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50¢ November 30, 2016

Pittsfield, IL Thank you,

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Rosemary Clark of Pittsfield, for subscribing to Pike Press!

News Western to have “Truth in taxation” hearing.

See page A2 Law enforcement makes drug arrests.

See page A3

News

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Most wildlife watchers are blaming the weather for lower deer harvest numbers in Pike County this year. Statewide, Pike County is third in deer harvest after leading the state for the past two decades before faltering last year in the first firearm season but rebounding back by the second. Last year at this time, Pike was ranked fourth, but came back with a strong second firearm season. The 2017 second firearm season is this coming weekend. Adams County was one of the few counties that increased over last year’s

total – 1,642 this year, 1,562 last year. Jackson County was down but still had more deer harvested than Pike. Last year Jackson had 1,586 and this year 1,562, Pike is down 80 deer from 1,419 last year to 1,346 this year. While the weather has been unseasonably warm and, at least in West Central Illinois, was hit by 40 mph winds, 20 counties reported an increase in deer harvest – Adams, Boone, Carroll, Champaign, Clay, Clinton, Jasper, Kane, Kankakee, Kendall Lake, LaSalle, Livingson, McDonough, Mercer, Piatt, Richland, Stephenson, Warren and Wayne. “It was windy and warm,” Gary

Harpole, Harpole’s Heartland Lodge, said. “Deer just weren’t moving. They don’t like wind.” Harpole said the lodge was full over the firearm season, but added that is not an indication that firearm is more popular than bow or vice versa because firearm season is much shorter than bow season. According to numbers issued by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, the number of deer harvested so far this year is 16,763. At the same time last year, the number stood at 19,567. “I expected that,” Harpole said. “I wasn’t disappointed because I expected it, but with the warm weather we

friday, DEC. 2

46 27 High Low

Saturday, DEC. 3

42 32 High Low

Sunday, DEC. 4

43 32 High Low

Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

Online

Classified . . . . . . . . C3 Community . . . . . . b3 County News . . . A2, A3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .A6,d1,d4 Court . . . . . . . . . . . c3 Marketplace . . . C2-3 Obituaries . . . . . . . b2 Opinion . . . . . . . . . A4 Op-Ed . . . . . . . . . . A5

Pie

for the sky

Tristan Coy waits patiently for Pleasant Hill student council member Kaylee Smith to serve him a sample of one of the pies at the Pleasant Hill pie sampling. The student council held the event last Wednesday morning in the school cafeteria. The group collected 24 different pies from members of the council and staff at the school. Anyone wanting to sample half of the pies could pay $3 and anyone wanting to sample all the pies could pay $5. Milk and coffee were also available for an adiditional $1. Each pie was cut into approximately one-inch cubes and served.The event raised $250, all of which will be donated to the All-Pike County Honor Flight, scheduled for 2017.

Gary Harpole Harpole’s Heartland Lodge

have been having, then the wind that Friday and Saturday, it was not good for hunting. Sunday was a little better and our hunters had some success that day.” (See, deer, A2)

By JUSTIN A. COBB Pike Press A skeleton crew is keeping West Central Mass Transit District (WCMTD) buses running on a very limited basis despite continued lack of state grant funding. The rescue comes thanks to donations from the community. “We have been able to put just one bus a day on to help seniors with disabilities get to their medical appointments,” Jean Jumper, WCMTD executive director, said by phone Friday afternoon. “We’re just trying to be as economical with the donations as we can be and still get folks to where they need to go.” WCMTD has received donations from four of the six counties it serves— Cass, Morgan, Pike, and Schuyler— according to Jumper, who said donations had not yet been received from Brown or Scott County, which are much smaller in population and ridership than the other four. The Health and Wellness Foundation of Pike County (HWFPC) so far has collected $6,000 in donations, $3,500 (See, service, A2)

Wind farm applies Chair bids farewell to three members for approval west of Pittsfield city limits

By JUSTIN A. COBB Pike Press Society . . . . . . . . . . B3 The county has received Sports . . . . . . . . C1-2 a siting application for a proposed wind farm Obituaries in this west of Pittsfield, Zoning issue: Bertagnolli, Carroll, Crowder, Halpin, Administrator Mark Mountain told Pike County Board Hobbs, Ifner, McCann, members when they met Mixer. Monday evening. According to a proposed site plan, which Mountain Pike Press © 2016 All rights reserved. This provided to board members material may not be published, and others attending the broadcast, rewritten meeting, Illinois Winds LLC or redistributed. is seeking permission to install 26 wind turbines on private land within Pittsfield Township west of Pittsfield city limits. The electricity generated by the turbines would feed into an existing Prairie Power-owned transmission line via a dedicated substation located on the northwest corner of 350th Street and 250th Avenue, as indicated in the proposed site plan. “A wind farm is a permitted use in agricultural zoning, but state law applies also,” Mountain said, noting he and State’s Attorney Zachary Boren would be working together to ensure the applicant conforms to county and state laws and regulations, which Boren said included entering into an agricultural impact mitigation agreement with the Illinois Department of Agriculture. Final siting approval would be up to the county board following a public hearing, though the city of Our Town . . . . . . . b1

“It was windy and warm. Deer just weren’t moving. They don’t like wind.”

Donations drive barebones bus service

WEEKEND WEATHER

INSIDE

Vol. 174, No. 48

Experts say weather to blame for lower deer harvest in county

Lewis wins Saukee raffle. See page d1

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Pittsfield would have some say in the matter since the proposed project falls within 1.5 miles of its municipal limit, according to Mountain. Asked by board member Carrie Martin whether the siting approval process

By JUSTIN A. COBB Pike Press “I will miss you from the board,” Pike County Board chair Andy Borrowman said during the chairman’s remarks portion of Monday night’s county board meeting. Monday’s meeting was the last for three members who had chosen not to run for re-election this year:

Michael Boren, Cleve Curry, and Dr. Dan Mefford. The three members had worked diligently during their terms in office to ensure the county’s money was spent wisely and served with the county’s best interest at heart, Borrowman said. “It’s been my pleasure to serve with them,” Borrowman said. “You have all been good for Pike Coun-

ty.” Mefford, the shortest serving member leaving the board, who was elected in 2012 and served a single four-year term, distributed copies of “The Law” by Frederick Bastiat, which stresses the importance of respecting natural rights in governance, to fellow board members and praised their hard work. (See, farewell, A2)

“A wind farm is a permitted use in agricultural zoning, but state law applies also.”

Mark Mountain Pike County zoning administrator would be similar to that completed in September for the proposed expansion of Hickory Ridge Landfill, Boren said, “It’s similar but with fewer steps.” Martin said she would be interested in hearing from landowners who may be affected by the project. “If the landowners are behind it, that’s two-thirds the battle,” board member Rodger Hannel said. In other business, the board: n Accepted the labor contract with sheriff’s department personnel as approved by their bargaining unit, represented by Illinois Fraternal Order of Police (FOP). The three-year contract, effective retroactively (See, county, A2)

Justin A. Cobb/Pike Press

4-H

visits county board

Pike County 4-H made its annual visit to the Pike County Board at Monday night’s meeting. Members described their accomplishments for the year and presented the board and audience members with homemade cookies as a gesture of thanks for the community’s continued support of the organization. County board member Carrie Martin, right, accepts a cookie from 4-H member Isabella Vortman, center. County board chair Andy Borrowman, left, beamed as he described the club’s annual visit as his favorite meeting of the year.


A2

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

News

Pittsfield, Illinois

Area deer harvest 2015 2016 Adams 1,562 1,642 Brown 738 645 Calhoun 565 482 Greene 711 660 Jersey 460 440 Pike 1,419 1,346 Scott 276 264

Deer

(Continued from A1) Harpole does not think the size or health of the herd is in question. “I am optimistic about the health of the herd and the number of deer out there,” he said. Scott Andress of the Archery Shop in Pittsfield agreed the deer numbers are good and the herd is healthy. “We have had the best bow season we have had in 15 years,” Andress said. “I’d estimate 30 percent of the hunting ground isn’t even hunted during firearm season. Out-of-state hunters that bow hunt own a lot of the hunting ground and during firearm season it is not even hunted.” Andress said he has no numbers to backup his theory but says he believes a lot of locals still firearm hunt but few visitors come to Pike County for firearm season. Andress says he wishes Illinois would go the same route as Iowa – lengthen bow season and move firearm season to two weekends in December.

Rick Rodhouse of Pleasant Hill agrees with Andress on the popularity of bow hunting. “I bow hunt only,” Rodhouse, a former outfitter, said. “I may take the grandkids out during firearm season but I bow hunt.” Rodhouse also agreed that the deer herd is healthy and the numbers are good. “I saw two different herds of at least 20 this weekend,” Rodhouse said. “I think we were down for a couple of years with CWD and Blue Tongue. And I think some areas were hit harder than others and deer may have migrated to some of the less populated areas, kind of evening the herd out instead of pockets of deer in some areas.” Andress said the fewer numbers of deer taken this season could result in a better season next year. Harpole agreed. “About once every five years, we have bad weather for the first season,” he said. “But it may be better this weekend.”

Service

(Continued from A1) of which has since been turned over to WCMTD, to help sustain mass transit services while WCMTD awaits state funding, HWFPC executive director Patty McIntosh said via email Monday afternoon. A 501(c)(3), not-for-profit organization, HWFPC is the designated organization to collect donations within Pike County for mass transit. As a result of the donations, the WCMTD branch in Pike County announced last week it has been able to provide non-emergency medical transportation by appointment on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays between 5 a.m. and 5 p.m. for those 60 years of age or older or disabled. Those qualifying within Pike County may arrange transportation at least 24 hours in advance by calling 217-245-2900 or 866443-2901 between 8:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Monday through Friday; voice messages left will be returned. “The donations have come not because I’ve been out scouting, but the community has seen the need and are coming to me, people in their own community stepping out to say, ‘There’s a real need here,’” Jumper said. “Personally, this just blows me away that people have literally stepped out this way to say we need this to happen. I’m very grateful and thrilled to be back up and moving again.” WCMTD initially suspended all services starting Oct. 15 after the state comptroller’s office announced state grant funds already promised to the mass transit district would not be disbursed before December. Jumper said she has heard nothing new from the comptroller’s office regarding those funds and that if or

when those funds are finally disbursed, WCMTD may only receive a portion of the money promised, similar to the proration of state aid public school districts have endured since the 2010 fiscal year. “There are a lot of back bills at the comptroller’s office, obviously,” Jumper said. “We have been told there’s not enough money to be transferred for all the needs in the comptroller’s office, and they’re not telling us how they’re going to distribute what money they do transfer. I don’t know if we’ll get the full amount. Maybe we’ll get a portion of it. We don’t know. We haven’t been told. Nobody’s saying.” Jumper hopes to receive all of the money promised so the mass transit district can resume service in full, but if it receives only a portion, WCMTD will use those funds as judiciously as possible to sustain the muchneeded service, she said. “We understand the inconvenience, and it’s not making us real happy, either,” Jumper said. “We’re all ready to come back to work. We just need cooperation from Springfield.” The grant money upon which the transit service is waiting allows WCMTD to provide its services at a considerable discount, between $2 and $3.50 per rider, since many of those who depend on the service would otherwise be unable to afford it, according to Jumper. Actual per-rider cost depends on distance traveled and number of passengers per trip, but accounting for all costs, including insurance, leases, telephone service, and other overhead in addition to maintenance and fuel, net cost of operation is $2.79 per mile traveled, Jumper said.

Farewell (Continued from A1) “I will miss these fine folks,” Mefford said. “Everyone of you has served the county with diligence.” Curry, who marked 10 years on the board, commented that he was wearing the same blazer and gray shirt at that he had

worn at his first meeting, and while he had not gained or lost weight, “my hair now matches my shirt,” he said. Boren grinned as he listened to his colleagues but did not offer any parting comments himself.

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Nikki Liehr/Pike Press

FNB

donates to

G-P

The Farmers National Bank of Griggsville recently donated $1,000 to the teachers at Griggsville-Perry Middle School. Members of the G-P staff and the Farmers National Bank at the presentation were left to right: Grant Huber, ag loan officer at Farmers National Bank; Heather Knight, Garrett White, Courtney Sargeant, Carl Spath, G-P Middle School principal; Erica Denish, Stephanie Steele, Doug Smith, president of Farmers National Bank; Shannon Butler, Cody Freeman, Genny Stauffer and Sarah Bauer-Herron.

Western to have ‘Truth in Taxation’ hearing By JUSTIN A. COBB Pike Press Western School Board will have a “Truth in Taxation” hearing regarding its tax levy at its December regular meeting, members voted at the Nov. 21 regular meeting. “We should have a Truth in Taxation hearing whether or not we’re required to if it gets the public discussing the financing of our schools,” interim district superintendent Terry Robertson said. Under the Truth in Taxation Law, codified as a division of the Illinois Property Tax Code, taxing bodies are required to have a public hearing if a proposed tax levy would exceed the amount of most recent tax extension by more than five percent. The proposed levy, which the board voted to authorize Robertson and cointerim district superintendent Dr. Curt Simonson to prepare will “probably ask mildly” above the five-percent threshold, Robertson said. Simonson generally serves as interim superintendent in the spring, but both interim superintendents work together to draft the levy in the fall. Robertson said the aggregate tax rate would likely remain about the same, with most of the increase in the amount stemming from anticipated growth in the district’s equalized assessed valuation (EAV). However, the district, which is con-

tained almost entirely in Pike County with a small amount of territory in Adams County, has not yet received an EAV from Pike County, and “it could be a few weeks” before they do, Robertson said. Regardless of the size of the levy, transportation services will continue to suffer lack of funding as long as the state of Illinois continues failing to pay the transportation aid to which school districts are legally entitled, according to Robertson. The district has still not received the last quarterly payment of state transportation aid from the fiscal year that ended June 30, “which we probably won’t see,” and although the first payment for the current fiscal year has been vouchered but not yet sent, the second payment should have arrived by now, Robertson said. “We’re three payments behind,” Robertson said. “You’re dealing with the state of Illinois.” The district is limited to levying 0.20 percent for transportation purposes, but it would require about three times that rate if the district hypothetically were to depend completely on property taxes to fund transportation, according to Robertson. Robertson said districts in downstate Illinois often get shortchanged on transportation funding, despite proportionally higher transportation costs, because its sparse population of voters makes them politically easier to ignore versus

the densely populated Chicago area. “We’ve got all the miles and the fewest people,” Robertson said. In other business, board members voted one hour and 12 minutes into the meeting to go into closed session to discuss specific employee matters, collective bargaining, security, student discipline, individual student matters, and litigation. After one hour and 27 minutes in closed session, the board returned to open session and approved the following personnel actions, according to draft minutes provided by the district office the following afternoon. Hires: n Tammie Branham, long-term substitute pre-K teacher n Anna Hechler, junior high volleyball coach n Justin Puterbaugh, junior high boys basketball assistant coach n Ali Zaerr, elementary teacher, 2017-2018 school year Resignations: n Kara Jockisch, kindergarten teacher, effective Dec. 21. n Trenda Jung, pre-K teacher, effective Dec. 21 Other: n Authorized superintendent to fill emergency vacancies prior to next meeting. The meeting began 6:01 p.m. and, according to draft minutes, lasted two hours and 45 minutes.

County

(Continued from A1) to Dec. 1, 2015, provides zero wage increase in the first year, followed by two-percent increases in the second and third years, and brings the employee share of health insurance premium contributions to the same level as all other county employees, according to county board chair Andy Borrowman. Board member Carrie Martin voted No on the contract because she had not received a copy to review prior to voting. The newly approved contract had already been signed by FOP and would be signed by Borrowman, the county clerk, and the sheriff upon county board approval, Borrowman said. n Discussed a draft policy on official travel reimbursement, which units of local government must implement by Jan. 1, 2017, under the Illinois Local Government Travel Expense Control Act, which was signed into law in June. Departments of county government that already have a travel reimbursement policy in place may continue following that policy insofar as it complies with the act, according to Boren, who said he would present a final draft for full board approval in December. n Learned the state’s attorney and Hickory Ridge Landfill had negotiated two minor changes to the landfill host agreement regarding the escrow fund for post-closure care. The first adds language

clarifying that those funds are not to be used until after the 30-year period during which the landfill company by state statute is responsible for decommissioning and post-closure care has passed, while the other delays establishment of the escrow fund until Jan. 1, 2017, so the county will not have to pay the bank the annual $450 maintenance fee just for the final calendar month of 2016, according to Boren. n Granted highway department employees a 1.7-percent wage increase and approved the county engineer’s salary of $96,000, as recommended by the Illinois Association of County Engineers and Illinois Department of Transportation, as well as a resolution to appropriate funds for the county engineer’s salary, half of which is reimbursed by IDOT. Martin voted No on both the salary and the resolution to appropriate funds for the salary, citing language in the IDOTdrafted resolution freeing the state of any obligation to pay its share in the event the state fails to pass an appropriation for those funds. n Adopted budget amendments for fiscal year 2016, which ends today, Wednesday, Nov. 30. Highlights included approximately $10,000 in adjustments for office supplies, fuel, and director’s salary for Pike County Emergency Management Agency, internal line-item

transfers in the circuit clerk’s office, and the adjustment for the billing cycle change by the Regional Office of Education following the July 2015 consolidation of regional offices statewide. n Passed a resolution authorizing the treasurer to solicit bids for a line of credit of approximately $524,000 to be borrowed against the tax levy for general fund purposes. The finance committee will review the bids at their next regular meeting and provide a recommendation for full board approval in December, according to Treasurer Scott Syrcle. n Adopted the fiscal year 2017 budget and tax levy. The levy is up $46,224 from the previous year, according to board member Jim Sheppard, finance committee chair, who said the increase is “right in line” with the concomitant increase in the county’s equalized assessed valuation (EAV). n Agreed to continue working with MS Communications of Quincy to seek additional savings on telephone services. The service has saved the county approximately $400 per month so far, according to the GIS/IT committee report, presented by board member Dr. Dan Mefford, committee chair. n Appointed Brice Lawson as commissioner to Valley City Drainage and Levee District for a three-year term ending

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first Tuesday of September 2019 and Jeremy Thomas to Rural Pittsfield Fire Protection District Board for a three-year term ending first Monday of May 2019. n Renewed services with the Illinois State’s Attorney Appellate Prosecutor’s office for $7,000, which according to the state’s attorney provides legal assistance for appeals and in the event of a conflict of interest involving his office. n Set an organizational meeting Monday, Dec. 5, 6:30 p.m., in the lower courtroom of Pike County Courthouse in Pittsfield to swear in newly elected board members and set the December regular meeting date. n Learned the ambulance service posted a loss of $4,930.26 in October after $95,453.81 in revenue and $98,197.52 in expenditures plus $2,186.55 spent toward the new ambulance building. n Donated $1,000 to help sustain mass transit services while West Central Mass Transit District awaits release of a state grant. n Appropriated $448,000 in motor fuel tax funds for the 2017 county highway maintenance program. n Approved Oct. 24 meeting minutes, committee reports, and payment of bills totaling $223,420. The meeting lasted one hour and 40 minutes. Board member Patrice Mills was absent.


News

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

a3

Pittsfield, Illinois

Law enforcement makes drug arrests By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Search warrants were issued last week in two separate, unrelated incidents. Both resulted in drug arrests of four persons and another individual arrested on a warrant. The two incidents started Tuesday morning, Nov. 22 when the Pike County Sheriff’s Department, with assistance from Pittsfield Police Department and the West Central Illinois Drug Task Force, executed a courtauthorized search warrant at a residence in the 400 block of East North St. near the Pike County Little League Field. Arrested as a result of the search were Ricky Allen, 42 and Sasha A. Smith, 28, both of Pittsfield. Allen was arrested for possession of methamphetamine, possession of meth manufacturing waste, possession of meth manufacturing materials, and endangering the life of a child. Smith was arrested for possession of methamphetamine and endangering the life of a child. . Both individuals remain lodged at the Pike County Jail pending court appearance. Allen’s bond was set at $100,000 and Smith’s was set at $80,000.

The next arrest happened less than 24 hours later when the Pike County Sheriff’s Department, the West Central Illinois Drug Task Force and the Illinois State Police executed a court authorized search warrant on Blue Street in Milton early Wednesday morning. Michael J. Wallace, 51, Nebo, was immediately taken into custody on an outstanding warrant of arrest for revocation of bail bond and transported to the Pike County Jail. Subsequent to the search, police located the targets in the investigation in Barry, at the Barry Travel Plaza. Shelby R. Mulford, 21, Pittsfield and Kensey R. Mesey, 23, Milton, were taken into custody in Barry. Mulford was arrested on charges of possession of controlled substance and burglary. Mesey was arrested for possession of controlled substance and burglary. The investigation concludes a 24-hour investigation involving a residential burglary in Pike County which involved the theft of United States Currency and private property. All three individuals in the second incident remain lodged in the Pike County Jail pending court appearance. Messy has a bond of $50,000, Mulford’s was set at $25,000 and Wallace had no bond set.

Justin A. Cobb/Pike Press

Digging

in for

December

opening

A heavy equipment operator excavates soil Tuesday morning along the foundation of the Dollar General store currently under construction in Griggsville. The new store may open by late December, according to Crystal Ghassemi of Dollar General corporate communications. The company currently anticipates a Jan. 7 grand opening, offering $10 gift cards to the first 50 adults customers and door prizes to the first 200 customers. The Griggsville store will employ between six and 10 employees and will have a “soft opening” prior to the Jan. 7 celebration.

Nikki Liehr/Pike Press

Judge’s Choice winner Kaytlin Risley, left, speech coach at Griggsville-Perry Middle School, presented Nathalie Lothridge, a fifth-grader and member of the G-P speech team, with the Judges’ Choice Award from the IESA State Speech competition. The Judges’ Choice Award is bestowed on the winner by the competition judges. Each judge selects one exceptional performance among those that have adjudicated. One winner is chosen from the entire competition. Lothridge competed in the story telling category.

Justin A. Cobb/Pike Press

Local business bustles on Small Business Saturday Local businesses were bustling with activity on the seventh annual Small Business Saturday, an nationwide initiative supported by the Pike County Chamber of Commerce to devote the Saturday after Thanksgiving to supporting small, local businesses. Robin and Bob Church of Pittsfield shop for gifts Saturday afternoon at Casteel’s Color Wheel in downtown Pittsfield.

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Sherry Stewart updates the chalkboard menu at her restaurant, Hog Daddy BBQ, Saturday afternoon. The restaurant, which opened in downtown Pittsfield earlier this month, offered a free Pepsi product with meal purchase for Small Business Saturday.

ISP watching for distracted drivers Officials with the Illinois State Police (ISP) announce that additional officers will be patrolling work zones as the construction season comes to an end. Although officers will be enforcing all traffic laws, they will primarily focus on motorists who are violating distracted driving laws. “The purpose of the additional patrols is to ensure the safety of both the workers and the motorists traveling through the work zone,” stated ISP Director Leo P. Schmitz. “As the construction season comes to an end, we want to do what we can to keep work zone related injuries from occurring. You can do your part by remembering to drop it and drive.” Unless it is an emergency, you must be age 19 and older and use hands-free technol-

ogy to use a cell phone while operating a motor vehicle in Illinois. The use of hand-held cell phones, texting, or using other electronic communications while operating a motor vehicle is prohibited by law in Illinois. The ISP encourages motorists to also limit other distractions that may be occurring while driving through a work zone. Please refrain from eating or drinking, using navigation systems, adjusting your music devices, or anything else that may take your eyes away from the road. “Work zones can pose many challenges for drivers and require your undivided attention, “said Priscilla Tobias, director of the Illinois Department of Transportation’s (IDOT) Office of Program Development.

“Studies have shown that drivers engaged in activities other than driving are up to four times more likely to be involved in a crash. Please avoid distractions at all times and pay extra attention as well to first responders and maintenance vehicles working to keep our roads safe for everyone.” Distracted driving is one of the common factors related to fatal traffic crashes. The other three most common factors are speeding, driving under the influence, and not wearing a seatbelt. Together, they make up the “Fatal Four” violations related to fatal traffic crashes. The initiative is funded by IDOT. The ISP and IDOT worked jointly to identify the locations best suited for the additional patrols.


OPINION Pike Press

A4

Wednesday, November 30, 2016, Pittsfield, Illinois

Donald Trump is Comin’ to Town (Sung to “Santa Claus is Comin’ to Town)

You better watch Fox, you better not cry, Better not pout, I’m telling you why, Donald Trump is comin’ to town.

Our View DECEMBER ADVICE

He’s making his picks, with the help of his Vice,

Finding joy in a packed Christmas schedule

Donald Trump is comin’ to town. He Tweets when you are sleepin’ He knows when boobs are fake He knows if it’ll help his bottom line, So be Yuge for goodness sake. Oh! You better read Twitter, forget the “fake” press, Believe in what he’s doing, forget all the rest.

Some call this “the most wonderful time of the year.” Others, burdened by planning, shopping, wrapping, mailing, cooking (you get the idea,) struggle to find the joy. Is there a solution? Or even a compromise? Perhaps the best advice is to keep it all in perspective. And to realize that an antidote may be closer than you think. Now that Black Friday, Small Business Saturday and Cyber Monday are behind us, it’s time to review the Christmas list and realize that your remaining December needs are right here at home. Local stores have gifts and some will wrap them, too. There are decorations to be hung and plenty of ingredients for delicious Christmas eating. There are many friendly post offices to launch your Christmas greetings and churches with messages and music to inspire. Christmas, like the rest of the year, isn’t really about “things.” It’s about the people in your life…and undoubtedly, some of your favorite people are right here in Pike. When you shop locally for Christmas, you are helping to support the goods and services that you like to have handy all year ’round. And these merchants, in turn, support the community organizations that help improve our shared quality of life. December is beginning; the last lap of the race stretches before us. Let’s run with joy – right down to our local store and share some friendly conversation with the clerk we already know. Let’s check out the service times at our local church and track down the true source of joy this season. Pretty soon you’ll be humming “the most wonderful time of the year.” This Week's

Poll Question Week of November 30, 2016

Q: December is upon us.

1. I haven’t done anything to get ready for Christmas. 2. Decorations are up, shopping is done, cards are ready to be mailed. 3. I’ve really scaled back, try to celebrate Christmas in a small way. 4. I’m looking forward to shopping local this month.

Share your answer at pikepress.com

Last week's poll results The Thanksgiving weekend is upon us. My priority is: 100%

0% 0%

0%

A. Spending time with family and eating way too much. B. Scoring Black Friday bargains! C. Supporting local merchants on Small Business Saturday. D. All of the above!

Donald Trump is comin’ to town!

Guest Column: By Lee H. Hamilton

Welcome to Washington, Mr. President-elect A

s hard as the campaign might have been and the transition is proving to be, Donald Trump’s challenges are really just beginning. Governing after a toxic election in which the results awarded him an ambiguous national mandate — his opponent, after all, got more votes — will require finesse, a clear-eyed view of his role in the world, and no small amount of luck. There is no question that, come January, President Trump and the Republican majority in Congress will be in firm control of the government. They will be able to call the shots on policy, and cooperation between the President and Congress should be far more assured than it has been for the last six years. He will soon find, even under these circumstances, that the commitments and promises made during the campaign are going to be very hard to carry out. The new President’s number one priority almost certainly is going to be rebuilding U.S. economic power. A great many of the people who voted for him did so because they expect him to produce more good jobs, better incomes, and better economic opportunity. But he faces great difficulties on this front: gross inequalities of income and opportunity, persistent poverty, a decaying infrastructure, a challenging education system, a health care system that even after reform remains expensive and often ineffective, and rapid technological and global changes that make it harder for people without a college education to find work. To say nothing of a slow-moving Congress

Timothy F. Campbell President

Julie Boren

Publisher & Editor

much stomach Congress and the country have for sending deficits spiraling upward. Others of the President-elect’s programs — slashing regulations on financial institutions, on worker protections, and on environmental impacts — would create major changes in American policy at home. These, too, will arouse much opposition. While contemplating this, it’s also worth remembering the words of Harold Macmillan, who was once asked what he most feared as Britain’s prime minister. “Events, dear boy, events,” he replied. Surprises will come along that interrupt even the best-tended plans — and that can buttress or destroy a president’s standing in the blink of an eye. The Senate, in particular, is precariously balanced in his favor, and it won’t take much for Democrats to brake or stymie his initiatives. As a candidate, Mr. Trump effectively captured the discontent and anger of many Americans. With his proposals, he has upended the political order with a new brand of politics and policies. My guess is that he is on a steep learning curve, having underestimated the difficulties and over-estimated his capabilities to deal with them. We should all extend the President-elect the benefit of the doubt, be vigilant, and see how his presidency unfolds before becoming judgmental.

■ Lee Hamilton is a Senior Advisor for the Indiana University Center on Representative. He was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives for 34 years.

Guest Column: By Jim Nowlan

The center is not holding I

spoke post-election to the Current Events Class in Evanston, 30 or so mature and very successful professional and business couples who have been meeting for decades to assay the world around them. Over coffee before my remarks, I learned that most couples had been unfavorable to Trump. I also sensed that their children and adult grandchildren were married and part of what I call the twoincome “double professional” class, and doing very well. In this election, Evanston and most of the suburbs in the once reliably GOP “golden crescent” around Chicago went for Hillary. In contrast, my rural county of Stark, like all of rural Downstate, was casting two of every three votes, or more, for Donald Trump, a much more GOP turnout than normal. I pointed out to the worthies in Evanston that, sadly different from the situations of their offspring, many families in Stark, often headed by single white moms, are earning as little as 1/12th to 1/30th (this last for single moms) that of the double professionals. When I was growing up in Stark in the 1950s, most families were intact and felt middle class. This, even though they had less purchasing power wealth than many of today’s poor families. For example, purchase of the new, miniscule-screen TVs was a big deal back then, and many had to hold off for a few years. Like many rural folks, the bread-winner often had a job “on the line” at CAT or John Deere, up to an hour’s drive away. The factory worker earned maybe a third as much as the general practitioner “doc” living just down the street. Enough certainly for both

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and an entrenched bureaucracy. Most Americans are not getting ahead and they know it. His supporters may grant him a grace period in which to fix all this, but economic dissatisfaction will persist. Other domestic issues he addressed in the campaign will prove no easier to pursue. Donald Trump campaigned on replacing Obamacare, a position that PresidentElect Trump began to moderate within days of winning the election. He has not set out a comprehensive alternative — simply keeping the popular parts and jettisoning the rest, which he suggested he might do, is not an acceptable or workable option. Which leaves open the question of how to insure the 20 million people who gained coverage under Obamacare. Mr. Trump has suggested he’d support health savings accounts and allow insurers to sell policies across state lines. He would also like to convert Medicaid from an entitlement program into a block grant. These proposals are certain to arouse fierce opposition. He has made clear that he wants to enact large tax cuts, especially on businesses — while at the same time spending billions on infrastructure improvements. The path to tax cuts is clear: members of Congress like to vote for tax decreases. However, most evaluations of his policy proposals suggest that deficits will explode under his program. He has talked about offsetting some of that revenue by eliminating or limiting loopholes and tax deductions, but this has been standard rhetoric in Washington for years and never been carried out with any effectiveness. We’ll see how

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to feel middle class. Today that broad swath of the rather comfortable middle, living in the same neighborhood, is largely gone. The double professionals often live instead in gated communities, consciously removed from the hoi polloi. The center is not holding, I fear, just as Yeats worried in his post-WWI poem. In this recent election, the anxious, even scared, underemployed former factory class may have gotten its revenge. What might it portend? I called several former students, all deeply ensconced inside the Beltway, to see what they thought. I admit this is ironic, as Trump campaigned against this powerful swirl of D.C. interests. Yet that is where he will have to govern, and not from Trump Plaza. Will Trump want to be a one or twoterm president, one observed, rather astutely, I thought. If the former, he may play strictly to his base, keeping all in turmoil for four years. If Trump wants a longer tenure—which would certainly be needed to fulfill his objective of “draining the swamp” in the Washington—he will be more centrist, hoping to convince the many anti-Hillary (not pro-Trump) voters that he can run the country effectively. Because of his signature campaign promise, Trump has to address “The Wall,” even if it is a “virtual wall,” which might use high-tech surveillance along much of the 1,900 mile border with Mexico. Second, he must try to stimulate good jobs for his base. This will be difficult, to say the least, I fear. Any “on the line” factory jobs brought back to the US from over the border or across the pond would likely soon be E-mail: publisher@campbellpublications.net

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squeezed out by continuing technological change. A huge jobs-generating infrastructure program is indeed badly needed, for example, to replace, not just re-pave, our mostly worn-out, 60-year-old interstate system. To get such a program off the ground will take most of his first term. Another savvy former student, now a D.C. lawyer, noted that, “Trump is not— at least has never been to this point—an ideologue.” So, he may fly by the seat of his pants. Another wondered which Trump we might see? That is, will he revert to campaign mode and lash out via twitter at real and perceived slights? Or will he be ennobled by the presidency? Randy Fritz, a retired history teacher friend, pointed back to Chester A. Arthur, a New York political hack elected vice president in 1880. President James A. Garfield died shortly after their election of medical ignorance, following an assassination attempt. The most reluctant, unprepared president in history, Arthur rose nobly to the challenge, signed the first civil service act and modernized the Navy. The biggest challenge for Trump, among a daunting array of international and domestic conundrums, is to try to reduce somehow the psychological and economic gap between “the haves” in Evanston and the underemployed in Stark County, who worry that the future may not need them.

■ Jim Nowlan is a former state legislator and former senior fellow at the Institute of Government and Public Affairs at the University of Illinois. He has worked for three Illinois govenors.

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2016


OP-ED Pike Press

Wednesday, November 30, 2016, Pittsfield, Illinois

A5

The Coonridge Digest: Freida Marie Crump

Let’s keep this all in perspective Greetings from the Ridge Someone had shrunk the house. There was no other logical explanation. I’d spent hundreds of hours of my childhood exploring the nooks and crannies of Grandma’s house, jumping on each piece of her furniture, inspecting each precious knickknack, and generally terrorizing my poor grandparents who were more than indulgent when the grandkids would come to play. I can remember going at a dead run for what seemed like a half a mile from her kitchen table then doing a belly flop in Grandpa’s recliner, and then running marathons around the interior of her spacious, two-story frame farmhouse. So what the heck had happened? This summer I asked the house’s present residents if I could once again take a peek at this wonderland that had provided me with so many hours of childhood pleasure and they gladly agreed. I just don’t understand. The house looked the same from the outside but when I stepped inside the front door. . . well, everything had suddenly become a miniature of that big old house that was stuck so firmly in my recollection. Sure, the new residents had remodeled, but everything was so darned small in comparison to the playground of my memory. The same thing had happened just weeks before when I tracked down the hill where I’d first learned to ride a bicycle. I can even

remember the temperature on that long-ago afternoon when my dad knelt in the grass of our backyard and removed the training wheels from my bike. I had tried to convince him that I’d need those “cheaters” for at least ten more years but he insisted that it was time I hopped aboard and learned to balance without the help of the two little rubber spheres that had been holding me upright. And I plainly recall that my first three attempts at balance were disasters, leaving me to dig the grass out of my nose and try again. The truly scary part of this adventure was the steepness and length of the hill. I sat atop my black and orange Monarch bicycle and gazed down a slope that seemed to go on for miles with our house looming some two or three miles below me. So what had happened in the ensuing years? I stood at the ridge of that same hill last week and it wasn’t a hill at all. In fact, I could detect only the slightest slope between where I was standing and the brick wall some twenty feet away. Twenty feet? Whoever had snuck in and shrunk Grandma’s house had been at work leveling off and shortening the bike path of my maiden voyage down what was left of the hill. Perception is a tricky thing, but when you combine it with a memory that tends to exaggerate the past at the expense of reality, you’re in for an awakening. The things we once knew look so very piddling when

P

erception is a tricky thing, but when you combine it with a memory that tends to exaggerate the past at the expense of reality, you’re in for an awakening. The things we once knew look so very piddling when compared with today’s truth. compared with today’s truth. I’ve had friends who say that in the days since the election have been unable to sleep, fearful of what might be looming in our nation’s future. Otherwise stable individuals have found themselves staring off into the distance for long periods of time in a sort of politi-daze. One lady told me she hadn’t come out of the house since the election results were announced, but she hoped that by Christmas she again attend church. And of course there are an equal number of folks giddy with joy at the voting results. They believe that all our problems will be solved by the new White House, Dorothy will click her heals together three times and we’ll all be back in a long ago Kansas where Eisenhower played golf as Ozzie and Harriet chatted about their sons’ report cards over their morning Quaker Oats. Of course, both camps are wrong, but the emotion of the moment has made us unable to see the reality. As a nation we tend to be excitable.

I’m reminded of the words of Mr. Rogers of TV fame: “When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me, ‘Look for the helpers. You will always find people who are helping.’” And I can’t help but recall the sight of my Uncle Francis who surveyed the smoking ruins of his garage after a late night fire had destroyed the structure. He lit his pipe and said, “Well, the damned thing needed cleaning out anyway.” So let’s come out of our houses, let’s lick our wounds, let’s ease up on the bragging about our victories and realize that we’re all in this together. Some day we’ll look back and realize the hill wasn’t all that steep and that we’re better off without the training wheels. You ever in Coonridge, stop by. We may not answer the door but you’ll enjoy the trip. ■  The imaginative commentary of Freida Marie Crump comes to us from Coonridge

PICKINGS FROM PIKE’S PAST

125 YEARS AGO: CONGRESSMAN WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN VISITS WIFE’S FAMILY IN PERRY

150 Years Ago Nov. 29, 1866 It seems to us to be ridiculous for the committee for improving the courthouse to insist that bricks be “seasoned” before being laid down for sidewalks. We of the Democrat publish the proceedings of the board of supervisors at the usual rates. We are glad to note the liberal appropriations for the Atlas and Louisiana bridge. We are behind in the matter of roads, and it is time that the producers of the county should be afforded the best facilities for transporting their products to market. Mrs. Windslow, “an experienced nurse and female physician” calls for the attention of mothers to her “soothing syrup” for children who are teething. It is also sure to regulate the bowels.

125 Years Ago Dec. 2, 1891 Congressman Wm. J. Bryan and wife, Mary, nee Baird, and three bright little children, of Lincoln, Neb., arrived in Perry last Friday evening. Mr. Bryan left Saturday for Jacksonville, his former home, and will today start for Washington. He is a young lawyer, only 31 years old. We predict he will become popular in Washington, D.C. Flour is so low that Chapman and Co. are running their mill on half time. Since the 15th of June they have made and shipped from Pittsfield 45,000 barrels of flour. The spacious residence of Mr. and Mrs. C. P. Chapman was thrown open Monday night to celebrate the 15th anniversary of

their daughter’s marriage to Mr. Myron King. An elegant supper was served, in which the hostess surpassed herself. Thanksgiving day brought delightful weather and feasting by happy family parties. Turkeys were abundant and sold for 12 1/2 cents a pound. The Thanksgiving dinner and supper given by the Milton M.E. church was well patronized. Net proceeds, $47. Milton has the only barber shop in the state that will give you a shave, song, (solo or quartet) and music by an orchestra, all for ten cents. Dr. Doss of Milton reports four brand new babies in the community. The Illinois river is blocked at Montezuma. We are in need of another butcher shop in Perry. We have two now, and they pay two cents for beef and sell it for ten cents. The supper given by the ladies of the Perry M.E. church was a success, notwithstanding the bad roads, and $15 was realized to be used for repairing the church. During the past week we have experienced many changes in the weather, but none in the roads, which have been bad all the time. 100 Years Ago Nov. 29, 1916 A delightful party was given in Rockport at the home of Mrs. J. C. Gay by Miss Lucille Horton and Mrs. L. O. Gay, complimentary to Mr. and Mrs. Herman Gay who had just been married. The Pittsfield city council is having a traffic post

put in at each corner of the public square. The posts are iron. On top of each post will be a 16-inch ruby colored globe, containing an electric light. A deer has been seen on the farm of R. A. and Charles Williams near Time a number of times lately. It comes into the pasture and feeds with the cattle. State law provides a fine of not less that $50 and not more than $100 for killing or attempting to kill a deer. The Democrats in Pleasant Hill are feeling good over the final outcome of the election. There is some talk of having a jollification meeting in the near future, at which time public addresses will be given. Henry Marion of Atlas informed us that Fred Hyde of New Canton, who was in an auto, on which it was said the lights were not lighted, ran into Warren Billings of Atlas, who was in a buggy, demolishing it and knocking out five teeth. Billings thinks he must have swallowed two of his teeth, since he could not find them after the accident. The Pittsfield First Congregational church was filled with one of the most fashionable gatherings of the season to witness the marriage of Miss Edna Hull and Dr. William K. Logsdon. Mrs. Earl Grigsby was organist, and accompanied the three soloists, Miss Mary Shastid, Miss Marian Hersheimer and Merle Barber. 75 Years Ago Nov. 26, 1941 Friends here were interested in the reports from the

maneuvers in South Carolina, in which Kay Barber of Pittsfield was forced to make an emergency landing in a corn field when his fighter ran out of fuel. He deliberately landed with the wheels up, and did not receive a scratch. While the Japanese ambassador and special envoy are in Washington trying to negotiate with President Roosevelt and Secretary of State Hull, the warlords in Tokyo are shouting that Uncle Sam must concede in order to avoid war with Japan. Fourteen more Pike county men have been called by the Selective Service for military duty. Little Carroll Dean Cox will celebrate his second birthday Saturday November 29. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Cox and has one sister, Phyllis, and two brothers, Keith and Leroy. Three more names were added early Thanksgiving morning to the long list of men and women who have been killed outright or died of injuries incident to automobile accidents on U.S. 36 across Pike county. Records show 820 persons employed at the shoe factory in Pittsfield. Supt. H. E. Stevens is expecting 1,000 to be employed there by January first. Some farmers are shucking corn while wearing hip boots in submerged fields in the Mississippi and Illinois river bottom ground. 50 Years Ago Nov. 30, 1966 With a new county treasurer scheduled to assume office next Monday, the future of that office remained in doubt as continued un-

certainty prevailed should a recount of the Nov. 8 ballots be ordered. Sheriff-elect Jim Wade has named Milburn (Mib) Craven as his deputy, effective Monday when Wade assumes the duties of his new office. Wade has also named Claude Wilson, former Pittsfield chief of police, as his bailiff, replacing Charles Troutner, who has held the position under Sheriff Charles Lowery. Robert E. Seiler, 53, of Joplin, Mo., brother of Allan Seiler, editor of the Pike County Republican, Tuesday was named to the 7-member Missouri Supreme Court by Governor Warren E. Hearnes. 25 Years Ago Nov. 27, 1991 Three have announced their candidacy for Pike County Circuit clerk; they are incumbent Republican Wendell Hall and two Democrats, Thomas McCarter of Griggsville and Charles Gates of rural Pittsfield. The Pike County Chamber of Commerce will try to solicit more members despite its current shaky financial status. Madison County Treasurer, John Shimkus, 33, has announced his candidacy for the Republican nomination for U. S. representative from the new 20th Congressional district. Registered nurse Debbie Renoud has been named Illini Community Health Care System’s November Employee of the Month. She and her husband, Curt, were raised in Pike County. The Pittsfield Saukees played their first game

ASC –“after the state championship,” and defeated a tall and talented Brown County team 73-67 as Jamie Sweeting scored 30 points and Tom Hart 19 for PHS.

10 Years Ago Nov. 29, 2006 For more than a decade Pike County has led the state in the number of deer harvested, and this year was no exception with 2,419 deer harvested in the first shotgun season, compared to 2,340 last year. At least four break-ins were reported in the county over the weekend, two involving schools. Also reported was a suspicious fire near Summer Hill and the theft of a 4-wheeler from Pittsfield. The Pike County Board dealt with several matters, including the budget and appropriations ordinance and hiring Chris Dolbeare of Pleasant Hill as ambulance administrator. When the meeting concluded, cake and punch was served in honor of four retiring board members: Tammy Ator, Richard Myers, Brad Smith and Harry Wagy. William G. Grote, 89, of Pittsfield died Nov. 23, 2006. He was born in Pittsfield July 7, 1917 to Paul F. and Almarena Grimshaw Grote. He married Jane E. Adams Aug. 26, 1946 in Summer Hill, and she preceded him in death in 1989. He founded Pike County Coal and Lumber in Pittsfield in 1947. ■ Pickings from Pike’s Past is compiled by Michael Boren.

Guest Column: By Scott Reeder

I

remember watching my older brother, Danny, dribbling down the court and me wiggling uncomfortably in the bleachers, starring at my blue Keds and asking: “How do we know who wins?” Someone patiently explained that the team with the most baskets wins. I guess that was a good enough explanation for a 4-year-old and that’s usually the way things worked out. But not always. You see in basketball, a basket can count as one, two or three points. So occasionally the team with the fewest baskets wins. The same could be said for democracy. Sometimes the candidate who receives the most votes loses. I was thinking about that Nov. 20 as I sat high in the seats of Hilton Coliseum with two of my college buddies, Doug and Fred. I watched my beloved Iowa State Cyclones set a new all-time school scoring record as they played the Citadel. Player after player sank 3-point shots quite a distance from the basket. While it wasn’t the case in this particular game, sometimes a team that scores a

Playing by the rules you have lot of three-point shots wins even when they made fewer baskets than their opponents. That’s just the way it works. I suppose a loser could holler that their team made the most baskets. And most folks would file it away as “interesting but not relevant.” As I noted in last week’s column I did not vote for Donald Trump. In fact, I dislike his brand of politics. But what I do value is the rule of law. Presidents are elected in this country by the Electoral College, not the popular vote. Counting Trump, five of the 44 men elected president have lost the popular vote. That’s one out of 10 presidents. So, it’s hardly an unknown phenomenon in our history. Hillary Clinton supporters can shout that she won the popular vote by 2 million ballots. I can just shrug and file that away as “interesting but irrelevant.” Like basketball, you play by the rules you have, not the ones you want. And the Electoral College has been around since the election of George Washington.

It’s a provision in the constitution that has always had its critics. In fact, over the history of our country, there have been at least 700 proposed amendments to modify or abolish the Electoral College - more than any other subject of Constitutional reform. But each one of the provisions has failed. Each state has as many electors as it does U.S. Senators and members of the U.S. House of Representatives. Since all states have the same number of senators, it gives a slight, but at times significant, added weight to votes from less populated jurisdictions like Wyoming or South Dakota. The framers of the U.S. Constitution did this because they wanted to ensure that big states didn’t dominate smaller states. In fact, the provision granting each state equal representation in the Senate is the only part of the Constitution that can never be amended. Back in the 1960s, American Basketball Association Commissioner George Mikan, the pioneer of the three-point field goal, said the three-pointer would give the

smaller player a chance to score more often. Framers of the constitution were thinking something similar. They wanted to ensure smaller states in the union would continue to have influence so they created the Electoral College. Those who don’t like this arrangement can work to amend the Constitution. Complaining about the system being “rigged” diminishes your cause – and your candidate. Elections have consequences and your candidate lost. And it’s impossible to say who would have won the popular vote if there wasn’t an Electoral College because the strategies of both campaigns were predicated not on winning the popular vote but collecting more than 270 electors. They were playing by the rules that were in place, not the ones they may have wanted.

■ Scott Reeder is a veteran statehouse journalist. He works as a freelance reporter in the Springfield area and can be reached at ScottReeder1965@gmail.com.


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Health Dept. employees donate $500 for transportation Pike County Health Department employees recently made a $500 to the stopgap transportation fund. The donation came from their “jeans” fund, to which employees donate $1 to wear jeans on Fridays and which is used periodically to support special causes or special events for the employees. The Health and Wellness Foundation of Pike County, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization, continues to seek tax-deductible donations to maintain limited West Central Mass Transit District services. Checks should be made out to “HWFPC, Transportation Fund” and mailed to P.O.Box 81, Pittsfield, IL 62363.

PCS receives $15k Tracy Foundation grant The Tracy Family Foundation recently donated $15,000 through the Formal Funding Grant process to Pikeland Community School. The donation will go toward Chromebooks and a cart. “The Tracy Foundation’s generous donation will provide students the proper resources for success in school,” Jacklyn Feldpausch, PCS English language arts teacher, said. “With the technology, our students are preparing for the necessary 21st century skills.” PCS is committed to providing students with the best education possible. Technology allows students to learn on a new level and provides them with new opportuni-

ties, such as presentation skills, communicating more efficiently, and researching effectively. “The Tracy Family Foundation exists to provide resources to organizations that foster the values of Robert and Dorothy Tracy – a Catholic/Christian belief, honesty, integrity, fairness, and a strong work ethic,” the foundation’s website states. “The Foundation seeks to proactively strengthen Brown County in Illinois and the surrounding Region by investing in the education, youth, families, and the capacity of these communities. The Foundation is also the vehicle for developing a philanthropic spirit among Tracy family members.”

Registration open for Central Illinois Youth Goose Hunt Youth interested in participating in the annual Central Illinois Youth Goose Hunt, sponsored by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources (IDNR), can register now for the hunt, which is scheduled for January 15-16, 2017. To register for a drawing to participate in the hunt, youth hunters must phone in to the IDNR at 217-785-8060 by the registration deadline of Friday, December 30, 2018.  The youth goose hunt will be held at private waterfowl hunting clubs in the Canton area in Fulton Co. A lottery drawing involving all youth who phone in to register will be conducted on January 3, 2017, and

youth hunters selected will be notified by mail. Firsttime applicants will be given a priority over previous participants in the drawing.  The hunt is open to youngsters ages 10-15 at the time of the hunt.  All applicants must possess a valid Illinois hunting or sportsman's license, have a Harvest Information Program (HIP) registration number, and have a 20 gauge or larger shotgun. Youth hunt participants must be accompanied by a parent or guardian who must possess a valid firearm owner's identification (FOID) card.  To register for the hunt or for more information, call 217-785-8060.

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

What’s Happening

BARRY n Christmas Time in Barry. Saturday, Dec. 10 starting at 3:30 p.m. Come visit Santa and the Disney characters at the Barry Firehouse, along with horse and carriage rides; Christmas crafts at the library and much more. The lighting of the community tree at Lafayette Park at 5 p.m., youth and adult paint parties at Era of Elegance and a teen dance from 7-10 p.m. at the Barry Firehouse. n Teen dance at Barry Firehouse Saturday, Dec. 10 from 7-10 p.m. Junior high and high school students welcome. Donate a canned food for entry. This event is sponsored by the Barry Business Association.

n El Dara Village Clerks office will be open 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Dec. 12-Dec. 19 to receive Candidates Petitions for the April 2017 Election. n First National Bank of Barry is hosting a Bazaar, Candy and Cookie Walk on Friday, Dec. 2 from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. This event is sponsored by the Barry United Methodist Women.

n Western PTO's Second Annual Holiday Bazaar, Saturday, Dec. 3 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Western High School cafeteria. Vendors may set up their booth at 9 a.m. the day of the event in the cafeteria (west side of the school). For more information call 217-473-5474.

cordially invited.

and Preschool. Call 217-285-4002 to place your order on Dec. 6 or enjoy a dine-in experience at 102 W. Washington St.

n The Griggsville-Perry Athletic Boosters will be hosting a New Year's Eve Dance at the Griggsville American Legion! A pork chop meal will be served from 6-8 p.m. The band, Vertigo, will play from 8 p.m.12:30 a.m. (21 & over only). Call Jill Kunzeman at 309-264-3785 to get your tickets!

n Missouri Vein Care in Hannibal Mo. will be at the Findley Place Apartments to do a free vein ultrasound screening on Wednesday, Dec. 7. Must bring a Medicare card. Call Connie to set up an appointment 217-285-6150.

PITTSFIELD n Santa will visit the Pittsfield Moose Lodge #420 Saturday, Dec. 17 from 4-6 p.m. Parents who intend to bring their children are asked to call Ray Miller at 309-314-5619 with their children’s name and ages so an appropriate gift will be available.

n First Christian Church Christmas Bazaar. Friday, Dec. 2 at the Crossroads Center, 125 W. Jefferson St. Featuring a tea room, lunch and a Love Raffle. Drawing at 1:30 p.m. for a quilt. Proceeds go to Mounted Angels, Quanada and Pike County Hospice. Stop by and enjoy homemade and unique gifts and ornaments, homemade cookies and sweets and new and gently used items in the Treasure Chest room.

n Party til you drop vendor event is scheduled for Saturday, Dec. 3 at the Pittsfield Senior Citizen Center from 9 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Vendor booths will be open throughout the event. We will also be holding live vendor shows to introduce products and play games for door prizes. Refreshments and areas for shopping will be provided. A grand mystery hostess prize will be given away at the close of the event, you will not have to be present at the time of the drawing to win.

n Liberty Village is hosting a food drive for Pike county families until Dec. 19. Canned items, non-perishable food items, house hold items, toiletries, and coats are all accepted. If you have any of these items, please come to 610 Lowry street and through the front entrance where there will be a lovely decorated cart to put your items in. All items will be donated to the Crossing Church in Pittsfield.

Enjoybetter better hearing hearing Enjoy withoutanyone anyone knowing. knowing. ithout n The remaining rehearsals for the Barry Community Chorus Christmas cantata will begin at 7 p.m., not 7:30, and last till 9 p.m. on Monday nights at the Barry United Methodist Church.

n South School Breakfast with Santa Saturday, Dec. 3 from 8-11 a.m. Personal visits with Santa, raffle for 31 bag, raffle for Origami Owl Christmas Bracelet. Please visit the South Elementary School PTO Facebook page for additional information

n The East Pike Fire Protection District Ladies Auxiliary is asking for support for the new firehouse. This project is self funded and being voluntarily built. The funds used to build this firehouse come from only tax dollars, generous donations and fundraisers supported by the community. Be a permanent part of the construction, by preserving your name, that of a loved one or Business with the purchase of a personalized brick paver to be placed in the sidewalk or around the flag pole of the new firehouse. To order a personalized brick paver contact Deb Moore at (217) 723-4228 or Mary Eustace at (217) 829-4016 or any Auxiliary member.

n 4-H Cake Decorating SPIN Club had its first meeting. Youth can still join! It meets one Saturday a month through April. If you are between 8 and 18, (If you turned 8 before Sept. 1) and would like to know more, please e-mail dwelbour@illinois.edu or call 217-2855543 and ask for Dorothy.

New! Siemens New! Siemens I’ v e been wearing Hearing aids GRIGGSVILLE been wearing Hearing aids n To give you a chance to check your Medicare part D plans for 2017, Micon® Micon® from Pike County Senior several over 20 years. I’ v e worn 20Connie years. I’ v e worn several Service will be at the Griggsville Hearing AidsAids Library on Wednesday, Nov. 30 in Hearing the afternoon. Call for an appointn Pittsfield youth library would

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n The Griggsville Christian Church will hold its first-ever Christmas Sing-Along Wednesday, Dec. 7 at 6:30 p.m at the church. Everyone is welcome. n The Pike Pipers will be the featured music at the Christmas meeting for Griggsville Historical Society, Thursday, Dec. 8, at 2 p.m. at the Skinner House. The public is

like to invite families to the library Monday, Dec. 5 from 6-7 p.m. to visit with Santa Claus and color holiday cards for recipients from the library's Senior Citizen's Giving Tree! There is no cost and parents are asked to accompany their children.

ONGOING n Exercise classes available at the Pittsfield Senior Center every Tuesday and Thursday from 5:156:15 p.m. Strenuous enough to help, but easy enough for anyone to do. For additional information call 217285-4524.

n Let's Raise Some Dough: All day Dec. 6, a portion of all sales at Gianni's Pizza will be donated to Children First Daycare

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n Liberty Village Hawthorne Inn

in and around the Pike County Area

will be hosting Senior Bingo the third Wednesday of every month from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Snacks and prizes will be provided. Come join the fun at 610 Lowry St., Pittsfield. n Expect Extraordinary Community Gatherings are held every 4th Tuesday from 6-7 p.m. in the Findley Place Community Room, 400 W. Jefferson, Pittsfield. What if people with developmental disabilities lived, learned, worked, played and worshiped in all the regular places of our community? Join us to make it possible! People with developmental disabilities, their families and friends, caring neighbors, and all members of the community are invited. n Bright Star Methodist Cooperative Parish (Oxville, Florence, Detroit, Griggsville, Perry, New Salem and Baylis Methodist Churches) county wide Bible Study every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. at Griggsille United Methodist Church and every Teusday evening at Perry United Methodist Church at 6:30 p.m. This is absolutely free and everyone in Pike County are welcome to attend. If you have questions, feel free to contact Pastor Dave at 217-833-2575 or 217-8332457. n The Bible studies for 2016 will be held every Tuesday evening at 6:30 p.m. at Perry UMC and every Wednesday at 9:30 a.m. at Griggsville UMC. n To learn more about the Catholic Church, Rev. Mark Schulte will be leading discussions covering the 10 Commandments, the Apostles Creed, The Sacraments, Prayer, Church History and Tradition every Monday evening at St. Mary's Parish Hall at 7 p.m. Members of all Faiths and Denominations are welcome to attend. n Free meals served every third Saturday of each month at the Pittsfield United Methodist Church from 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Everyone is welcome. Carry-outs are available. n A non-denominational, Bible class meets for one hour on Tuesdays, 2:30 p.m., at the Findley Place Apartments, 400 W. Jefferson street. Dr. Calvin Warpula is leading a study of the book of Romans. Everyone is invited.

n Southern Pike Youth for Jesus hosted by the Nebo Nazarene Church at the Nebo Gym. The church van will pick up every Wednesday at the Pearl Jiffi Stop at 6:15 p.m. Ages 6 and up are welcomed to join. Games, music, bible message and snacks will be included. For more information call (217) 440-3327. The van will return approximately around 8:15-8:30 p.m. n Liberty Village of Pittsfield Hawthorn Inn will be hosting Senior Bingo Day the third Wednesday of every month from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Snacks and prizes will be provided. n Set Free is a non-traditional recovery program for adults (ages 18+), based on doing life together. Join us for Set Free every Tuesday at 6:30 p.m. at Pittsfield Assembly of God. There is free childcare, from birth-6th grade. It's time to finally be Set Free. Learn more: Set Free Recovery Group on Facebook.com. n The Living Room is a ministry at Pittsfield Assembly of God that seeks to reach the people in the in between stage of life (After high school, but before midlife). Those who are finding a home and mate, establishing a family or circle of friends, and looking to get the dream job. The Living Room meets every first Friday at 6:30 p.m. at Pittsfield Assembly. For more information visit us at PittsfieldAssembly.com or call us (217) 285-4258. n The Pittsfield Masonic Lodge meets the second Monday of every month at the Masonic Lodge, 210 W. Fayette, Pittsfield. n Meals Plus for Seniors serves lunch at noon, Mon. through Fri. at Findley Place at 400 W. Jefferson St., Pittsfield, Il. 62363. Over 60, meals are based on donations. Under 60, the cost of the meal is $6. Call Connie by 8:50 a.m. on the day you would like to make reservations at 217-285-6150. Milk and bread offered with every meal. Wednesday, November 30 Fried chicken, mashed potatoes with chicken gravy, green beans, dinner roll, apple pie. OUT-OF-COUNTY n Bluffs American Legion Chicken and Fish Dinner on Wednesday, Dec. 14 from 5-7 p.m. Menu also includes mashed potatoes and gravy, green beans, corn, slaw, dessert and drink. Carry out available.

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Lureta McCann Lureta Wilson McCann, 94 of Maryville, formerly of Pittsfield, passed away Thursday, Nov. 24, 2016 at Anderson Hospital in Maryville. Lureta was born in Nebo on Oct. 8, 1922, a daughter of Luther and Florence McBride Wilson. On May 27, 1944 she married Mayo McCann in Jerseyville; he preceded her in death on Oct. 27, 1984. Lureta was a member of the Church of Christ in Pittsfield. Her interests were centered around her church, family and friends. She is survived by her children, Larry (Marilyn) McCann of Louisville, Ky., Delbert (Denise) of Rochester, Sara (Paul) Briggs of Troy, and Crystal (Al) Maxted of Union, Ky. She is also survived by seven grandchildren; 12 great-grandchildren; and a sister-in-law, Mary Wilson of Quincy. Lureta was preceded in death by her husband and two half sisters, Nellie Cross and Rosemary Smith, and a brother, Donald Wilson. Funeral services were

held at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016 at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Dan VanHeck and Pastor Brent Newton officiating. Visitation was held from 12 p.m. until 2 p.m. preceding the service. Interment took place in the Nebo Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to be made to Vitas Healthcare #8 Executive Drive, Suite 150, Fairview Heights, IL 62208 or c/o of Niebur Funeral Home. Condolences may be sent to the family at www. nieburfh.com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

Elisabeth Iftner Elisabeth R. Iftner, 91 of Pittsfield, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016 at Barry Community Care Center in Barry. Elisabeth was born on March 7, 1925 in Stronghurst, a daughter of Vern Orval and Sarah Ruth Staley Wood. She married Joseph I. Iftner on Aug. 24, 1947 in Stronghurst; he preceded her in death on Sept. 28, 2007. As a young girl Elisabeth was an excellent alto saxophone player and often traveled to Battle Creek, Mich., for Regional Music Band Contests. During WWII and Elisabeth’s college years with there being a shortage of teachers, Elisabeth left college to teach several grades in a one room school. She later completed her college education and received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Home Economics from Western Illinois University. After graduating college she went on to teach Home Economics in Mansfield. In 1954 Elisabeth and Joseph moved their family to Pittsfield to be near Joseph’s family home place and she became a farmer’s wife, helping on the farm and cooking for the farm hands but most importantly raising her children. After her oldest went off to college Elisabeth then took a lifelong position with the Pittsfield Community Center where she worked for 27 years, cooking and preparing many meals for many organizations. After her retirement Elisabeth loved going dancing with Joe and being with her grandchildren. Elisabeth was a wonderful cook and giver to the community and was a devoted mother and grandmother. Elisabeth had been a member of the United Methodist Church since childhood where she participated in the Epworth Youth League. She was currently a member of the New Salem United Methodist Church where she was actively involved and held several positions over the years. She was a former member of the Pike County Home Extension, and a former member of the WSCS which later became the UMW.

She was honored to be chosen by the Pittsfield Rotary Club to receive the Paul Harris Fellow award. Elisabeth is survived by four loving daughters, Ruth Ann (Matt) Korwel of Indian Head Park, Jo Ellen (James) Cummings of Merritt Island, Fla., Rebecca Sue (Mark) Winner of Pittsfield, Mary Elisabeth (Brian) Dobbins of Springfield; 10 adoring grandchildren, Matthew (Elyse) Korwel, Christopher Korwel, Mary Elisabeth Korwel, Thomas Cummings, Jamie (Nori) Kono, Joseph (Katy) Winner, Kristina Winner, Deborah (Benjamin) Kramer, Benjamin Dobbins and Joseph Dobbins; and there are three great-grandchildren, Ruth Ann and Ava Grace Korwel and Joseph Jeremiah Winner. Elisabeth’s brother, John (Erni) Wood of St. Louis also survives. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Joseph; a brother, Manly Wood; and two great -randchildren, Grace and Mercy Winner. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016 at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Peg Ratliff and Al Laird officiating. Visitation was held from 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. Friday evening at the Niebur Funeral Home. Interment took place in Oakwood Cemetery. Memorials are suggested to be made to the New Salem United Methodist Church or Oakwood Cemetery. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.nieburfh. com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

George Halpin George Ellis Halpin, 84 of Pittsfield, died Thursday, Nov. 24, 2016 at Illini Community Hospital. Funeral services were held at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 28, 2016 at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Pastor Wes Tischer offi-

ciating. Visitation was held from 12 p.m. until 2 p.m. at the Niebur Funeral Home. Interment took place in the West Cemetery in Pittsfield with graveside military honors accorded by Pittsfield American Legion Post #152 military funeral honor guard.

Pike Press

Thomas Hobbs Thomas Arthur Hobbs of Pleasant Hill passed away Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016 at Illini Hospital in Pittsfield. He had been a resident of Liberty Village of Pittsfield since May of this year.   Thomas was born Aug. 10, 1926 to Verlie (Thomas) and Charles Arthur Hobbs in Pleasant Hill.  On April 5, 1947, he married Donna June Crowder at the First Baptist Church and to that union two sons, Thomas Mark Hobbs and Kevin Crowder Hobbs, were born.  Thomas was preceded in death by his wife, Donna June, his son, Thomas Mark Hobbs, his parents and five brothers, Leo, Kenneth, Everett, Ralph and Larry. Thomas loved farming, but in the early 1950s he left farming full time to work for Tallman Conduit Company in Louisiana, Mo. He would become manager of the company and his career would span 35 years.  He continued to farm as a hobby throughout his working life.  An avid fisherman, he took his boys fishing at every opportunity, often spending the family summer vacations in Minnesota leasing a cabin on Big Lake. He served as a Boy Scout leader and was a trustee of the First Baptist Church, where he was a lifelong member. When he retired, he took up woodworking and became an excellent furniture maker. Thomas and Donna June loved to travel and were

very proud to have visited all 50 states, most of the Canadian provinces and Mexico.   Thomas is survived by a son, Kevin Hobbs (Jim) of Overland Park, Kan.; daughter-in-law, Carolyn E. Hobbs of Rockport; granddaughterm Stacy L. Clark (John) of Liberty; great-grandchildren, Sandra Clark (Zach) of Bloomington, Patrick Clark of Liberty, John Paul Clark of Biloxi, Miss.; and great-greatgrandson, Noah Gilmore of Bloomington.  He is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews and friends. Services were Saturday, Nov. 26, 2016 at 11 a.m. at the First Baptist Church in Pleasant Hill conducted by Bro. Don Hannel. Visitation began at 9:30 a.m. at the church.  Burial followed at Crescent Heights Cemetery, Pleasant Hill. Memorials may be made to St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital or to the Shriners Hospital for Children. Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

Rita Carroll Rita M. Carroll, 84 of Pittsfield, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 22, 2016 at the Barry Community Care Center in Barry. Rita was born on April 15, 1932 in Warsaw, Va., a daughter of Cornelius and Dora Moore Jenkins. Rita grew up on her family farm in Warsaw and after graduation she moved to Richmond, Va., to attend secretarial school. She later worked for Standard Papers. She married James Robert Carroll and to this union three children were born. The family later moved to Pittsfield where the children grew up. She was a devoted member of the St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Pittsfield and a member of the St. Mary’s Altar Society. Rita worked for Pittsfield Community Unit #10 elementary schools as a lunchroom cook for many years before retiring from the district. During the summer Rita worked at the BiRite Grocery store in Pittsfield. After her retirement Rita enjoyed volunteering at Illini Community Hospital, planting her spring flowers and working on many needlework projects. She loved the St. Louis Cardinals. Rita dearly loved her family and enjoyed spending time with them. Surviving are Rita’s children, James Timothy Carroll of Seattle, Wash., Robert Clayton (Vicki) Carroll of Fishers, Ind.,

Colleen (Roger) Couch of Springfield; five loving grandchildren, Eric (Melissa) Carroll, Marcus Carroll, Alea Carroll, Amber Couch, and Emily (fiancé, Jacob Elliott) Couch; and two greatgrandchildren, Brandon Couch and Marlo Carroll. Several nieces and nephews also survive. Rita was preceded in death by her parents; two sisters, Virginia Jenkins and Rose Alma Shackleford; and a brother, Lyle Jenkins. A Mass of Resurrection was held at 11 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 28, 2016 at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Pittsfield with Father Mark Schulte officiating. Visitation was held from 9 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield on Monday preceding the Mass. Memorials are suggested to be made to the St. Mary’s Altar Society. Condolences may be sent to the family at www. nieburfh.com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

Angela ‘Angie’ Crowder Angela “Angie” Lynn Crowder, 43 of Pittsfield, died Wednesday, Nov. 23, 2016 at Illini Community Hospital in Pittsfield. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 at the Niebur Funeral Home

in Pittsfield with David Hamilton officiating. Visitation was held prior to the service, from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. Interment took place in the West Cemetery in Pittsfield.

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Pittsfield, Illinois

Tina Bertagnolli Tina Bertagnolli, 53 of Pittsfield, passed away Monday, Nov. 21, 2016 at Illini Community Hospital Emergency Room. Tina was born in Manhattan, Kan., on May 11, 1963, a daughter of Maurice “Butch” Malcomson and Betty Hannant Miller. She married Shane Bertagnolli in 1985 and to this union two children were born. Tina graduated from Pittsfield High School in 1981 and worked as a medical receptionist. She loved gardening, reading, and watching movies. When her kids were young she loved doing puzzles with them and enjoyed taking care of them and watching them grow up to be who they are today. Tina is survived by her mother and stepfather, Betty and Richard Miller of Meredosia; her father, Butch Malcomson of Mexico, Mo.; a son, Tyler (Samantha Wasylenko) Bertagnolli of Gillespie; a daughter, Katelyn (Jim) Force of Gillespie; her grandmother, Elizabeth Hannant of Perry; and a granddaughter, Taiven Force. Tina is also survived by a brother, Scott Malcomson of Mexico, Mo.; a sister, Robin (Bob) Ayers of Ursa; nieces and nephews, Amber (Kyle) Dixon of Quincy, Ashlee Ayers of Collinsville, Ryan (Jessie) Ayers of St. Peters, Mo., Shelby (Jenny) Malcomson and Autumn Malcomson, both of

Mexico, Mo.; two great-nieces, Tessa and Adryonna; and a great-nephew, Cooper; in addition to several cousins and her friends. She was preceded in death by her maternal grandad, Gordon Hannant; paternal grandparents, K.D. and Opal Malcomsom; and her stepmother, Carolyn Malcomson. A Celebration of Life will be held at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016 at the Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield with Darin Workman officiating. Visitation with Tina’s family will be held from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. prior to the service. Interment of cremains will be in the Wilson Cemetery in Perry following the service. Memorials are suggested to be made to Tina’s family. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.nieburfh. com. The Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield has been entrusted with the service.

Mary Alice Mixer Mary Alice Mixer, age 90, of Perry, passed away at 10:20 a.m. Friday, Nov, 25, 2016 at Liberty Village in Pittsfield. She was born Jan. 11, 1926 in Fairmount Township in Pike County, the daughter of Alby “Ab” and Ida Ann Stinson Mountain. She married Russell Mixer on Dec. 10, 1947 in Pittsfield, and he preceded her in death on Nov. 16, 2002.  Mary Alice was a homemaker and along with her husband, Russell, farmed in Pike County until retiring in 1981 and moving to Perry.  Earlier in life she worked at the Perry locker for seven years.  Mrs. Mixer attended Perry High School and had also attended the Perry Methodist Church, where she and her husband delivered noon meals for Methodist Monday dinners. Mary Alice was a member of the Perry American Legion Post # 1040 Auxiliary.   She enjoyed playing cards and dominoes with her husband and many friends, making crafts for giving to the Sunday school classes, Operation Christmas child shoeboxes and as holiday decorations.  Mary Alice also loved attending “Fishhook Days” and collecting antiques, but her greatest joy was spending time with her family. Survivors include numerous nieces and nephews including Wayne Mountain

(Genna), Dean Mountain (Vicki) and Donald Mountain, all of Perry, and Lyndell Mountain (Mary Ann) of Quincy. She was preceded in death by her parents, and two brothers, Earl Wayne and Doyhl Mountain. Funeral services were held at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 in the Hendricker Funeral Home in Mt. Sterling with Pastor Mark Dickerson officiating. Visitation was one hour prior to services on Tuesday at the funeral home. Burial took place in the Woodland Cemetery in Fishhook. Memorials are suggested to the Woodland Cemetery or the Adult D.D. Activity Fund through Transitions of Western Illinois. Condolences for the family may be left on line at www.hendrickerfuneralhome.com. 
The Hendricker Funeral Home in Mt. Sterling is in charge of the arrangements.

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SOCIETY/COMMUNITY

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

Nebo

Veterans Park decorators ‘did a nice job’ The Community Club regular meet will be Thursday Dec 1st at 7 pm. We will have Santa Claus visiting the Community Club on Dec 16th from 6 pm to 7:30

By SANDI TAYLOR 217-248-4960

pm. More information next week. The folks that decorated Veterans Park did a nice job. If you haven’t been by yet after dark you should go check it out.

SANDI1959@GMAIL.COM

Rockport

Plenty to eat at Pence Thanksgiving dinner

Gary and Sharon Pence from Rockport had a turkey dinner on Thursday. Michael pence from Quincy, Richard Pence from Hannibal, Mo. my daughter, her husband, and I were all invited. We all enjoyed the meal and got plenty to eat. My church over in Bowling Green also had a

turkey dinner on Sunday. All had a good time. Jennifer Damon’s birthday was Monday. Happy birthday from Grams! Grayson Damon’s birthday was Tuesday. Happy birthday from Great-Grams! Brett Cox is having a birthday today. Happy birthday from Grams! He is stationed in Japan and is

By FRANCES  PENCE 217-242-3511 the son of Lynn and Rob Cox of Pleasant Hill. I believe that’s it until next week! May God bless you all, and have a good one!

Pleasant Hill

Pantry use heavy this time of year

There is a community wide Christmas caroling service tonight, Wednesday November 30 at 6:30 p.m.at the Pleasant Hill High School everyone is invited. This is a change from December 7. They are asking for those who want to bring a can for the food pantry. It is the time of the year when the food pantry is more heavily used. So they are running low on most items. Any donations can be dropped off at the Christian Church. The American Legion is having their dinner Sunday December 4 and it is fish. Serving starts at 11:30. A good meal and a time to meet with others. Pat and Cecil hosted a

Thanksgiving gathering with the following present: Virgia Gates and Dan Long from Pittsfield; Ann, Dan and Will Podbelsek from Lincoln; Paige Podbelsek and Tommy Mendenhall from Oswego; Amanda Podbelsek from St Louis, Jarred Maxheimer from Mt. Pulaski; Susan Douglas, and Kris, Eric, and Avery Moghadamian of Versailles, Ky.; Pam and John Douglas, and Pat and Cecil Long from Pleasant Hill. The group celebrated Pam and John Douglas’s twenty-ninth anniversary. They also celebrated the following birthdays: Ann’s fifty-fourth, Amanda’s twentyseventh, and Cecil’s eightyfourth.

By DEBBIE  MILLER 217-734-2845 The community send sympathy to the family of Thomas Hobbs. He was a great family man and will be missed by many. The Christmas Wish Trees are up at both banks. If you choose to take a tag, please bring the items back by December 15 to either bank. The people who signed up for the wish tree can pick up their items at the Christian Church basement on December 20 from 1 until 3 p.m.

New Salem

and other area news Reminds readers of funeral procession etiquette Since I considered the delivery date of this paper as being Wednesday, November 30th, you all now officially have 24 days until Christmas. If you see any information that needs to be changed on the Birthdays & Anniversaries, please give me a call. B I RT H D AY S & ANNIVERSARIES FOR THIS WEEK: 12/1 -- Sandy Peterson 12/3 -Jim Davidsmeyer, Gena Long 12/4 -Lilly Borrowman, Jordan Garner 12/6 -- Becky Winner Happy belated birthday to Kaye Iftner who celebrated her birthday on November 12th. PRAYER REQUEST LIST: Brother Joe Gammon, Betty & Champ Collins, Christine Henthorn, Cleo Whitaker, Connie McFall, David Brawdy, Dianna Ruble, Frances Larson, Ginger & George Whitlock, Jerry Gully, Jim Shields, Josh Bennett, Kaitlyn Fletcher, Leroy Leonard, Mark Welch, Mike Peters, Mary Crane, Ona Ogle, Pastor Gary Dice, Radar Grim, Roger Robbins, Roger Bonnett, Roger Woods, Sharon Dice, Sue Yackley, Steve Manker, Teresa Manker, Ted Waddell, Tom Barger, and OUR UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. Be thou exalted, O God, above the heavens: let thy glory be above all the earth. Psalm 57:11 Sympathy is extended to the family of Elisabeth Iftner who passed away Tuesday, November 22nd. She would have been so very pleased to know what a good service was held in her honor, and all the many people there at both the visitation and funeral. Recycling will be this Friday from 9:30 - 1:30 at the Bowlers’ Universe Parking Lot. East Pike Lending Library in Detroit will be open this Saturday from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, November 19th, Tammy & Jesse Knight of Washington, Illinois, and Erma Garner, and Mindy Cloninger, both of Canton, Illinois, called on Ona and Don Ogle of New London,

Missouri. Erma is Ona’s sister-in-law and the rest are nieces and nephew. They all had a great visit. One afternoon recently Beverly Lashment of Winchester called on her aunts Genny Hayden and Max Self, both of Pittsfield, where they all enjoyed a good visit. Saturday evening, November 19th, Ona and Don Ogle of New London, Missouri, hosted an early Thanksgiving dinner / get together at the Country Kitchen in Hannibal. Family members that attended were: Mark & Becky Winner, Kristina, and JJ and Joe & Katy Winner, all of Pittsfield; Bruce Winner of Davis, California; Dale & Sandy Winner of Quincy; and Rena & Ted Waddell, Cade, and Leah and Leah’s friend Dalton, all of Louisiana, Missouri. Everyone enjoyed being together for a good visit and a good meal. Bruce Winner of Davis, California, arrived in the Midwest November 19th. He was at the home of his mom and stepdad’s Ona and Don Ogle alot of the time visiting plus he enjoyed the family get-together on that evening. He left out of the St. Louis Airport to go home in California on Thanksgiving morning. Thanksgiving dinner was hosted at the home of Fritz and Donna Long and T.J. of Springfield. Those in attendance were Edna Thompson and Jean and Brian Replogle, all of Springfield, and Max Self and Les Garner, both of Pittsfield. They all enjoyed a good meal and games afterwards. Thanksgiving dinner was hosted at the home of Amy Davis and Keenan Smith of Pittsfield. Family members in attendance were: Rachel Burrows, Hannah, Emma, Eli, Kathryn, and Natalie; Sara and Micah Rudd, Elizabeth, Tristan, and Landon; Mike Burrows and Gena; Jacqueline, Wess, and Reese Davis and Raylan Smith; and Mark Burrows; Joe and Sue Yackley. All enjoyed a turkey dinner with all the trimmings. Wyatt Kroeschel picked up his grandmother Lucille Kroeschel

By WYVETTA DAVIS 217-285-4880 w9yti@irtc.net

and took her to his parents John and Sheila Kroeschel’s home for a big family Thanksgiving where a delicious meal was enjoyed. Nancy and Tim Halpin hosted Thanksgiving dinner at their home. Those who attended were Harry and Sue Gleckler, Brad Gleckler, Jim and Betty Halpin, and Todd Halpin. Everyone enjoyed a turkey dinner. Steve and I enjoyed our Thanksgiving dinner on Friday, November 25th, at the home of our son Nathan Davis, Jacqueline, Wess, and Reese. We enjoyed turkey that Nathan had grilled and all the trimmings. Dwight and Ruth Yackley of Naperville, Illinois, called on the family at his niece’s Sara Rudd on Friday, November 25th. Everyone had a good visit. Do all of you know common courtesy what to do when you meet a funeral procession? I was taught, along with most everyone else, to pull over and stop to show respect and to let the procession proceed to the cemetary. On Saturday, November 26th, we were in a funeral procession in Pittsfield coming from Niebur Funeral Home when this older red van, driven by a younger blonde woman came barreling up to our car through the stoplight, barely missing us by a foot, blaring her horn the entire time. She finally stopped, raised her fist at us, honking her horn. She was so desperate to get across the street that she ended up going between our car and the one behind us and went on to her destination. Guess where she was in such an all fired hurry to get to? McDonald’s!!! Had plenty of witnesses if she would have hit us because the cars in the procession behind us couldn’t believe what they saw. God bless you and yours, and God bless America.

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Pittsfield, Illinois

Griggsville

Library books pair well with cold weather Would you like to become more involved with the library? The North Pike District Library has candidate packets available to be picked up for anyone interested in running for a position as Library Trustee in the April 2017 election. Statements of Candidacy and a petition with a minimum of 33 signatures must be turned back into the library between December 12 – 19. If you have any questions, please contact Kimber at the library (217) 833-2633. As the cold weather creeps in take a moment to stop into the library and pick up a book or movie to keep yourself entertained during these chilly nights! Santa had such a good time at Meet and Eat with St. Nick last year, he’s coming back again! St. Nick will be at the North Pike Firehouse on December 17 from 9 – 11 a.m. Bring your little ones for a chance to tell St. Nick their Christmas wishes and have their picture taken with him. There will be breakfast, crafts, cake walk, games, food, and more that continue until noon. Admission is a non-perishable food item to be donated to the Perry Community Christmas Baskets. Any questions, or if you’d like to help in any way, please contact Lila Martin. The event is

sponsored by the Ladies of North Pole. The Griggsville Christian Church will hold its first annual Christmas sing-along at the church on Wednesday, December 7 beginning at 6:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome! Congratulations to Roy Hobson! Roy turned ninety-eight years young today, November 30! Scott and Lori Bradshaw hosted Buster, Rose and Jennifer Craven for Thanksgiving dinner. I hope you all got out and shopped on Small Business Saturday! There were lots of goodies! The crew at Tom’s Grocery reports that they enjoyed all their customers! Ralph and Betty Tucker hosted Thanksgiving dinner at their home in Perry for all their family. Our sympathy goes out Dean and Lynda Lawber and family in the death of Lynda’s brother, George Halpin of Pittsfield. George passed away on November 24 at Illini Community Hospital. Mary Shoemaker of Perry underwent surgery at Blessing Hospital on Friday and returned home on Saturday. Mary suffered a broken wrist in a fall recently. We wish you a speedy recovery, Mary! Many people believe in turning the other cheek, especially when it’s your cheek.—Anne Ellis

By NADINE  KESSINGER 217-407-4502 kessy@casscomm.com

Jim and Connie Manker’s Thanksgiving Day dinner guests were Jimmy, Kari, Wyatt and Cole Manker, Kendra Manker, Justin Schneider, Nadine Manker, Carol Crear, Scottie Crear, Tom and Nancy Ramlow, Reta and Arye Jane Crabtree, Troy Main, Scott, Michele, Zacharie, and Colton Bartman, Larry and Patty Manker, Valerie Brawdy, Koert and Norma Bartman, Jamie and Talen Wand, Kim Manker, Beth Scott, Wes Manker, Shelly Hill, Brendon Moore, Cheyenne Allen, Bryan McDaniles, Lester, Janet and Pennie Rush, Lester Rush, Jr, Kay Sullenger, Peyton Rush, Dianna Castleberry, James Begley, David and Amy Hill, Dawnyetta Manker and Ben and Charlene Westfall. A big congratulations goes out to Devin Battefeld for scoring her 1,000th career varsity point in the Lady Tornadoes’ 62-55 win over Rushville-Industry at the Lady Hornets Classic at Mt Sterling. Devin becomes the fifth player in girls program history to achieve 1,000 points! What an accomplishment!

Milton

Christmas decorations ‘worth the drive to Milton’ Pike County Christmas Basket giving trees are up at Walmart, Dollar General and Farm & Home Supply. Donations to the Christmas Basket program maybe sent to Pike County Christmas Basket Program, 121 East Washington Street, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363. If you have any questions, call Carla Allen at 2852726.  The Village of Milton will be having its annual

Card of Thanks

THANK YOU We want to thank all the people who have shown our family compassion and support during a most difficult time in our lives with the passing of Robert “Bob” Ghrist, husband and father, most loved by us all. We want to give a special thanks to our extended family and friends who were by our sides during our grief by providing words of comfort and prayers, and the many cards of sympathy and for those that brought food for us to the house. Special thanks goes to Jennifer and staff at Niebur Funeral Home for making a difficult burden as easy as possible for our family. Thank you to Jim Jacques for words of comfort during the funeral service and the Assembly of God Church for generously providing a meal for our family and friends after the service. The Family of Robert “Bob” Ghrist Hazel Ghrist Barbara & Kevin McKee Donna & Steve McKee Cindy & Paul Verticelio Bobby Ghrist

Christmas decorations/ lighting contest. Prizes are $75 for first place, $50 for second place and $25 for third place. Judging will take place during the week of December 19-23. It’s worth the drive to Milton, to see all the decorations in the square. Many thanks to those who have generously donated money and decorations throughout the years. If you would like to make a donation towards the Milton Christmas

Birth

Neese A boy was born to DJ and Heather Neese of Edwardsville, IL. both originally from Calhoun, IL. at 8 a.m. at the Anderson Hospital in Maryville, IL. on Nov. 8. Tag Olin Neese was 7 lbs 2 oz and has two siblings, Marek, 5 and Rafe, 2. He is also the grandson of Thomas & Pennie Polman from Brussels, IL. and Dennis & Judi Neese from Edwardsville, IL. He is the great grandson of Gladys Neese from Pleasant Hill, IL.

By KARRIE SPANN 217-723-4262

decorations, donations can be sent to the Village of Milton, Christmas Decoration Fund, PO Box 68, Milton, Illinois 62352. Thank you, Doug Whitlock, Mike Spann, and Matt Allen for helping decorate the square this year. Check out our Briday Registry at casteelcolorwheel.com

WEDDING REGISTRY April Brown and Jordan Dunn Dec. 17 Megan Goodman and Lucas Stoller June 10

BABY REGISTRY Katie Mothershead and Wyatt Smithers Nov. 18 Beth Willman Jan. 4 Need to add to your bridal collection? China, Fiesta, Noritake, stemware, or silverware. We have rock bottom prices.

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B4

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

Pittsfield, Illinois

SPECIAL

End-of-year duties for seniors By BETH ZUWMALT Pike Press The end-of-the year is approaching and like everyone else, senior citizens must be proactive in taking advantage of the services offered them. “First and most important is having their Medicare Part D checked,” Connie Lerch of the Pike County Senior Services at Findley Place, said. “That is for their prescription drugs and that has to be completed before Dec. 7.” Lerch said every senior citizen needs to have their plan examined each year to determine what their deductible will be and the amount of their new premium. “If they have don’t take medications, only take one or take a dozen of the same ones they have taken for years, they need to have their plan looked over to make sure they are in the right

plan.” Lerch also said seniors can save $25 on one car license plate per household once they turn 65 by filling out the proper paperwork. “It has to be filled out every two years,” Lerch said. “People often forget or can’t remember if this is the year they need to renew or not.” Lerch also said the Senior Center at Findley Place will offer help with tax returns in March. “We haven’t set a date yet, but it will be two days in March,” she said. Pike County Supervisor of Assessments Cindy Shaw said her office will mail out reminder notices to seniors for the homestead exemption. “We try to get those in the mail Dec. 30 so seniors receive them around Jan. 1,” Shaw said. “It’s in addition to the owner/ occupancy exemption. This one is for owners 65 and older and

only available on their primary residence.” Seniors making less than $55,000 per year are also eligible for the Senior Citizens Assessment Freeze Homestead Exemption. A person qualifies for this exemption if the person is at least 65 years old; has a total household income of $55,000 or less; and meets certain other qualifications. This exemption “freezes” the senior citizen’s property’s equalized assessed value the year that the senior citizen qualifies for the exemption. The property’s equalized assessed value does not increase as long as qualification for the exemption continues. The tax bill may still increase if any tax rates are increased or if improvements are added that increase the value of the property. This exemption allows senior citizens who meet the qualifica-

How to help socially isolated seniors Individuals looking to give back to their communities may want to consider helping seniors in their area. Although it can be difficult to see seniors with diminished physical or mental capabilities, the rewards of interacting and helping seniors can be immeasurable. There are plenty of ways to help seniors avoid isolation and continue to live fulfilling lives. n Provide transportation. A Place for Mom, a senior housing placement resource, notes that lack of adequate transportation is a main cause of social isolation among seniors. Voluntary or necessary cessation of driving makes getting to and from appointments or even recreational outings more difficult. Where public transportation is unavailable or challenging to come by, volunteers can help shuttle seniors to and from grocery stores, doctor's offices and any other places they need to go. Getting out regularly and seeing new faces can help seniors over-

File photo

come feelings of loneliness. n Encourage exercise. Physical exercise keeps the body fit and improves mental health. Seniors can benefit from physical activity because it promotes strong bones and a healthy cardiovascular system. In addition, seniors who enroll in exercise classes at gyms or local senior centers can meet like-minded adults, helping them overcome their feelings of isolation even further. n Provide meals and companionship. Older adults may

not be getting all they need to maintain healthy weights and bodily functions. Cooking and shopping for healthy foods may be difficult. Provide seniors with healthy meals when possible, and take the time to share those meals. This can foster conversations that keep seniors' minds sharp and also may help prevent social isolation. Seniors can benefit from many different forms of support, and helping older adults is a worthy volunteer initiative.

Welcome to our team!

NEWSPAPER Post

WELCOME

NEWSPAPER Post

TO OUR TEAM!

Dr. Kaydi Grote

Smiles Plus Dental Care of Pittsfield is excited to announce that Smiles Plus Dental Care of Pittsfield is excited announce Dr. Kaydi Grote has joined its dental team!toDr. Grote completed her education in June 2016 from Illinois University School of that Dr. Kaydi Groteofhas joined itsSouthern dental team! Dr. Grote Dental Medicine in Alton, IL. She attended SIU-Edwardsville completed her education in June of 2016 from Southern Illinois where she earned her bachelor’s degree in biomedical science. Prior to University School of Dental Medicine in Alton, IL. She attended that, she from WELCOME TOgraduated OUR TEAM ! Jersey Community High School.

SIU-Edwardsville where she earned her bachelor’s degree in

Kaydi strong to the Pike County Her mother was born Smiles Plus has Dental Careties ofPrior Pittsfield is excited to area. announce biomedical science. to that, she graduated from that Jersey and raised in Barry, Illinois, herGrote grandmother Dr. Kaydi Grote has joined its dentalwhere team! Dr. completedand her extended Community High School. education in June of 2016 from Southern Illinois University School of recently family still reside. Dr. Grote (formerly Kaydi Legate) was Dental Medicine in Alton, IL. She attended SIU-Edwardsville where married on her Pikedegree County family farm and currently resides in she earned inPike biomedical science. Prior to was Kaydiher hasbachelor’s strong to theto County area. Herworks mother Shefrom is ties married Nick Grote, who with his family at that,Pittsfield. she graduated Jersey Community High School.

born and raised in Barry, Illinois, where her grandmother and

County Lumber. KaydiPike has strong ties to the Pike County area. Her mother was born extended family still reside. Dr. Grote (formerly Kaydi Legate) and raised in Barry, Illinois, where her grandmother and extended When Dr. Grote is not dentistry, she spending timeinwith her family was recently married on practicing her Pikestill County family farmenjoys and currently resides Pittsfield. She is at their family reside. Dr. Grote (formerly Kaydi Legate) was recently farm in southern Pike County riding four-wheelers, hunting and boating. married to Nick Grote, who workson with family at Pike County Lumber. married herhis Pike County family farm and currently resides in She isthat married to Nickwill Grote, worksasset with to his its family at team and Smiles Plus Dental CarePittsfield. is confident Dr. Grote be awho strong dental Pike County Lumber. that its patients will find her to be a very gentle and caring dentist! When Dr. Grote is not practicing dentistry, she enjoys spending time with her family at their

When Grote is not dentistry, she enjoys spending timeboating. with her family at their farmDr. in southern Pikepracticing County riding four-wheelers, hunting and farm in southern Pike County riding four-wheelers, hunting and boating.

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tions to elect to maintain the equalized assessed value (EAV) of their homes at the base year EAV and prevent any increase in that value due to inflation. The amount of the exemption benefit is determined each year based on (1) the property’s current EAV minus the frozen base year value (the property’s prior year’s EAV for which the applicant first qualifies for the exemption), and (2) the applicant’s total household maximum income limitation. It must be applied for each year. Senior Citizens Real Estate Tax Deferral Program is also available. This program allows persons 65 years of age and older to defer all or part of the real estate taxes and special assessments (up to a maximum of $5,000) on their principal residences. The deferral is similar to a loan against the property’s market value. A lien is filed on the property in order to ensure repayment of the deferral. The

state pays the property taxes and then recovers the money, plus 6 percent annual interest, when the property is sold or transferred. The deferral must be repaid within one year of the taxpayer’s death or 90 days after the property ceases to qualify for this program. The maximum amount that can be deferred, including interest and lien fees, is 80 percent of the taxpayer’s equity interest in the property. Shaw said their are other exemptions available – Homestead Exemption for persons with disabilities, a standard homestead exemption for veterans with disabilities, homestead improvement exemption, natural disaster homestead exemption and the returning veterans homestead exemption. Questions about these exemptions can be answered by call ing the supervisor of assessment office during regular business hours.


Sports Saukees Hoist the Trophy Pike Press

C1

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 Pittsfield, Illinois

By Jacob Bradshaw Pike Press The Pittsfield Saukees began their season in style. For the first time in five years, the Saukees win the tournament in a tie-breaker. Jacksonville Routt, Illini West, Western, and Pittsfield all finished 3-1, and Pittsfield broke the tiebreaker by allowing the least amount of opposing points. The first game of the season was a win, Pittsfield easily taking the win in a 67-50 victory. Leading scorer of the game was Noah Mendenhall with 23 points, and Korbyn Personett and Jon Moore with 16 points each. Saukees maintained a 60% field goal percentage throughout the night. They then proceeded with another win over the Liberty

Eagles, 70-23. Personett led the way with 24 points and Nick Reel with 16. Pittsfield set a record on the night, the record being the least points allowed in a tournament game. Pittsfield won their third game easily against Lovejoy, the final score being 69-39. Personett lead the way again with 23 points, followed by Mendenhall with 13 and Reel with 10. In the final game of the tournament, Pittsfield faced Illini West, and lost a nail biter 52-46. The game was taken to overtime, and Illini West held true at the free throw line, not allowing opportunity to slip. Personett had 23 points in the loss, but it wasn’t enough to overcome Illini West. Illini West was led with a 24 outing from Illini West’s Jackson

Porter, along with Kennedy Gooding’s 12 points. “It felt good winning the tournament, but weird at the same time,” Korbyn Personett stated. “We won with a tie-breaker, but sweeping the tourney and being able to go 4-0 would’ve really sealed the deal. Losing our last game in a barn-burner to Illini West really hurt us, but the positive thing, is that our team as a whole felt empty hoisting that trophy. One thing will lead to another, and with the mindset we have, I think that this team can only go up from here. Making the all tournament team was a huge honor, and I’m happy for having the honor of making it and I congratulate those from my team that made it and all other players.”

Photo by Doug Pool

Saukees boys with their trophy from the Turkey Tournament

Devin Battefeld makes 1000 point club 2016 Pittsfield Turkey Tournament By Ashley Miller Pike Press The twenty-sixth of November will be a day Devin Battefeld, a senior at Griggsville-Perry High School, will not soon forget. During their game against Rushville Saturday Battefeld made a shot from the free throw line that set her spot in the Lady Tornadoes 1000 point club. Only five other women from GP have received the honor and Battefeld felt every bit of it. “It’’s exciting to be a part of such an elite group of girls.” She went into the game knowing roughly how many points were needed. “After all it had only been my goal since I can remember.” She said, still smiling Monday morning. Not only did she reach that  long time goal but the Lady Tornadoes also took home their first win, a 62-55 victory over the Lady Rockets, placing them 9th out of 10th in the Brown County Lady Hornet Classic. Battefeld lead the team in points with 27, going 13 for 16 at the line, all leading up to the moment she had been waiting for. “I walked up to the free throw line, received the ball from the ref, and went about it like

By Steven Spencer Pike Press The All Tournament Team athletes were named after last weeks Turkey Tournament. Korbyn Personett of Pittsfield, Hunter Chumley and Drew

Winter from Routt, Noah Mendenhall from Pittsfield, Kennedy Gooding from Illini West, Cameron Wallace from Lovejoy, Dalton Malone from Western, Nick Reel from Pittsfield, Lance Loos from Payson and Dlaton Lentz

from Liberty all made the list for the All Tournament Team. Western was named the cheerleading champion and Ty Rylander from Liberty received the Sportsmanship award.

Lady Saukees keep rolling Photo by Ashley Miller

Devin Battefeld with her family and the banner they surprised her with after she made the free throw that sent her into the 1000 point club.

any other free throw.” Of course the excitement coming from her family in the stands gave it away. “If it hadn’t been for my whole family standing up, cheering, clapping, and waving the banner I wouldn’t have even known.” This being just one example of the kind of player Battefeld is she also gives advice to the girls looking up to her, hoping her join the ranks of the club one day. “”At the end of the game if you’re weak and all you want to do is lay down, you know you gave 100%.

Play every second, minute, and game like it’s your last. Set your goals high and don’t ever give up.” Lauren Kennedy and Jordan Brite also came in clutch during their victory, scoring 11 points, Kennedy went 3 for 4 and Brite 2 for 2. The Lady Tornadoes are now into the swing of the season, their record currently being 1-6. They will be back on the court Thursday at Calhoun and then Friday at home with Greenfield before traveling to Triopia Monday to take on the Trojans.

Women’s Bowling League Standings in the Tuesday Women’s Bowling League: Fashion Flowers - 37 - 11 Pin Pals - 28 1/2 - 19 1/2 Gray House B&B - 27 1/2 - 20 1/12 Rolling Pins - 27 - 21 Road Runners - 26 - 22 Late Comers - 22 1/2 - 25 1/2 Loose Cannons - 19 1/2 - 28 1/2 Bowling Bags - 18 1/2 - 29 1/2 Gutter Gals - 17 1/2 - 30 1/2 Five Aces - 16 - 32 Team scratch game Road Runners 757

Team scratch series Road Runners 2172 and Gray House B&B 2172 Team handicap game Gutter Gals 1064 Team handicap series Road Runners 2937 Robin Callender led the women individual scratch game and series with 207 and 533. Callender also led the handicap game and handicap seirs with 263 and 701. The individual high averages were Beth Wade with 163.53, Kay Taliaferro with 154.03, Jan Kelly with 153.31, Laurabell McCon with 143.52 and Doris Webel with 143.36.

By Jacob Bradshaw Pike Press The Lady Saukees have been playing well as of late. The good thing about their wins, are that they are managing to pull out close victories. One of their major key wins is their 59-57 victory in overtime against Rushville. In the win, Lilly Pepper led the ladies with a 28 point scoring outburst, and Maddie Palmer contributing 13 points. Other noticeable victories

was their 55-47 win against Payson. In this win, Pepper had 17 points, and Palmer had 10. Maggie Marable and Sydney Bauer each contributed 8 points a piece off the bench. Another close victory against Brown County, 44-42. Palmer had 13 points, Pepper had 11, and Sydney Bauer had 9. The ladies respectively finished 3-2 in the tournament, and finished 5th overall. “We’ve been able to win

some close games,” head coach Jeff Shireman stated. “If we play hard and stay within ourselves, we will do what needs to be done. I’m extremely proud of these girls and what they’ve accomplished. It can only go up from here.” The Lady’s will be looking to the underclassmen for production, since senior forward Katie Moore is out with injury for awhile. She is expected to be back, but it will be a test for the Lady’s bench.

Pittsfield/Pleasant Hill Brown County Tournament Results By Steven Spencer Pike Press Pittsfield girls basketball won three of their five games in the Brown County Tournament last week. They lost their first two games against Western and West Hancock. Western beat the Saukees in the first game 27-34. Top scorers for Pittsfield were Lilly Pepper with 10 points and Bella McCartney with seven points. Top scorers for Western were Blair Borrowman with 18 points and Anna Melton with six points. West Hancock beat the Saukees in their second game 41-52. Lilly Pepper scored 14 points for the Saukees in that

game and Bella McCartney and Maddie Palmer each scored eight points. The Saukees won their other three games of the tournament. They beat Rushville 59-57. The Saukees took control in the first half of the game with a six point lead and a score of 25-19. The six point lead was enough to keep control of the game even as Rushville turned things up in the fourth quarter scoring 28 to Pittsfield 24. The top scorers of the game were Pittsfield’s Lilly Pepper with 28 points and Maddie Palmer with 16. In Saukees fourth game they beat Payson 55-47. Payson took the lead in the first half of the game with a score of 19-22. Both teams kept the game close in the third quarter. It was in

the fourth quarter when in the Saukees turned things around to win it. Pittsfield scored 22 in the fourth while Payson scored 11. Lilly Pepper and Maddie Palmer were the top scorers for Pittsfield/Pleasant Hill. Pepper scored 17 points and Palmer scored 10 against Payson. The Saukees beat Brown County in their fifth game of the tournament 44-42. They took the lead in the the first half with a score of 17-16. After scoring 11 points on Brown County in the third quarter, they upped their lead by two points. Each team scored 16 points in the fourth quarter making a final score of 44-42. The Saukees top scorers were Maddie Palmer with 13 points and Lilly Pepper with 11.

Pittsfeild beats Routt 67-50 Pittsfield beat Liberty 70-23 By Steven Spencer Pike Press The Pittsfield Saukees beat the Routt Rockets 67-50 in boys basketball last week. The first quarter of the game was close with 14 points for the Saukees and 13 for Routt. Jon Moore scored seven points for the Saukees. Noah Mendenhall scored five points and Korbyn Personett had two points in the first quarter. Pittsfield took control of the game in the second quarter, scoring 25 points. Seven

points came from Moore. Nick Reel and Austin Ator each scored two points. Mendenhall and Personett each scored six points, and JD Gresham scored two free throws. Routt put eight points on the board in the second quarter. Making the score at the end of the second half Pittsfield 39 and Routt 21. In the third quarter Moore and Nick Reel each scored two points for the Saukees. Personett scored four points and Mendenhall scored ten points. Routt tried to close the gap in the third quarter scor-

ing 14 points to Pittsfield 18. In the fourth quarter Routt continued to try to turn things around putting 15 points on the board to the Saukees ten, but it wasn’t enough to win. Mendenhall scored two points in the fourth from free throws. Nick Reel and Thomas Hull each scored two points. Personett scored four more points in the final quarter, making the game score 67-50. Pittsfield top scorers of the game were Noah Mendenhall, Korbyn Personett and Jon Moore. Mendenhall scored 23 points and Personett and Moore each scored 16.

All Conference Selections   Congratulations to the following players on their selection to the All Conference Team for the Sangamo conference. This will be the third straight year that a team from the Sangamo conference has played in the title game. Defense 1st Team All Conference -

Korbyn Personett - ILB 2nd Team All Conference Jonathon Rumple - DL 2nd Team All Conference Austin Motley - OLB 2nd Team All Conference Derek Neupauer - DB Honorable Mention - Trenton Ruddy - DE

Offense 2nd Team All Conference Korbyn Personett - FB Honorable Mention - Jonathon Rumple - C Honorable Mention - Chase Howland - T Honorable Mention - Austin Motley - RB

By Steven Spencer Pike Press The Pittsfield Saukees boys basketball beat the Liberty Eagles last Monday 70-23. Pittsfield took a strong lead in the first quarter with 21 points and Liberty scored seven in the first. Korbyn Personett put 12 points on the board for Pittsfield in the first quarter, six of which came from the three point line. Nick Reel scored three points. Noah Mendenhall, Jon Moore and Austin Ator each had two points. The Saukees continued to

control the game and strengthen their lead in the second quarter scoring 23 more points and giving them a total of 44 at half time. The Eagles only scored two points in the second quarter after making two of four free throw attempts. Nick Reel put 13 points on the board with three shots from behind the three point line and four points from free throws. Personett put eight points up for the Saukees and Mendenhall scored two. The second half of the game started with the Saukees leading by 35 points and a score of 44-9. In the third quarter Personett scored four points. Thomas

Hull, JD Gresham, Austin Ator and Ethan Scott each scored two points. Liberty scored two points in the third quarter to Pittsfield 12. Giving Pittsfield a lead of 45. In the fourth quarter Pittsfield scored 14 points. Jacob Bradshaw had eight points. Jacob McIntire scored four points and Ethan Scott had two. Liberty scored 12 points in the fourth quarter, making the final score of the game 23-70. The top scorers for the Saukees were Korbyn Personett with 24 points and Nick Reel with 16.

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

COURT

Pittsfield, Illinois

Police Beat

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SPEEDING VIOLATIONS ($120 total unless otherwise posted) Darryl W. Bequette Jr., Nebo, DOB 6/7/1987, 15-20 mph above limit, $383 fine. Kelli L. Daniel, Pittsfield, DOB 7/23/1971, 15-20 mph above limit, $352 fine, three months supervision. Tabitha M. Dempsey, Pleasant Hill, DOB 2/4/1994, 1520 mph above limit, nolle prosequi. Hayle M. Eller, Pearl, DOB 9/26/1996, 26-34 mph above limit, $604 fine, 12 months conditional discharge. Larry E. Goewey, Nebo, DOB 6/16/1948, 15-20 mph above limit. Travis L. Myers, Rockport, DOB 4/18/1984, 26-34 mph above limit, $418 fine. Mackenzie L. Phillips, Kinderhook, DOB 7/18/1999, 2125 mph above limit, $377 fine, four months supervision. Melissa C. Robinson, Hull, DOB 7/13/1969, 15-20 mph above limit. Tanner Cole Still, Pearl, DOB 4/8/1998, 15-20 mph above limit, $352 fine, three months supervision. SEATBELT VIOLATIONS ($60 total unless otherwise posted) Austin S. Crowder, Pleasant Hill, DOB 5/28/1994, driver. Martin L. Grisham, Baylis, DOB 4/19/1999, driver. Mycah J. Hoaglin, Pittsfield, DOB 10/31/1993, driver. Sheldon D. Howland, Nebo, DOB 8/28/1962, driver. Justin E. Kindle, Pittsfield, DOB 8/8/1986, driver, $62 fine. Vincent A. Scranton, Barry, DOB 8/19/1994, driver. Dalton R. Yokem, Pleasant Hill, DOB 9/25/1993, driver. MISCELLAENOUS VIOLATIONS Chase H. Brown, Barry, DOB 9/1/1998, improper traffic lane usage, $120 fine. William E. Coleman, Pittsfield, DOB 6/4/1974, operating uninsured motor vehicle, nolle prosequi. Julie L. Crawford, Griggsville, DOB 4/23/1966, driving on suspended license, $852 fine, 18 months supervision. Tabitha M. Dempsey, Pleasant Hill, DOB 2/4/1994, driving on suspended license, $917 fine, 24 months supervision. Hayle M. Eller, Pearl, DOB 9/26/1996, operating uninsured motor vehicle, nolle prosequi. Jacob M. Frasier, Pleasant Hill, DOB 8/26/1986, no valid registration, $402 fine, three months supervision; reckless driving, $707 fine, 12 months supervision. Joshua E. Gandy, Hull, DOB 11/4/1986, driving on suspended license, $829 fine, 12 months conditional discharge. Shawn A. Hoover, Pittsfield, DOB 3/18/1975, illegal stopping, standing, or parking, nolle prosequi. Madison P. Johns, Rockport, DOB 8/26/1999, improper left turn into oncoming traffic, $120 fine. Amanda J. Johnson, Pleasant Hill, DOB 4/26/1988, operating uninsured motor vehicle, nolle prosequi. Justin E. Kindle, Pittsfield, DOB 8/8/1986, operating uninsured motor vehicle, $437 fine, six months supervision; unlicensed, nolle prosequi. Anthony David Little, Griggsville, DOB 7/12/1982, operating uninsured motor vehicle, nolle prosequi. Travis L. Myers, Rockport, DOB 4/18/1984, driving on suspended license, $963 fine, 12 months conditional discharge. Jeffrey L. Shireman, Pittsfield, DOB 10/4/1957, improper traffic lane usage, $402 fine, three months supervision; expired registration, nolle prosequi.

The police records released by the Pike County Sheriff’s office include the following arrests and bookings. The records state that these are accusations and each individual is presumed innocent until proven guilty. BOOKINGS Humberto R. RomeroSachez, 27, Oswego, was arrested Nov. 21 on an instate misdemeanor warrant. He posted $300 bond and was released pending court appearance. Vickie J. Kramer, 51, Nebo, was arrested Nov. 22, on an Pike County traffic warrant. She was released on $450 recognizance bond. Sasha A. Smith, 28, Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 22 on a felony charge of methamphetamine possession and endangering the life of a child. She remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $8,000 bond. Ricky L. Allen, 42, Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 22 on a felony changes of methamphetamine possession, possession of methamphet-amine waste. possession of methamphetamine manufacturing material and felony endangering the life of a child. He remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $10,000 bond. Jacob O’Neal, 33, Springfield, Mo., was arrested Nov. 22 on a felony Pike County warrant. He posted

$150 bond and was released pending court appearance. Laura A Pfleger, 41, Winchester, was arrested Nov. 22 on a charge of driving under the influence of alcohol, failure to reduce speed, failure to yield to an emergency vehicle, disobeyed traffic control device, improper lane usage. She posted $100 and was released pending court appearance. Gregory D. Santoni, 25, Lubbock, Texas, was arrested Nov. 22 on a felony charge of methamphetamine possession. He remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $1,000 bond. Michael J. Wallace, 51, Nebo, was arrested Nov. 23, on a felony revocation of bail bond, He remains lodged in lieu of $5,000 bond. Adam L. Crowder, 28, Pleasant Hill, was arrested Nov. 23 on a small claims body attachment and a Pike County traffic warrant. He posted $400 on the civil matter and $150 on the warrant and was released pending court appearance. John E. Resor, 26, Barry, was arrested Nov. 23 on a Pike County felony warrant. He posted $250 and was released pending court appearance. Andrew J. Westmaas, 25, Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 23 on a revocation of bail bond. He remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $2,500 bond. Shelby R. Mulford, 21,

Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 23 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance and burglary. She remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $2, 500 bond. Joey M. Mulvaney, 24, East Peoria, was arrested Nov. 23 on a Pike County traffic warrant alleging failure to appear on a DUI charge. He remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $250 bond. Kensey R. Mesey, 23, Milton, Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 23 on a felony charge of possession of a controlled substance and burglary. She remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $5,000 bond. Brenton J. Noble, 18, Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 23 on a Pike County traffic warrant. He posted $100 and was arrested pending court appearance. Carli M. Fenton, 21, Hamel, was arrested Nov. 23 on a felony Pike County warrant. She remains lodged in the Pike County Jail in lieu of $2,500 bond. Robert D. Ostrander, 37, Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 24 on a Pike County body attachment. He posted $200 and was released pending court appearance. Andrew M. Kindle, 27, Summer Hill, was arrested Nov. 24 on a Pike County body attachment. He posted $200 and was released pending court

Dispositions FELONY Reid A. Richards, Pittsfield, DOB 6/26/1985, aggravated battery by strangling, nolle prosequi. Richard K. Rupley, Griggsville, DOB 6/20/1981, use of vehicle, structure, or property in manufacturing methamphetamine, nolle prosequi; obstruction of justice by destroying evidence, $3,142 fine, 30 months probation, 180 days in jail, 17 days credit for time served. MISDEMEANOR Brenton D. Kilzer, Pittsfield, DOB 9/12/1991, unlawful possession of drug paraphernalia, $2,413 fine, 24

months probation, 60 days in jail; unlawful possession of cannabis between 10 and 30 grams, nolle prosequi. Reid A. Richards, Pittsfield, DOB 6/26/1985, battery by making physical contact, $2,737.61 fine and restitution, 24 months probation, one day in jail, one day credit for time served. Justine M. L. Walker, Pittsfield, DOB 2/20/1993, domestic battery causing bodily harm, charge amended or reduced; domestic battery by making physical contact, $1,242 fine, 300 days in jail; resisting peace officer, correctional employee, or firefighter, nolle prosequi.

appearance. Larry O. Franklin, 36, Springfield, was arrested Nov. 25 on a charges of operating a uninsured motor vehicle, driving while suspended or revoked, loud muffler, failure or improper signal, criminal damage to property, misdemeanor possession of stolen property and felony possession of stolen property. He posted $1,500 and was released pending court appearance. Jason C. Shelton, 21, Pittsfield, was arrested Nov. 26 on a misdemeanor charge of criminal trespass to a residence. He posted $150 and was released pending court appearance. Tyler S. Felker, 24, O’Fallon, Mo., was arrested Nov. 26 on charges of driving under the influence and speeding. He posted $300 bond and was released pending court appearance. Mark A. Newell, 29, Essex Mo., was arrested Nov. 26 on a felony Pike County warrant. He remains lodged with no bond set. Has your charge been amended, reduced or dropped or have you been found not guilty? Email ppnews@campbellpublications.net to be considered for a status update on your court proceeding. Please include name and case number.

Crime Stoppers Crime of the Week Pike County Sheriff’s Department is seeking information about a broken window at the Cornerstone Independent Church located at 825 Bluegrass St. in Milton. The report was received on Nov. 23 at approximately 6:30 p.m. 

If you have information on this or any other crimes taking place in Pike County, call Crime Stoppers at 217-285–1500. All callers remain anonymous, and if your tip leads to an arrest, you will be eligible for up to a $1,000 cash reward.  

GOT NEWS? SEND IT TO US! ppnews@campbellpublications.net

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COURT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY, PITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association PLAINTIFF Vs. 16 CH 00023 Chance M. Lippincott; Malissa M. Lippincott; Unknown Owners and Nonrecord Claimants DEFENDANTS NOTICE BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU: Malissa M. Lippincott Unknown Owners and Claimants

Pike Press

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Nonrecord

That this case has been commenced in this Court against you and other defendants, praying for the foreclosure of a certain Mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to-wit: COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 105 Randall Drive Pleasant Hill, IL 62366 and which said Mortgage was made by: Chance M. Lippincott Malissa M. Lippincott

Mortgage, as Mortgagee, and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Pike County, Illinois, as Document No. 2009-3772 Book 792 Page 22; and for other relief; that summons was duly issued out of said Court against you as provided by law and that the said suit is now pending.

I708027

F14040021SVTSPT KOND IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY- PITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS

ATED IN THE COUNTY OF PIKE, AND STATE OF ILLINOIS.

11.23.16, 11.30.16, 12.7.16

Commonly known as: 303 West Washington Street aka PO Box 513, Griggsville, IL 62340 P.I.N.: 43-085-03 First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $134980.44

vs. CASE NO. 14 CH 43 Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Peggy S. Liggett aka Peggy Sue Liggett; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of John Branstetter; Carolyn Lovelace; Margaret Louise Tarrante; Terry Nugent; Jane Nugent; John Nugent; David Russell Branstetter aka Rusty Branstetter; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Mary Jane Nugent; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Joe Nugent aka Joseph Nugent; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Elizabeth McCormick; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of James Richard Branstetter; Carol Ann Branstetter; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Betty Lou Branstetter; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Sara Francis Branstetter; Kelly Shawn Skaggs aka Kelly Skaggs; Jerry Shane Skaggs aka Jerry Skaggs; Renee Darlene Brown aka Renee D. Brown aka Renee D. Skaggs; Jimmy Branstetter; Robin Skaggs; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants. Property Address: 303 West Washington Street aka PO Box 513, Griggsville, IL 62340

SUPERVISOR CLERK TRUSTEES ROAD COMMISSIONER 11.30.16

on or before December 23, 2016, A DEFAULT MAY BE ENTERED AGAINST YOU AT ANY TIME AFTER THAT DAY AND A JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE PRAYER OF SAID COMPLAINT.

the Mortgagor(s), to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as Nominee for First Bank d/b/a First Bank

Kondaur Capital Corporation, as separate trustee of Matawin Ventures Trust Series 2015-2 Plaintiff,

The Martinsburg Township Republican Caucus for the Spring election will be held at 6 p.m. on December 6, 2016 in the Morrow Garage in Martinsburg. The Democratic Caucus will follow at 6:30 p.m. Offices in the Martinsburg Township that are up for reelection are:

Debbie Dugan Circuit Clerk Pike County Courthouse 100 East Washington Street #3 Pittsfield, IL 62363

NOTE: This law firm is a debt collector.

IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS AND COURT COSTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments for the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Pike County.

Looking to sell your

Notice is given of the death of BESSIE JANE VOSE, of Chambersburg, Pike County, Illinois. Letters of office were issued on November 17, 2016, to MARCIA K. HOLDSWORTH, 5400 W. Vengeance Trail, Prescott, Arizona 86305, whose attorney is Rammelkamp Bradney, P.C., 232 West State Street, P.O. Box 550, Jacksonville, Illinois 62651. Claims against the Estate may be filed in the Office of the Clerk of the Court at Pike County Courthouse, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363, or with the representative, or both, within 6 months from the 30th day of November, 2016, being the date of first publication of this Notice and any claim not filed within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it has been filed. Dated this 23rd day of November, 2016.

1CHEVY952

Bel Air?

MARCIA K. HOLDSWORTH, Executor of the Estate of BESSIE JANE VOSE, Deceased

Classification 100

BY: RAMMELKAMP BRADNEY, P.C. By: Richard Freeman, Attorney

The People’s Marketplace.

This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 120 Naperville, IL 60563-4947 630-453-6960 | 866-402-8661 | 630-428-4620 (fax) Attorney No. Cook 58852, DuPage 293191, Kane 031-26104, Peoria 1794, Winnebago 3802, IL 03126232 foreclosure@ALOLawGroup.com

F15070111

REAL ESTATE, TO-WIT: THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, OF TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH OF RANGE 4 WEST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: TAKING A POINT 240 FEET SOUTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF OUT LOT 26 OF THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW CITY OF PITTSFIELD, IN PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, FOR A PLACE OF BEGINNING, RUNNING THENCE SOUTH 160 FEET, THENCE EAST 160 FEET, THENCE NORTH 160 FEET, THENCE WEST 160 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF PIKE AND STATE OF ILLINOIS.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTY‚ PITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS Wells Fargo Bank, NA Plaintiff, vs. 15 CH 39 Ryan R. Culton aka Ryan Culton; Carrie B. Boyd aka Carrie Beth Boyd aka Carrie Beth Culton aka Carrie Boyd aka Carrie Culton; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants. 254 South Monroe Street, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363 NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION The requisite affidavit for publication having been filed, notice is hereby given you, Carrie B. Boyd aka Carrie Beth Boyd aka Carrie Beth Culton aka Carrie Boyd aka Carrie Culton and UNKNOWN OWNERS and NON-RECORD CLAIMANTS, defendants in the above entitled cause, that suit has been commenced against you and other defendants in the Circuit Court for the Judicial Circuit by said plaintiff praying for the foreclosure of a certain mortgage conveying the premises described as follows, to wit: TRACT 1: THAT PART OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, OF TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN, PIKE COUNTY, ILLINOIS, DESCRIBED BY METES AND BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: TAKING A POINT 160 FEET SOUTH OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF OUT LOT 26 OF THE ORIGINAL TOWN, NOW CITY OF PITTSFIELD, IN THE COUNTY OF PIKE AND STATE OF ILLINOIS FOR A PLACE OF BEGINNING, RUNNING THENCE WESTERLY ON A LINE PARALLEL WITH THE NORTH LINE OF SAID QUARTER SECTION 160 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 80 FEET, THENCE EAST 160 FEET, THENCE NORTH 80 FEET TO THE PLACE OF BEGINNING, SITUATED IN THE CITY OF PITTSFIELD, COUNTY OF PIKE, AND STATE OF ILLINOIS. TRACT 2: THE NORTH 20 FEET OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED TRACT OF

11.30.16, 12.7.16, 12.14.16

P.I.N.: 54-033-06; 54-033-01A Said property is commonly known as 254 South Monroe Street, Pittsfield, Illinois 62363, and which said mortgage(s) was/were made by Ryan R. Culton aka Ryan Culton and Carrie B. Boyd and recorded in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds as Document Number 2011-2280 Book 810, page 242 and for other relief; that Summons was duly issued out of the above Court against you as provided by law and that said suit is now pending. NOW THEREFORE, unless you, the said above named defendants, file your answer to the complaint in the said suit or otherwise make your appearance therein, in the Office of the Clerk of the Court at Pike County on or before December 23, 2016, a default may be taken against you at any time after that date and a Judgment entered in accordance with the prayer of said complaint. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. Steven C. Lindberg ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 120, Naperville, IL 60563-4947 630-453-6960 | 866-402-8661 | 630-428-4620 (fax) foreclosure@ALOLawGroup.com THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR.

STATE OF ILLINOIS, CIRCUIT COURT PIKE COUNTY NOTICE OF FILING A REQUEST FOR NAME CHANGE (ADULT) Request of: Beulah Mae Giles Case Number: 16-MR-125 There will be a court hearing on my request to change my name from: Beulah Mae Giles to the new name of Dolly Mae Giles. The court date will be held: on January 20th, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at 100 E. Washington St. Pittfield, IL, Pike county in Courtroom #1. /s/ Beulah Mae Giles Filed November 21st, 2016 Debbie Dugan Clerk of the Circuit Clerk 11.30.16, 12.7.16, 12.14.16

SEE THIS? SO WILL YOUR CUSTOMERS! CALL

217-285-2345

I708003 11.23.16, 11.30.16, 12.7.16

11.23.16, 11.30.16, 12.7.16

NOTICE FOR PUBLICATION - CLAIMS

Sales Department at ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 West Diehl Road, Suite 120, Naperville, IL 60563 (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.alolawgroup.com 24 hours prior to sale.

THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR. R410

Donnie Apps COUNTY CLERK

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF NO. 2016-P-65 BESSIE JANE VOSE, DECEASED.

The person to contact for information regarding this property is:

LOT ONE (1) IN BLOCK FIVE (5) IN HATCH’S ADDITION TO THE TOWN, NOW CITY OF GRIGGSVILLE, SITU-

Public Notice is hereby given that on November 17th, 2016 a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of Pike County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post-office addresses of all the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as Ator Enterprises, located at 21684 US 54 Pittsfield, IL 62363. Dated this 17th day of November, 2016

STATE OF ILLINOIS IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF PIKE

NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on October 7, 2016, I, Sheriff, Paul Petty of Pike County, Illinois, will hold a sale on January 6, 2017 , commencing at 9:00am, at the Pike County Courthouse, 100 East Washington Street, Pittsfield, IL 62363, to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit:

NOTICE

NOTICE

NOW, THEREFORE, UNLESS YOU file your answer or otherwise file your appearance in this case in the Office of the Clerk of this Court,

CODILIS & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 15W030 North Frontage Road, Suite 100 Burr Ridge, IL 60527 (630) 794-5300 DuPage # 15170 Winnebago # 531 Our File No. 14-16-11995

C3

Pittsfield, Illinois

TO PLACE YOUR AD TODAY!

Attorneys for Estate: Rammelkamp Bradney, P.C. Richard Freeman #6198969 232 West State Street; P. O. Box 550 Jacksonville, IL 62650 Telephone: (217) 245-6177 Email: rfreeman@rblawyers.net 11.30.16, 12.7.16, 12.14.16


Campbell Publications

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GENERAL INFORMATION DEADLINES: Classified ads, Monday 3:30 p.m. (For placement and for cancellation.) CLASSIFIED RATES: First insertion, 25¢ per word, minimum $6. Consecutive repeat insertion, 15¢ per word, minimum $5. Prepayment is required. Any change in original ad will be considered start of a new ad. Blind Ad, $4 service charge, plus postage if replies are to be mailed. Yard Sales, $6 up to 20 words. No Trespassing notice, one year, up to 20 words, $60. ADVERTISING POLICY The following are policies of: Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times and The Weekly Messenger: We are not responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of display and classified advertising. One free insertion will be allowed for a classified ad with a significant mistake. Please let us know immediately. The newspaper reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement submitted for publication. Yard Sale and Work Wanted ads are payable in advance. Proper identification is required of persons placing ads. A F.O.I.D. card will be asked for when selling a firearm. No exceptions will be allowed. Newspaper reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including the right to do so after the ad has been accepted for publication but before publication occurs. The advertiser’s sole remedy for such refusal shall be the refund of the funds paid to purchase the ad. Advertisements are accepted by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the contents and subject matter of the advertisement and that it is not libel-

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Ph: 217-742-3313 • Fax: 630-206-0320

E-Mail: gppnews@campbellpublications.net

E-Mail: sctnews@campbellpublications.net

JERSEY COUNTY JOURNAL

The Weekly Messenger

3:45-5 p.m. Monday, Thursday

Mon.: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Tues.: 9 a.m.-noon; Fri.: 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

P.O. Box 340, Pleasant Hill, IL 62366 Ph: 217-285-2345 • Fax: 630-206-0320

832 South State, Jerseyville, IL. 62052 Ph: 618-498-1234 • Fax: 630-206-0320 E-mail: jcjnews@campbellpublications.net

8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Monday - Friday *Certain classifications of ads appearing in The People’s Marketplace also appear on www.pikepress.com on the Internet at no additional charge.

IF YOU need parts for mowers and tillers, Dorsey's Hardware and Western Auto has a large selection of belts and parts and service. New equipment sales available. Winchester. Call 217-742-9241. SELLBEST, 101 W. Quincy St., Griggsville. Quality Used Furniture & Appliances- Washers, Dryers, Freezers, Fridges, Microwave, Electric Stoves, Twin, Full, Queen Beds, New Mattress Sets, Bedroom Furniture, Tables & Chairs, Upholstered Furniture, Tools. Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Closed for lunch 12-1 p.m. Or by appointment. Call 217-242-2252. TFN TFN

400D FOR RENT Pike County 2 BEDROOM home for rent. No smoking, no pets, security deposit required. 217-2854502. TFN 2 BEDROOM apartment for rent. No smoking. No pets. Security deposit required. 217285-4502. TFN ONE BEDROOM apartment for rent. No pets, no smoking, security deposit required. Call 217-285-4502. TFN

500 FOR SALE

HOMEGROWN POPCORN, Japanese Hulless. Call 217430-2881. 1.11.17 3 CEMETERY plots for sale in 400D the Oakwood Cemetery. SW FOR RENT 1/4 of Lot. No. 285. Very nice location. Will sell individually. Pike County $200 firm per plot. Please call HOUSE FOR rent at 27614 217-779-7348. 1.18.17 Dutch Creek Rd. About 10 miles from Pittsfield. $500 per COUNTRY HOME on 5 acres. 3 bedroom, 2 bath; remodeled month. 662-816-0704. 12.7.16 inside and out. 217-248-4417 HOUSE FOR rent. 3 miles 12.7.16 from Pittsfield. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. No pets, no smoking. READ THE classifieds evReferences and deposit re- ery week for great details on quired. Call 217-285-2448. 12.7.16 cars, boats, hunting land and housing! Call and place your 1990 PRESTIGE double wide ad today. mobile home, 22x40. 3 BR, 2 SIX NEWSPAPERS, over BA. Call 217-370-2629. TFN 20,000 readers every week. YARD SALE season is here! The People's Marketplace Place your ad with us! 20 Classifieds! words for only $6

SCOTT COUNTY LAND AUCTION John Barker Farm

Tract I-80 acres, 62 tillable-Owner-John Barker Trust Tract II-245 acres, 197 tillable-Owners-Lesley Barker, Kerry Barker, Tim Barker and Terrie Day

WEDNESDAY, DEC. 14 • 10:30 A.M.

Tract I is the West half of the Southeast Quarter of in Section 25, Township 13 North, Range 12 West of the Third Principal Meridian, Scott County, Illinois, with a PI of 116.3. Tract II is located in Sections 25, 26 and 36 in Township 13 North and Range 12 West of the Third Principal Meridian, Scott County, Illinois, with a PI of 119.7. Prospective bidders shall submit a sealed bid to the office of Charles E. McNeely, 226 West State Street, Jacksonville, Illinois, or mail the same to P.O. Box 970, Jacksonville, Illinois 62651, by Monday, December 12, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. Bids may be submitted for Tract 1 or Tract II or both. If bidding on both tracts, separate bids must be submitted for each tract. Bids shall be by the acre. Indicate name of bidder on outside of envelope. Bids shall be opened on December 14 at 10:30 a.m. at the Nimrod Funk Building, 401 North Walnut, Winchester, Illinois. Anyone who has submitted a bid may attend the bid opening and raise their bid at that time. Attendance at the auction will be restricted to those persons who have submitted a bid. The successful bidder shall deposit 5% of the purchase price the day of auction, with the balance due at closing by January 31, 2017. Sale subject to seller approval. Possession granted at closing. Inspection at your convenience. Contact Charles McNeely at 217-245-7148, email chuck@thomsonlaw.net or Eddie Carpenter at 217-245-7015, email ecarpenter@ irtc.net for sale brochure and further details.

• 100 Automotive * • 200 Business* • 220 Collectibles* • 300 Farm Market* • 400 For Rent* A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County F: Miscellaneous • 500 For Sale* • 600 Help Wanted* • 610 Hobby Shop/Handicrafts*

900A 600 HELP WANTED Calhoun County

600 HELP WANTED

11.30.16

DRIVERS-CO & O\Op’s: Teams. Earn great money running dedicated! Great hometime and benefits. Monthly bonuses. Drive newer equipment! 855-493-9921. 11.30.16 WANTED- SEMI truck driver to haul bulk feed within 250mile radius. No overnight trips. Truck will be based in Milton, IL. Must have clean CDL record and be able to pass drug test. Call 217-248-2398 or 217-723-4359. 11.30.16 NEED MILL operator/driver in Griggsville. Make feed & load trucks. Need CDL. Good pay/ benefits. E-mail resume hr@ jbsunited.com or fax 317-7582680. 12.7.16 BAWANAS TAVERN - Part time bartender needed 618535-9962. 11.30.16

NO HUNTING or Trespassing allowed on 315 acres property in Batchtown Illinois owned by Jim and Carol Squires. All violators will be prosecuted. 8.30.17 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Steve and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.24.17 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Marcy Klockenkemper, Judy Lamer, Jeremy Russell, Bonnie Stepanek, and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.24.17

900C

NO TRESPASSING

Pike County

NO HUNTING or trespassing on the Linda Bennett farm, rural Griggsville. Violators will be prosecuted. 11.2.17 MY LAND lo­cat­ed in Sec­tion 18 SW of Pearl is pri­vate prop­ er­ty. Hunt­ing, fish­ing, trap­ping, tres­pass­ing, for any pur­pose, with­ out the writ­ ten, signed per­ mis­ sion of the own­ er, is 615 strict­ly for­bid­den. Vio­la­tors will HUNTING be pros­e­cut­ed. Ti­mothy Brink­ man. 5.20.17 LOOKING FOR ground in ABSOLUTELY NO trespassNorthern Calhoun or Southern ing on any ground owned by Pike to lease short term or long Double Creek Farms, Inc. 10.18.17 term. No size too big! 618-5509406. 3.15.17

Your

FIND YOUR NEW JOB HERE!

• 615 Hunting • 620 Kids For Hire • 700 Lost/Found • 710 Meeting Reminders • 800 Miscellaneous* • 900 No Trespassing A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County • 1000 Pets* • 1100 Real Estate* A: Calhoun County

1000 PETS

NO TRESPASSING

DRIVERS & Owner Ops CDLA. Guaranteed Salary + Mileage. Percentage Pay for Owners. $2500 Sign On. Annual Bonuses. Exceptional Hiring Packages 855-902-7681.

ous or does not infringe on the privacy of any individual or entity. All advertisements are accepted and published by the newspaper upon the representation that the agency and/or advertiser will indemnify and hold harmless the newspaper from any loss or expense, including the cost of defense and any settlement and/or judgment resulting from claims based upon the contents of any advertisement, including claims or suits for defamation, libel, violation of right of privacy, plagiarism or copyright infringement. All advertisements created by the newspaper are not considered a “work made for hire” and the newspaper retains the copyright to all advertisements created by the newspaper for the advertiser. The advertisement may not be reproduced without the written permission of the newspaper. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination EQUAL based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial sta- HOUSING tus or national origin, or an intention to make any such OPPORTUNITY preferences, limitations or discrimination, in the sale, rental or financing of housing. In addition, the Illinois Human Rights Act prohibits discrimination based on age, ancestry, marital status, or unfavorable discharge. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which violates the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call the Chicago area Fair Housing Alliance toll free at 1-800-659-OPEN.

CLASSIFICATIONS

P.O. Box 138, Winchester, IL 62694

P.O. Box 265, Carrollton, IL 62016 Ph: 217-942-9100 Fax: 630-206-0320

200 BUSINESS Business

The People’s Marketplace Classifieds

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County • 1200 Services* • 1300 Wanted* • 1310 Web Sites* • 1400 Work Wanted • 1500 Yard Sales A: Calhoun County B: Greene County C: Jersey County D: Pike County E: Scott County

1100E

REAL ESTATE

Scott County

PUPPIES FOR sale. $20. Half FOR SALE: Two bedrooms coyote hound, half yellow lab. home, located at 209 west Call 217-430-2881. 1.11.17 pleasant street in Winchester. Vinyl siding, replacement windows, oak kitchen cabinets, 1100E great starter home or investREAL ESTATE ment property. Call Lyle at 217Scott County 652-2522. TWO ADJOINING buildings located near a busy intersec1200 tion in Winchester, Illinois. Ideal SERVICES for new business and storage. The north building is 2170 square feet with: Two offices LET ME cross off your honey(16 ft x 13 ft and 10.5 ft x 13.5 ft) do list! Clean gutters, rake A bath and storage room (9.5 ft leaves, any odd jobs. Call 217x 8.5 ft) Gas forced-air furnace, 248-3584. 12.7.16 Central air, 200 amp breaker CRACK YOUR pecans. Call box, Double doors in back 217-430-2881. 1.11.17 for easy loading and unload- FORESTRY MULCHING Sering. The south building is ap- vice. Charged by the hour or proximately 1175 square feet; by the job. Call Long Forestry it is great for a new business at 618-893-2307. 11.30.16 or for use as a storage room. Two buildings for one price! The vacant lot to the north 1300 could possibly be purchased, WANTED making a great addition to the property. Darrell Moore dar- STANDING TIMBER R. McKrellm@worrell-landservices. innon Logging buying. Walnut, com (217) 473-5486 Worrell White Oak, etc. No yard trees. Land Services, LLC 2240 West Not affiliated with Pleasant Hill Morton Jacksonville, IL 62650. McKinnons. 217-242-5401. Office: (217) 245-1618 Fax: 8.18.17 (217) 245-5318 info@worrellNEED EXTRA cash? Sell your landservices.com TFN used items in The People's GREAT JOBS start here! Look Marketplace Classifieds. One here every week for new, ex- phone call puts your ad in six citing careers! The People's newspapers....a total circulaMarketplace Classifieds! tion of almost 22,000 readers!

1500C

YARD SALES

Jersey County INSIDE YARD SALE. Twopassenger go-cart with electric start, Antiques and collectibles, Aladdin Kerosene Lamps, and much more. Call for appointment: 618-883-2633. 12.21.16

100E

YARD SALES

Scott County INSIDE YARD sale. 386 W. Cherry St. Winchester. Four piece desk set, Avon inventory, lots of glass, and other collectibles. Dec. 2 and 3 from 9 a.m.4 p.m. 11.30.16 NO TRESPASSING ads are $60 for one year! Call to place yours today. In Calhoun: 618-576-2345; Greene: 217-942-9100; Jersey: 618-498-1234; Pike: 217-285-2345 and Scott: 217-742-3313. Keep unwanted people off your property! Great way to keep people off your land! FIND THE job you've been looking for in The People's Marketplace Classifieds. Calhoun News-Herald, Greene Prairie Press, Jersey County Journal, Pike Press, Scott County Times, The Weekly Messenger. Look online every week, too! calhounnewsheraldcom, greeneprairiepress. com, jerseycountyjournal. com or pikepress.com

n w o t e m o H ! e c r u o S News

The People's Marketplace Classifieds

Pike Press

Call today to place your classified ad!

217-285-2345

RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE AUCTION THURSDAY, DEC. 1 • 3 P.M. 510 N. Liberty St., Pittsfield, IL

A fantastic 1215 sq. ft. single-level home with 3 BR, an open kitchen, living room and family room layout, a 1-car attached garage and a 4-year-old roof on a great lot along the dead-end Liberty Street in a peaceful location. This low-maintenance vinyl sided home has radiant electric heat, 200-amp electric service, all city utilities and will make a great starter or get-closer-to-town home! For more info, please contact Brian Curless at 217-242-1665 or email: bcurless@irtc.net

10’x16’ PORTABLE WOODEN STORAGE SHED SELLS FOLLOWING THE REAL ESTATE AUCTION

Attorney: Ron Hoskin, 130 S. Madison, Pittsfield, IL 217-285-4822

EILEEN COOLEY WWW.CURLESSAUCTION.COM • 217-242-1665

MADE YOU LOOK Advertise your ad in all six newspapers here! Call Nikki at 217-285-2345

or Jack at 618-498-1234

to advertise!


Campbell

314-375-7390

Publications

fax: , 375-7399 Wednesday November 30, 2016

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Place your line classified ad with us! Insertion Order #AA16461 RNs and LPNs Email us anytime! NEW PAY RATES! Ad copy:

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If your interest and satisfaction with your career are not what they used to be, perhaps it’s time to try something different in the growing specialty field of correctional healthcare! A unique environment that provides a rewarding career in a specialized field that encompasses ambulatory care, health education, urgent care and infirmary care.

TEARSHEETS ONLY should be sent to our client: Corizon Health Attn:Ellen Anderson 12647 Olive Blvd St. Louis, MO 63141

Corizon Health, a provider of health services for the Missouri Department of Corrections has excellent opportunities on Days or Nights at Northeast Correctional Center in Bowling Green.

For Advertising • nliehr@campbellpublications.net, For school, locAls or Anything CLASSIFICATION: NURSINGelse or Medical/Healthcare HELP WANTED • ppnews@campbellpublications.net

PIke Press

Any other correspondence must be directed to our agency.

The People's Marketplace ATTN:

Corizon Health offers EXCELLENT compensation, differentials and comprehensive benefits. Please Contact: Tamara Anderson, RN Admin. 573-324-6520 Tamara.Anderson@ CorizonHealth.com Or View Jobs & apply @ Careerbuilder.com EOE/AAP/DTR

MACHINERY CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

ADVERTISE WITH US!

Please return the following info to our agency:

Put Yourself in the Marketplace, in the

Classieds

Size_________ Publish Date

Gross DEC. $ SATURDAY,

Net $ 3____ • 9 A.M.

Western Illinois Fairgrounds • IL Route 107, Griggsville, IL

Tractors • Farm Machinery • Trucks • Cars Construction & Livestock Equipment & More! Call or email: bcurless@irtc.net with consignments!

WWW.CURLESSAUCTION.COM • 217-242-1665

FOR SALE

BUSINESS AND STORAGE BUILDING - WINCHESTER

F14040021SVTSPT KOND IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 8TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT PIKE COUNTYPITTSFIELD, ILLINOIS

Commonly known as: 303 West Washington Street aka PO Box 513, Griggsville, IL 62340

Kondaur Capital Corporation, as separate trustee of Matawin Ventures Trust Series 2015-2 Plaintiff,

First Lien Position; Single-Family Residence; Judgment Amount $134980.44

vs. CASE NO. 14 CH 43 Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Peggy S. Liggett aka Peggy Sue Liggett; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of John Branstetter; Carolyn Lovelace; Margaret Louise Tarrante; Terry Nugent; Jane Nugent; John Nugent; David Russell Branstetter aka Rusty Branstetter; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Mary Jane Nugent; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Joe Nugent aka Joseph Nugent; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Elizabeth McCormick; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of James Richard Branstetter; Carol Ann Branstetter; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Betty Lou Branstetter; Unknown Heirs and Legatees of Sara Francis Branstetter; Kelly Shawn Skaggs aka Kelly Skaggs; Jerry Shane ______ Skaggs aka Jerry Skaggs; Renee Darlene Brown aka Renee D. Brown aka Renee D. Skaggs; Jimmy Branstetter; Robin Skaggs; Unknown Owners and Non-Record Claimants Defendants. Property Address: 303 West Washington Street aka PO Box 513, Griggsville, IL 62340

P.I.N.: 43-085-03

IN ACCORDANCE WITH 735 ILCS 5/15-1507(c)(1)(H-1) AND (H-2), 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(5), AND 765 ILCS 605/18.5(g-1), YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED THAT THE PURCHASER OF THE PROPERTY, OTHER THAN A MORTGAGEE, SHALL PAY THE ASSESSMENTS AND LEGAL FEES REQUIRED BY SUBSECTIONS (g)(1) AND (g)(4) OF SECTION 9 AND THE ASSESSMENTS AND COURT COSTS REQUIRED BY SUBSECTION (g-1) OF SECTION 18.5 OF THE ILLINOIS CONDOMINIUM PROPERTY ACT. Terms of Sale: CASH - 10% down at the time of sale and the balance due within 24 hours of the sale. All payments for the amount bid shall be in certified funds payable to the Sheriff of Pike County. The person to contact for information regarding this property is: Sales Department at ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 West Diehl Road, Suite 120, Naperville, IL 60563 (866)402-8661. For bidding instructions, visit www.alolawgroup.com 24 hours prior to sale. This communication is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose.

NOTICE OF SHERIFF SALE Public notice is hereby given that in pursuance of a judgment of said Court entered in the above-entitled cause on October 7, 2016, I, Sheriff, Paul Petty of Pike County, Illinois, will hold a sale on January 6, 2017 , commencing at 9:00am, at the Pike County Courthouse, 100 East Washington Street, Pittsfield, IL 62363, to sell to the highest bidder or bidders the following described real estate, or so much thereof as may be sufficient to satisfy said decree, to-wit:

ANSELMO LINDBERG OLIVER LLC 1771 W. Diehl Rd., Ste 120 Naperville, IL 60563-4947 630-453-6960 | 866-402-8661 | 630-428-4620 (fax) Attorney No. Cook 58852, DuPage 293191, Kane 031-26104, Peoria 1794, Winnebago 3802, IL 03126232 foreclosure@ALOLawGroup.com THIS LAW FIRM IS DEEMED TO BE A DEBT COLLECTOR. R410 11.30.16, 12.7.16, 12.14.16

RETIREMENT AUCTION

Two adjoining buildings located near a busy intersection in Winchester, Illinois. Ideal for new business and storage. The north building is 2170 square feet with: • Two offices (16 ft x 13 ft and 10.5 ft x 13.5 ft) • A bath and storage room (9.5 ft x 8.5 ft) • Gas forced-air furnace • Central air • 200 amp breaker box • Double doors in back for easy loading and unloading. The south building is approximately 1175 square feet; it is great for a new business or for use as a storage room. Two buildings for one price! The vacant lot to the north could possibly be purchased, making a great addition to the property. Darrell Moore Worrell Land Services, LLC darrellm@worrell-landservices.com 2240 West Morton Jacksonville, IL 62650 (217) 473-5486 Office: (217) 245-1618 Fax: (217) 245-5318 info@worrell-landservices.com

5 IH TRACTORS, 3 IH COMBINES, GRAIN TRUCKS, & OTHER EQUIPMENT & MACHINERY

SAT., DEC. 10, 2016 • 10 A.M.

LOCATED: 964 Taylor lane, Winchester, IL. From the North edge of Winchester, on old route 36 turn West on Taylor lane, go 1 mile. Watch for auction signs. TRACTORS: IH 5288 sn#15904 w/3hydrol, pto, 20.8x38 10 bolt duels, 4543 hrs. - IH 5488 sn#36493 w/3hydrol, pto, 20.8x38 10 bolt duels, 2007 hrs. on newer motor - IH 5088 sn#13259 w/3hydrol, duel pto, 18.4x38 10 bolt duels, 5091 hrs. - IH 1586 sn#99023 w/3hydrol, pto, 20.8x38 rubber, 4000 hrs. - IH 3788 2+2 sn# 07791 20.8x38 rear J bolt duels, 2900 hrs. - MF 1155 sn#006878 w/2hydrol, 20.8x38 w/spin out rims, 4609 hrs. - several IH front weights to sell separately - 1951 Massey Harris 44 w/narrow front, 4 cyl. & loader bucket - 1937 F-20 antique tractor (ran 5 years ago) - COMBINES: Case IH 1680 axial flow w/3044 hrs, 30.5x32 rubber, w/chopper - Case IH 1660 axial flow w/3071 hrs, 30.5x32 rubber, specialty rotor sn#0038918 w/chopper - IH 1460 axial flow w/ 3608 hrs, 28LX26 rubber, sn#033553 w/chopper - 2 IH 1460 salvage combines for parts - HEADS IH 963 corn head, 6-30” w/water pump bearings - IH 963 corn head 6-30” for parts - IH 863 corn head 6-30” - IH 20’ 1020 platform w/newer pan & fingers - IH 30’ 1020 platform - IH 20’ 1020 platform - IH 17 ‘ 1020 platform (parts only) - 30’ Underforth head cart - 21’ EZ trail head cart - 16’ single axel head cart - 2 older wagon style head carts - PLANTERS: JD 7200 12/30” front fold w/precision finger pickups - IH 900 6/30” pull type - IH 900 6/30” pull type - IH 12/15” 3pt, hydrol drive bean planter - IH 800 16/15”no-till, pull type TRUCKS 1989 IH S-1900 grain truck w/ 466 diesel turbo, straight 5 sp, 18’ grain bed w/cargo doors, spring tag axel, 241,479 mi. - 1979 IH S-1800 grain truck w/404 gas, 16’ grain bed, 5&2 trans, single axel w/spring tag axel, 55290 mi. - 1974 IH 1700 w/345 gas, 5&2 trans, 15’ grain bed - 1981 Chevrolet 4x4 pickup, w/350 V8, auto trans, (used for spraying) - EQUIPMENT: Kinze 400 grain cart w/roll tarp - JD 1210 grain cart - 3 gravity flow wagons 200bu. each - Ectric wooden barge wagon - JD 953 wagon gear - older snow mobile trailer (no title) - Dodge truck bed wood hauler - 2 Mayrath 10x71’ swing away augers - Mayrath 8x71’ bottom drive straight auger - Mayrath 6x34’ transport auger w/3hp elec. motor - Mayrath 6x24’ transport auger w/elec. motor - 10’ Big Ox 3pt rear blade 15’ Woods 3180 batwing mower 1000 pto - Great Northern 550 gal truck mount sprayer w/booms - 1000 gal water tank on JD running gear - IH 700 on land 6 bottom plow - IH 20’ rotary hoe w/end transport - JD 28’ #400 wing fold rotary hoe - tandem tank trailer - single axel sprayer no booms - round pipe Donahue impl. trailer (no floor) - Farm Star 6’ rear blade - 2 axel sprayer - MF pull type chisel plow - IH 6/30 row crop cult. - older pop up camper needs repair - 9.00 & 10.00 truck tires - some misc. hand tools - air compressor, hydrol press, drill press, Note small amount of small items be on time. other items to sell not listed.

For photos view web site at auctionzip.com Auctioneer I. D. #16215 TERMS: CASH. Buyer number issued and personal check accepted upon presentation of positive photo identification. Vehicle and title held until check clears or replaced with cash, certified or cashier’s check. Food available. Your attendance is always appreciated.

Owner: JERRY LOVEKAMP

AUCTIONEERS DARRELL MOORE, Winchester, IL. (217)-473-5486 ROGER STRANG, Virginia, IL. (217)-370-2530 DICK SAMPLES, Jacksonville, IL. (217)-245-5010


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All e h T w Ne

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2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

2013 CHEVROLET CRUZE LTZ

2013 DODGE DURANGO R/T

2014 JEEP CHEROKEE 4X4

#76025A FULL POWER STOW N GO

#75768C RS SUNROOF LEATHER LOADED

#11603 4X4 HEMI LEATHER CHRYSLER CERTIFIED

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2015 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT

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2015 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4

2016 CHEVROLET COLORADO

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Wednesday, November 30, 2016

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1211 Rodgers St., Barry – Hosted by Rodney Borrowman

130 Bainbridge, Barry – Hosted by Chris Little

516 Lawrence St., Barry – Hosted by John Borrowman

Justin A. Cobb/Pike Press

Lewis

wins

Saukee

raffle

Tom Lewis, right, was the winner of the $5,000 jackpot in the annual Saukee athletics raffle. Studentathletes at Pittsfield High School sell tickets for the raffle to fund their participation in interscholastic sports. Presenting Lewis the check in the high school gymnasium Monday afternoon is athletic director Brad Tomhave.

Pikeland ELA to host ‘This I Believe’ Dec. 7 The Pikeland School District English language arts department will host a “This I Believe” event Wednesday, Dec. 7, 6-7 p.m., at the Pikeland Community School cafeteria in Pittsfield. “This I Believe” is base on an National Public Radio program that began in the 1950s and presented short essays on the values of daily life. It has been revitalized in the past decade. “In reviving ‘This I Believe,’ the goal is not to

persuade Americans to agree on the same beliefs,” executive producer Dan Gediman said, as quoted on NPR’s website. “Rather, the hope is to encourage people to begin the much more difficult task of developing respect for beliefs different from their own.” Students in grades 6-12 will share their beliefs and values in various forms. The students and staff invites the public to join them for this inspirational and treasured event.

Three Pike students chose Culver-Stockton Three Pike County students from two Pike County Schools have been accepted into Culver-Stockton’s fall 2017 incoming class. Maddie Palmer of Pittsfield, has been accepted into Culver-Stockton College’s fall 2017 incoming class. Palmer plans to major in undeclared secondary education and was awarded the Hilltop academic scholarship. Alexa Shoemaker of

Griggsville, has been accepted into Culver-Stockton College’s fall 2017 incoming class. Shoemaker plans to major in nursing and was awarded the Trustees’ academic scholarship. Devin Battefeld of Griggsville, has been accepted into Culver-Stockton College’s fall 2017 incoming class. Battefeld plans to major in occupational therapy and was awarded the President’s academic scholarship.

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Customer Appreciation Day Wednesday, December 7th | 11am – 2pm Please stop in to the lobby and enjoy complimentary food and beverages from UCB as a thank-you for a wonderful year. We appreciate your business!

285-2176 UCBbank.com The Leader of Community Banking

NEW LISTING - Adams County 80 acres +/- Richfield TWP. Affordable hunting farm with mobile home and 16 acres tillable. Adams County 10 acres +/- Richfield TWP. Located minutes from Barry on blacktop. Would make a great building site. Adams County 72 acres +/- Northeast TWP. Nice investment farm with 50 acres tillable earning $16,000 per year. PRICE REDUCED - Calhoun County 390 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Huge hunting farm with 70 acres tillable, secluded on dead end road with older home and outbuildings. Calhoun County 310 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Huge hunting farm with 55 acres tillable and the balance in timber located at the end of a dead end road. Calhoun County 80 acres +/- Hardin TWP. Excellent hunting farm with 15 acres tillable. Calhoun County 38 acres +/- Crater TWP. Nice farm with 2 acres tillable and 45 acres timber with Crawford Creek running through it. PRICE REDUCED - Pike County 172 acres +/- Martinsburg TWP. Awesome hunting farm with cabin, lake and 50 acres tillable. Pike County 166 acres +/- Spring Creek TWP. Big timber hunting farm with 3BR ranch home. Pike County 100 acres +/- Pleasant Vale TWP. Great hunting farm that has been

in the same family for over a century! Pike County 94 acres +/- Pleasant Vale TWP. Big timber hunting farm sitting on the Mississippi River bluffs with 3BR 2BA brick home. Pike County 90 acres +/- Pleasant Vale TWP. Big timber hunting farm sitting on the Mississippi River bluffs. PRICE REDUCED - Pike County 79 acres +/- Derry TWP. Awesome hunting property on Dutch Creek with nice mix of timber and CRP with small cabin. PRICE REDUCED - Pike County 54.93 acres +/- New Salem TWP. Secluded hunting farm located at the end of a dead end road surrounded by big timber with a major creek. Pike County 40 acres +/- New Salem TWP. Nice hunting property with big timber, creek and 7 acres CRP. Pike County 15 acres +/- Montezuma TWP. Awesome hunting farm with spring fed creek and 2BR cabin. SALE PENDING - Pike County 120 acres +/- Hadley TWP. Fantastic 120 acre investment farm with 114 tillable acres with the remaining 6 acres in timber. SALE PENDING - Pike County 4 acres +/- Spring Creek TWP. Secluded piece of property with hunting and tillable. SALE PENDING - Pike County 287 acres +/- Spring Creek TWP. Excellent hunting farm with 120 acres tillable and secluded location.

RESIDENTIAL LISTINGS NEW LISTING - Pleasant Hill - 204 Fairgounds Rd. - Totally remodeled 2BR home with 1 car attached garage. Like new!! $40’s. NEW LISTING - Bluffs - 107 N. Rodgers St. - Spacious 4BR home with 2 car detached garage. Priced to sell!! $50’s. NEW LISTING - Pittsfield - 419 N. Jackson - Fantastic maintenance free 2BR home with 2 car attached garage and spacious sun room. $90’s. NEW LISTING - Pittsfield - 2 Quail Ridge Dr. Beautiful 4 bedroom, 3 bath home sitting on 2 lots in one of Pittsfield’s finest locations. $200’s. PRICE REDUCED - Baylis - 210 S. Main - 4BR home with detached 1car garage sitting on 2 lots. Home needs some TLC and is sold “as is.” $10’s. Griggsville - 107 N. Union - Great storage or building site on a nice lot behind Jiffi Stop with privacy fence and 2 car garage with concrete floor and city water. Griggsville - 201 N. Union St. - Large 4BR 2BA home with huge barn on nice lot. $70’s. Hamburg - 407 Water St. - Old Post Office transformed into two workshops with a scenic view of the Mississippi River with separate 23 ft. riverfront lot included. PRICE REDUCED - Milton - 248 Tucker St. - Excellent property for a large family or to use as a hunting lodge, bed and breakfast, etc. Highly Motivated Seller!! $100’s. Nebo - 515 E. Bridge St. - Very nice 2BR home sitting on 3 lots with many updates. Motivated Seller!! $60’s. Nebo - 13192 Co. Hwy. 7 - Nice 3BR 2BA home with new heating and cooling on 1.5 lots. $60’s. PRICE REDUCED - New Salem - 500 Griggsville Rd. - 2BR home with machine shed and small pond sitting on 3 acres on the edge of town. $30’s. Pearl - 48186 166th Ave. - Nice 4BR 2BA manufactured home with large machine shed and small pond on 4 acres. Move-in ready! $90’s. PRICE REDUCED - Perry - 36282 400th Lane 3BR brick country ranch home 2 miles West of Perry with many updates sitting on 1.89 acres. Motivated Seller! $80’s. Pittsfield - 10 Douglas Dr. - A must see 6 yr. old.

ranch home with up to 6 bedrooms, full finished basement with walk-out, and beautiful in-ground pool, all sitting on 4.5 acres. $300’s. Pittsfield - #3 Hope Ave. - Very nice maintenance free 2BR duplex that is handicapped accessible close to town. $100’s. Pittsfield - 3A Dove Lane - Newer very efficient 2BR 2BA duplex with a new enclosed 4 season room in a nice subdivision setting. $100’s. Pittsfield - 326 S. Jackson - Very desirable 3BR 2.5BA home with 1 car attached garage in nice location. $100’s. PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 617 S. Memorial Beautiful 3BR 2BA ranch home totally updated with full basement sitting on 2 lots. $100’s. Pittsfield - 536 N. Memorial - Affordable 3BR 1BA home with updated high efficiency heating and cooling. $80’s. Pittsfield - 521 N. Dutton - Large 5BR, 2BA two story home with a family room in the lower level/basement that opens out to the back yard! $60’s. PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 218 W. North St. - 2BR 1BA home with nice fenced in yard and 1 car attached garage. Priced to sell!!! $50’s. PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 180 Washington Ct. - Nice 2BR home with 1 car detached garage on quiet street. Would make a great rental or starter home. $50’s. Pittsfield - Corner of N. Orchard and Oklahoma - 4 mobile home lots, three of which are rented. Call office for details! Pittsfield - 2.5 acres platted as 3 wooded residential building lots near Petty Place. Buy 1 or all 3. Call our office for more details! PRICE REDUCED - Pittsfield - 640 W. Jefferson Extra nice remodeled 1BR home. Live cheaper than renting. All appliances included. Motivate Sellers!! $40’s. Pittsfield - 519 S. Memorial - Nice 2BR bungalow with maintenance free exterior. Move-in ready!! $30’s. Pittsfield - 510 W. Adams - Great building lot to build your dream home on! Pittsfield - 220 W. Jefferson - Great building lot close to downtown Pittsfield.

Pittsfield - 830 N. Orchard - Nice home building site that consists of 2 80’ x 160’ lots . Pleasant Hill - Deer Ridge Estates - Large building lot with City sewer and water available. Pleasant Hill - 13290 Hwy. 96 - Nice 3BR home with 2 car attached garage and detached garage with workshop on the edge of town with many updates. $60’s. Pleasant Hill - 16777 340th St. - 3BR 1BA home with large outbuildings on 22.6 acres +/- in a quiet country location. $200’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 355 Curtis - Nice 3BR brick home in great location. $90’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 211 W. Perry St. Beautiful 3 - 4BR 2,200 sq. ft. home with many updates and fenced-in back yard. $100’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 711 S. Memorial - One owner 3BR 2.5BA ranch home in nice South location. Move-in ready!! $90’s. SALE PENDING - PRICE REDUCED - Griggsville - 215 N. Union St. - Large 4BR 2BA house with many updates. Would make a great family home. $70’s. SALE PENDING - Pleasant Hill - 13581 County Hwy. 11 - Iconic 5BR secluded country home yet close to town with a stunning view of the Pleasant Hill bottoms and wildlife on 35 acres +/-. $200’s. SALE PENDING - Chambersburg - 401 Mill St. Beautiful, well preserved historic home built in 1870 with beautiful built-ins and lots of storage. A must see!! $70’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 1217 Sunset Dr. Many many updates, including new fireplace, roof, heating and cooling, etc., makes this 3BR ranch home a very desirable property! $100’s. SALE PENDING - Pittsfield - 101 Lashmett Lane - Beautiful 3BR 3BA home sitting on beautiful corner lot in nice subdivision. SALE PENDING - New Canton - 145 E. Mechanic St. - Very nice 3BR home with 2 car detached garage and many updates. $80’s. SOLD - Kinderhook - 28940 St. Hwy. 96 - 2BR home with screened-in porch and some remodeling on large lot in a rural setting. $60’s. SOLD - Louisiana - 13030 Hwy. NN - Nice 3BR ranch home with 2 car garage and out building on 10 acres.

Pike County Real Estate Richard Smith John Borrowman Chris Nichols Tere Boes Barb Goertz

217.473.3286 217.430.0645 217.473.3777 217.491.2267 217.257.7865

Elaine Smith Todd Smith Chris Little Scott Andress Robert Evans

217.473.3288 217.285.4720 217.653.3697 217.371.0635 217.491.2391

www.pikecorealestate.com

Rodney Borrowman Nikki Fish Cyndi Borrowman

• (217) 285-5800

630-247-0667 217-371-2858 217-779-1861


D2

Pike Press

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

REAL ESTATE

Pittsfield, Illinois

Town & Country Tour... Covering Real Estate in your area If you would like to

Visit Us Online w w w . m c c a r t n e y - r e a l e s t a t e . c o m

advertise your Real Estate here, give Nikki a call today at 217-285-2345

DaviD T. McCartney • Managing Broker 217-491-1014

Celebrating over 75 years in business!

Phone (217) 285-4502 Office Fax: (217) 285-9672

William mccartney 285-2999

Kirby Hobbs (217) 491-2059

Ken renoud 285-4749

sonya miller (217) 653-2943

GREAT LOCATIONTAKING on the hill! 3 bedroom, 1 bath OFFERS ranch with attached one car garage, storage shed, ON THE FOLLOWING: sun room and lovely yard. Listed at $72,000!

D 206SE. • 208 E. Quincy OLQuincy 300 LD • 301 Clay SOClay 204 College SOLD • 304 Pearl St. 204 Fairgrounds Cabin in Belleview PRICES WILL NEVER BE with LOWER! Beautiful 3 bedroom, 2 bath home large utility TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THESE room and 1 car garage. Has open floor plan and nice view. Desirable location HOUSES! close to school and REMAINING

Karen mcconnell (217) 723-4217

estABlisHeD 1938

320 W. Washington Street Pittsfield, Illinois 62363

lloyd pHillips 217-257-7096

KATE MARABLE anGela moss 217-370-9809

elaine HoaGlin (217) 491-1141

dennis & Judy douGlas 217-430-1557

217-883-2031

OPEN HOUSE

THURSDAY, SEPT. 15TH 5:00-7:00 PM

OPEN HOUSE

park! $85,000.

Capps Real Estate

Sunday, Dec. 4 • 2-4 p.m. 31099 Jim Town Hollow Rd., Rockport (Turn right reduced!! at the Summer Hill Antique Shop) Email: cappsrealestate@outlook.com 829 n. orcHard pittsField V i s i t U s O n l i n e w w w . m c c a r t n$119,500 ey-realestate.com 205 E. Quincy St. Pleasant Hill, IL

Judy Capps/Managing Broker Cell: 217-242-0001 Office: 217-734-2327

Lynne Springer/Broker Cell: 217-430-3739 lspringer3739@gmail.com

DaviD T. McCartney • Managing Broker 217-491-1014

Celebrating over 75 years in business!

Phone (217) 285-4502 Office Fax: (217) 285-9672

William mccartney 285-2999

Kirby Hobbs (217) 491-2059

Ken renoud 285-4749

sonya miller (217) 653-2943

Karen mcconnell (217) 723-4217

estABlisHeD 1938

320 W. Washington Street Pittsfield, Illinois 62363

lloyd pHillips 217-257-7096

Kate marable 217-370-9809

elaine HoaGlin (217) 491-1141

dennis & Judy douGlas 217-430-1557

Celebrating over 75 years serving Pike County!

neW listinG!! 734 West JeFFerson pittsField $79,500

neW listinG!! 31099 Jim toWn HolloW rocKport $400,000

neW listinG!! 19671 us HWy 54 summer Hill $287,500

reduced!! 690 soutH Walnut pittsField $119,000

neW listinG!! 17916 369tH pleasant Hill $158,000

neW listinG!! 120/122 West crane pittsField $35,000

504 n. dutton pittsField $84,500

listing/broker/owned,

reduced!! 829 n. orcHard pittsField $119,000

419 soutH memorial pittsField $265,000

123 W. perry pittsField $169,500

1351 W. WasHinGton pittsField $335,000

reduced!! 511 n. orcHard pittsField $89,900

reduced!! 17868 county HWy 11 pittsField $122,000

sold!! 1240 W. WasHinGton - KFc pittsField $449,000

sold!! 433 piper lane pittsField $29,900

sold!! 501 sycamore pittsField $189,000

david mccartney


Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

D3

Pittsfield, Illinois

www.hurley-dodge.com Phone: 618-576-2225 - MINIVANS, TRUCKS, & CARS -

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10 Chevy 2500HD Crew LT 4x4 $20,995 Bright White 6.0L V8, Leather, Steps, Alum. Wheels, P-seat

13 Lincoln MKS $18,995 White Platinum, Loaded, 1-Owner, Navigation

15 Ram 1500 Crew Laramie 4x4 $35,995 Blue Streak Hemi, 20” Chrome, Htd/AC Leather, Camera, Phone

15 Chrysler 200 Limited $14,995 R-start, P-seat, Camera, Phone, Htd Seats

07 RAM 2500 Quad Laramie 4x4 $26,995 Inferno Red, 6.7 Cummins, S-roof, Power steps, Liner, Htd Leather

10 Toyota Prius Pkg. IV $9,995 Silver, 51 MPG, S-roof, Camera, Phone, Leather

14 Dodge Charger AWD R/T $26,995 Granite Crystal, Tech Pkg., Sunroof, Only 7xxx miles

07 Chevy Tahoe LT 4x4 $14,995 Dk. Blue, Htd Leather, DVD, Phone, P-seat

13 Dodge Charger SXT AWD $20,995 Pitch Black, NAV, Sun Roof, Uconnect, Camera, Rem. Start

12 Dodge Avenger SXT $8,995 Brilliant Black, P-seat Alum. Wheels, Prem. Cloth

16 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT $19,995 Brilliant Black, P-sliders, Alum Wheels, P-gate

16 Jeep Patriot Sport 4x4 $16,995 Black, Phone, Tinted Windows, Keyless Entry

05 GMC Yukon Denali AWD $11,995 Black S-roof, DVD, Phone, Chrome 20’s

11 Ford Expedition eL Limited 4x4 $19,995 Black, Loaded, NAV, S-roof, 2nd Row Buckets, Rear DVD

10 GMC Acadia $9,995 Black, Sun Roof, 7-Passenger, 2nd Row Buckets, P-gate

02 Chevy S-10 LS 4x4 5,995 Bright Red, Aluminum Wheels, CD, Bed liner

11 Dodge Nitro Heat 4x4 $16,995 Inferno Red, S-roof, 20” wheels, V6,

04 Ram 2500 Quad SLT 4x4 $16,995 Green/ Silver 1-Owner, 5.9 H.O., P-seat, Wheels, Bedliner

04 Ram 3500 Quad SLT 4x4 $21,995 Silver, 5.9 H.O., P-seat, Tow Mirrors

08 GMC Acadia SLE $10,495 White, 7-pass, Alum. Wheels, CD, V6,

10 Ram 3500 Crew LB Laramie 4x4 $28,995 White/Tan, Loaded, Nav, Phone, 5th Wheel

06 RAM 2500 Quad ST 4x4 $15,995 Brilliant Black, Tow, Hemi, Steps, Liner,

16 Ram 1500 Quad BigHorn 4x4 $29,995 Flame Red, Hemi, Chrome 20’s, P-seat, Bench

14 Chrysler T&C Touring $17,995 Deep Cherry, Alum Wheels, DVD, Camera, Phone

07 Ram 1500 Quad SLT 4x4 $15,495 Mineral Gray, Hemi, TRX4 Off Rd, P-seat, Bench

16 Chrysler T&C Touring $22,995 Cashmere, DVD, Leather, Phone, Camera

11 Dodge Caliber Mainstreet $5,995 Bright White, New Tires, CD Player, Full Power

05 Ram 1500 Quad BigHorn 4x4 $11,495 Flame Red, Hemi, P-seat, Steps, Liner

08 Ford Escape XLT $5,995 Black, Aluminum Wheels, All Power, V6

05 Chevy Silverado 3500 LB Crew LS 4x4 $20,995 Bright White 6.6 Diesel, Tow, Liner

06 RAM 2500 Quad Laramie 4x2 $22,995 Dark Blue, 5.9 DSL, Posi-Trac, Tonneau Cover, Bed Liner

08 Chevy 2500HD Crew LTZ 4x4 $28,995 Black, 6.6 Duramax, NAV, Heated Leather, Rem. Start

08 GMC Canyon Crew 4x4 $13,995 Dk. Blue, Alum Wheels, Bed liner, CD, All Power

01 Ford Ranger SuperCab XLT 4x4 $7,995 Harvest Gold, V6, Alum Wheels, Flare Bedsides

10 Chevy Suburban LT 4x4 $22,995 Black, Htd Leather, S-roof, DVD, NAV, P-seat

13 Dodge Durango Crew AWD $23,995 Bright Silver, 1-Owner, P-gate, NAV, Camera

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04 Ford Ranger RegCab XLT $5,495 Red, 5 Speed, V6, Bed Cover, Alum Wheels

06 Dodge Charger SXT $6,995 Brilliant Black, P-seat, Tinted Windows, 3.5L V6

11 Chrysler T&C Touring-L $12,995 Sapphire Blue, Htd Leather, Camera, R-start, DVD

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94 Ford F-150 XL $2,995 Green, Steps, Tow, Liner, 6 cyl.

05 Dodge Durango SLT 4x4 $5,495 Bright Silver, P-seat, Alum Wheels, 7-Pass

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08 Chrysler T&C Touring $5,995 Black, DVD, Camera, R-start, Htd Leather

$$$ TOP QUALITY & GUARANTEED $$$ • Like us on Facebook


D4

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

Pike Press

Pittsfield, Illinois

News

FRANK SMITH DOZING 217-491-1042

Rebuilding & Cleaning Out Terraces

Aiming to keep up on the latest area outdoor news?

Photo by Debbie Harshman/The Paper – Barry, Ill.

Red Lantern

marks opening

Visit tworiversoutdoors.com today! Sign up for our newsletter and we’ll deliver the news to your inbox every Friday!

The Red Lantern in Barry is now open under the new ownership of Matt Reynolds of Barry. The newly remodeled establishment has had a complete inside renovation and is located on Mortimer Street. Attending a ribbon cutting ceremony Wednesday, Nov. 23, are, from left, Pike County Chamber of Commerce ambassadors Michael Eckardt and Beth White, Barry Business Association (BBA) member Pat Conley, Barry city administrator Jeff Hogge, Chamber executive director Kaye Iftner, Barry Mayor Shawn Rennecker, Barry alderman and BBA member Debbie Harshman, owner Matt Reynolds, BBA president Justin Wilson, BBA member Diane Castleberry, and Chamber ambassador Coy Bainter.

Justin A. Cobb/Pike Press

New

photography studio opens in a flash

A new photography studio has joined the business community in downtown Pittsfield with the grand opening of Jessica Guthrie Photography at 101 S. Madison St., marked with a ribbon cutting ceremony sponsored by the Pike County Chamber of Commerce. Participating in the ribbon cutting were, from left, Michael Eckardt and Beth White of Farmers National Bank of Griggsville; husband Rodney Guthrie, studio owner Jessica Guthrie, and sons William and Alexander Guthrie; Pittsfield Mayor John Hayden; Pittsfield economic development director Bill McCartney; Chamber ambassadors Kim Ator and Bob Evans; and Chamber executive director Kaye Iftner. Jessica Guthrie grew up in Southern California but moved to Pike County with her husband, Rodney Guthrie, a graduate of Pittsfield High School.

SWITCH & GET

HALF OFF ANY SMARTPHONE

This holiday season, join the highest-ranked network in the Middle of Anywhere. Superior Network Quality “Highest Wireless Network Quality Performance in the North Central Region”

Pittsfield 103 E. Washington St. 217-285-5400 Things we want you to know: New Shared Connect Plan, Retail Installment Contract, Device Protection+, port-in and Smartphone turn-in required. Credit approval also required. A $25 Device Activation Fee applies. A Regulatory Cost Recovery Fee (currently $1.82) applies; this is not a tax or gvmt. required charge. Additional fees (including Device Connection Charges), taxes, terms, conditions and coverage areas apply and may vary by plan, service and phone. Offers valid at participating locations only and cannot be combined. See store or uscellular.com for details. Half off Smartphones: 50% off rebate on base model Smartphone devices. Rebate fulfilled in the form of a U.S. Cellular® Promotional Card issued by MetaBank,® Member FDIC, pursuant to a license from Visa U.S.A. Inc. Valid only for purchases at U.S. Cellular stores and uscellular.com. Devices $399 or higher are eligible for $200 Promotional Card at the point of sale and remaining balance in arrears. Devices $200–$398.99 are eligible for $100 Promotional Card at the point of sale and remaining balance in arrears. Devices $200 or less are eligible for $100 Promotional Card at the point of sale. For Promotional Cards in arrears, allow 8–10 weeks for processing after final submission. Turned-in Smartphone must be in fully functional, working condition without any liquid damage or broken components, including, but not limited to, a cracked housing. Smartphone must power on and cannot be pin locked. Device Protection+ (DP+): Minimum monthly price is $8.99 per phone. A service fee/deductible per approved claim applies. You may cancel anytime. Property insurance is underwritten by American Bankers Insurance Company of Florida and provided under a Master Policy issued to U.S. Cellular. You will be the certificate holder on U.S. Cellular’s Master Policy for loss/theft benefits. Service Contract Obligor is Federal Warranty Service Corporation in all states except CA (Sureway, Inc.) and OK (Assurant Service Protection, Inc.). Limitations and exclusions apply. For more information, see an associate for a DP+ brochure. J.D. Power Award: U.S. Cellular received the highest numerical score among five providers in the North Central Region in the J.D. Power 2016 U.S. Wireless Network Quality Performance Study —Volume 2, based on 43,300 total responses, measuring the network quality experienced by customers with wireless phones, surveyed January–June 2016. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com. Limited-time offer. Trademarks and trade names are the property of their respective owners. ©2016 U.S. Cellular

PP 11.30.16  

PP 11.30.16

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