunting farm with 15 acres tillable. n Calhoun County 80 acres +/- Belleview TWP. Nice investment farm with 80 tillable acres. n PRICE REDUCED - Calhoun County 20 acres +/- Richwood TWP. Completely remodeled 3BR farmhouse with 1 car detached garage sitting on 20 acres. n Calhoun County 7 acres +/- Poor Farm Hollow. Perfect building site with water, septic, electricity and 30’x 35’ metal shed. n Calhoun County 5 acres +/- Belleview TWP. One of a kind piece of property with cabin nestled between the wooded hills with a creek. n Pike County 1,500 acres +/- Atlas TWP. Fantastic deer and water fowl hunting farm with 1,200 a. tillable and remainder in timber and lakes with duck pits with cabin and pole shed. n Pike County 150 acres +/- Pittsfield and Derry TWP. Beautiful recreational farm with good tillable acreage, great deer density and pond. n Pike County 122 acres +/- Hadley TWP. Highly productive farm with 70 acres tillable with a PI of 121 and the remainder in timber with excellent deer hunting. n Pike County 89 acres +/- New Salem TWP. Beautiful recreational farm with good tillable acreage, pasture with cattle set-up, stocked pond and 2BR 2BA home. n Pike County 14 acres +/- 26170 Co. Hwy. 14, Pittsfield-Great building location in the country with 2 car garage with living quarters already on the property. n SALE PENDING - Pike County 41 acres +/- Pittsfield TWP. Nice recreational farm with 11 acres tillable and nice creek.

OTHER LISTINGS

NEW LISTING - Rockbridge - 313 North St. - Adorable 2-3BR 1BA home sitting on 6 lots. Needs some TLC to bring back its glory! Priced to sell! $60’s. NEW LISTING - Hardin - 604 W. Main St. - Adorable 3-4BR 2BA home with many updates sitting on an oversized lot. $90’s. NEW LISTING - Golden Eagle - 771 Golden Eagle Ferry Rd. - 3BR 3BA 1,600 sq. ft. home with oversized 22’ x 21’1” garage with many updates sitting on 4.81 acres. $100’s. NEW LISTING - Pittsfield - 1101 Sunset Dr. - Nice 3BR 1BA brick home with full basement in great location. $100’s. NEW LISTING - Griggsville - 301 S. Stanford - Newer 3BR 2BA home with 2 car detached garage, huge family room and nice deck. $100’s. NEW LISTING - Barry - 1315 Bainbridge - Very well kept 3BR 2BA home with full basement and nice yard on dead end road. Well worth the money!! $40’s. NEW LISTING - Griggsville - 401 N. Chandler St. - 2BR home that needs some work sitting on nice lot. Would make good rental property. $30’s. NEW LISTING - Pittsfield - 211 W. Fayette - Beautiful 3BR 2BA 1,750 sq. ft., 2 story home with many updates sitting in a great neighborhood close to the historic downtown area. $100’s. Barry - 658 Main St. - Affordable 3-4BR 2BA home with some updating. Could be converted to 2 apartments. Priced to sell!! $50’s. MAJOR PRICE REDUCTION - Barry - 1211 Rodgers St. - 4BR 3BA home with 21 ft. pool with deck and 30’ x 40’ shed sitting on 8.5 acres +/-. Very motivated Seller – will not refuse any reasonable offers!!! $200’s. Baylis - 415 W. Railroad - 3BR 1BA home with 1 car detached garage, covered patio, newer roof and 2 enclosed porches sitting on .95 acres +/-. $20’s. PRICE REDUCED - Batchtown - RR1, Box 74 - 5BR 2BA brick ranch home sitting on 1 acre with new tin roof and very spacious front and back yard! $70’s PRICE REDUCED - Batchtown - 14797 S. Mississippi River Road - 3-4BR 4BA brick ranch home with 2 car attached garage sitting on 3 acres +/- with many added features. Move-in ready! $100’s. Detroit - 106 E. Farm St. - Nice 3BR home with 2 car detached garage that has been newly updated. A lot of house for the money! $40’s. Florence - 25187 492nd St. - Cabin in the heart of Florence with a beautiful view of the Illinois River. Cabin has access from a rear gravel road. $50’s. Griggsville - 209 N. Oak - Own cheaper than rent this freshly painted 2BR 1BA home with newer water heater, furnace, roof, and carpet. Priced right! $20’s. HUGE PRICE REDUCTION - Griggsville - 202 N. Federal - 2BR home with deck and large garage/ storage shed on corner lot across from school. $30’s. Griggsville - 114 S. Stanford - 2BR 1BA home that has been totally remodeled. $40’s. Griggsville - 114 W. Walnut - Totally remodeled 2BR home with solid hardwood floors and lots of closet space. Perfect starter or retirement home! $70’s. Hamburg - 15664 N. Mississippi River Road - Adorable 2BR cabin on the Mississippi River with new roof and siding. Priced to sell!! $40’s. Hamburg - 408 Washington - 2BR home sitting on 2 lots with many updates with workshop and private fenced in yard. $50’s. PRICE REDUCED - Hamburg - 15729 N. Mississippi River Road - Updated 3BR cabin with deck sitting on 4 riverfront lots on the Mississippi River with 2 boat docks and ramp. $60’s. Hardin - 1041 St. Hwy. 100 - Adorable 3BR 2BA home with oversized 2 car attached garage with heat sitting on one acre. $100’s. Calhoun County - Golden Eagle - Riverfront lot at the end of a dead end road on the Mississippi River on Cove Rd. with electricity and water available. Kampsville - 4 lots St. Louis Ave. - 4 lots with water, sewer and electricity hookups currently used as a campground with outbuildings and camper. Kampsville - 218 New St. - 4BR 2BA home with a 22’ x 28’ separate man cave with patio and deck perfect for entertaining sitting on 2 lots. $90’s. Kinderhook - 310 High St. - Cute 1-2BR home with nice 2 car detached garage with large garden space and numerous fruit trees sitting on 2 lots. $30’s. Kinderhook - 27959 230th Ave. - 2BR custom built home sitting on 1 acre with 10 x 12 shed. Would make the perfect retirement home or weekend getaway! $100’s. Milton - 372 Blue Grass St. - Exquisite 3BR 2BA home with 2 car detached garage with many updates. $100’s Nebo - 720 East Park St. - Nice 2BR home with knotty pine ceiling and pine floors, wrap around deck and detached garage with a big yard. Would make a great starter home. $40’s. MAJOR PRICE REDUCTION - MOTIVATED SELLER - Pittsfield - 331 Piper Lane - Beautiful 2 story completely remodeled 4BR 2BA home with an impressive master suite. $100’s. PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 3A Dove Lane - Newer very efficient 2BR 2BA duplex with a new enclosed 4 season room in a nice subdivision setting. $100’s. Pittsfield - 690 Walnut - 3BR ranch home with 1 car garage and full finished basement in nice location. Would make a great starter home! $100’s. Pittsfield - 444 Kellogg St. - 2-3BR 2BA manufactured home with 2 car attached garage on corner lot. $100’s. Pittsfield - 913 N. Orchard - Nice 3BR maintenance free ranch home with 2 car garage and large storage shed. $90’s. Pittsfield - 428 N. Monroe - Large 4BR home on nice corner lot. Motivated Sellers!! $60’s. Pittsfield - 339 S. Illinois - Neat 2BR 1BA home with new roof and maintenance free exterior. $60’s. PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 104 Liberty Court - 2BR 1BA ranch style home with new roof and many updates. $50’s. Pittsfield - 527 Meadow St. - 3BR 2BA home with 1 car attached garage in great location. $50’s. Pittsfield - 223 E. Perry - 2BR home with 1 car attached garage. Would make a great starter or retirement home. $30’s. Pittsfield - 217 S. Illinois St. - Empty 67.5’X160’ lot. Nice flat lot to build a home. Pleasant Hill - 803 S. Main St. - 2BR 1BA 952 sq. ft. home selling as is. Interior needs some TLC. Priced to sell! $20’s. Pleasant Hill - 405 Commerce - Nice building lot with partially finished workshop with heat and office space. $50’s. PRICE REDUCED - Pleasant Hill - 702 Houston - Move-in ready 3BR 2BA manufactured home on permanent foundation with 2 outbuildings. $70’s. Pleasant Hill - 408 Commerce - 4BR 1BA home with oversized 1 car garage sitting on .9 acre. $80’s. Summer Hill - Hwy. 54 - Great building lot in the heart of Summer Hill. DRASTIC PRICE REDUCTION - Summer Hill - 19620 U.S. Hwy. 54 - Classic 4BR 2BA farm home with modern updates and hardwood floors in the living room and dining room. Motivated Seller!! $80’s. SALE PENDING - Kampsville - 108 W. Maple - Beautiful 3BR 2 1/2BA ranch home with many updates located on a dead end road. $90’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 14 Bear Court - Very nice 3BR 2BA home sitting on 1.5 lots in a nice South location. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 810 W. Grant St. - Like new high efficient 3BR 2BA ranch home with attached 2 car garage. Great starter or retirement home! $100’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - Beautiful classic 2 story 4-5BR home in highly desirable location. SALE PENDING - New Salem - 1000 Brown St. - Remodeled 3-4BR home with oversized 3 car garage sitting on 2 acres +/-. Move-in ready! $100’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 343 S. Mason - Extra nice 2BR home with loads of updates in a nice neighborhood. $70’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 3BR 2BA bi-level home with 2 car garage. SALE PENDING - Pleasant Hill - 701 S. Main - Adorable 2-3BR 1BA home with many updates and beautiful landscaping! This is the perfect starter home! $40’s. SALE PENDING - Jerseyville - 3BR home in rural setting. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - Modern 3BR 2BA ranch style home with attached 2 car garage in South location. $180’s. SALE PENDING - Baylis - 245 Locust St. - Maintenance free 3BR 1BA bungalow with nice fenced in yard and great 2 car detached garage/workshop. $50’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - Very nice 3BR 2BA home with finished basement in Quail Ridge Subdivision. $200’s. SALE PENDING - PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 116 N. Jackson - Beautifully restored and very well maintained 6BR 2BA home with full finished basement, 1 car detached garage and fenced in back yard. Motivated Sellers!! $100’s. SALE PENDING - Barry - 207 2400 E. - Custom log home with nice outbuilding, all sitting on 10 acres. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 1302 Lakeview Dr. - Totally custom home sitting on 4 acres +/- with all the extras. The perfect home site with your own private pond at the edge of Pittsfield. $300’s. SALE PENDING - Griggsville - 616 W. Quincy - Well maintained 5BR 1.5BA 2 story home with original woodwork, newer garage and additional carport sitting on corner lot. $70’s. SALE PENDING - PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 34229 270th Ave. - 3,200 sq. ft. finished 3BR 3BA home with 2 car attached and 2 car detached garage sitting on 5 acres +/-. $200’s. SALE PENDING - PRICE REDUCED - Barry - 1400 Rodgers St. - Nice shop with geo-thermal in great location. SOLD - Pleasant Hill - 16784 Cold Run Creek - Nice newer home with outbuilding on 45 acres. SOLD - NEW LISTING - Pittsfield - 423 E. Fayette St. - Very nice 2BR home with many updates in a great location. Priced to sell!! $60’s. SOLD - Pittsfield - 626 N. Monroe St. - 4BR 2BA home with beautiful oak staircase and 1 car attached garage. Priced to sell! $30’s. SOLD - Pearl - 46823 103rd Ave. - 3BR home with 2 car detached garage and large shed sitting on 4.8 acres +/-. $50’s SOLD - Pittsfield - 311 E. Benson - Maintenance free 3BR 1BA home that is move-in ready. Bank owned. $50’s. SOLD - Pittsfield - 125 Haney Lane - Maintenance free 3BR 2BA brick home with 2 car attached garage, pool and deck in a quiet subdivision. $100’s.

FEATURED PROPERTIES duced

Re Price

PERRY - S. Naples St. - 3 nice building lots with utilities available. $12,000.

PITTSFIELD - 830 N. OrchardNice home building site that consists of 2 80’ x 160’ lots. $14,000.

ing

PLEASANT HILL - Deer Ridge Estates - Large building lot with City sewer and water available. $25,000.

ing

ist New L

ist New L

NEW LISTING - MILTON - 588 Elm St. - Affordable 2-3BR maintenance free home with newer roof. $32,900.

PLEASANT HILL - 801 S. Main 4BR 2BA home with attached garage sitting on nice corner lot. Price right! Needs some TLC!! $59,000.

d

PLEASANT HILL - 204 Fairgounds Rd. - Totally remodeled 2BR home with 1 car attached garage. Like new!! $49,900.

GRIGGSVILLE - 303 W. Washington - 4BR 2,484 sq. ft. home with beautiful oak entry stair case and 1 car detached garage sitting on 2 lots. $54,900.

ending Sale P

Red Price

PITTSFIELD - 509 Jill St. - 3BR 2BA home with 1 car garage and nice back yard. $89,900.

uced

GRIGGSVILLE - 415 W. Lincoln St. - Quality 3BR 1BA home with nice screened in porch, 2 car garage and large heated workshop. $115,000.

e Reduc Price

c Drasti eduction R Price

ROCKPORT - 17620 Hwy. 96 - Old schoolhouse converted into 4BR 2BA home with full basement that has endless possibilities sitting on 1.62 acres +/-. $142,000.

PITTSFIELD - 429 Piper Lane - Beautiful, spacious 3-4BR 2BA home with full finished basement and oversized 2 car attached garage sitting on 2 lots. $149,900.

ROCKPORT - 16934 St. Hwy. 96 - Custom built pine log home with 1 car attached garage and open loft located on 2 acres. $159,000.

BARRY - 1409 Pratt St. - Beautiful 3BR 2BA home with finished basement and elaborate pool, patio and back porch perfect for entertaining. A must see!! $298,500.

PITTSFIELD - 4 Quail Ridge Dr. - Grand 2 story 4BR home accentuated with beautiful hardwood, custom cabinetry and spacious floor plan. $308,500.

ending Sale P

PITTSFIELD - 15 Quail Ridge Drive - Beautiful 2,200 sq. ft. ranch home in Quail Ridge Subdivision with full finished basement and 2 car attached garage sitting on large lot. $249,900.

For additional properties, see us at

www.pikecorealestate.com


NEWS

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

C1

Pittsfield, Illinois

FSB awards $1,000 scholarships Joel Cook and Paige Borrowman are the 2018 recipients of the Farmers State Bank Achievement Scholarship in Pike County. Joel Cook is the son of Richard and Julie Bauer Cook of Pittsfield and is a 2018 graduate of Pittsfield High School. He will be attending Coe College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in the fall, double majoring in Physics and Biology. Paige Borrowman is the daughter of Chris & Jill Borrowman of New Canton and is a 2018 graduate of Western High School. She will be attending The University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana this fall, majoring in Business. FSB Achievement Scholarships are awarded to graduating seniors, based on the student’s character, academic achievement, perseverance toward further education, extra-curricular activities and good works. Recipients can be planning to attend any college or university, pursuing any field of study. “Young people are our most important asset.We feel supporting students in furthering their education is an investment in the future of our community,” Farmers State Bank President Nevin Grigsby said. Farmers State Bank awards scholarships in all of the market areas it serves, with $6,000 in scholarships being awarded this year. The amount of scholarships awarded in 2018 will bring the total amount of scholarships funded to $141,000 since the bank began awarding scholarships in 1989.

Submitted photo

HCE

Submitted photo

Farmers State Bank President Nevin Grigsby, right, presents a $1000 scholarship to 2018 Western High School graduate Paige Borrowman, left, July 12.

gives to

PFD

The Pike County Home and Community Education Unit presented a raffle quilt to the Pittsfield Fire Department, June 28, as a part of their Nite Quilter program. Quilters present were, front row, left to right, Jackie Williams, Linda Belford, Mary Eustace (president of Pike County HCE), Louise Gill, Debbie Wright, Ona Day Johnston, Joyce Dyer, Becky Ghrist, and Debbie Stendback. Second row, left to right, Jim Shade, Chad Ruble, Bill Grimsley, Jeff Bonnet, Allen Motley, Matt Kirgan, Keenan Smith, Bruce McKee, Rob Seybold, and Jason Thomas. Third row, left to right, Adam Rush, Dalton Kissinger, Scott Bennett, Brian Wade, Trent Benard, Michael Starman, Richie Williams, and Todd Gratton. Back row, left to right, Chad Knight, Jason Herron, and Bryan Bristow. Other HCE members not pictured are Shehnaz Ansari, Elizabeth Miller, Beth Fencik, Barb Liehr, and Edna Baughman.

HCE 2018 Nite Quilter success

Submitted photo

Farmers State Bank President Nevin Grigsby, right, presents a $1000 scholarship to 2018 Pittsfield High School graduate Joel Cook, left, July 11.

Each year the Pike County HCE board chooses a community outreach project and suggests that each HCE Unit consider ways to show support of that particular initiative. This year it was to show appreciation to the county’s First Responders. While discussing options at one of the HCE Nite Quilters meetings, it was suggested by Becky Ghrist that they make a quilt to give to the firemen, to raffle off as a fundraiser for their expenses. The project was completed in four months

and was presented to the Pittsfield Firemen by the HCE Nite Quilters, along with Pike County HCE board president Mary Eustace, June 28. Tickets can be purchased from PFD wives auxiliary and Pike County Home Extension Heritage Skills Nite Quilter. One ticket for a dollar. Six for $5. Twenty for $15. The quilt will be given away Saturday, November 3, at the Firemen’s Annual Dance. You do not have to be present to win.

Ethan Brown/Pike Press

Is

it over already?!?!

Raylan Smith gives it his all in the Kid’s Tractor Pull game, July 14, at Pig Days on the Square. Smith (24 ft. and 8 in.) was the winner of the 3 and 4 year boys group, with Grayson Mowtefone coming in second (6 ft. and 4 in.). David McDonald claimed victory in the 5 and 6 year boys group (35 ft. 1 in.). In the girls 3 and 4 year category, Rorrie Dunham won (26 ft.), with Lyla Sanderson in second (8 ft. 6 in.). Finally, the 5 and 6 year girls group was won by Sadie Buss (42 ft. 4 in.) and seconded by Raven Martin (37 ft.).

Submitted photo

Some

run, some don’t

The 3K Porker Poker Run/Walk for Diabetes Awareness kicked off their first year at 9 a.m, July 14. Around 25 people signed up, allowing for $320 to be donated to Lions of the Illinois Foundation for Diabetes Awareness program.

Ethan Brown/Pike Press

Pig Days

gets rained out

Just when the night events of July 14 were about to get started, Pig Days was officially washed away by the storm. Approximately three-fourths of an inch of rain was received in a brutal wind that swept across Pittsfield and a few of the surrounding towns. Due to the amount of work it would take to dry everything and setup it back up, Lion Jennifer Liehr said, the final stretch of Pig Days was cancelled.

Ethan Brown/Pike Press

Looking

for their owners

While the “paint-a-pig” event was a success with around 80 pigs, the violent storm prevented the Little Miss Piglet and Mr. Porkchop from picking a winner. Now, these pigs are looking for their rightful owners who spent much sweat and toil to paint them. If you have painted any of the 28 pigs above, they will be ready for pickup in the west room of the Cardinal Inn until Sunday, July 22.

Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

Come

over here and say that!!

Kyle Bradshaw, left, and Vinny Olsen engage in a bit of rougherie Friday night at Pig Days. The two friends were experiencing the Lion Leo’s obstacle course, where participants ran an obstacle course in giant cylinders, making for a good time for the bystanders as well.


Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Campbell Publications

The People’s Marketplace Classifieds

The People's Marketplace

CLASSIFIEDS Reaching 75,000 Readers Each Week!

Calhoun news-herald P.O. Box 367, Hardin, IL 62047 Ph: 618-576-2345 Fax: 630-206-0320

E-Mail: cnhnews@campbellpublications.net

Mon.: 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Fri.: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Closed: 12-1 p.m.

Greene Prairie Press

P.O. Box 265, Carrollton, IL 62016 Ph: 217-942-9100 Fax: 630-206-0320

E-Mail: gppnews@campbellpublications.net

Mon.: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.: 9 a.m.-noon; Fri.: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

P.O. Box 70, Pittsfield, IL 62363 Ph: 217-285-2345 Fax: 630-206-0320 E-Mail: ppnews@campbellpublications.net 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday

E-mail: jcjnews@campbellpublications.net 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday

CLASSIFICATIONS • • • • •

100 Automotive * 200 Business* 220 Collectibles* 300 Farm Market* 400 For Rent* A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County F: Miscellaneous • 500 For Sale* • 600 Help Wanted* • 610 Hobby Shop/Handicrafts* • 615 Hunting • 620 Kids For Hire • 700 Lost/Found • 710 Meeting Reminders • 800 Miscellaneous* • 900 No Trespassing A: Calhoun County

• •

• • • • •

300 FARM MARKET

500 FOR SALE

2003 CHEVY Trailblazer LT low engine miles. 3rd row seat, good condition. $3,950 Call 217-370-0324. TFN

CUSTOM FARMING Services: Deep tillage, Combining, Grain Hauling, Vertical Tillage and much more. Unbeatable prices, Several references, Reliable equipment. 217257-7797. 8.29.18

2002 INT'L Tandem Grain Truck. International 4900. 22' aluminum Kann bed. Int'l DT 530 engine with 214,000 miles. Great truck. Asking $36,000. 217-473-1343 call or text. TFN 1990 PRESTIGE double wide mobile home, 22x40. 3 BR, 2 BA. Call 217-3702629. TFN

HARDWOOD FLOOR Sanding/Refinishing Call Mark at 217-370-6549 for your free estimate. Over 20 years experience. Full service sanding/refinishing needs. markdarrhardwoodfloors.com. 8.1.18 IF YOU need parts for mowers and tillers, Dorsey's Hardware and Western Auto has a large selection of belts and parts and service. New equipment sales available. Winchester. Call 217-7429241. TFN RICK'S LAWN Equipment. Parts and services for all brands. Tillers, lawn mowers, chain saws, blowers and weedeaters. We sell the best and service the rest. Gravely, Stihl. Zero turn mowers on sale! Pick-up and delivery. Hwy. 54, west of the Illinois bridge, Louisiana, Mo. 573754-5055. TFN

400D FOR RENT Pike County ONE BEDROOM upstairs apartment for rent in Pittsfield. All utilities, gas, water, sewer, electric and garbage included, covered parking; $640 a month. Call 217-491-1014. TFN ONE BEDROOM apartment on the square in Pittsfield. Nice wood, tongue and groove. Washer and dryer in the unit. $525/mo. References and deposit required. Call 217-491-1014. TFN OFFICE SPACE. Prime location. Ample parking. West Washington St., Pittsfield. Call 217-285-2848, 217285-5925 or 217-653-0212. TFN

600 HELP WANTED INDEPENDENT CONTRACTOR needed to service Herald-Whig subscribers Monday through Friday in the afternoons & early morning on weekends. For more information call 217-214-9444 or 800-373-9444. 7.18.18

900A NO TRESPASSING Calhoun County NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on land in Calhoun County owned by Ruth Smith. Violators will be prosecuted. 3.27.19

DEADLINES: Classified ads, Monday 3:30 p.m. (For placement and for cancellation.) CLASSIFIED RATES: First insertion, 25¢ per word, minimum $6. Consecutive repeat insertion, 15¢ per word, minimum $5. Prepayment is required. Any change in original ad will be considered start of a new ad. Blind Ad, $4 service charge, plus postage if replies are to be mailed. Yard Sales, $6 up to 20 words. No Trespassing notice, one year, up to 20 words, $60. ADVERTISING POLICY The following are policies of: Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times and The Weekly Messenger: We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. One free insertion will be allowed for a classified ad with a significant mistake. Please let us know immediately. The newspaper reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement submitted for publication. Yard Sale and Work Wanted ads are payable in advance. Proper identification is required of persons placing ads. A F.O.I.D. card will be asked for when selling a firearm. No exceptions will be allowed. Newspaper reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including the right to do so after the ad has been accepted for publication but before publication occurs. The advertiser’s sole remedy for such refusal shall be the refund of the funds paid to purchase the ad. Advertisements are accepted by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the contents and subject matter of the advertisement and that it is not libelous or does not infringe on the privacy of any individual or entity. All

900A NO TRESPASSING Calhoun County

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike County

NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Steve and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.30.19 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Marcy Klockenkemper, Judy Lamer, Jeremy Russell, Bonnie Stepanek, and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted.

MY LAND lo­ cat­ ed in Sec­ tion 18 SW of Pearl is pri­ vate prop­er­ty. Hunt­ing, fish­ ing, trap­ping, tres­pass­ing, for any pur­pose, with­out the writ­ten, signed per­mis­sion of the own­er, is strict­ly for­bid­ den. Vio­la­tors will be pros­e­ cut­ed. Ti­mothy Brink­mann.

5.30.19

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike County NO HUNTING, ATV-ing or trespassing on our property without permission. Section 4 of Derry Township and Section 34 of Hadley Township. Frank & Ruth Armistead. 6.26.19 ABSOLUTELY NO swimming/no hunting on land owned by Fred Smith at Valley City Falls. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.22.19 NO TRESPASSING on Linda Bennet farm ground near Griggsville. Trespassers will be prosecuted. 5.1.19

E-Mail: sctnews@campbellpublications.net 8:30 a.m. - 11 a.m. Monday, Thursday

6.12.19

ABSOLUTELY NO trespassing on any ground owned by Double Creek Farms, Inc. 11.7.18

1000 PETS FOR SALE: Border Collie puppies $50 Call 217-2851756. 7.25.18

1100D Real Estate Pike County HOUSE FOR sale: 333 Walnut St. Rockport. 2 bedrooms, 1 bath. New front closed in porch. 217-4303710 or 217-430-9488. Big lot. $26,000.00 7.25.18

advertisements are accepted and published by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser will indemnify and hold harmless the newspaper from any loss or expense, including the cost of defense and any settlement and/or judgment resulting from claims based upon the contents of any advertisement, including claims or suits for defamation, libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism or copyright infringement. All advertisements created by the newspaper are not considered a “work made for hire” and the newspaper retains the copyright to all advertisements created by the newspaper for the advertiser. The advertisement may not be reproduced without the written permission of the newspaper. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental or financing of housing. In addition, the Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on age, ancestry, marital status, or unfavorable discharge. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which violates the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call the Chicago area Fair Housing Alliance toll free at 1-800659-OPEN.

1500D YARD SALES Pike County

1300 WANTED ARROWHEADS WANTED: Local avocational archaeologist is looking to purchase either one arrowhead or an entire collection. Love Indian artifacts! Please call 314608-2692. 7.25.18 ARROWHEAD SITE Wanted! Respectable and professional executive looking for land site to look for arrowheads, As an avocational archaeologist “hobbyist,” I love the incredible pre-history we have here in our state! Willing to lease or pay fee or even buy the land outright. Also looking for information leading to a site where lots of artifacts have been found - farm-field, pre-construction, or even a backyard. Well have land put back to original condition or better. Please call Connor 314-6299828. 7.25.18 CASH FOR Antlers. Looking for large piles of antler to buy. Paying cash, and coming to you. Accepting all grades, and sizes. Call or message 618 294 1260. Ask for Melanie. 7.18.18

GARAGE SALE- 202 Piper Lane Friday, 9-2 p.m., Saturday 9-2 p.m. Too hot last weekend to get all of the deals. New twin and queen bedding, used gas grill, nice desk, clothes, shoes, kitchen, books galore and more! 7.18.18

NO TRESPASSING ads are $60 for one year! Call to place yours today. In Calhoun: 618-576-2345; Greene: 217942-9100; Jersey: 618-4981234; Pike: 217-285-2345 and Scott: 217-742-3313. Keep unwanted people off your property! Great way to keep people off your land! FIND THE job you've been looking for in The People's Marketplace Classifieds. Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times. Look online every week, too! GREAT JOBS start here! Look here every week for new, exciting careers! The People's Marketplace Classifieds! YARD SALE season is here! Place your ad with us! 20 words for only $6

Advertising Your Yard Sale With Our Newspaper? ALL YARD SALE INFORMATION MUST BE SUBMITTED IN WRITING

READ THE CLASSIFIEDS FOR GREAT DEALS!

200 BUSINESS

P.O. Box 138, Winchester, IL 62694

Ph: 217-742-3313 • Fax: 630-206-0320

GENERAL INFORMATION

B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County 1000 Pets* 1100 Real Estate* A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County 1200 Services* 1300 Wanted* 1310 Web Sites* 1400 Work Wanted 1500 Yard Sales A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County

100 AUTOMOTIVE

Scott County Times

Pike Press

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL 832 South State, Jerseyville, IL. 62052 Ph: 618-498-1234 • Fax: 630-206-0320

Delivered to one of our offices Sent via pikepress.com or jerseycountyjournal.com Emailed Mailed ■ Faxed to (630) 206-0320 ■ ■ ■ ■

Payment is required in advance. Credit card payments can still be made over the phone or through pikepress.com and jerseycountyjournal.com Calhoun News-Herald 310 S. County Road, Hardin, IL 62047 (618) 576-2345 cnhnews@campbellpublications.net

Jersey County Journal 832 S. State Street, Jerseyville, IL 62052 (618) 498-1234 jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

Scott County Times 4 S. Hill Street, Winchester, IL 62694 (217) 742-3313 sctnews@campbellpublications.net

Greene Prairie Press 516 N. Main, Carrollton, IL 62016 (217) 942-9100 gppnews@campbellpublications.net

Pike Press 115 W. Jefferson, Pittsfield, IL 62363 (217) 285-2345 ppnews@campbellpublications.net

The Weekly Messenger 700 W. Quincy St., Pleasant Hill, IL 62366 (217) 285-2345 wmnews@campbellpublications.net


Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Campbell Publications

AUCTIONS Brown County, Illinois

MON., JULY 30 @ 10:00 A.M.

Sale to be held at the Mt. Sterling Community Center YMCA 896 IL 99 850 E. St. • Mt. Sterling, IL

The People’s Marketplace Classifieds

YARD SALE SEASON IS HERE! LOOKING FOR HELP? Get rid of your unwanted Place your help wanted ad with us stuff with us! and reach over 20,000 readers!

251 ACRES± • 5 TRACTS (Subject to Survey)

The property is located approximately 6 miles southwest of Mt. Sterling, IL or approximately 2 miles southeast of the small community of Buckhorn, IL. From Mt. Sterling, IL take Hwy. 107 south approximately 4 miles to CR 525, then west on County Road 525N approximately 1 1/2 miles to farm. The land is further described as being located in Section 1 of Buckhorn Township (T2S•R4W) and Section 6 of Elkhorn Township (T2S•R3W), Brown County, IL.

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IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS

www.SullivanAuctioneers.com

First Bank f/k/a The State Bank of Jerseyville PLAINTIFF Vs. Ricky L. Johnson a/k/a Rickey L Johnson; et. al. DEFENDANTS. 17 CH 55

THE LATE MARIAN & CASPER WAGNER FAMILY FARMS

NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE

DETAILS, MAPS & PHOTOS AVAILABLE ONLINE @:

KAREN SAXER AND LOUIS WAGNER – SELLERS REPRESENTING ATTORNEY: Steven E. Siebers Scholz, Loos, Palmer, Siebers & Duesterhaus LLP 625 Vermont Street • Quincy, IL 62301 • 217-223-3444

SULLIVAN AUCTIONEERS, LLC • TOLL FREE (844) 847-2161 IL LIC. #444000107 • www.sullivanauctioneers.com

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PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 3/7/2018, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on August 22, 2018 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate:

If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5 (g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises.

PIN 04-370-045-00 Improved with Residential COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 211 Sheridan Jerseyville, IL 62052 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 7TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT JERSEY COUNTY - JERSEYVILLE, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Gary L. Pruitt; et. al. DEFENDANTS 17-CH-58 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 3/7/2018, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on August 22, 2018 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 04-825-001-00 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 605 Cleveland St Jerseyville, IL 62052

217-285-2345

If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9 (g) (1) and (g) (4).

Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. If the property is a condominium and the foreclosure takes

The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701 (C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-17-17018. I3092374 7.18, 7.25, 8.1

place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-1717691. I3092373

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JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. Cory A. Watson; et. al. DEFENDANTS 17-CH-59 NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S SALE OF REAL ESTATE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on 3/7/2018, the Sheriff of Jersey County, Illinois will on August 22, 2018 at the hour of 8:15AM at Jersey County Courthouse, 201 West Pearl Jerseyville, IL 62052, or in a place otherwise designated at the time of sale, County of Jersey and State of Illinois, sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash, as set forth below, the following described real estate: PIN 05-222-015-50 Improved with Single Family Home COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 17417 Delhi Farms Road Jerseyville, IL 62052 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the auction; The balance, including the Judicial sale fee for Abandoned Residential Property Municipality Relief Fund, which is calculated at the rate of $1 for each $1,000 or fraction thereof of the amount paid by the purchaser not to exceed $300, in certified funds, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court.

ium and the foreclosure takes place after 1/1/2007, purchasers other than the mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If the property is located in a common interest community, purchasers other than mortgagees will be required to pay any assessment and legal fees due under the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee or the Mortgagee’s attorney. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after Confirmation of the sale. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. The property will NOT be open for inspection and Plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the Court file to verify all information. IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For information: Examine the court file or contact Plaintiff’s attorney: Codilis & Associates, P.C., 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100, Burr Ridge, IL 60527, (630) 794-9876. Please refer to file number 14-1717589. I3092372

If the property is a condominIN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE FOR THE SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT GREENE COUNTY, ILLINOIS 21st MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, v. JOSHUA FARRIS; UNKNOWN OCCUPANTS; UNKNOWN OWNERS-TENANTS; AND NONRECORD CLAIMANTS; Defendant(s). Residential Mortgage Foreclosure Case No.: 2018-CH-4 Property Address: RR 1 Box 20 Roodhouse, Illinois 62082 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above cause on April 27, 2018, Sheriff of Greene County, Illinois, will at 9:00am on August 24, 2018, at the Greene County Courthouse located at 519 North Main Street, Carrollton, Illinois 62016, sell at public auction to the highest bidder, as set forth below, the following described real estate: LEGAL DESCRIPTION: COMMONLY KNOWN AS: RR 1 Box 20, Roodhouse, Illinois 62082 PERMANENT INDEX NO.: 08-20-11-203-003 The real estate is improved with a single family residence. The Judgment amount is was $34,964.09 Sale terms: 10% down of the highest bid by certified funds at the close of the sale payable to The Greene County Sheriff’s Office. No third party checks will be accepted. The balance in certified funds/or wire transfer, is due within twenty-four (24) hours. No fee shall be paid by the mortgagee acquiring the residential real estate pursuant to its credit bid at the sale or by any mortgage, judgment creditor, or other lienor acquiring the residential real estate whose rights in and to the residential real estate arose prior to the sale. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments, or special taxes levied against said real estate and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff

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and in “AS IS” condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the amount bid, the purchaser will receive a Certificate of Sale that will entitle the purchaser to a deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection and plaintiff makes no representation as to the condition of the property. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee, shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). If this property is a condominium unit which is part of a common interest community, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DAYS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. You will need a photo identification issued by a government agency (driver’s license, passport, etc.) in order to gain entry into our building and the foreclosure sale room in Greene County. For information, contact Plaintiff’s attorney: QUINTAIROS, PRIETO, WOOD & BOYER, P.A., 233 S. WACKER DRIVE, 70TH FLOOR, Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 566-0040 QUINTAIROS, PRIETO, WOOD & BOYER, P.A. 233 S. WACKER DRIVE, 70TH FLOOR Chicago, IL 60606 (312) 566-0040 Case Number: 2018-CH-12 NOTE: Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Practices Act, you are advised that Plaintiff’s attorney is deemed to be a debt collector attempting to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. 7.11, 7.18, 7.25


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Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

Pittsfield, Illinois

NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on June 28, 2018, a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of Pike County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as Alternate Root, located at 109 W. Quincy St., Griggsville, IL 62340. Dated this 28th day of June, 2018. /s/ Donnie Apps PIKE COUNTY CLERK 7.4, 7.11, 7.18

Submitted photo

Attend dedication ceremony

The year was 1868. Ulysses Grant was elected President. The 15th Amendment guaranteeing citizenship to all former slaves was passed. The first volume of Louisa May Alcott’s “Little Women” was published. Thomas Edison applied for his first patent. The US was struggling to recover from the Civil War and Versailles Christian Church began meeting. Elder Robinson of Ipava, Ill. came to Versailles to call people to the principles of the Stone Campbell Movement that was sweeping the Midwest at the time. The desire was to see Christ’s church restored to the simple standard of the New Testament. The group met in the Jeptha Wilson Hall and later built on land donated by Sanford McDaniel. The First Christian Church, later to be renamed Versailles Christian Church, has met continually since the founding year of 1868. Thirty-nine folks organized the group and in 1902 a Revival Meeting led by Brother Bassett’s forceful preaching added 114 new members. Several have ministered to the church over the years. The church was an original supporter of Hippo Valley Christian Mission in Zimbabwe, Africa. Other Mission works have been supported as well. The church has seen some of its own enter into full-time ministry and has been instrumental in helping fund and support Lamoine Christian Camp near Tennessee, Ill. (where nearly

1,000 young people from the area attend camp each year). Members have also assisted in support of Lincoln Christian University in Lincoln, Ill., Central Christian College of the Bible in Moberly, Mo. and Ozark Christian University in Joplin, Mo. To celebrate the 150th anniversary, they would like to invite the community, all area churches, former members and friends to gather for a special service Sunday, July 22 at 10:15 a.m. A cake and punch fellowship will follow the morning service. Sunday evening at 7 p.m., Versailles Christian Church will kick off a four night revival with its own “Timothy,” Pastor Steve Ingram preaching. Steve Ingram grew up in the church at Versailles. Pastor Ingram is currently ministering with Mound Road Christian Church in Decatur. The nightly meetings will be held July 22 through Wednesday night, July 25 at 7 p.m. each evening. Brother Ingram is a graduate of Brown County High School and Ozark Christian University. Patricia White from First Christian Church in Beardstown will be the guest pianist and soloist. Many other friends will be bringing special music each night. Come join for a rousing congregational singing, wonderful fellowship and great preaching. The church is located one block west of IL Highway 99 in Versailles on the corner of 3rd and Maple streets. For more information, you may call 217-248-8086.

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, Case No. 2018TX24, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST. To: Joy L. Davis; Occupant of; Discover Bank; Pike County Clerk; and all other persons/entities UNKNOWN having or claiming any right, interest or title in the following described real estate: Beginning at a point on the Section line between Section 21 and Section 22 in Kinderhook Township 80 feet South of a point directly East of the northeast corner of Lot 5 in Block 2 in Hawkins Addition to the Village of Hull, Illinois; thence West 108 feet; thence South 152 feet; thence East 108 feet; thence North to the place of beginning. Situated in the County of Pike and the State of Illinois. Permanent Index No. 47-027-10 On June 25, 2018, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIESWEST filed a Petition for Order of Tax Deed. The object of the plaintiff’s petition is to foreclose on the Tax Sale Certificate No. 2014-00115 for the delinquent taxes on real estate described above which was issued by the Pike County Treasurer on December 3, 2015. The taxes due under the certificate are for the 2014 tax year. The petition asks the court to direct the county clerk to issue a tax deed if the property is not redeemed from the sale on or before December 3, 2018, and that Petitioner, as grantee of tax deed be put in possession of said parcel of real estate. The Petition for Order of Tax Deed will be brought before the Pike County Circuit Court on December 18, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in Courtroom Upper. If you fail to redeem, the court may enter a judgment for the relief demanded in the petition. PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST, Petitioner

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Summer Time Cook

Children First Daycare is seeking a part–time summer cook to facilitate meal preparation for the center. The cook is responsible for preparing and/or directing the preparations of food to be served, complying with all applicable sanitation, health and personal hygiene standards and following established food production programs and procedures. Preferred Education: High School diploma or equivalent Applicate should have their Certified Food Manager Summer Time Cook Certification. Summer Timea Cook Children First Daycare is seeking part–time summer cook Interested candidates apply summer byThe cook Children First Daycare is seeking athe part–time cook to facilitate meal preparation for should center. is responsible preparing and/or the preparations calling Jennifer at (217) to facilitate for meal preparation fordirecting the285-4129. center. The cook of is food to be served, complying with all applicable sanitation, responsible for preparing and/or directing the preparations of health and personal hygiene standards and following Teacher Assistant Part-Time food Summer to be served, complying with alland applicable sanitation, established food production programs procedures. Preferred Education: Highhygiene School equivalent Children First is seeking a DCFSdiploma early or childhood teacher health and personal standards and following Applicate should have their Certified Food Manager assistant fill aproduction part-time daycare program position. establishedto food programscenter and procedures. Certification. Applicant have aHigh highSchool schooldiploma diploma GED Preferred must Education: ororequivalent Interested candidates should apply by and must calling Jennifer at (217) 285-4129. be willing toshould obtain all DCFStheir requirements. Candidate must Applicate have Certified Food Manager have aSummer passion forTeacher working with children. Certification. Assistant Part-Time We are also looking for aDCFS qualified early Interested candidates by childhood Children First is seeking DCFSshould early apply childhood teacher assistant to calling fill a part-time program position. substitutes. Jenniferdaycare at (217)center 285-4129. Applicant mustJennifer have aat high school diploma GED and must Contact 217-285-4129 for or information.

Children First is seeking a DCFS early childhood teacher assistant to fill a full-time daycare center program position. Applicant must have a high school diploma or GED and must be willing to obtain required credentials, along with meeting all other DCFS requirements. Candidate must have a passion for working with children. We are also looking for DCFS early Part-Time childhood substitutes. be willingqualified to obtain all DCFS requirements. Candidate must Summer Assistant have a passion forTeacher working with children. We are Children also looking for aDCFS early childhood First Summer Children Firstat is seeking DCFSqualified earlyProgram childhood teacherinformation. Contact Jennifer 217-285-4129 for substitutes. Children applications our School Age assistantFirst to fillisa accepting part-time daycare centerforprogram position. Contact Jennifer at 217-285-4129 for information.

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, Case No. 2018TX25, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST. To: Michael S. Ruttman; Occupant of; Estate of Janice Ann Ferguson, c/o Lowry & Hoskin, LLP; Michael Ruttman, c/o Floyd Allen; Michael Ruttman, c/o Jennifer Allen; Pike County Trustee; Pike County Clerk; and all other persons/entities UNKNOWN having or claiming any right, interest or title in the following described real estate: Lot 12 in Dutton’s Second Addition to the Town, now City of Pittsfield. Situated in the County of Pike and the State of Illinois. Permanent Index No. 54-118-10 On June 25, 2018, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIESWEST filed a Petition for Order of Tax Deed. The object of the plaintiff’s petition is to foreclose on the Tax Sale Certificate No. 2014-00171 for the delinquent taxes on real estate described above which was issued by the Pike County Treasurer on December 3, 2015. The taxes due under the certificate are for the 2014 tax year. The petition asks the court to direct the county clerk to issue a tax deed if the property is not redeemed from the sale on or before December 3, 2018, and that Petitioner, as grantee of tax deed be put in possession of said parcel of real estate. The Petition for Order of Tax Deed will be brought before the Pike County Circuit Court on December 18, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in Courtroom Upper. If you fail to redeem, the court may enter a judgment for the relief demanded in the petition. PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST, Petitioner Stuart E. Morgenstern, #6275553 Attorney for Petitioner 1 W. Laurel Street Pinckneyville, Illinois 62274 (618)357-5315

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, Case No. 2018TX23, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST. To: Bryan Bower; Jamie L. Bower; Occupant of; Pike County Trustee; Pike County Clerk; and all other persons/entities UNKNOWN having or claiming any right, interest or title in the following described real estate: Lot 1, except the South 36 feet 8 inches thereof in Block 35 in the Original Town of Worcester, now City of Barry. Situated in the County of Pike and the State of Illinois. Permanent Index No. 46-082-01

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PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, Case No. 2018TX21, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST. To: Sandra K. Westfall; Occupant of; Gem City Account Service, as assignee of Blessings Hospital, Quincy Medical Group & Midwest Orthopedic, Barry Kessell; Stephen Castleman; Opal Castleman; Pike County Clerk; and all other persons/entities UNKNOWN having or claiming any right, interest or title in the following described real estate: Lot 46 in the Sub-division of the Southwest ¼ of Section 7 in Township 4 South Range 4 West of the 4th Principal Meridian in Pike County, Illinois as shown by Plat of said Lot 46 recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of said Pike County in Plat A at page 188, said Lot 46 being bounded as follows: Commencing at a stone 20 feet West of the southwest corner of Lot 22 in said Sub-division; thence West 20 feet to a stone; thence West 46 feet to a stone; thence North 166 feet to a L.R. 20x6/16x1/6; thence East 66 feet to a stone; thence South 165 feet to the place of beginning. Situated in the County of Pike and the State of Illinois. Permanent Index No. 44-012-06 On June 25, 2018, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIESWEST filed a Petition for Order of Tax Deed. The object of the plaintiff’s petition is to foreclose on the Tax Sale Certificate No. 2014-00049 for the delinquent taxes on real estate described above which was issued by the Pike County Treasurer on December 3, 2015. The taxes due under the certificate are for the 2014 tax year. The petition asks the court to direct the county clerk to issue a tax deed if the property is not redeemed from the sale on or before December 3, 2018, and that Petitioner, as grantee of tax deed be put in possession of said parcel of real estate. The Petition for Order of Tax Deed will be brought before the Pike County Circuit Court on December 18, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in Courtroom Upper. If you fail to redeem, the court may enter a judgment for the relief demanded in the petition. PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST, Petitioner Stuart E. Morgenstern, #6275553 Attorney for Petitioner 1 W. Laurel Street Pinckneyville, Illinois 62274 (618)357-5315

On June 25, 2018, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIESWEST filed a Petition for Order of Tax Deed. The object of the plaintiff’s petition is to foreclose on the Tax Sale Certificate No. 2014-00100 for the delinquent taxes on real estate described above which was issued by the Pike County Treasurer on December 3, 2015. The taxes due under the certificate are for the 2014 tax year. The petition asks the court to direct the county clerk to issue a tax deed if the property is not redeemed from the sale on or before December 3, 2018, and that Petitioner, as grantee of tax deed be put in possession of said parcel of real estate. The Petition for Order of Tax Deed will be brought before the Pike County Circuit Court on December 18, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in Courtroom Upper. If you fail to redeem, the court may enter a judgment for the relief demanded in the petition. PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST, Petitioner Stuart E. Morgenstern, #6275553 Attorney for Petitioner 1 W. Laurel Street Pinckneyville, Illinois 62274 (618)357-5315 7.18, 7.25, 8.1

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, Case No. 2018TX22, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST. To: Bryan Bower; Jamie L. Bower; Occupant of; Pike County Trustee; Pike County Clerk; and all other persons/entities UNKNOWN having or claiming any right, interest or title in the following described real estate: The site with buildings thereof of the Old Bus Barn and garage in and of Community School District No. 1, Pike and Adams Counties, Illinois, located in the northeast corner of the intersection of Main Street with Decatur Street in the City of Barry, Illinois, including but not limited to the following described tract: Lot 8 and Lot 7 in Block 23 in the Original Town, now City of Barry, formerly known as the town of Worcester, situated in the County of Pike and State of Illinois, excepting that part thereof described as follows: Beginning at the southeast corner of said Lot 7; running thence West 25 feet and 6 inches; thence North 120 feet; thence East 25 feet 6 inches; and thence South 120 feet to the place of beginning, said property being known as the Barry Coliseum. Situated in the County of Pike and the State of Illinois. Permanent Index No. 46-077-10

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Stuart E. Morgenstern, #6275553 Attorney for Petitioner 1 W. Laurel Street Pinckneyville, Illinois 62274 (618)357-5315

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Summer ages 6 years to 12 years. or GED and must ApplicantProgram must have a high school diploma Children Summer Program This program will include a variety of activities in all areas of be willing to obtain allFirst DCFS requirements. Candidate must Children First is applications development. Some activities include limitedAge to have a passion foraccepting working with children.butforareournotSchool Summer Program ages 6 years to 12 years. field trips,also science experiments, activities, daily physical We looking fora variety DCFSartof qualified early This are program will include activities in allchildhood areas of development. Some activities include but are not limited to activity and music. substitutes. field trips, science art individualized activities, dailyacademic physical In addition we willexperiments, provide daily Contact Jennifer at 217-285-4129 for information. activity and music. activities spelling, writing, that will academic keep the In addition(math, we will provide daily etc.) individualized children on track for the upcoming school year.willWekeep will also activities (math, spelling, writing, etc.)Program that the Children First Summer children track for the upcoming schoolfor year. will also offer dailyon reading time. Children First is accepting applications our We School Age offer daily reading time. For more more information please contact Summer Program agesinformation 6 years to please 12 years. For contact Jennifer atvariety 217-285-4129. 217-285-4129. This program will Jennifer include aat of activities in all areas of development. Some activities include but are not limited to field trips, science experiments, art activities, daily physical activity and music. In addition we will provide daily individualized academic activities (math, spelling, writing, etc.) that will keep the children on track for the upcoming school year. We will also offer daily reading time. For more information please contact Jennifer at 217-285-4129.

Members of the Daughters of the Union, General William P. Carlin Chapter, attended the Dedication Ceremony of the Ulysses S. Grant marker, at the All-American Park in Quincy. The marker points to the place where Grant and the 21st Illinois infantry were ferried across the Mississippi River, as the Union troops had been ordered to engage the Confederate forces located in the town of Palmyra, Mo. The 21st Infantry and its commander, then Colonel Grant, mustered at Camp Yates in Springfield July 3, 1861, and traveled across the state, camping in Jacksonville, Naples, and the Perry area of Pike County. By July 11, they had reached Quincy and by July 13 they were in Missouri to quell secessionist activity. The marker is part of the U.S. Grant Trail sponsored by the Heritage Resources department of the Missouri Humanities Council. Depicted are chapter members, left to right, Rachel Reed, Marynel Corton, and Leslie Reynolds Fowler. Reed’s children are, left to right, Rebecca Reed, Lloyd Reed, and Catie Reed.

Versailles Christian Church to celebrate 150 years

PUBLIC NOTICE/CLASSIFIEDS/NEWS

Call us at 618-498-1234 or visit pikepress.com

On June 25, 2018, PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIESWEST filed a Petition for Order of Tax Deed. The object of the plaintiff’s petition is to foreclose on the Tax Sale Certificate No. 2014-00097 for the delinquent taxes on real estate described above which was issued by the Pike County Treasurer on December 3, 2015. The taxes due under the certificate are for the 2014 tax year. The petition asks the court to direct the county clerk to issue a tax deed if the property is not redeemed from the sale on or before December 3, 2018, and that Petitioner, as grantee of tax deed be put in possession of said parcel of real estate. The Petition for Order of Tax Deed will be brought before the Pike County Circuit Court on December 18, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. in Courtroom Upper. If you fail to redeem, the court may enter a judgment for the relief demanded in the petition. PLATINUM INVESTMENT PROPERTIES-WEST, Petitioner Stuart E. Morgenstern, #6275553 Attorney for Petitioner 1 W. Laurel Street Pinckneyville, Illinois 62274 (618)357-5315 7.18, 7.25, 8.1


REAL ESTATE

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

C5

Pittsfield, Illinois

To w n & C o u n t r y To u r... Covering Real Estate in your area real estate ACtIve SINCe 1961

WADE AGENCY

www.wade-real-estate.com

200 S. Madison Pittsfield, IL 62363 217-285-2774

COURTNEY WADE - MANAGING BROKER

Licensed in Illinois & Missouri

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Pike Press

sales staFF Courtney Wade roger hall 217-285-2774 CeLL 248-0231 CeLL: 473-1289 taMI WeBel Karen Fox 217-285-1441 217-285-5481 CeLL 242-5193 CeLL: 473-3755 BrIan rueBush terry rush 217-370-1590 CeLL: 242-0075

PITTSFIELD NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 521 W. PERRY ST. Split foyer, 3-4 BR, 1 3/4 BA, 2392 sq. ft. 2 car att. garage with 25x15 workshop. C/A, hardwood floors. PRICED $119,000. CALL KAREN FOX. PITTSFIELD - BOWLING ALLEY AND LOUNGE - Situated on 7 acres. FOR SALE by new ownership. Sellers will be give Buyers concessions. FOR MORE INFO, CONTACT COURTNEY WADE AT WADE REAL ESTATE. PITTSFIELD - N. Madison St. - 2 storage bldgs. Masonry constructed, 12,500 sq. ft. total storage area. PRICED AT $135,000. REDUCED TO $100,000. CALL COURTNEY FOR INFO. PITTSFIELD - 310 S. Monroe St. Beautiful, brick ranch style home. 2600 sq. ft. 9 rooms, 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, 2 fireplaces, family room, basement, att. 2 car garage, and much more. PRICED $265,000. $239,000. $229,000. $219,000. CALL COURTNEY. REDUCED - PITTSFIELD - 639 E. WASHINGTON ST. 5 BR, 3.75 BA, 1.35 AC lot. 3 car garage, formal dining room, fireplace and extra large master suite. Make this home your castle! PRICED IN THE 100’s. CALL KAREN. 39162 235th AVE. - PITTSFIELD - South edge of Pittsfield, on 2.76 acres. 33 yr. old, split foyer style home, 2600 sq. ft. 9 RM, 4 BR, 2 1/2 BA, family room, large deck, 3 car det. garage and more. PRICED AT $194,500. CALL BRIAN RUEBUSH. PITTSFIELD - 420 N. Jackson St. - Remodeled 2 story home, 9 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, new kitchen, new electrical. All thermo w/d, NEW heating and cooling, NEW 16x32 IN GROUND swimming pool and more. MOTIVATED SELLER CALL COURTNEY FOR MORE INFO. PRICED $137,000. NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD- 215 S. CLINTON ST. - 1 story frame home, 1168 sq. ft. 6 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, HW floors, gas furn., C/A, basement, alum. siding, large carport, large lot. PRICED $77,500. CALL COURTNEY-SELLER CONCESSIONS. NEW LISTING - 327 SYCAMORE ST. - PITTSFIELD - Redecorated brick ranch home. 1230 sq. ft. 6 RM, 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA, full waterproofed basement, thermo w/d, newer gas furnace and C/A, att. 1 car garage and covered patio. PRICED $119,000. IMMEDIATE POSSESSION. CALL COURTNEY. PENDING NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 609 LINCOLN ST. 1300 sq. ft. ranch style home, 6 RM, 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA, full waterproof basement, newer furn. and C/A, att. garage and det. 20x24 garage. MOVE-IN READY. PRICED AT $102,000. CALL BRIAN RUEBUSH. NEW LISTING - 319 N. JACKSON ST. PITTSFIELD - Remodeled 1 story frame home, 1160 sq. ft. 5 rooms, 2 BR, 1 BA, newer furnace and C/A, thermos well insulated, vinyl siding, att. 1 car garage. PRICED $59,500. CALL COURTNEY. IMMEDIATE POSSESSION. PITTSFIELD - 510 N. OKLAHOMA ST. On nice lot at the Northwest edge of town. Frame home, 850 sq. ft., 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, newer gas furnace, vinyl siding. PRICED AT $36,000. NEW PRICE $33,500. CALL ROGER HALL. NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 230 N. ILLINOIS ST. Neat 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA home. Furnished, newer kitchen, baseboard heat, vinyl siding, shingle roof. IMMEDIATE POSSESSION. PRICED AT $32,500. CALL COURTNEY. NEW LISTING-PITTSFIELD-511 W. WASHINGTON. Large vacant lot with utilities, Zoned B-3 35’x36’ garage. CALL ROGER HALL. PRICED AT $29,500. GRIGGSVILLE/PERRY/BAYLIS/VALLEY CITY/BARRY/KINDERHOOK NEW LISTING - 27959 230TH ST. KINDERHOOK Newly constructed 3 1/2 year old cabin on 1 acre. 1024 sq. ft. 5 rooms, 2 BR, 1 BA. Built with native oak, cottonwood and walnut. All thermo, metal siding and shingle roof. VERY UNIQUE, CALL COURTNEY. PRICED AT $132,500. NEW LISTING - GRIGGSVILLE - 309 S. UNION ST. Mostly remodeled 1800 sq. ft. 1 story home. 6 RM, 3 BR, 2 BA, newer heating and A/C, newer flooring and kitchen ect. det. 26x30 garage. “As Is. PRICED $79,000. CALL COURTNEY. GRIGGSVILLE - 201 N. 3RD ST. on 2 lots, 1979 Victorian Mobile home, 5 RM, 2 BR, 2 BA, gas furnace, 2 car det. garage. PRICED $19,000. CALL COURTNEY. VALLEY CITY - 31027 CO. HWY. 21. 15 year old, frame 1 story, 768 sq. ft. 5 rm., 2 BR, 1 bath, gas furnace, vinyl siding, TO BE SOLD “AS IS” $26,000. CALL COURTNEY. NEW LISTING - BARRY - 262 TREMONT ST. 1 story frame home, 1000 sq. ft., 5 rooms, 2 BR, 1 BA, aluminum and vinyl siding. TO BE SOLD “AS IS”. PRICED AT $12,000. CALL COURTNEY. DETROIT/PEARL/MILTON NEW LISTING-PEARL-48042 130TH AVE. Situated on 3 acres. 2 hours both 2 BR. 1 fair condition and 1 fixer with 4 outbuildings. Sold “AS-IS”. PRICED AT $40,000. REDUCED TO $30,000. CALL ROGER HALL.

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

SOLD

CALL ON OUR AGENTS: RICK BARTON (217) 285-2400 Cell: (217) 473-8303 ROBIN CALLIHAN (217) 833-2787 Cell: (217) 370-3451 300 Mississippi St. • Pittsfield, Illinois • (217) 285-2400

EQUAL HOUSING EQUAL

LENDER

www.barton-homes.com

RICK BARTON ROBIN CALLIHAN MANAGING BROKER BROKER ASSOCIATE

112 W. MORGAN ST., CLAYTON 3 Bedroom, 2 bath, manufactured home on partial fenced yard, deck, & oversized two car garage. $48,500

316 N. CHANDLER ST., GRIGGSVILLE Two bedroom ranch home located close to schools. Full usuable basement, enclosed porch, awesone sunroom, & more. Two car garage with attached heated & workshop. Immediate Possession. $69,900

2 QUAIL RIDGE DR., PITTSFIELD Sprawling 3-4 bedroom with open floor plan. Delighful master suite with private bath.Main floor laundry. Awesome partial finished basement with family room, bath, & more.Must See! $230,000

SOLD 3 HOPE AVENUE, PITTSFIELD Two bedroom duplex located close to golf course. Partially finished basement with additional bath. Attached garage. Call for a showing. $129,900

SOLD

ONLINE AUCTION

654 CHERRY ST., PITTSFIELD 3 Bedroom ranch home with inviting covered porch, big deck, attached garage, additional garage for storage, & privacy fence. Partial finished basement with bath. $99,900

113 N. OAK ST., GRIGGSVILLE Rambling ranch home with four-season room, family room, formal dining area, & much more. Attached garage & hugh outbuilding.

G

IN PEND

301 S. FEDERAL ST., GRIGGSVILLE Darling 2 bedroom bungalow located on nice shaded lot. Patio, covered porch, & workshop.

109 S. STATE, GRIGGSVILLE Two bedroom home with beautiful woodwork, hardwood floors, built-in china cabinet, & more. Basement, covered porch, & garage.

243 CLAUS ST., MILTON 2 Bedroom ranch home on nice shaded lot. Kitchen appliance to convey. Priced to sell with Immediate Possession. $28,500

678 GRAND AVE., BARRY Solid 2 bedroom brick ranch home with full basement, big living room, & eat-in kitchen. Updated metal roof & carport. $32,500

664 GRAND AVE., BARRY 2-3 bedroom home with eat-in kitchen. Covered porch, fenced yard, & garage. $29,900

587 DAVIS ST., BARRY Ideal family home with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, nice kitchen, & much more. Partial fenced yard. Garage. $59,900

622 S. MEMORIAL ST., PITTSFIELD 2 bedroom home with partial hardwood floors. Many many updates. Located close to schools. Garage. Full usable basement. Immediate Possession! Broker owned. $62,500

305 S. CONGRESS ST., PERRY Split-level home with some nice updated. Deck & partial fenced yard. $52,000

BIDDING OPENS SAT. JULY 21ST @ 8AM AND ENDS MON. JULY 30TH @ 12PM

HOME & 5.5 ACRES IN PIKE CO. 607 WEST ST. - PEARL, IL 62361 Manufactured home in need of repair on wooded 5.5 +/- acres located in Pike County, IL is being sold at online auction. The property is located on West Street just outside of Pearl, IL. Subject to Court Approval. For: Estate of M. McBride Call or go online for terms & conditions.

GO ONLINE OR DOWNLOAD OUR AUCTION APP TO REGISTER FOR BIDDING

BID.TARRANTANDHARMAN.COM

TRAVIS: (618) 974-9259 OFFICE: (618) 433-9436 3644 FOSTERBURG RD. - ALTON, IL 62002

313 YORK ST., CAMP POINT Two story home located at edge of town. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, big family room,& much more. Full basement. Priced to sell! $69,900

SOLD

SOLD

325 GREEN ST., MEREDOSIA Appealing 2 bedroom ranch home on nice lot. Big living room, dining area, & more. Garage.

303 WALNUT ST., MT. STERLING Cozy ranch home on small lot. Full basement.

YOUR HOME COULD BE FEATURED HERE!


C6

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

Pittsfield, Illinois

SALES STAFF

320 W. Washington • Pittsfield • (217) 285-4502 www.illinoishometown.com • Follow us on Facebook!

ISTING NEW L

48178 160th Ave., Pearl: 3 BR, 2 BA, 4,100 sq. ft., full unfinished basement. 3 car att. garage. Call Harrison Lane.

$475,000

G

PENDIN

#7 Pheasant Lane, Pittsfield: 3 BR, 3 BA, Move In Ready, Quail Ridge Sub. Call Kate Marable.

$239,900

ISTING NEW L

G

PENDIN

32568 360th St., Baylis: 4 BR, 1 BA, 1,576 sq. ft. 17 acres, full unfinished basement. Call Charlene Anderson.

$239,500

ISTING NEW L

R.R. 1 Box 60, Nebo: 7 BR, multiple baths, 3,400 sq. ft. Currently being used as a hunting lodge. Call Scott Gatewood.

$189,000

110 E. Prairie St., Camp Point: 6 BR, 3 BA, 2,200 sq. ft w/partially finished basement. Call Lloyd Phillips.

$179,000

ISTING NEW L

524 N. Orchard St., Pittsfield: 3 BR, 2 BA, 102 E. Franklin St., Griggsville: Great Busi1,415 sq. ft., 1 car attached garage. ness Opportunity. Commercial Property. Call Judy Douglas. Call Kate Marable.

$128,900 ED

REDUC PRICE

$125,000

18 Quail Ridge Drive, PIttsfield: 3 BR, 2 BA, 1,953 sq. ft., partially finished basement, 2 car attached garage. Call Kate Marable.

$210,000

G

PENDIN

PRICE

ED

REDUC

310 State St., Griggsville: Updated 3400 sq. ft. home, outdoor living spece, detached 24x40 garage. Call Kate Marable.

$194,000

ISTING NEW L

10 Shane Lane, Pittsfield: 3BR, 2BA 254 S. Monroe St., Pittsfield: 4 BR, 230 W. Jefferson St., Pittsfield: 3 1 home. 2 car garage, 1,732 sq. ft. 2 BA, 1,860 sq. ft. *Broker Owned. BR, 1 BA apartments, 3,530 sq. ft. Call Kate Marable. Call Scott Gatewood. Investment property. Call Kate Marable. $179,000 $159,000

$129,900

ED

ISTING NEW L

REDUC PRICE

303 N. Jackson St., Pittsfield: 4 BR, 215 N. Illinois St., Pittsfield: 4 BR, 3 3 BA, 3,707 sq. ft. BA, 2,473 sq. ft., carport. Lot size Call Kate Marable. approx. 80x80. Call Kate Marable. $119,000

$114,000

ED

REDUC PRICE

Harrison Lane: 217-440-0319 Kate Marable: 217-370-9809 Karen McConnell: 217-491-0563 Lloyd Phillips: 217-257-7096 Ken Renoud: 217-285-4749

Charlene Anderson: 217-473-8246 Judy Douglas: 217-430-1557 Dennis Douglas: 217-430-7181 Elaine Hoaglin: 217-491-1141 Kirby Hobbs: 217-491-2059 Shane Hunt: 217-491-1299

SOLD

ISTING NEW L

ISTING NEW L

8 Acres Summer Hill Investment Property / Building Site: Pike County, Summer Hill. Call Judy Douglas.

$100,000 ED

REDUC PRICE

610 Field St., Nebo: 3BR, 1.5BA, 114 E. Franklin St., Griggsville: 4 BR, 3 Rural Pike County / Pittsfield School 432 Piper Lane, Pittsfield: 4 BR, 3 BA, 2.5 422 W. Perry St., Pittsfield: 3 BR, 1 4,400 sq. ft. metal building. 6 city lots. BA, attached 2 car gar., full finished bsmt. District: 2BR, 1BA home. 1,474 sq. ft. car garage,3,432 sq. ft. 3.65 Acres. BA, detached garage. 1,144 sq. ft. Call Elaine Hoaglin. Call Kate Marable. Call Kate Marable. Call Charlene Anderson. Call Charlene Anderson.

$100,000

ISTING NEW L

$98,500

$97,000

$95,000

ED

REDUC PRICE

G

PENDIN

PRICE

ED

REDUC

$82,500

ISTING NEW L

504 N. Dutton St., Pittsfield: 3BR, 36236 Co. Hwy. 2, Baylis: Completely 328 Crossman Lane, Pittsfield: 2 BR, 1 BA, 635 N. Grant, Pittsfield: 3 BR, 2 BA, 303 N. Illinois St., Pittsfield: 2 BR, 1 BA, Car2BA, 1,440 Sq. Ft. remodeled country home on 1 acre. Attached 1 car garage. Broker Owned. 1,284 sq. ft., 1 car detached garage. port, 940 sq. ft. Large lot, partially fenced. Call Scott Gatewood. Call Kate Marable Call Charlene Anderson. Call Harrison Lane. Call Kate Marable.

$79,900 ED

REDUC PRICE

$68,000

PRICE

ED

REDUC

$64,900

$59,900

ISTING NEW L

$55,000

ISTING NEW L

Large Metal Building on 3 City Lots. Features a metal shed with 4,400 square footage, six 610 Field St., Nebo, Illinois 1,120 sq. ft., 3 30469 253rd St., Barry: Residential, 170 Kellogg St., Pittsfield: Resi- 922 W. Adams St., Pittsfield: 2 BR, garage doors with openers, an office are and BR, 1/2 BA. Attached garage, Basement. 2BR, 1BA,1,000 sq. ft., .6 Acre. 1 BA, 747 sq. ft., detached gadential property. work station; 200 amp. Floor is concrete. Call Charlene Anderson. rage. Call Elaine Hoaglin. Call Kate Marable. Call Elaine Hoaglin.

$50,000 ISTING NEW L

318 E. Griggsville St., Pittsfield: 2 BR, 1 BA, 775 sq. ft., partial finished unfinished basement, Carport. Call Kate Marable.

$40,000

243 S. Memorial St. & 240 S. Illinois St., Pittsfield: Call Kate Marable.

$11,000 each

$50,000

ISTING NEW L

$49,999

ISTING NEW L

$49,900

ISTING NEW L

946 W. Jefferson St., Pittsfield: 2 BR, 405 West St., Pearl: 3 BR, 1 BA, 600 W. Jefferson St., Pittsfield: 2 BR, 1 BA, Newly updated open floor 936 sq. ft., crawl space. 1 BA, 978 sq. ft., carport. Historic plan. Newer roof, new flooring. Call Kate Marable. Luston home on large corner lot. Call Kate Marable. Call Kate Marable. $35,000

$36,000

$32,000

Call Kate Marable.

$45,000

ISTING NEW L

936 W. Jefferson St., Pittsfield: 1 BR, 1 BA, 480 sq. ft. Located on the edge of town. Call Kate Marable.

$24,500

If you are considering selling your home, please give us a call. We have many buyers looking in this area!


Pike Press

D1

Pittsfield, Illinois

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2016 DODGE DART SXT #117620 FULL POWER CHRYSLER CERTIFIED

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2016 SUBARU FORESTER

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2017 DODGE JOURNEY GT

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All The ew N

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All Prices are plus tax, title, license and doc fee. All Prices have all rebates, bonus cash and dealer discount applied. Pictures are for advertising purposes only, actual colors may differ. Dealer not responsible for errors.


D2

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

COURT

Pittsfield, Illinois

Police Beat The police records released by the Pike County Sheriff ’s office include the following arrests and bookings. The records state that these are accusations and each individual is presumed innocent until proven guilty. Jordan M. Wallace, 26, Pittsfield, was booked into the Pike County Jail after being sentenced in Pike County Court. He was also arrested for failure to appear on possession of drug paraphernalia and burglary

charges. Bond on the FTA was $200. David L. Smith, 48, Hannibal, Mo., was arrested July 10 on an Adams County traffic warrant. He posted $78 and was released pending court appearance. Michael K. Goewey, 51, Pittsfield, was arrested July 12 on a felony revocation of bail bond. He posted $800 and was released pending court appearance. Adam L. Crowder, 30, Pleasant Hill, was arrested July 12 on a felony Pike

County warrant alleging failure to appear and a Pike County traffic warrant also alleging failure to appear. He posted $250 on each charge and was released pending court appearance. Michael D. Rohn, 26, Baylis, was arrested July 13 on a felony in-state warrant with a bond of $2,000; a felony Pike County warrant with a bond of $1,000 and a second Pike County felony warrant with a bond of $1,500, an in-state traffic warrant with a bond of $500 and an Adams

County misdemeanor warrant with a bond of $1,500. He remains lodged. Adam G. Christensen, 27, Bicknell, Ind., was arrested July 13 on charges of driving under the influence of drugs. He posted $300 bond and was released pending court appearance. Devon T. Johnson, 26, Pittsfield, was arrested July 14 on a Calhoun County warrant seeking to revoke probation on a driving while suspended charge and a Jersey County warrant alleging

failure to appear on a driving under the influence charge. Bond in Calhoun was $1,000 and $250 in Jersey. He remains lodged. Jesse S. Moore, 47, Barry, was arrested July 14 on a felony McDonough County warrant. He posted $5,000 and was released pending court appearance. Brian L. Fredde, 42, Moscow Mills, Mo., was arrested July 15 on a felony charge of filing false police report. He remains lodged. Daniel J. Walker, 27, Kan-

Dispositions Traffic Speeding ( $120 unless noted): Payton J. Woodward, 12/28/01, Griggsville, $357, three months supervision. Seatbelts ( $60 unless noted): Danny L. Harris, 5/29/78, Hull. Charles D. Kindle, 1/28/63. Linda D. Smith, 1/27/63. Jordan L. Still, 7/13/99, Barry. Miscellaneous traffic: Brady L. Borrowman, 7/23/55, New Canton, bridge weight limit sign, $572. Trever S. Bradshaw, 12/23/55, Kinderhook, improper lane usage, $120. Kaleb L. Root, 7/15/99, Pleasant Hill. Donald Leroy Schultz, 12/22/61, Barry. Rebecca A. Shirley, 9/28/59, driving on suspended license, $815. Jason K. Sprague, 9/28/77, Pleasant Hill, driving on a suspended license, $1,003, display plate attachment, $384. George A. Neitzel, 6/1/65, Nebo, fail to yield at right of way intersection, $120. Joshua A. Person, 7/25/97, electronic communication device, $120. Chance Stamper, 10/9/95, Pleasant Hill, electronic communication device,

$120. Jason Michael Taylor, 2/5/99, Pittsfield, improper lane usage, $120. Misdemeanors: Jessie R. Boatright, 2/16/85, Pittsfield, driving on revoked license, $689, 300 days in jail with credit given for 88 days. Samuel J. Pruett, 6/13/94, Chambersburg, domestic battery, $1,707, 24 months probation, 30 days in jail with credit given for three days served; revocation of probation, 24 months probation, 60 days in jail with credit given for 12 days served. Matthew R. Smith, 9/18/95, domestic battery, $1,472, 24 months supervision. Josie Smithers, 8/23/90, Pittsfield, allows truancy, 24 months probation, 150 days in jail with credit for 80 days, revocation of probation, 30 days in jail. Felonies: Jessie R. Boatright, 2/16/85, Pittsfield, violate order of protection, $1,402, 30 months probation and 50 days in jail with 50 days credit time served; aggravated driving under the influence, $4,463, 30 months probation, four years in the Illi-

nois Department of Corrections with 63 days credit time served. Zoey Cannam, 7/7/90, Barry, domestic battery,$1,673, 30 months probation, 119 days credit time served, two years in IDOC, revocation of probation, two years in IDOC, credit given for 160 days served. Aaron Coats, 8/5/88, burglary, $1,316, four years in IDOC, 30 days credit for time served, retail theft, $872, four years in IDOC, 31 days credit for time served. Rachelle R. Gress, 3/14/97, Griggsville, criminal damage to property, $3,376, 24 months supervision, 30 hours community service, domestic battery, 24 months supervision, battery, 24 months supervision, 30 hours community service. Josie L. Smithers, 8/23/90, possession of methamphetamine, $2,217, 30 months probation, 150 in jail with credit given for 80 days served, revocation of probation, 30 months probation, attempt to foil or defeat a screening test, $1,647, 30 months probation, 150 days in jail with credit give for 80 days time served, 20 months in IDOC with credit for 180 days served.

Jury finds Missouri man guilty on two of three charges

Ph: 217-371-2760 Darin Workman, Owner Email: dlworkman2000@gmail.com

CUSTOM FARM MANAGEMENT

AUTO

Eduardo Cortes Gallegos of Collinsville, Ill. to Jenille Nicole Reese of Collinsville, Ill. Dylain Kirk Hull of Hull, Ill. to Ellie Margaret Weir of Hull, Ill.

Divorces

Ann Lorraine Storey vs. Matthew Stewart Storey, 7-2-18.

AGRICULTURE HOME IMPROVEMENT

HOME IMPROVEMENT

Casteels

Casteels

Ph: 217-371-2760 Darin Workman, Owner

CUSTOM FARM MANAGEMENT te ple m

Asphalt Serv ice

te ple m

Sealcoating • Cracksealing Patching

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CALL RYAN BLAND AT 618-550-9406 OR 217-730-8844

Christensen was arrested for driving under the influence of drugs and speeding. He was transported to the Pike County Jail where he posted $300 and was released pending court appearance.

Marriages

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• Planting • Spraying Harvesting & Much More!

The Pleasant Hill Police Department conducted a traffic stop on Douglas Drive July 13 at approximately 7:30 p.m. The vehicle stopped was a 2005 Dodge Caravan and was driven by Adam G. Christensen, 27, Bicknell, Ind.

Co

13178 Co. Hwy. 7 Nebo, IL 62355

PHPD nabs Indiana man for driving while drugged

Pittsfield City Police, Jennifer By BETH ZUMWALT Thompson and Lisa Hobbs; Pike Press from Illinois State Police, A Missouri man was Brian Douglas. Frank Smith, found guilty last week in Pike a citizen, also testified. Judge County Circuit Court of a Jerry Hooker heard the case. felony charge of aggravated Pinkett is set for sentencfleeing to avoid arrest and -ing, Sept.TREATMENTS 20 at 1 p.m.- CUSTOM FRAMESPAINT - WALLPAPER - WINDOW TREATMENTS - CUSTOM FRAMES PAINT - WALLPAPER WINDOW 13178 Co. Hwy. a traffic charge of speeding. His 7companion, Mikhail The same jury found him Nebo, not ILA.62355 Williams, 25, also of guilty of failure to use a turn Columbia, Mo. was set for signal. jury trial beginning today but The jury of seven men and entered into a plea agreement five women heard the case Tuesday •morning. He was Debbie Roseberry Cell: 217-491-4489 Debbie Roseberry • Cell: 217-491-4489 that alleged Michael Pinkett, charged withILfleeing, driving 110 W. Adams St. • Pittsfield, • Ph: 217-285-4488 110 W. Adams St. • Pittsfield, IL • Ph: 217-285-4488 36, Columbia, Mo.www.casteelcolorwheel.com failed while suspended, speeding Email: dlworkman2000@gmail.com • email: casteel@casscomm.com www.casteelcolorwheel.com • email: casteel@casscomm.com to stop for a Pike County and failure to signal. No terms Sheriff’s Deputy June 10, of the plea agreement were the life of your DRIVEWAYS Extend the life of your 2017, near Atlas. According available Extend at press time. DRIVEWAYS to the information presented Both men have been free Asphalt pavement! Asphalt pavement! PARKING LOTS PARKING LOTS at the trial he and another on $12,000 bond. *Local Contractor* *Local Contractor* Planting • Spraying motorcycle rider • fled and A George jury was to have been & Brandon Whitlock • Chris Wingler George & Brandon Whitlock • Chris Wingler reached speeds in excessHarvesting of impaneled Sealcoating for a • Patching civil • Cracksealing trial Sealcoating • Patching • Cracksealing 80 m.p.h. in an attempt to Monday for a dram shop case O O C C AS AS C C COMPLETE ASPHALT SERVICE CO. COMPLETE ASPHALT SERVICE CO. More!Hwy. elude police officers. & Much involving Lindsey’s Tavern 107 N. - Pittsfield, IL Hwy. 107 N. - Pittsfield, IL Testifying at the trial and The Copperhead. The Email: casco3@frontier.com Email: casco3@frontier.com RYAN BLAND AT 618-550-9406 were:CALL Pike County trial was scheduled to take Call for a Sheriff FREE ESTIMATE Call for a FREE ESTIMATE www.completeasphalt.net www.completeasphalt.net Paul Petty; OR deputies Brad two days but was settled out (217) 285-6099 (217) 285-6099 217-730-8844 Wassail, Matt Frazier; from of court late last week. Co

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sas City, Mo., was arrested July 15 on a felony charge of possession of a stolen firearm and misdemeanor charges of possession of cannabis, 10-30 grams. He remains lodged in the Pike County Jail. Has your charge been amended, reduced or dropped or have you been found not guilty? Email ppnews@campbellpublications.net to be considered for a status update on your court proceeding. Please include name and case number.

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OUR TOWN

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

What’s Happening

BARRY n The summer reading challenge at the Barry Public Library continues until Aug. 14 for the 3rd-8th grade. Prizes will include Kindles and gift cards. For children who are not yet in Kindergarten, we have the Rubber Ducky Club. 12 children have received their prizes for June which totaled 20 rubber ducks and 8 books. This program will continue indefinitely. Call the library for more information: 335-2149. DETROIT n The Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp is having their taco salad delivery lunch fundraiser again this year on July 27. Salad order forms are being handed out and will be picked up this week July 16 through July 20. These meals will be delivered to your place of business on July 27 at the time of your choosing between 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. If your business has not received order forms yet and you would like some, please contact 217-4734118. n Jim Dain, MVCSC camp manager, has announced the return of Gospel Gigs for this summer into fall, ‘2018. Dain said there will be a series of (4) concerts continuing until Sept. 9. All concerts will be held in the camp chapel starting at 6:30 p.m. The theme for the concert series will be “Lord, Here am I. Send me!” (Isaiah 6:8). For more information please contact Jim Dain at (573) 324-4676 or Steve Haskins at (217) 891-7616. GRIGGSVILLE

n The Griggsville Day HCE unit will meet at the Park and Ride Monday, July 23, for their Day trip that usually is in August. We will be visiting Stacy Spradlin's home in Quincy, and enjoying hearing and seeing her story about her online quilting business. After lunch, we travel to Warsaw to view the mansion that John and Melisha Thomas have restored and refurbished. Please call Susanne Curry if you wish to go. 217-833-2500 or 217-653-5631.

PITTSFIELD n The Pike County Senior Citizens Center in Pittsfield will be hosting an evening of gospel music presented by the group Anticipation Saturday, July 21 from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Concessions will open at 5 p.m. All ages are welcome and encouraged to attend. n Senior Day at the Pike Co. Fair Wed., July 18 with registration before the Liberty Village lunch at 11:30 a.m. in the AC of the Lion's Bldg. on the Fairgrounds. There will be chosen a new king and queen, the whitest hair, oldest, etc. and then BINGO!! This is open to all seniors in the area, so come and enjoy fun and fellowship in AC. n An information night about the Truck Driver Training Program at John Wood Community College will be held Monday, July 23, at 6 p.m. at the Southeast Education Center (SEC), located a mile north of Pittsfield on Route 54. Classes will begin at the SEC Oct. 29 and will be held every Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday through Dec. 12. For information, contact the Truck Driver Training program, 217.641.4959 or 217.641.4914. PLEASANT HILL n Benefit softball tournament for Rick White, Aug. 11 in Pleasant Hill. Teams will consist of at least eight players, minimum of four females per team and can be10 players. Game times will start at 8 a.m. Trophy for first, second and third. Raffle items and food. For more information contact Cam Little or David Yokem. ONGOING

n Classmates of Pittsfield High School Class of 1963,

have you made your reservation for our 50th class reunion? If not, please call Cherryll Gaffney Allen at 309-333-7753 or email: cherryll@mchsi.com. Don't miss out on all the fun! n Looking for graduates

of the class of 1958- Anyone with information call Peggy Westerhold at 217-248-

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n EPFPD Ladies Aux. will be sending in another brick order. Anyone that missed out on the first order and would like to purchase a brick, please contact a member of the fire dept. or ladies aux. Sizes available are 4x8, 8x8 and 12x12. If you would like to see what the bricks look like, they are on the north wall at the Milton Firehouse. Any questions, please contact Deb Moore 217-723-4228. Deadline for this order is 7/27/18. n For more information please contact Jim Dain at (573) 324-4676 or Steve Haskins at (217) 891-7616. MVCSC Camp calendar: Mission Trip, July 15-21 Wilderness Camp, Aug. 5-9 Sportsman (and Ladies) Camp, Aug. 12-15 Family Camp, Sept. 7-9 n John Wood Community College’s JDub Academy will offer classes for students during the month of June. The hands-on educational enrichment program is offered to children in grades kindergarten through 12th. Experts in a range of professions from art and foreign language to engineering and science will instruct classes. To learn more about these classes, visit www.jwcc.edu/ jdubacademy. Cost per class varies. For more information, call 217.641.4941. n All John Wood Community College center offices, in Pittsfield and Baylis will operate on summer hours, 7:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday, May 21 to Aug. 3. Summer classes will meet as listed on students’ schedules. Regular office hours for the academic year will resume Monday, Aug. 6, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Pittsfield, Illinois

in and around the Pike County Area Shaw room of the Pittsfield Senior Center with refreshments, visiting and group singing from 10-10:25 a.m. Bible study begins at 10:30, dismissing promptly at 11 a.m. A free printed study guide will be provided each month.

n Do you have an old cell phone you don’t use anymore? You can donate it to a worthy cause! We will take all donated phones, even if they are damaged. They can be left at the Quanada in Pike County office at 941 W. Washington in Pittsfield. For further information, call 285-6119. n Water Aerobic classes at the King Park pool in Pittsfield Mondays and Thursdays from 11 a.m.noon and 5-6 p.m. Any questions: call 217-285-4524. n The Pittsfield Women's Club meets at noon on the 4th Tuesday of the month. The meeting includes lunch and a program. Membership is open to all women in Pike County. For more information, contact Ann Rine at 217-285-1616. n Calvary Baptist Church of Pittsfield's Helping Hands is held every 3rd Saturday of month from 9-11 a.m. n Pike County Senior Citizens Center Widows Support Group meets in the Shaw room every 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month. There also is a monthly card party/luncheon scheduled for every 2nd Wednesday. The players play Pitch and Bridge and if you are interested please call the center at 217-285-4969.

n The class of 1959 will meet for lunch the third Tuesday of each month at the Courtyard Cafe at 11 a.m. All classmates please come.

n Home and Community Education (HCE) board meets the first Monday of each month. Visitors and members of HCE are invited to attend the 10 a.m. meeting at the Farm Bureau building. Come see the plans for the new year.

n Area senior adults are invited to attend a monthly multi-denominational Bible Study with David and Charlotte Hamilton. Meeting the 1st and 3rd Thursday morning each month in the

n The Springfield Vet Center is now offering Readjustment Counseling in Pittsfield. We are currently at the American Legion Post 152 every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month from

9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Veterans and their families can schedule an appointment by calling 217-492-4955 during normal business hours and asking for John Mizer LSW. n Pike County PAL (Parents of Addicted Loved Ones) Group will be meeting every Thursday evening from 6:30-8 p.m. in the Shaw Room at the Pike County Senior Citizens Center. Please use the back entrance. For questions call 217-653-6076. n The class of 1961 will have lunch at the Cardinal Inn on the 3rd Friday of each month at noon. Classmates, Please attend. n Bursting Bubbles foundation emotional support group on the first Tuesday of the month from 6-7 p.m. at the Barry YMCA and at Illini Hospital on the second Thursday of the month from 6-7 p.m. For more information call 217-335-2961. n 12 Step Al-Anon Family Support Group for alcohol and narcotic addiction every Monday at 8 p.m. at the First Christian Church in Pittsfield (Breezeway entrance). For more information, call Betty at 217285-6191. n Bright Star Methodist Cooperative Parish (Oxville, Florence, Detroit, Griggsville, Perry, and New Salem) county wide Bible Studies for Spring 2018 will be held every Wednesday morning at Griggsville UMC at 9:30 a.m. and every Tuesday evening at 6:30 p.m. at Perry UMC. This is absolutely free and everyone in Pike County are welcome to attend. Questions? Call Pastor Dave at 217-8332575. n Set Free is a non-traditional recovery program for adults (ages 18+), based on doing life together. Join us for Set Free every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pittsfield Assembly of God. There is free childcare, from birth6th grade. Learn more: Set Free Recovery Group on Facebook.com. n The Pittsfield Masonic Lodge meets the second

Monday of every month at the Masonic Lodge. n Meals Plus for Seniors serves lunch at noon, Mon. through Fri. at Findley Place. Over 60, meals are based on donations. Call Connie by 8:50 a.m. on the day you would like to make reservations at 217-285-6150. Milk and bread offered with every meal. OUT-OF-COUNTY n Come to the Y and check out our new mother/daughter volleyball league! The girls can play with mom, stepmom, aunt, grandmother, or anyone that fits that role! Registration is open from July 16-Aug. 1. Games will be played on Monday nights. Game times are 6, 7, and 8 p.m. The 6 week league will run from Aug. 6-Sept. 10. Ages include 9 years old and up. Don’t have an adult to play with? No problem! Give us the girls name and we will find a place for them! Register at the front desk to reserve your spot or call 217-7732230. Only 7 teams are allowed in the league so be sure to sign up early! Email ymcabuss@casscomm.com for any questions! n Come out to beautiful Rolling Greens Golf Course to play in the YMCA's 4th Annual Golf Tournament! This 18-hole 4 person scramble tournament featuring Rolling Greens will be Aug. 3 with registration starting at 10:15 a.m. Your team will have the opportunity to bid on great silent auction items, participate in minigames, as well as provided lunch at 11 a.m. Shotgun start will be at 11:30 a.m. Registration deadline is July 27. Registrations received after July 27 will have a late fee added. Get your team signed up today! All proceeds from this tournament are given directly back to the community in the forms of numerous programs, services, as well as continuance of our established endowment fund. With our endowment fund, we are able to ensure that the Y’s mission will be carried out for generations and generations. Contact Kristen Buss at 217-773-2230 for more information.

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D4

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Pike Press

SPECIAL

Pittsfield, Illinois

Programs for pre-K readers By O. ETHAN BROWN Pike Press With school just around the corner, parents are trying to make the best of the last few summer weeks. While some may do crafts and others go on field trips, reading could be a fun and exciting addition to a young child’s day. “Children need to be read to. If they are not they will not enjoy reading,” Barry Public Library director Becky Winner said. All three of Pike County’s major libraries have special programs designed to assist pre-K children in their journey to reading. However, each has its own unique method in making it exciting for your toddler. The Barry library has several programs, including one called Baby Board Book. This program is dedicated to getting kids started at the earliest age possible, through the giving of books. Each pre-K kid that comes into the library for their first time, will receive a free book, Winner said. Their picture will be taken with the book and placed in the Barry paper, The Paper. Winner credits her inspiration for such an incentive-based program at the steps of Griggsville Library director Kimber Martin. About 65 “board books” have been given so far.

Another interesting program is the Rubber-Ducky Club, which started at the beginning of June. Each child that signs up will receive a sheet of activities to take home. When completed, he or she can return and pickup a rubber-ducky of their choice, Winner said. Each time they bring back their sheet, they receive another duck and a free book. The program was made possible through the receiving of grants from the Tracy Family Foundation, a branch of Dot Foods. “I plan to keep it going indefinitely. As long as parents keep bringing their children, we’ll keep having it,” Winner said. Martin recommends enrolling kids in the “A 1000 Books before Kindergarten” program, at the Griggsville library. This presents a goal of reading 1000 kids books before the child begins their first year in kindergarten. Each time they complete the challenge, they receive a free book. “There are studies that show if your child reads a thousand books before he starts kindergarten, he has a higher likelihood of success,” Martin said. While the Griggsville library is currently wrapping up their summer programs, if parents are interested in a series of reading sessions, a “Birth to Five” course will be coming in September.

Submitted photo

The Barry Public Library offers several different reading programs for pre-K children, as do the other libraries in Pike County. Libraries present a place for kids to have fun reading and see that children are not the only ones that do it, Barry Public Library director Becky Winner said.

This program will run through May of next year and anyone who is interested can visit the library to signup, Martin said. The Pittsfield Library also has a reading session,

Help kids calm first-day-of-school jitters The first day of school can be an exciting time, especially for children who have never before attended school. But even youngsters excited about the first day may also experience some jitters. Such nerves are normal, and parents can help kids calm those jitters in various ways. n Talk about the first day as it approaches. A child’s first day of school is a milestone, and parents may do various things to commemorate the occasion. The excitement leading up to the first day can spark kids’ enthusiasm, but it also may lead to some anxiety about the unknown. Parents can quell those fears by discussing the first day as it approaches. Explain why the first day is so special, encouraging youngsters to share their feelings. If kids express fears about their first day, parents can explain they felt similarly on their first day of school but quickly adjusted. n Let kids choose their own clothes. Parents may be tempted to buy special outfits for their children for the first day of school. But kids who are jittery about their first day may calm down if allowed to choose their own attire for the big day. A favorite T-shirt or outfit might be just the thing to comfort kids feeling a bit nervous about their first day of school. n Get a head start on your morning routine. As summer winds down, begin

acclimating children to the morning routine they can expect when the school year begins. One to two weeks before the first day of school, start waking children up when they will need to be up for school. Kids who are accustomed to the morning routine may be more calm on their first day of school because of their familiarity with their new schedule. Going cold turkey on the first day of school may make kids less enthusiastic about attending school. n Attend school orientation events and plan some play dates in advance of the first day. Seeing familiar faces might make kids forget all about their jitters when they arrive at school on the first day. Inquire about school orientation events and attend as many of those sessions as possible. If encouraged to do so, take kids along so they can meet prospective classmates. Arrange for play dates with those classmates in advance of the first day so kids have a few recognizable faces their own age come the first day of school. n Start the day off on the right foot. The night before the first day of school, make sure kids’ outfits are clean, their supplies are packed and ready to go and their lunch is made. The less parents have to rush around on the morning of the first day of school, the calmer kids are likely to be.

Simple ways to help children develop self-esteem Confident children can grow up to become confident adults who are in better positions to reach their potential and find success. Parents can help their children build selfesteem that can benefit them throughout their lives. Children with healthy self-esteem may be confident to try new things, feel good about themselves and feel better prepared for life’s challenges than youngsters with low self-esteem. Low self-esteem can lead to feelings of insecurity and doubt and encourage children to focus on the times they’ve failed rather than succeeded. The resource Kids Health also notes that low self-esteem may lead to kids being self-critical. While parents may think they can foster self-esteem in children by consistently praising them and telling them they are wonderful, experts disagree. According to Jim Taylor, author of the book, “Your Kids Are Listening: Nine Messages They Need to Hear from You,” rather than layering on the praise, parents can help kids become more competent in their worlds, which will help children develop self-esteem in turn. This may mean taking a step back and letting kids take risks and work through their own problems. Consistently telling children they’re great at everything never raises the bar, potentially discouraging them from

trying to achieve greater goals. When they venture into “the real world,” artificially praised kids may be in for a surprise. Parents also can boost self-esteem by giving children choices, which may help them feel empowered. Parents can facilitate age-appropriate choices, such as letting kids pick their own between breakfast foods or their own clothes, that can gradually prepare kids for more difficult choices. Parents may be tempted to do everything for their children, especially if it is faster or if parents want to ensure a task is done correctly. But letting kids do things themselves helps them to learn new skills. Even if kids don’t perform tasks perfectly, allowing them to do things themselves teaches them about approaching challenges, making mistakes and learning by practice. One-on-one with kids is another great way for parents to build their children’s self-esteem. One-on-one time gives parents an opportunity to initiate discussions while giving kids chances to express themselves. One-on-one sessions provide opportunities to discuss problems or issues that may require some advice. Knowing they have a voice and that their views matter can be one of the easiest ways to help children develop confidence and self-esteem.

director Sara Bernard said. During the summer, the library runs a read/reward system where a child can read a specified number of books and choose a backpack, book, or other reward,

similar to those mentioned above. Libraries are an excellent way to get children excited about reading, Winner said. It allows them to see the multitude of books available

to them, as well as the fact that older people read. “You want them to see reading as a fun thing, rather than just drudgery,” Martin concluded.

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