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50¢ MAY 15, 2019

PITTSFIELD, IL Thank you,

Leonard Turnbaugh of Pittsfield,

Pike Press

Congratulations to all area graduates! See pages B2-7

Western looks at tech options. See page A2

SPORTS

Moving up a class no problem for Lady Saukess. See page B1

WEEKEND WEATHER FRIDAY, MAY 17

85 64 High

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SATURDAY, MAY 18

83 65 High

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SUNDAY, MAY 19

78 61 High

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INSIDE Classified . . . . . . . A8 Community . . . . . A7 County News . . . A2 - 3, . . . . . . . . .A9-12, B8, B11 Court . . . . . . . . . . A8 Marketplace . . . . . .B9 Obituaries . . . . . . A6

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CHALLENGE

Gardner Camp, located outside of Hull, held its annual outdoor challenge for youth May 11. There were 12 competing teams in the challenge. Activities included trap challenge, air rifle challenge, and kayaking. The winning team, Out of Towners, received $500 as their prize. The team was from Hannibal but wanted the prize money to go to the Liberty High School bass fishing team. Here team representatives compete under the watchful eye of Range Master Brad Poulter, right. Left to right are Noah Wagner, Warriors, Quincy Christian School; Cody Riddle, Sledgang, Higbee (MO) High School; and Trevor House, 3 Stooges, Louisiana (MO) Junior High School.

NEWS

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VOL. 177, NO. 20

OUTDOOR

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Pittsfield Girl Scouts enjoyed Girl Scout Day in Springfield.

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Floods and field work not compatible little,” he said. By BETH ZUMWALT The flood fight prevented Pike Press many farmers from planting crops The Mississippi River is going and the wet, soggy fields near the down and should soon be at minor levee for the most part remain flood stage. That’s good news, but unplanted. not the final answer as to when “Last year most of the corn, crops will be planted. about 80 percent, was planted the Blake Roderick, executive last two weeks of April,” Tom director of the Pike-Scott Farm Weisenborn of the USDA Center Bureau, said just because the in Pittsfield, said. “I’m guessing river is going down, doesn’t mean right now we are at 25 percent planting will start anytime soon. planted.” “There is a lot Weisenborn said of seepage that has it is too soon for to dry up as well “…if you producers to worry as low spots,” planted corn about decreased Roderick said. “If yields due to late we get a lot of rain last year and planting. north of here, it got 250 bushel “There is could jump right something in the to the acre, and Farmer’s Almanac back up.” Roderick said this year you about having corn the Illinois River on planted by midthe east side of the only get 225, is May,” he said. county is still criti“But even if that is cal and will be until that still not a accomplished, the at least next week, good crop?” corn is still a long if there is no more way from being rain. harvested.” “They are still Tom Weisenborn We i s e n b o r n patrolling the said corn could be USDA Pittsfield levees to make sure planted early, and there are no animals hit drought, espeburrowing or any leaks or boil cially at pollination times, wind, spots,” Roderick said. “There is disease, any number of obstacles still water on the levee. The levee preventing a good yield. on the Mississippi River has a “And if you planted corn last clay core, it’s not just sand. It can year and got 250 bushel to the tolerate water being on it better acre, and this year you only get than a sand levee.” 225, is that still not a good crop?” The Mississippi and Missouri he asked. “It’s unclear how much rivers, both having been at major less potential there will be.” flood stage the last two weeks, Weisenborn said that he felt could stop the Illinois River from one week of good weather would flowing freely into the Mississippi see producers catch up pretty River at Alton, according to quickly. Roderick. “Farmers today have state-of“Right now we are getting a the-art equipment, some have the good flow on the Mississippi and the Illinois is starting to flow a (See, FLOODS, A2)

ROTARY

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SPONSORS

DRUG AWARENESS DAY

Elliet Alger of the Illinois State Police volunteered as a guest speaker for the annual Drug Awareness Day held at Pikeland Community School May 10. The event was sponsored by the Pike County Rotary Club with support from the Health and Wellness Foundation of Pike County. Eighth graders from Pike County attended the program, along with seventh graders from PCS. All attending students received brightly colored T-shirts which served to sort them into groups for their rotation around the building to hear various presentations by local law enforcement and healthcare agencies.

Sampley case continues, Poor goes to IDOC, Carter waives prelim By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Three of the four men charged with violent felonies in Pike County were in court this week. David Sampley, the man accused of murdering his live-in companion in June of last year, appeared in court Tuesday, May 14. He was present for his arraignment. His attorney Walker Filbert and cocounsel David Leefers of Jacksonville were present and asked for more time. “We have been trying to find an expert to review

Opinion . . . . . . . . A4

the pathology reports of the victim,” Filbert told Judge Frank McCartney. “The court wants to approve both the person chosen and the fee schedule, but we have been unable to find anyone to take the case. Many of these type of experts have retired and others have a conflict.” McCartney agreed and asked Filbert how much time he would need. Filbert and Leefers both asked to come back at the end of June and also said they did not wish to be on the July jury docket.

WANTED:

Op-Ed . . . . . . . . . A5 Our Town . . . . . . A9

“There is no way we will be ready for July jury,” Filbert told McCartney. “We would ask to be put on the October jury docket or have a special setting,” Leefers said. The state had no objection and McCartney advised the defense, the October jury was scheduled for two weeks starting Oct. 15. “Or we might have a special setting,” McCartney said. Sampley and the defense team will be back (See, COURT, A2)

Shelby Stroemer/ Pike Press

CENSUS TAKERS

The Pike County Economic Development Corporation hosted a census hiring event May 13 at the John Wood Community College campus in Pittsfield. The Census Bureau is hiring for a number of jobs associated with the upcoming 2020 national census. Laura Graf, left, and Latasha Preston were with the Census representatives who delivered information and answered questions. More information on potential jobs can be found at www.2020census.gov/jobs.

Obituaries in this issue: Anderson, DeSpain, Fester, Miller, Stone, Weinant, Westfall, White.

Pike Press © 2019 All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Gas leak causes two block evacuation in Pleasant Hill By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press A contractor in the process of demolishing a building on Clinton Street in Pleasant Hill struck a gas line early Saturday afternoon. According to city officials, the line was struck, causing gas to leak from the line and the meter. A nearby fire was a source of concern for the Pleasant Hill Fire Department which responded to the call. “We asked people in a two block area to leave their homes for safety reasons,” Cory Winchell

of the Pleasant Hill Fire Department, said. “I don’t know an exact number that were included or the exact number that followed the evacuation request.” Winchell said the incident was escalated because of a nearby brush fire and the fact Pleasant Hill City Wide Garage Sales were in progress, having gotten off to a slow start because of an early morning rain. Pleasant Hill Public Works were called and were able to fix the leak. Winchell estimates the evacuation was in effect for about one hour.

First hemp seeds ready to plant in Pike County By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press With a little cooperation from the weather, the first legally planted hemp seeds in Pike County are ready to go in the ground. Lance Kendrick and Dennison Collard have marked off three and one-half acres in western Pike for production of the recently legalized product. “We wanted to have the seeds planted by now,” Kendrick said. “But the weather has held us back.” Collard said the two are now attempting to start their seeds inside and will transplant them when the weather allows. “I have an indoor grow location on my license, so I can start the plants before I move them to the location specified on our permit,” Collard said. The growing of hemp was signed into law April 30 and Kendrick immediately applied

“We wanted to have the seeds planted by now. But the weather has held us back.”

Lance Kendrick hemp producer for a permit, receiving it four days later. “They are putting on a fast track,” Kendrick said. “They wanted access to be available regardless of cost and technology. The state streamlined the process.” Kendrick said planting of the hemp seed is labor intensive and will be done in a grid pattern by hand. Seed can cost up to $1 per seed while other seeds are in the 10 to 50 cent range. Seeds must be approved by the state. “In other states, it can bring up to $30 per pound,” Kendrick

said. “But right now there is zero market locally.” The two are hopeful the public will realize there is no THC in their plants and leave them alone. “It’s not marijuana,” Collard said. Collard said the plants will look like, smell like and appear in every way the same as cannibas. “But it’s not,” he said. “The plants we are planting are only for oil.” Collard said 30 days prior to (See, HEMP, A2)


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NEWS

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Western looks at tech options >>>Board wants more research on high ticket items

By SHELBY STROEMER Pike Press James Broeckling officially began his tenure on the Western School Board after the pledge May 13 with his official oath as a school board member. Broeckling was absent at the April 23 meeting where the other members were sworn in. Smart TV purchases for the district classrooms were mentioned. The TVs would replace all current technology such as projectors and smart boards. The TVs would be 75 inch touch screen and interactive and would include sliding mounts. The final quote for all on a three year lease was $122,500. The decision needs to be made by June meeting so an order can be placed. A lot of skepticism among board members caused the matter to be tabled. The amount of money has the board questioning whether there are cheaper options out there. A video scoreboard was approved for purchase by the school board. A six foot by 12 foot video board and a three foot by nine foot LED score board are floor models being held for the school. The boards cost around $50,000. The board intends to sell ads on the video board to local businesses to bring back some revenue and support the local

businesses. Old boards will be moved to other schools or sold. Payments don’t start until next year. Susan Stouth subbed for Lisha Fee to discuss the health and wellness committee. This year the committee proposed that the back-toschool day and the health and wellness fair combine. The fair would take place and the participants at the fair would receive a free pool pass for that evening at the Barry Municipal Swimming Pool around 6 p.m. A free meal will be served. Summer hours starting after Memorial Day for the Western staff are Monday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Insurance rates for the district were discussed. Blue Cross Blue Shield originally gave the school a 8.65 percent rate increase for the year. After negotiation, the insurance company and district settled on a 3.22 percent increase in rates. The rates were approved. The district approved to switch its energy provider to Future Green. Rates were compared. The final rate was 0.03300 with a total savings of $87,590 annually. The contract with Future Green is for two years. The board went into closed session at 7:13 p.m. After returning to open session at 7:33 p.m., the board approved a contract with principal Connie Thomas for five years. The board adjourned at 7:34 p.m.

Shelby Stroemer/ Pike Press

THE

SQUARE FILLED WITH MUSIC

During the sunshine-filled day Friday, May 10, the Pittsfield High School jazz band set up on the courthouse lawn and played. There were solos performed by band teacher Justin Bangert and a few of the band students.

PHS to hold Baccalaureate The Baccalaureate service for Pittsfield High School Class of 2019 has been set for Sunday, May 19 at 6 p.m. at the Pittsfield United Methodist Church. The tradition of a Baccalaureate service goes back centuries and started in England. In general terms, the word refers to a nondenominational ceremony that allows students to reflect on this special rite of passage and enjoy

words of wisdom and the musical talents of fellow students. The senior class officers have planned a program that will include student-led devotions, worship, and special music and hymns. The guest speaker for the ceremony will be Pastor Clint Weir, with opening remarks provided by Brian Curless. Everyone is invited to enjoy refreshments with the Class of 2019 after the ceremony in Orr Hall.

Court

(Continued from A1) in court June 25 at 11 a.m. to update the court on the progress. Sampley, now 65, was returned to the McFarland Zone Center, a mental health facility, where he has been held since his arrest. Last week, William Poor, the man accused of beating Josh Witherbee to death March 25 in Witherbee’s apartment in Pittsfield, was sentenced to four years in the Illinois Department of Corrections on escape charges. McCartney asked that his transport to IDOC be postponed until Tuesday’s scheduled hearing on the murder charges. Poor’s attorney was unable to make Tuesday’s court date and the matter was moved to Monday. Poor had been charged with escape from a penal institution July 7, 2018 after he walked out of a courtmandated drug treatment facility. “He was still a prisoner,� State’s Attorney Zachary Boren said. “He had just

been housed at a treatment facility. He was not on bond or anything and he just left.� Poor will be transported to an IDOC facility at the discretion of the Pike County Sheriff’s Department and returned to Pike County for court dates on his other charges, according to Boren. His next court date is May 30 when he will have the option of a preliminary hearing. There will also be a motion hearing on whether to unseal records. Chaz Carter, 32, the man accused of shooting a family member in the yard of the family home, was to be in court Tuesday afternoon. Boren said Carter would most likely have a date set for arraignment Tuesday afternoon. Carter is accused of shooting Vincent DeLong in a yard in the 100 block of Fayette Street in Pittsfield April 30. Delong is recovering from the two gunshot wounds he received. Carter is being held on $1 million bond.

SHASTID HOUSE

Shelby Stroemer/ Pike Press

SEES YOUNG VISITORS

Former Pittsfield High School history teacher Michael Boren greeted students from Pikeland Community School May 10 at the historic Shastid House in Pittsfield. Students also took tours of the Pike County Courthouse and Historic East School, visible in the background. All PCS sixth graders participated in the event.

State awards to Pike Press Pike Press received five editorial awards at the Illinois Press Association annual meeting held May 3 in Springfield. Reporter Beth Zumwalt led the list with a first place honor in the category of Localized National Story. Her entry dealt with mental health issues in rural areas. She received an honorable mention in the same category for a story about issues farmers face regarding health insurance. “Very relevant for the community,� the judge commented. In the category of feature writing, Zumwalt received third place for a story about opioid problems in Pike. “Great personal look at the opioid problem from the perspective of one of its victims,� the judge wrote. “The story presents the picture of addiction from another angle. VERY well done.� Pike Press received second place in the category of Community Service for its thorough coverage of the status of a pre-K program in Griggsville. “There is extensive coverage of how the decision will affect both parents and children in the community,� the judge wrote. The staff also received a third place award in the Special Section category for the annual spring ag magazine. “I’m very proud of all the hard work the Pike Press team does every week to

bring readers and advertisers the best possible local coverage of Pike County,� publisher Nichole Liehr said. More than 100 daily and non-daily newspapers competed in the 44 categories which attracted more than 2,400 entries. The contest was judged by members of the Alabama Press Association. Pike Press was represented at the event, held at the President Abraham Lincoln DoubleTree Hotel, by executive editor Julie Boren and Michael Boren, also a Pike Press employee. While at the convention, Julie Boren also attended a meeting of the Illinois Press Foundation board of directors, of which she is a member. The Illinois Press Association, headquartered in Springfield, represents approximately 440 newspapers statewide. Awards were presented June 10 at the Illinois Press Association annual meeting and awards luncheon in Springfield. Pike Press was represented by publisher Julie Boren at the event. She currently serves as a member of the Illinois Press Foundation board of directors. This year’s contest attracted more than 3,000 entries statewide and was judged by members of the Wisconsin Press Association.

Spring Pickin’ days next weekend By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Spring Pickin’ Days will be held Friday through Sunday, May 17-19, thoroughout Pike County. In alphabetical order, towns and villages participating will be: Atlas: White Cottage: antiques, furniture, home decor, junk and outside vendors. Also jewelry, wreaths, vinyl signs and more in the Atlas Township building. Barry: Ruthie’s Blackberry Run, Barry Thifit Shop Detroit: Flea market and garage sales El Dara: Judy’s Country Store, antiques, primitives, Big Bro’s BBQ Rigs, pulled pork, Nancy’s relish, salsa and jams, painted and repurposed furniture and more. Fishhook: Antiques, collectibles and more in the Old Church New Canton: Former Dori’s Restaurant, flea market and yard sales

New Hartford, Ackles will be open: Plants, flowers, candy, fresh product and more. Midwest Vintage Co. (Formerly Country Fixins) antiques, primitives,collectibles, home decor, clothing and much more plus outside vendors; Reel New and Twine, ornamental concrete benches, angels, memorial plaques, statuary with custom paining available; Courthouse lawn; Saturday and Sunday only, Pike County Art Guild Kiddy Kraft Korner, Lion’s Club Leos inflatables and various vendors. Summer Hill: The antique mall will be open, antiques, collectibles, home decor, plants, clothing, lawn art, Mattick’s Kettle Corn,much more. Pittsfield: The Picket Fence, antiques, collectibles home decor and many outside visitors. Pleasant Hill: Yard sales throughout town.

GP to decide future of pre-kindergarten By SHELBY STROEMER Pike Press Griggsville-Perry school board called to order a special board meeting to discuss the future of the pre-kindergarten program. At this May 6 meeting, the public was invited for comments and ideas. Several ideas to consider for next year were men-

tioned. No final decision will be made until the next meeting on what will occur in the upcoming school year. “There’s a lot to consider. It’s a lot of money, a lot of kids, and a lot of time,� Superintendent Kent Hawley said. The meeting adjourned after about an hour of discussion.

Griggsville council discusses ‘fix or flatten’ changes O. ETHAN BROWN Pike Press The Griggsville city council recently discussed updates to its ‘fix or flatten’ ordinance during its May 1 meeting. “We looked over a proposed ordinance and are supposed to discuss it before we send it back to our attorney,� Alderman Larry Bradshaw said. “The city is using a new attorney out of Jacksonville since the older one decided to retire. He was showing us how they do things there and what we might change

here.� The board discussed the various updates and decided to table the issue until the next meeting, Mayor Kent Goewey said. “There is just some dilapidated properties around town that, instead of letting the varmints get to them, we want to get fixed up or removed,� Bradshaw said. In other business, Ashley Waters was hired as the city’s help for the summer at the minimum wage rate. The board went into closed session at 7:20 p.m. and adjourned at 7:35 p.m. with no further action.

Floods (Continued from A1) biggest planters ever made. If they get it in the ground, and get it up, then we can predict better. Some of the earlier planted stuff may have to be replanted. I’m still optimistic we can have a good year.� Weisenborn said is it way to early to predict what government programs might be available to farmers who planted late or were not able to plant at all. “The governor has declared emergency areas and Pike is included,� he said. “But to my knowledge there has been no federal declaration.� U.S. Congressman Darin LaHood visited communities along the Illinois River Monday impacted by recent flooding. Rep. LaHood surveyed areas along the river separating Pike and Scott counties near Florence and also Meredosia in Morgan County. LaHood was joined by community leaders to assess the damage caused by flooding of the Illinois river. “Over the last few weeks, communities in west-central Illinois have

faced significant damage due to flooding along the Illinois river. I appreciated the opportunity to see firsthand the impact of the flooding and today’s visit underscored the challenges many in our rural communities are facing this spring,� Rep. LaHood said. “I am grateful to the first responders who have worked tirelessly to assist those impacted by the flooding damage.� LaHood heard from property owners in Scott County how a better levee system in needed, one that will not require sandbagging each year LaHood agreed and said the project would have to be a joint venture between landowners, local government, state government and the federal government. The Army Corps of Engineers have been offering technical advise and support to those fighting the Illinois River on daily basis, but according to Roderick, they are pulling out today. “They will still be available, they just won’t be here everyday,� Roderick said.

Hemp (Continued from A1) harvest, he and Kendrick will have to send a sample of their plants to the state for testing to make sure the THC levels are not high. “And then five days before harvest, an agent will come out and sample to make sure we aren’t growing cannabis,� Collard said. “It’s hemp, not cannabis.� “Currently, there is no market in Illinois for hemp,� Collard said. “We want to put in our own processing plant and make oil on site. We could market it as locally grown CDB oil. There would be a big market in St. Louis, Jefferson City, places like that.� Collard admits that it is only a matter of time before the market is flooded with

hemp producers but also says there is a big market for the product. “We are hoping to set up a co-op along with producers who are interested,� Collard said. Gov. J.B. Pritzker signed the law saying the the crop could have a massive impact on the state’s economy. “Industrial hemp is a potentially-billion-dollar-a-year industry that Illinois will now take part in,� Pritzker said. Illinois was once a major producer of hemp until it was criminalized in 1937. But Congress reopened the market in the 2014 Farm Bill, which authorized states to launch research pilot projects. It became fully legal under federal law with passage of the 2018 Farm Bill,

which allows states to authorize hemp production as long as the plants contain no more than 0.3 percent THC, the psychoactive chemical in marijuana. Illinois authorized hemp production last year with passage of the state’s own Industrial Hemp Act. John Sullivan, acting director of the Illinois Department of Agriculture and former state senator for Pike County, said there are two major types of industrial hemp. One is used for its fiber, which can be processed into a wide range of materials from textiles to plastics. Another is used primarily for its oil, known as CBD oil, which is sold overthe-counter for a variety of medical uses such as controlling seizure disorders.


NEWS

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Pike Press

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Bailey Scoggins/Pike Press

A duck decoy found at a yard sale proved to be a perfect subject for a beginning drawing class taught by Delbert Sheppard of Pittsfield.

Pike Art Guild starts with the basics Submitted photo

Pittsfield Girl Scouts enoyed Girl Scout Day in Springfield. Left to right in front: Christy Ellison, Stephanie Seidelman, Adeline Hillman, Sophia Moore, Piper Lewis, Isabella Torrez, Summer Kimber, Adalynn Torrez, Ginger Torrez (leader), Laura Lemons (co-leader). Back, left to right: Daphne Lemons, Kristina Kimber, Zoey Lemons, Sheila Lewis. Not pictured: Jaylynn and Nancy Cooley.

Local Scouts third in state

By BAILEY SCOGGINS Pike Press Pittsfield Girl Scouts want everyone to know that their organization is more than just cookies. The Pittsfield Brownie Girl Scout Troop #5676 attended Girl Scout Day in Springfield on Friday, May. The troop placed third in a statewide banner submission. “We were pleasantly surprised to win third – all the girls put a lot of time

and effort into the banner,� Ginger Torrez, troop leader, said. The theme of this year’s Girl Scout Day was girl power, so the group put together a superhero-themed banner, Torrez said. Each girl “became a superhero� and had their faces on the banner, along with a superpower individually picked by the girls. The superpowers placed on the banner represented the traits and what it means to be a Girl Scout member. Some of the traits

on the banner were responsibility, sisterly and courageous. During this event, the girls were able to march at the Illinois State Capitol building. When asked what their favorite part of the day was, Torrez said the girls enjoyed the march because the theme was empowering girls, and how girls have a voice. “Getting the girls’ faces into the superhero was my favorite part [of the banner] because that was fun,� Torrez said.

Next deadline for Pike County tourism grants June 1

The deadline for the next round of grants through the Accommodations Tax Project Funding Program is June 1. Pike County offers project funds for ventures that promote area tourism. Eligible applicants include any individual, agency, group, business or non-profit organization whose project has a beneficial impact on Pike County. These grant funds are made possible through the accommodations tax funds received by Pike County. Applications are reviewed on a quarterly basis by a Funding Advisory Committee comprised of representatives from lodging establishments, county board representatives and the Pike County Economic Development Corporation Executive Director. The Advisory Board encourages creative projects that enhance the lives of residents of Pike County or promotes tourism in the community. Projects must also comply with

all local laws and grantees are responsible for proper licensing, permits, insurance and other applicable requirements. Projects will be evaluated using certain criteria including but not limited to: Potential number of guests to be generated by the project, with emphasis on overnight stays in the community; number of people the project will reach; financial need of the project; percentage of project funding being requested; “seed money� to start a new project or expand an existing project; quality of the project and the likelihood that the project will achieve the stated goals. Projects that request funding for capital improvements will not be considered. The application is available on the PCEDC website at www.pikeedc.org or please contact the Pike County Economic Development Corporation at 217-491-2401. Applications must be received by 5:00 pm on June 1st.

Advertise Pittsfield students with us! receive Compeer Financial scholarship The Compeer Financial Fund for Rural America, the corporate giving program of Compeer Financial, has awarded 120 graduating high school seniors with $1,500 educational scholarships, including Alayna Scranton, Nathan Hoover, and Iva Welbourne of Pittsfield. Recipients were chosen rom across Compeer Financial’s three-state territory of

Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin. Scholarship recipients were chosen based on their academic achievement, essay writing, and involvement in agricultural and community organizations. This is the second year for the scholarship program from the Compeer Financial Fund for Rural America, which has now awarded 225 students with $337,500 in scholarships.

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The Pittsfield Brownie Girl Scout Troop #5676 will continue practicing and demonstrating the skills that they learned at Girl Scout Day just by being a Girl Scout, Torrez said. Girl Scout Day is a day that is dedicated to celebrating community, exploring government, promoting leadership, empowering girls, and gives them the chance to put use the skills that they are developing in Girl Scouts, according to information on the Girl Scouts website.

By BAILEY SCOGGINS Pike Press Looking to find a new hobby or just trying to pass some time? The Pike County Art Guild might be able to help you out with that with two different events that this group is hosting. The first event is “Drawing for Beginners.� A session will be held May 21 from 9-10 a.m. at the Pittsfield Community Center. This class is instructed by Delbert Sheppard of Pittsfield. “I just started with this (project) even though I paint every day,� Sheppard said, addding he starts the class with easy objects like drawing a vase. All ages are welcome to attend; however, the

class size is limited to ten people. It costs $10 per session, which includes the drawing paper. The second event that Pike County Art Guild is hosting is called “Spring Pick’ns Kiddie Kraft Korner.� This event will be held May 18 and 19 from noon to 4 p.m. The cost is $2 per child. There will be the following stations set up: box city, clay pinch pots, tie-dye paper making, sidewalk chalk murals and photo montage booths. All proceeds from this event will go toward future art in the park projects. The Pike County Art Guild is a group that was created to bring the community together through artwork and show off the creativity in Pike County.

Class of ’54 awards summer scholarships The Pittsfield High School Class of 1954 Scholarship Fund is pleased to announce the award of three summer school scholarships to PHS alumni. Brook Smith, Class of 2016, a nursing student at Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing in Quincy was a recipient of a scholarship. Madison Dean, Class of 2016, a business administration

student at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville was a recipient of a scholarship. Tracey Allen, Class of 1996, a teacher at Pikeland Community School and an educational administration graduate student at Hannibal-LaGrange University, was the third recipient for a scholarship.

These awards, combined with the fund’s January 2019 allocation of an additional 17 awards, bring the current year total of alumni scholarship giving to $37,900. An announcement of scholarship awards for the graduating Class of 2019 will soon follow.


Pike Press

OPINION

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Our View DRUG AWARENESS DAY

Volunteers seek to make a difference It’s not a new event, but it’s one that’s needed now more than ever. Each spring, eighth graders from around the county, joined by Pittsfield seventh graders, spend a day at Pikeland Community School, hearing about the lifetime consequences of drugs, alcohol and bad decisions.

Drug Awareness Day is sponsored by the Pike County Rotary Club, supported by the Health and Wellness Foundation of Pike County. Numerous health and law enforcement volunteers contribute their time throughout the day to talk to Pike County’s future citizens, telling them the truth about the tragedies of addiction, about the likelihood of lost opportunities.

The culmination of the event is a talk by an area judge called, “Seven Reasons to Leave the Party.� If you think these teens and preteens would better spend their day concentrating on academic subjects, just take a moment to visit the Pike Press court page. Week after week, crimes involving drugs, alcohol and bad decisions are recorded there. Nationwide and areawide, reports of drug overdose deaths abound.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Hoping for uniďŹ cation It is like a made for TV movie. Three-fourths of the way through. Steadily moving toward a climax. We are sending war ships to the Persian Gulf. Iran is threatening to restart parts of their nuclear program. 1RUWK .RUHD LV WHVW ÂżULQJ EDOlistic missiles again. The trade war with China is escalating. The White House threatens military action with Venezuela. Mr. Trump and Congress in-

crease squabbling over the actions of Mr. Trump, the rights RI WKH RIÂżFH RI WKH 3UHVLGHQW and the duties of Congress. Two more school shootings. The country is extremely, deeply divided. And all a large part of the USA wants is relief and recovery from high water, intense weather related events, and other devastating natural disasters of today, yesterday, and the recent past. It is hard to tell if it is a drama, a comedy, a mystery, or horror. The US House of Representatives just passed a very straightforward major disas-

We’re glad that caring adults in our community continue to take action to made a bad situation better.

This Week's

Poll Question Week of Wednesday, March 13, 2019

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ant a good funny story? Talk to someone who is a beautician, barber, nurse, or in law enforcement. These people work with the public and have the funniest true stories. My cousin, Kevin, has worked for the FBI, DEA, ATF, and other government jobs enforcing drug laws. When we have a family reunion I try to get a couple of stories out of him. They are usually hilarious and not anything I could dream up. I think it was Mark Twain who said,� Truth LVVWUDQJHUWKDQ¿FWLRQ´ Some people have asked that I not share a story or their name. It’s hard sometimes

B) Cary Grant. C) Clark Gable. D) All of them were lucky guys!

Share your answer at pikepress.com

Last week's poll results Former Vice President Joe Biden KDVMRLQHGDQDOUHDG\FURZGHGÂżHOG of Democrat presidential hopefuls. 17% 17% 17% 50%

1. Joe’s my man. I’m glad he officially entered the race. 2. I will be upset if anyone but Bernie Sanders wins the nomination. 3. I’m backing one of the lesser known candidates. 4. It doesn’t matter. Trump will defeat whoever the Democrats run.

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because the story they’ve told is true and hilarious but I totally understand. There are some things that just are for you and not for the rest of the world to know. Nurses have some good stories. When people are in pain or on drugs they say and do some funny things. A few years back I had some surgery on my elbow. I was in bed and had to go to the bathroom. I rang the nurse and she brought me a container to use. I began using the container and another older nurse came in. She lifted up the covers, took a look to see my progress, and then walked out.

I wanted to say, “Hey, what was that?� It felt like she just took a “free shot� then walked out. Recently I was relating the story and laughing about it to a friend . He was laughing and then said, “The real funny part is she wasn’t even a nurse!� I thought that was funny but then I realized I don’t know that I ever saw her come back. Maybe he was right! –––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– Q John Ottwell graduated from Pittsfield High School in 1984 and lives in Shrewsbury, Mo. His website is www. Finishyourstory.com.

LEARNING TO WRITE IN CURSIVE AGAIN T

wo of our granddaughters were here over the Easter holiday and a few days thereafter. They attend public school in New Jersey and have been in that school system for a number of years. While they were here, Annie left them a handwritten note one morning with a list of household chores for them to do if they expected to do something fun with her later that day. Nothing on the list was draconian; rather, they were asked to simply pick up their rooms, wash some dirty dishes (which was of their own doing overnight) and make their beds. But when the moment came for some “fun time,� we discovered that none of the chores had been performed. Was this outright anarchy or was something else going on? It turns out they could not read the note because it was written in cursive style—the style that Annie and I have been using our entire lives and the style that most people reading this column have been using as well. The long and short of it is that the New Jersey public schools do not teach cursive writing. These girls cannot write

cursive and they cannot read it. But even more surprising—they can’t even sign their names with a cursive “signature.� Instead, their “signatures� are printed. Apparently this educational trend of not teaching cursive writing started as a result of the adoption of the “common core standards� for all public schools throughout the country years ago. As I understand it, it was felt that having to teach children how to write in cursive style was a waste of time; computers, I Phones and so on dispensed with the need to be able to write in cursive, according to the experts. As a lawyer, I am astounded that some young people are unable to provide a cursive signature. What is going to happen when they grow up? When you think about all the documents that traditionally have required a cursive signature to be regarded as legal and binding, it certainly raises a lot of otherwise unnecessary questions; we are talking about contracts, loan applications, deeds, wills, marriage licenses, divorce settlements, and passports, just to name a few. If these kids can’t provide a signature, is everyone go-

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FUNNY STORIES

Ridge Runner Chronicles: Bill Hoagland

week. Of all her leading men, my favorite is: A) Rock Hudson.

ate Republicans tried to pass a watered down version of the +RXVH ELOO UHPRYLQJ VSHFLÂżF localities from the bill, but it was defeated. The Senate Republicans then voted down the House bill with essentially the same language as it was passed in the House. I sincerely hope the end will help unify the USA instead of further dividing the USA. Let us all hope it is not a “to be continuedâ€? saga. Too much is at stake to continue along these paths. GLEN PHILLIPS PittsďŹ eld Ill.

Finish Your Story: John Ottwell

In short, drugs are a huge problem and deserving of our attention. Are our young people listening? If even one mind is changed, Drug Awareness Day is worth it.

ter relief bill to help provide relief and recovery for said recent devastating natural occurrences. The second one they have passed since January. Most Republicans in the House, numbering over onethird of the House members, voted against the measure. Mr. Trump opposes the measure. Sadly, Mr. Trump wants to pick and choose which localities receive aid. Mr. Trump also wants to add unrelated amendments to the bill that likely would derail the bill. The Senate has not been able to pass a complementary bill. The Sen-

Executive Editor: Julie Boren Reporters: Beth Zumwalt, Shelby Stroemer Sports: Office: Michael Boren Commercial printing: Linda Schaake

ing to need a “seal,� as European royalty used to have? Of course, the seals would probably be made in China and then you have the risk—believe it or not—that someone fabricating your seal might make a few extra copies of your special seal for distribution to the highest bidder. Great. As it stands right now, a document that is executed without a cursive signature can still be regarded in most jurisdictions as legally binding if the party signing intends his “mark� or “x� to be binding on him, but that is going to require additional documentation stating that the person so signing intended this “mark� as his signature. But why not simply learn how to at least sign your name in cursive? The advantage of a cursive signature is that it would much harder to forge a cursive signature than a printed signature and that alone would seem to be worth it. Some experts on education believe that requiring young students to learn cursive improves their abilities to learn and remember substantive issues, and dispensing with this exercise is detrimental in the long run. In the words

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of one psychologist, cursive training connects the left and right sides of the brain in a way that printing and typing can›t. While there are opposing views on the value of cursive training for young students, the fact is that more than 14 states are again requiring that cursive be taught in grammar school, including Illinois. Effective for the school year 2018-2019, cursive must again be taught in Illinois schools. Frankly, it would be disappointing if millennials couldn›t even read the Declaration of Independence or the Gettysburg Address, both of which are written in cursive. But maybe change for the good is coming and maybe at some point, our chore list, written in cursive, will once again be readable. ––––––––––––––––––– Q Bill Hoagland has practiced law in Alton for more than 50 years, but he has spent more WKDQ  \HDUV KXQWLQJ ÂżVKing and generally being in the great outdoors. His wife, Annie, shares his love of the outdoor life. Much of their spare time is spent on their farm in Calhoun County. Bill can be reached at billhoagland70@ gmail.com. Mail: 115 West Jefferson P.O. Box 70 PittsďŹ eld, IL 62363 USPS 602-540, Timothy F. Campbell, president. Periodicals postage paid at Pittsfield, IL. M

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PICKINGS FROM PIKE’S PAST 100 YEARS AGO: PIKE COUNTY FARM BUREAU ORGANIZED

150 Years Ago May 20, 1869 Thus far the weather has been most unpropitious. Cold, rainy, cloudy, damp, dark and dreary, it has been just such weather that would ¿OO WKH KHDUW RI DQ\ EXW DQ honest man, like us, with gloom and lead to suicide, regardless of the hereafter. Farmers are behind in their work, but a small proportion of the corn having been planted. Grass is good, and the promise of the fruit crop abundant. On Monday the 10th, the last spike, said to have been of gold, was driven in WKH JUHDW 3DFL¿F UDLOURDG DQG WKH$WODQWLF DQG 3DFL¿F are now connected by rail. This is one of the greatest achievements of the age, and was celebrated with great rejoicing in New York, Chicago, and other cities. The distance from New York to San Francisco is 3,377 miles. Hard work still progresses on the Hannibal-Naples railroad. In a week the cars are expected to enter Barry. Then we suppose our Barry friends will take airs over LQODQG WRZQV OLNH 3LWWV¿HOG Never mind, we will shortly show you a railroad that is a railroad, then you city folks FDQ YLVLW 3LWWV¿HOG E\ UDLO the prettiest town in the military district. When of a morning early you hear the mellow notes of a stage horn resounding upon the air, that’s Zack, the clever and accommodating driver of the stage line from 3LWWV¿HOGWR)ORUHQFH=DFNœV stage and the Belle of Pike are now two of the established institutions of the age, without which life would be but an empty dream.

125 Years Ago May 16, 1894 The excavations for the foundation of the courthouse are completed and ready for the concrete, which is ex-

pected to be prepared and laid shortly. 7KH3LWWV¿HOGFLW\FRXQFLO meets this Thursday evening to hear Mayor Ladd’s reason for vetoing the electric light ordinance which grants a franchise for 10 years. The city is to have 30 arc lights of 1200 candle power at an annual cost of $1200 per year. Water for sprinkling the VWUHHWV RI 3LWWV¿HOG LV EDGO\ wanted, but is not to be had. The boiler in the city engine house sprang a leak, and the water had to be shut off, as the water in the tower must EHVDYHGIRU¿UH 7KH 3LWWV¿HOG &KULVWLDQ Church has engaged as it pastor for the ensuing year, Elder George L. Snively, who comes highly recommended from Virginia, Cass County. The effects of the great miners strike are reaching here, and coal is so scarce that the supply for the mill and other use can last but a few days longer. From the experienced orchardist, Richard Perry of Griggsville, we learn that the fruit prospect is not as good as it was 10 days ago, as the fruit is largely dropping from the trees.

A. Johnson of Hull; A.E. Sneeden of Detroit, Mrs. R. W. Fletcher of Barry, Ernest Gay of Rockport, J. L. Stauffer of Baylis, and O. T Turnbeaugh of Nebo. The agriculture course at 3LWWV¿HOG +LJK 6FKRRO ZLOO be extended from one year to two years, with an instructor employed all the year round. At the reorganization PHHWLQJ RI WKH 3LWWV¿HOG Woman’s club held Saturday afternoon, Mrs. Helen Lewis Grigsby was unanimously chosen president for the coming year. The organization had disbanded during the period of the war for the Red Cross work. Earl and Guy Zimmerman FRPSRVH WKH ¿UP RI =LPmerman Brothers. These two young men came here from Perry several years ago and engaged in business. When Earl entered the Army in 1917 he sold out to Guy, who conducted the business until the former was discharged, and then they again formed a partnership. Dr. Roy Pollock of Nebo has arrived home from overseas. He served as a lieutenant in the medical corps of the Army.

75 Years Ago May 17, 1944 The Louisiana, Mo. Press 100 Years Ago Journal reports that German May 14, 1919 The farm bureau meet- prisoners of war are being ing Saturday was attended brought here to replace the by a large crowd of repre- Italian prisoners of war that sentative farmers. Nearly were removed recently. The 500 membership cards were prisoners of war are emsigned and handed in. Each ployed at Stark’s Nursery. Miss Marguerite Schemember will be required to pay a $10 membership fee. del is the new Pike County The executive committee is Public Assistance superindoing some correspondence tendent, succeeding the late with a view to employing a Mrs. Mavis Aber who had made a brilliant record of effarm advisor. 2IÂżFHUV DQG FRPPLWWHH- ÂżFLHQF\LQWKDWRIÂżFH “The most serious probmen of the organization are: President, Jesse M. Thomp- lem in this country is soil son; Vice president, E. C. erosion,â€? said Joe McFarYockley of Perry; Secre- land, county chairman of the WDU\ $ : %XWWHUÂżHOG RI agricultural conservation asGriggsville; Treasurer, C. sociation, addressing his fel-

From the Depths: O. ETHAN BROWN

C

THAWING OF DESPONDENCY

an you hear that elegant symphony, smell the soothing odors, or feel the majestic expanse? Lifelessly those cold drops of despair fall to their death. Mighty rays of hope collect their forces of justice in the camp of the vast unknown. They lay siege upon its victims, dragging them helplessly to the tortures of the light. The signs of spring are among us, yet many do not realize that this gallant battle has many lessons to teach. Light, darkness. Hope, despair. Restoration, destruction. These are not merely a collection of analogical terms used to instill a scene RIEHDXW\RUÂżOWKLQWKHPLQG of a faithful reader. They are the intellectual tools of conĂ€DWLRQGHVLJQHGDQGEXLOWE\ the Almighty Craftsmen to VKRZ WKH Ă€XLGQHVV DQG SUHdictability that reins in our mortal world. A medium of abstract thought to which a mortal displays the interconnection of one’s soul to that of nature. “So you speak to me of sadness, and the coming of the winter. Fear that is within you now, it seems to never end. And the dreams that have escaped you, and the hope that you’ve forgotten. You tell me that you need me now, you want to be my friend. And you wonder where we’re going. Where’s the rhyme and where’s the reason.â€? The lyrics found in John Denver’s “Rhymes and Reasonsâ€? recently passed my attention through the distribution of a close acquaintance. The imputation of hope and

nature’s ability to convey a very clear picture thereof caught my consideration directly. Allow me to construct my original topic in greater detail by using a few brief extracts of this assimilation as an anchor-point. This analogical poem begins in the latter days of fall. An individual has witnessed the slow decay of his confused and misguided mind. His lack of foundation and hope in an Omnipotent being has caused him to fear the coming winter with much distress. A deep, lingering weight of sadness rests in his heart. He has travelled far, yet has journeyed so little. A lack of understanding the purpose of valleys and desolate forests implore have caused our mortal’s agony to be beyond what his spirit can withstand. “And it’s you cannot accept, it is here we must begin to seek the wisdom of the children and the graceful ZD\ RI Ă€RZHUV LQ WKH ZLQG For the children and the Ă€RZHUV DUH P\ VLVWHUV DQG my brothers. Their laughter and their loveliness could clear a cloudy day.â€? As a child and the plant upon the earth is pure and sinless in the eyes of our God, we must also venture forth onto this mysterious trail into the wilderness. A walk upon the road less travHOHG $ MRXUQH\ ÂżOOHG ZLWK contemplation and decision at each gleam of light that enlightens our present path of destruction. He continues to search the inner depths of the shadows for a meaning, a purpose to a separation from

eternal honor. Many will begin, few will complete the test of endurance and obedience. Those who continue will not do so without a constant battle against the elements of bitter cold and deceitfully whispering winds. They must take a hatchet to their lives of old and to those vines of destruction that lay awaiting to disturb their new journey. A journey to inner peace. A pursuit to a place of calm within the center of the pines. “Like the music of the mountains and the colors of the rainbow. They’re a promise of the future and a blessing for today.â€? The sun begins to rise again in the distant horizon. The warmth of perfection and purity lightens our mortal’s heart as he arrives at his destination. Yesterday’s winter of darkness has melted, its destruction forming the nutrients of encouragement for a bright new day. Spring has come and the days of true hope have dawned. “Wrong will be right, when Aslan comes in sight, At the sound of his roar, sorrows will be no more. When he bares his teeth, winter meets its death. And when he shakes his mane, we shall have spring again.â€? - C. S. Lewis ––––––––––––––––––––– Q O. Ethan Brown is an aspiring writer of history, philosophy, and politics and can be found on his personal VLWH DW (IÂżFLHQW0RUWDOFRP He was born and raised in Pike County for much of his early life and now resides in the sticks of Missouri.

low Rotarians at Thursday’s noonday luncheon at the Cardinal Inn. Brigadier General Hobart R. Gay, son of Mrs. Josephine Gay of Rockport, is now in England, after having gone through the Tunisian and Sicilian campaigns. After two disastrous ÀRRGVLQDVPDQ\\HDUVZH are wondering if that is suf¿FLHQWSURRIWKDWQDYLJDWLRQ dams on the Illinois and Mississippi rivers do not control ÀRRGVEXWFDXVHWKHP Rev. Joe Maynard of 3LWWV¿HOG ZLOO GHOLYHU WKH sermon at the baccalaureate services for Nebo High School at 8 o’clock Sunday evening in the gym. Roger Dudley, manager of Dudley’s grocery at New Canton, is selling out his business, as he has volunteered for service in the U. S. Navy. Graduation numbers are small this spring. Milton High School has nine graduates, Pearl High School four, New Canton eight, Baylis RQO\ RQH .LQGHUKRRN ¿YH Nebo thirteen, Pleasant Hill twenty-eight, Perry sixteen, and Hull ten. 50 Years Ago May 21, 1969 Police Chief Jess Hull told WKH 3LWWV¿HOG &LW\ &RXQFLO that there is a problem with cars parking in the alleys around the square, making it GLI¿FXOW IRU GHOLYHU\ WUXFNV DQG LPSRVVLEOH IRU D ¿UH truck to pass through in an emergency. The Pleasant Hill High School band recently performed in the rotunda of the Illinois state capitol. The group will be leaving June 11 for a concert tour in Europe. G. J. Rieckhoff is the band director. 3LWWV¿HOG +LJK 6FKRRO has 113 graduates this year; Pleasant Hill High School has 34; West Pike 35; East Pike 11; Barry 40, and

Griggsville 31. Rev. and Mrs. David Hamilton of Fort Worth, Texas attended services at the Nebo Baptist Church Sunday. David will complete his seminary work this summer. The Pike County Historical Society is sponsoring LWV ÂżIWK DQQXDO KRPHV WRXU Sunday June 8. The tour includes the Knox Apartment House on East Washington and the former John G. Shastid house, now owned by Vic Montequin. 25 Years Ago May 18, 1994 After many months of negotiations, the town of Barry has secured a deal with the Wendy’s Corporation and Phillips 66 to build a truck stop right off the Central Illinois Expressway off ramp. “At this point it will be the only facility of its kind from 4XLQF\WR6SULQJÂżHOGORFDWed right along the highway,â€? said John Shover, who is one of eight developers. More than 80 percent of the 203 Pike County graduates say they are staying in some type of schooling, including 50 percent who are headed for four-year colleges, 19 percent who are attending a two-year community college and 10 percent who are going to technical schools, and nearly 10 percent who are going into the military, which provides its own training. The 23-year-old Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp near Detroit has new walls, new tables, new chairs, new windows, new insulation and new ceiling fans. Kyle Chamberlain, camp manager, says the camp is supported by Independent Christian Churches in Pike County, and one in Beardstown. The second annual Land of Lincoln Jeep Jamboree will roll through Pike Coun-

ty May 19-21. More than 140 Jeeps are already preregistered. Spc. Michael Dehart is in the 25th light infantry division as a cavalry scout. He joined the Army in September, 1991. He is currently stationed in Hawaii.

10 Years Ago May 20, 2009 There wasn’t a dry eye in the house at South School Friday afternoon when Mya Kattelman saw her daddy, &RU\IRUWKH¿UVWWLPHLQ months. Cory Kattelman was supposed to be home over the weekend, but was cleared a bit earlier than expected. He had been in Iraq since July, 2008. Elizabeth Miller has announced her retirement from her law practice effective June 30. Miller serves as Pike County’s public defender and also has a private practice. Miller started practice Nov. 29, 1972 with her grandfather, A. W. Schimmel, and her father, Albert W. Schimmel. She is a 1963 JUDGXDWH RI 3LWWV¿HOG +LJK School and the University of Idaho. She has always pracWLFHGODZLQ3LWWV¿HOG Saukee pitcher Henry -RKQVRQ EURNH WKH 3LWWV¿HOG High School record for most career wins by a pitcher with 23. Johnson captured the record-breaking win Saturday with an 11-0 two-hit win over Rushville. It was his eighth of the season. Seven girl track stars from Pike County placed high enough at sectionals Saturday to qualify for the state track meet. The girls are Marla Willard, Karley Losch, Erin Allen, Natalie Hamilton, Shanna Tharp and Abby Forshey from 3LWWV¿HOG +LJK 6FKRRO DQG Macy Black from Pleasant Hill High School. Q Pickings from Pike’s Past is compiled by Michael Boren.

Guest column: Scott Reeder

PROM ISN’T THE END OF THE STORY W

ell, it’s that time of year again, parents are sharing photos of their handsome sons and pretty daughters all dolled up for prom. Last week my best friend from high school shared a photo of his son that brought back unexpected memories. The boy is the spitting image of his dad. And he had a pretty prom date on his arm. But back in 1983, when we were seniors at Galesburg High School, his dad and I were looking for prom dates. Words like “geeksâ€? or “nerdsâ€? might best describe our social caste in those days. Further complicating matters was that we shared an interest in a young woman who was not a nerd. In fact, she was a standout athlete in our class with a kind streak for stray puppies and social PLVĂ€WVOLNHXV So, unbeknownst to the other, we both asked her to the prom. And she told us both “no.â€? Here is how the conversation with me went: “I was wondering if you’d like to go to the prom with me.â€? “Oh, I’m sorry Scott, I’m planning to attend with Charlie.â€? Hmmm, Charlie? He was

a year older than us and a freshman at the University of Illinois. His dad was a doctor DQG KH ZDV D WHUULĂ€F WHQQLV player. But he was also the class clown. He loved to walk into a packed McDonald’s restaurant at noon, throw himself RQWKHĂ RRUDQGIHLJQDQHSLleptic seizure. As he would thrash around RQ WKH Ă RRU JRRG 6DPDULtans would try to hold him in place and keep him from swallowing his tongue. Restaurant workers would call for paramedics. But as soon as the emergency personnel arrived, Charlie would stand up, brush himself off and say, “Oh, never mind.â€? Then there was the time he showed up for class dressed as Superman: leotards, a cape and a great big “Sâ€? on his chest. On another occasion, he wore a red velvet GUHVV ZLWK Ă€VKQHW VWRFNLQJV to school. Yes, Charlie Cohen was a bit of a clown. So, when the day of the prom rolled around, Charlie stood his date up and sent a friend in his place. I suspect she was a bit perplexed by this development. But what about Charlie? Well, he went on to star in a television program. Unfortunately, the program was

“America’s Most Wanted.â€? In 1988, Charlie Cohen killed his parents who had moved to Delaware. For two years after his parents’ slaying he hid in various locations in the United States and Mexico until he was apprehended in New Orleans. It was later learned he killed a banker in San Francisco while he was on the lam. He is now serving a life sentence for murder in a maximum-security Delaware prison. So, as I glanced at the photo I received of my friend’s son, I couldn’t help but smile. We both have been PDUULHG WR Ă€QH ZRPHQ IRU many years and have wonderful children. And we both have enjoyed wonderful, fulĂ€OOLQJFDUHHUV On the other hand, Charlie Cohen, the picture of adolescent popularity, lives in a 6-foot by 9-foot cell. High school celebrity rarely equates to future success. But at least my buddy and I can say we didn’t get to go to the prom because we got turned down for a future serial killer. ––––––––––––––––––––– QScott Reeder is a veteran statehouse journalist and a freelance reporter. ScottReeder1965@gmail.com.

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Mabel Olive White Mabel Olive White, age 92, of Pittsfield, IL passed away on Friday, May 3, 2019 at St. John’s Hospital in Springfield, IL. She was born on June 14, 1926 in Pittsfield, IL to Eugene C. and Mary E. Daugherty Dark. She married Willis “Joe� White, Jr. on August 11, 1945 in Pittsfield, and he preceded her in death on December 30, 2002. Mabel worked as a cook for the Pittsfield schools for many years and later worked at Brown Shoe Factory, from where she retired. In earlier years, she was a member of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, where she taught Sunday School for several years. Mabel enjoyed quilting, making rugs, and crocheting. She also liked raising flowers in her garden and loved her parakeets and cockatiels. She is survived by two sons, Gary “Joe� White and E. Dean “Tuffy� (Mary) White, both of Pittsfield, IL; a grandson, Jason D. (Beth) White of Pittsfield, IL; two great granddaughters, Ariana White and Audrey White of Pittsfield, IL; and numer-

ous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband of 57 years, Joe; her parents, Eugene and Mary Dark; and brothers, Meredith Dark, Clifford Dark, and Galen Dark; and sister-in-law Opal “Rennie� Dark. Funeral services were held on Thursday, May 9, 2019 at 10:30 AM at Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield. Interment will follow at Pittsfield West Cemetery. There will be no visitation. Memorials are suggested to Pittsfield West Cemetery. Online condolences may be left to the family at www.nieburfh. com. Niebur Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.

David A. Fester David A. Fester, 56, passed away at 10:15 pm on May 1, 2019 at his home after a courageous two-year battle with pancreatic cancer. He fought with the help and support of his family, friends and the Calhoun County community. With this help, David was able to stay at home during this two-year battle. He loved Calhoun County and never wanted to leave. David was the youngest son born to the late Glenn and Captolia (Haney) Fester of Batchtown. His five brothers included, Charles (Jane) Fester of Hardin, Daniel (Marie) Fester of Dow, Edward Sr. (Linda) Fester of Batchtown, the late Larry (Margie Smith) Fester of Girard and Ronnie (late Sun) of Dupont, WA. He married Deann Koster in Carlinville, IL on June 30, 1989. This union was blessed with one son, Joseph Fester of Hardin, IL. David is survived by a larger family, which includes, fatherin-law and mother-in-law, John and Dolores (Schuckenbrock) Koster and three brother-in-laws, Douglas (Deanna), Don (Kara) and Daniel (Tracy) all of Carlinville. He had forty-three nieces and nephews at his passing, which he appreciated every day. He is also survived by an uncle, Ralph Robinson of Pleasant Hill, IL and an aunt, Starr McDaniels of Pearl. He was preceded in death by his parents, brother Larry Fester; sister-in-law, Sun Fester; uncles, Bill Haney, J.D. Haney and Ransom Haney, Warren Fester, Fred Fester, Herbert Fester and Louis Fester; and an aunt, Alice Robinson. David loved life each day. He enjoyed helping people and worked very hard at everything he did. David attended Batchtown and Hardin Elementary Schools, and graduated from Calhoun High School in 1981. He later attended Lewis and Clark College and the St. Louis Union Carpenters School, becoming a Jour-

Nellie Irene Stone Nellie Irene Stone, 92, formerly of rural Nebo, died Friday morning May 10, 2019 at Pittsfield Manor. Funeral services were held Tuesday May 14, 2019 at 1 p.m. at the Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill. Burial followed at the Burbridge Cemetery near Martinsburg. Visitation was held one hour prior to the services on Tuesday. Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

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neyman Carpenter. He was a member of Local 32 of Wentzville. In his youth, David was employed by Eilerman Brothers Farms, Saurwin Lumber Company and his family orchard. He started his thirty-year carpenter career with P & R Construction and later Behlman Builder in St. Louis, MO. After his diagnosis, he sat on his patio with his constant companion, “Butch� the granddog, gaining strength from all that visited. He always loved being outside. All of his life he enjoyed spending time with his family and friends watching late model dirt track races and working on antique tractors. In January 2019 he was able to fulfill many wishes including feeding alligators in Louisiana and make happy memories with his family and friends. And many other shorter trips, including a trip to the dirt track race under the dome. David’s Celebration of Life Memorial Service will be on May 22, 2019, at 3:30 p.m. at 407 South County Road, where he spent most of the last two years of his life. Then there will be a walk to Hardin City Cemetery for his burial. The family will be able to visit after the services at the Masonic Lodge in Hardin. Donations can be made to Boyd Memorial Hospital Foundation Cancer Gas Card Fund for Calhoun County Patients or Three Little Birds 4 Life. Online condolences and guest book may be found at www.eliaskallalandschaaf. com

Pike Press

Deborah ‘Debbie’ Miller Deborah Ann “Debbie� Miller, 65, of rural Nebo, IL passed away Friday morning May 10, 2019 in Roodhouse. Debbie was born November 2, 1953 in Richmond Heights, MO, a daughter of George Archibald and Joan Heckle Scranton,ll. She married Michael Raymond “Mike� Miller on August 6, 1971 at the Nebo Christian Church and he survives. Debbie was a 1971 graduate of Pittsfield High School and received her Associates Degree from John Wood Community College. She retired from the U.S. Postal Service as the Post Master at Baylis and more recently she really enjoyed substitute teaching for various local school districts. She was well known for her Pleasant Hill community news columns for several local newspapers and was currently serving as the secretary for the Pleasant Hill School Foundation Board that awards college scholarships to Pleasant Hill graduates. Debbie was an avid reader and St. Louis Cardinals fan and she enjoyed gardening, flowers, craft work and attending yard sales. Most important to her was her family and spending time with her children and grandchildren. Debbie was a long time member of the Pleasant Hill Christian Church and most recently was attending The Crossing in Pittsfield. Survivors include her husband of 47 years, Mike Miller of rural Nebo, two sons, Michael Raymond (Allison) Miller, II of Farmington, MO and Matthew Todd (Brecket) Mill-

er of Kirksville, MO, five grandchildren, Bernadette, Francine, Myah, Elise and Elijah, father-in-law, Todd Miller of rural Nebo, two sisters, Sandy (John) Taylor of Nebo and Laura (Daryll) Bequette of Nebo, a stepsister, Shirley Dean of Pittsfield, a brother, George Archie (Sue) Scranton, II of Springfield, a step-brother, Larry Neese of Nebo and several nieces and nephews. Debbie was preceded in death by her parents, stepfather, Felix Neese, motherin-law, Wilma Miller and two infant brothers. Funeral services will be held Thursday May 16, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. at the Pleasant Hill Christian Church in Pleasant Hill conducted by Clint Weir. Burial will follow at Crescent Heights Cemetery in Pleasant Hill. Visitation will be held Wednesday evening from 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. at the Pleasant Hill Christian Church and Thursday morning until time of services. Memorials may be made to the Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp near Detroit. Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

Dora May Weinant Dora May Weinant, 95, of Pittsfield, died at Illini Hospital May 10, 2019. Funeral services were held Monday, May 13, 2019 at 2 p.m. at Niebur Funeral Home in Pittsfield. Interment followed at Oakwood Cemetery in Pittsfield. Visitation was held prior to the service Monday from 1-2

Arthur ‘Russ’ Westfall II Arthur Marion “Russ� Westfall II, 54, of Pittsfield, died Thursday, April 18, 2019 at his residence. A memorial service will be held Saturday, May 25 at 10 a.m. at the Pittsfield Church of the Nazarene.

Linda Kay DeSpain Linda Kay DeSpain, 71, of Barry, IL died May 8, 2019 at her residence. A memorial service will be held at 6 p.m. Thursday, May 16, 2019 at the Niebur Funeral Chapel in Barry with Pastor Jimmy Hodges officiating. Visitation will be held from 4:00 P.M. until the time of service on Thursday. Memorials are suggested to Western Athletics Booster. Online condolences may be sent nieburfh.com. The Niebur Funeral Chapel is handling the arrangements.

Join us as we say farewell to those who have passed on Check our website daily for updated death notices pikepress.com

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p.m. at the funeral home. Memorials are suggested to Oakwood Cemetery, American Legion Honor Guard, or the Pittsfield Fire Department. Online condolences may be left to the family at www.nieburfh. com. Niebur Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.

Calvin ‘Andy’ Anderson Calvin Eugene “Andy� Anderson, 89 years, 11 months and 12 days, of Pleasant Hill, IL died Sunday, May 12, 2019 at home surrounded by family. He was born to Scott and Nora Anderson in Belleview on May 31, 1929. He married Lucille Prater on June 24, 1950 and she survives. Also surviving is a sister, Ruth Crowder of rural Nebo, seven children, James “Jim� (Cheryl) Anderson, Franklin “Keith� (Susan) Anderson, Tarissa (Dave) Buchanan and Vic Anderson all of Pleasant Hill, Gene (Nancy) Anderson of Paducah, KY, Christine (Don) Creamer of Alton, and Anna Marie (Frank) Cripps of Tolono, twelve grandchildren, Marsha (Brian) Hill, Marty (Heather) Anderson, Calvin (Charlene) Anderson, Amy (Gene) Traynor, Daniel (Wendy) Anderson, Emily (Jason) Feenstra, Melody Anderson, Adam (Regan) Anderson, Aaron Davis, Alexis Griffen, Andrew (Melissa) Davis and Richie Davis, fifteen great grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. Andy was preceded in death by his parents, a brother, James Wesley in infancy, a brother, Charles Anderson, and a great grandson in infancy.

Andy spent nineteen years as a maintenance worker, janitor and bus driver for Pleasant Hill Schools, He worked for the Village of Pleasant Hill for ten years and for the Sny Island Drainage District. Andy was a lifetime member of the Mozier Church of Christ and a U.S. Army veteran. Funeral services will be held Saturday May 18, 2019 at 12 p.m. at the Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill conducted by Chad Cranfield. Burial, with military honors, will follow at Crescent Heights Cemetery in Pleasant Hill. Visitation will be held Saturday morning from 9 a.m. until the time of services. Memorials may be made to Unity Pointe Hospice or Crescent Heights Cemetery. Lummis Funeral Home in Pleasant Hill is handling the arrangements.

Stay informed read the Pike Press Anna L. Kibler Willard September 8, 1919 – April 17, 2019

The family of Ann (R. Glenn) Willard wishes to express our sincere thank you for the many kind expressions of sympathy, condolences and support following the passing of our Mother. Thank you for sharing your memories and love. We also convey our thank you to Transitions Hospice and our gratitude and appreciation to the staff of Evenglow Inn in Pontiac, IL for your wonderful care and friendship and for providing Mother a loving home over the past 10 years. We express our sincere gratitude and thank you to Pastor Mick Laflin, Organist Lori Whitlock, the Pittsfield United Methodist Church and Niebur Funeral Home for your loving support and beautiful memorial service; to Flowers n More for the lovely flowers; and to Nucci’s Restaurant for graciously serving an exceptional funeral dinner. Your kindness is deeply appreciated and will always be remembered. R.J. and Lindalyn (Willard) Nelson and family Richard and Nancy (Willard) Sulzberger and family


COMMUNITY

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Pike Press

GRIGGSVILLE

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Two Griggsville men receive Quilt of Valor quilts last week The Griggsville Day Unit of HCE will meet this Thursday, May 16 at 1:30 p.m. in the home of Linda Patton. Linda will give the lesson on medical genealogy. Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp near Detroit will host Mark and Pam Fisher this Sunday, May 19 beginning at 6 p.m. in the Chapel. Since 2003, Mark and Pam have been singing exclusively Southern Gospel Music at churches, revivals, tent meetings, ice cream socials and other special events. You are invite to come join us in an evening of great gospel music! Concert funded by free-will offerings. Hope to see you

there! Congratulations to Bob Norris of Griggsville and Howard Staffy of Pittsfield who each received a Quilt of Valor Saturday at the Pike County All Wars Museum. Thank you for your service, gentlemen! Our sympathy goes out to the family of Dora Weinant of Pittsfield who passed away at Illini Hospital on May 10. Dora’s Griggsville family includes grandsons Jud Kirk and Richard Kirk, and two sisters Helen Hull and Nancy Brackett. Those enjoying Mother’s Day with Jim and Connie Manker were: Cassandra Ator, Wes Manker, Dick and

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ROTARIAN

By NADINE KESSINGER 217-407-4502

RECEIVES AWARD

kessy@casscomm.com

Gary Woods presented a non-Rotarian Paul Harris Fellow award to Lloyd Lawber at the May 8 meeting of the Pike County Rotary Club. Lawber has been instrumental in many local projects, notably the All Wars Museum which the club had as its Foundation Grant recipient a few years ago. Lawber thanked the club for the honor and the donation which the club has made to the museum.

Deb Lawson, Troy Main, Breanna Manker, Cory Bushnell, Larry Manker, Jr., David and Amy Hill, Carol Crear, Nadine Manker, Shelby Hill, Kendra Schneider, Lester, Janet, and Pennie Rush, Lester Rush, Jr. and Kay, and Jimmy, Kari, Wyatt and Cole Manker. Pain doesn’t show up in our lives for no reason. It is a sign that something in our lives need to change.Mandy Hale

MILTON Milton has a restaurant again Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp will be hosting Mark & Pam Fisher May 19,6 p.m. in the Chapel. Since 2003, Mark & Pam have been singing exclusively Southern Gospel music at churches, revivals, tent meetings, ice cream socials and other special events. Everyone is invited to come & join in an evening of great gospel music. The camp is handicapped accessible.

The East Pike Lending Library is open Saturdays from 9 a.m.-noon. They offer a huge selection of books to loan and a wide variety in the free pile. No fees of any kind are associated with the library. Stop in and see what the fuss is all about. Enter as a stranger; leave as a friend. The restaurant in Milton, now named P.A.M.S, is open! New owners, new menu, some new staff and some ole familiar faces.

LONG

By KARRIE SPANN 217-723-4262

GRADUATES WITH DEGREE

Hours are Sunday 6 a.m.-2 p.m.; Monday closed; Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Saturday 6 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-8 p.m.; Friday 6 a.m.8 p.m. Phone number is 217723-4286. It’s fantastic! If you haven’t already, you need to come check it out.

NEW SALEM

AND OTHER AREA NEWS NEAR AND FAR Pike County Health Fair and Senior Expo is Thursday If it be possible, as much as lieth in you, live peaceably with all men. Dearly beloved, avenge not yourselves, but rather give place unto wrath: for it is written, Vengeance is mine; I will repay, saith the Lord. Romans 12:18, 19 Prayer requests: Connie Vermillion, Christine Henthorn, Connie McFall, Frances Larson, Greg Ketterman, Ginger Whitlock, Jerry Gully, Josh Bennett, Linda Schnabel, Mark Vermillion, Melinda Chandler, Milo Klein, Mike Peters, Pastor Gary Dice, Radar Grim, oger & Sue Robbins, Roger Bonnett, Steve Davis, Susie Fudge, Susan Shaw, Ted Patton, Tom Ruble, Wayne Robbins, the country Israel, and the United States of America. Sympathy to the family of Mike Rueter of the Chosen Ones who passed away recently. Deepest sympathy to the family of Debbie Miller. Friday, May 10, Pike County lost one of its finest at a young age. Debbie Scranton Miller... daughter, sister, wife, mother, aunt, grandmother, and friend. She took each of those roles seriously and sincerely. I met Debbie and her then boyfriend, later husband, Mike many years ago at Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp which was then located in the hills of Nebo. She affected everyone she met with her enthusiasm, her beautiful smile, and infectious laugh. She was in the group from MVCSC called “Camp Crusaders� and we all went from church to church singing (yes, folks, that group even let me in). She retired

from the United States Postal Service and served in various offices, and her last post was in Baylis. She was a fellow columnist in our local newspapers and wrote the Pleasant Hill column for years. My favorite part of her column was all her take on various family stories. Everything she did, she gave it her all, from being a homemaker to a mom to a church worker to her career to be a grandmother. Debbie will be sincerely and deeply missed and there will always be a void where Debbie had been. Only birthday I have listed for this week is Jonathan Parrack May 19. The Pike County Health Fair and Senior Expo will be at the Crossroads Center this Thursday, May 16, in Pittsfield from 9:30-1:30. Free admission. This coming Sunday, May 19, the Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp will be hosting Mark and Pam Fisher starting at 6 p.m. The camp is handicapped accessible. Upcoming water aerobics classes will be starting June 3 at King Pool. These will be held Mondays and Thursdays 11-noon and 5-6 p.m. Cost is $1 to get into the pool and the class itself is free. Trivia questions: 1. What is the oldest town in Pike County? 2. What were and is the three county seats of Pike County, naming the oldest one first? 3. Who was the first building contractor in Pike County? 4. After the oldest town, what were the next three towns

Card of Thanks

Kvorka graduates McKendree

Callihan

The family of Heather Callihan wants to express to all that helped them through a very heart breaking and difficult time in their lives “THANK YOU!’’ The out pouring of love and support was overwhelming and will never be forgotten. We truly appreciated the cards, phone calls, visits, food, flowers, memorials for Heather’s children, Mason and Marlee, and all your prayers. Heather was here for a very short time but she left footprints of kindness and love, courage and compassion, humor and inspiration, joy and faith. Though she is gone we can still look back and clearly see the trail she left behind. A trail bright with hope, and a trail that did not judge, one that saw the best in everyone, and one that touched many hearts. Heather loved her family very much and will be missed by so many. The family of Heather Callihan

Emily R. Kvorka of Pittsfield graduated magna cum laude with a BA degree in psychology May 11 at the Lebanon campus of McKendree University. This was McKendree’s 179th commencement to have and celebrate with their graduates. McKendree University, founded in 1828, n the historic town of Lebanon, has its campus 25 miles from St. Louis, Mo. McKendree also has a campus in Radcliff, Ky., and offers programs online and at nearby Scott Air Force Base.

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By WYVETTA DAVIS 217-285-4880

KATIE LONG

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laid out in Pike County? 5. What had Pittsfield originally been called? 6. What location between what 2 present day towns was the town of Straut in Pike County? (Questions were supplied by the Pike County Illinois History and Families 18212014.) The Barry Food Pantry put food on the table for 825 people in the month of April, and these include: Barry 239; Baylis 43; ElDara 4; Griggsville 67; Hull 74; Kinderhook 5; Milton 7; Nebo 84; New Canton 73; New Salem 5; Pearl 12; Perry 8; Pittsfield 118; Pleasant Hill 69; Rockport 15; Time 2. Donations are down and food is running short. If other townships or towns don’t donate some money so the Food Pantry can purchase food, the board will have to go back to serving the Western School District only. And the Barry Food Pantry does not want to do this unless necessary! The golf tournament was successful but they wished there had been more teams. The sponsorships were great this year!! Had a phone call from Drake Pleus the other day. If any of you would like to send him a birthday card (his birthday is June 5), please give me a call, and I will give you his address. Have a great week and God bless. Check out our Briday Registry at casteelcolorwheel.com

WEDDING REGISTRY Emily Hooper and Klayton Fox June 1, 2019 Lacy Coultas and Josh MoďŹƒt June 15, 2019 Destiny Miller and Dryden Craven June 29, 2019 Need to add to your bridal collection? China, Fiesta, Noritake, stemware, or silverware. We have rock bottom prices.

We Have Cards For All Occassions! Stop by & check out our baby clothes and accessories. Know someone having a baby? Have them sign-up for our baby registry!

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Katie Sharrow Long, a 2009 graduate of GriggsvillePerry High School, recently graduated cum laude with a bachelor of science degree in psychology from the University of Maryland University College-Europe, Kaiserslautern, Germany. Long is married to Marty Long, who is an active member of the United States Air Force stationed at Ramstien Air Force Base in Germany. Parents are Steve and Jennifer Liehr of Perry and Rodney and Tammy Sharrow of Carrollton. Local grandparents are Sharon Smith of Griggsville and Jim Smith of Perry.

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CELEBRATE MAY BIRTHDAYS

Fun was had at the May countywide seniors birthday party. Everyone enjoyed the beautiful birthday cake donated by County Market, the springtime decorations and fresh flowers from Fashion Flowers, the Bingo prizes, and especially the Branson show DVD. Juanita Chapman was one of many who celebrated her birthday. Any senior with a June birthday, please come and join us June 14.

Illinois Wesleyan announces candidates for graduation Illinois Wesleyan University honored 410 candidates for graduation during Commencement on May 5. Doctor Stephen L. Ondra ‘80, the founder and CEO of North

Star Healthcare Consulting, LLC, delivered the Commencement address. Rowland Filbert graduated as a Cum Laude and majored in accounting.


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Pike Press

McCartney rejects preliminary findings on Lash case By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press Felony charges of illegal cutting of timber were dismissed by Judge Frank McCartney against Dustin Lash after the conservation police officer involved in the case could not identify Lash in court. Gregory Weishaupt, a now retired conservation officer with the Illinois Department of Natural Resources, testified last week in Pike County Court that he had been contacted by the Pike County Sheriff’s Department May, 2018 to investigate of case of illegal timber cutting. Weishaupt was under questioning by Pike County Assistant State’s Attorney Leecia Carnes. Weishaupt said he went to the home of Richard Feezel, southeast of Pittsfield, and talked with Feezel who said he had hired an individual to cut logs off of some timber adjacent to his house. The logger had cut the logs but had not returned to get them and Feezel needed to mow the property. Feezel told Weishaupt he then contacted Dustin Lash to remove the logs which he agreed to do. Feezel said he met Lash one morning in his driveway, just as Feezel was leaving for the day. When Feezel returned home at least five trees had been cut on his property that were not in the plan for harvest, including two in the yard of his home. Weishaupt said the Feezel told him there were also freshly cut trees on adja-

cent property owned by the First Christian Church of Pittsfield. At least four trees were harvested there and one tree severely damaged. Confirmation with the Christian Church minister showed they had not requested any trees be harvested. Value of the trees on the Feezel property could be determined a number of ways but was inbetween $5,373 and $6,237. Value of the trees on the church property was approximately $3,474. On cross examination by John Leonard, Lash’s attorney, Leonard asked Weishaupt if he was clear on the boundary lines and other information before asking Weishaupt to identify Lash in court. Weishaupt could not pick Lash out of the people in the court room. “Weishaupt investigated the case but never actually met Mr. Lash,� Pike County State’s Attorney Zack Boren, said. “The status is that I filed a motion for the court to dismiss the case without prejudice and with leave to reinstate,� Boren said. “I believe that’s the appropriate remedy. Then we would refile and proceed with a preliminary hearing with an additional witness to do an in court identification of the defendant. The court will need to hear my motion before anything else can happen.� Boren said he had no timetable on the process and that Lash will remain on bond until the matter is resolved.

Dispositions Traffic Speeding – ($120 unless noted): Trenton Conkright, 1/6/87, Griggsville. Ashley Fulmer, 5/16/95, Perry. Will Heavner, 6/12/01, Pearl, $392. Aja Hurst,5/4/90, Griggsville, $357. Daniel R. Workman, 6/2/02, $392, 4 months supervision. Daniel R. Workman, 6/2/02, $442, six months supervision. Seat belt ($60 unless noted): Rex Elledge, 9/19/58, Perry. Jon Freeman, 7/4/71, Baylis. Sandra Shaver, 9/17/59, Pittsfield. Steve M.Thomas, 322/84, Pleasant Hill. Miscellaneous traffic: Stephanie Coultas, 8/9/91, unlicensed, $407, 3 months supervision. David S. Harrison, 8/24/94, Pleasant Hill, operate uninsured motor vehicle, $382. Ryan M. Hill, 2/16/83, Nebo, illegal transportation of alcohol by a driver, $120. Gary L. Holcomb, 7/2/50, Pleasant Hill, $120. Aja Hurst, 5/4/90, Griggsville, disregard stop sign, $407, 3 months supervision. Laura R. Pierce, 6/5/69, Pittsfield, driving on suspended license, $742, 12

months supervision. Jack H. Sibley, 10/4/01, Pittsfield, driving on suspended license, $742. Cheyenne M. Williams, 9/24/88, Pleasant Hill, $407. Driving under the influence: Aja B. Hurst, 5/4/90, Pittsfield, $2,307, 12 months supervision, 100 hours community. Misdemeanors: Joshua S. Carter, 4/8/95, consumption of alcohol, possession of drug paraphernalia, $1,650, 12 months supervision; 24 months probation, 20 days periodic imprisonment, domestic battery, $1,892 24 months probation, 30 days periodic imprisonment, 3 days credit time served. Felonies: Zachary J. Bowen, 7/4/99, Pittsfield, theft $500 to $10,000; $1,882, theft, 24 months probation; 30 days in jail with credit for two days served. Crystal L. Crawford, 7/4/84, Griggsville, possession of methamphetamine, $6,134, 68 days in jail with credit for 34 served, 36 months probation, revocation of probation, 24 months probation, 30 days period imprisonment, obstruct justice, $2, 377, 24 months probation, 30 days periodic imprisonment, 30 months probation. Thomas J. Deitzman, 10/30,73, New Canton, driv-

ing while revoked or suspended, $2,064, 30 months probation, 300 hours public service. Robert E. Hutton Jr. 3/14/75, New Salem, possession of a controlled substance, $2,612,,24 months supervision; 30 public service. Teale M.Meighan, 4/20//78, Pittsfield, possession of methamphetamine, $3,636, 30 months probation 38 days in jail with credit given for 19 days served; revoke probation, 100 days in jail with credit for 30 days served. Teale M. Meighan, 4/20/78, Pittsfield, violate order of protection on prior domestic battery, $1,445, 100 days in jail with credit for 13 served. Janice A. Sidwell, 6/22/66, Nebo, possession of methamphetamine, $5,882, 18 days in jail with credit for nine served.

Police Beat The police records released by the Pike County Sheriff ’s office include the following arrests and bookings. The records state that these are accusations and each individual is presumed innocent until proven guilty. Anthony D. Little, 36, Griggsville, was arrested May 6 at 6:27 p.m. on a felony warrant seeking to revoke probation. He posted $1,700 and was released May 8 at 9:30 a.m. Clay L. Sidwell, 30, Pittsfield, was arrested May 6 at 4:03 p.m. on a felony Pike County warrant charging failure to appear. He posted $300 bond and was released May 16 at 4:15 p.m. April D. Hodges, Pleasant Hill, was arrested May 7 at 11:55 a.m. on a Pike County traffic warrant. She posted $100 and was released at 12:15 p.m, May 7. Felipe Garcia-Perez, 19, Pittsfield, was arrested May 7 at 2:42 p.m. on a Pike County traffic warrant. She posted $100 bond May 7 at 5 p.m. and was released. Charles C. Masterson, 36, Pleasant Hill, was arrested May 8 on a felony Pike County warrant alleging failure to appear on theft, driving while suspended and no insurance. He posted $300 bond and was released May 8 at 6:45 p.m. Amanda S. Haskins, 39, Barry, was arrested May 8, 8:51 p.m. on a charge of failure to appear. She posted $150 on a credit card and was released May 8 at 9 a.m. Jeremy R. Carnes, 32, Pittsfield, was arrested May 9 at 6:40 p.m.on a Pike County traffic warrant alleging failure to appear. He

posted $300 May 10 at 8 p.m. Lacee E. Morris, 28,, Ewing, Mo., was arrested May 9 on a Pike County traffic warrant alleging failure to appear on a driving while suspended charge. She was released by order of the court in lieu of $150 bond. Kenneth J. Watts, 45, Pittsfield, was arrested May 11 at 11:37 p.m. on a misdemeanor charge of assault. He posted $150 bond and was released May 12 at 1:45 a.m. Robert S. Bricker, 38, New Canton, was arrested May 11 at 12:51 p.m. on a felony in-state warrant with a bond of $1,000. He remains lodged. Ryan J. Kremer, 33, Nebo, was arrested May 11 at 11:37 p.m. on a felony Pike County warrant. He posted $300 and was released May 12 at 12:45 a.m. Gregory T. Kelly, 48, Pittsfield, was arrested May 11 at 11:37 on a charge of misdemeanor assault. He posted $150 bond and was released at 1:30 a.m. Jessica R. Crossman, 22, Pittsfield, was arrested May 11 at 4:42 a.m. on a charge of driving under the influence of drugs. She posted $100 and was released May 11 at 7 a.m. Theresa J. Scoggins, 43, Pittsfield, was arrested May 12 at 9:21 p.m. on a Pike County traffic warrant. She posted $150 bond and was released May 12 at 9:50 p.m. Has your charge been amended, reduced or dropped or have you been found not guilty? Email ppnews@campbellpublications.net to be considered for a status update on your court proceeding. Please include name and case number.

Public education underway supporting Scott’s Law Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White is again calling on drivers to stop driving while distracted – with a special emphasis on moving over when approaching a stopped emergency vehicle or any stopped vehicle displaying flashing lights. The Move Over Law, also known as Scott’s Law, is designed to protect law enforcement, emergency responders and others who are stopped on the side of roadways. “Motorists need to focus on driving when they are behind the wheel,� said White. “Stop driving distracted and stop texting. If you see an emergency vehicle stopped on the side of the road, reduce speed and change lanes if possible. Protect those who protect us.� White announced his office is undertaking efforts to enhance public education on the Move Over Law. This includes: Q Adding a reminder about the Move Over Law to driver’s license renewal notices. The office is required

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by state law to mail these notices. Q Adding a reminder about the Move Over Law to vehicle registration renewal notices. Q Adding a test question on the Move Over Law to the written driving exam. Q Creating a pamphlet on the Move Over Law for distribution at all Driver Services facilities statewide. In addition, White has instructed the Secretary of State Police to conduct periodic stings throughout the state to enforce the Move Over Law. This will add a police component to the educational campaign. The goal is not to write tickets, but

to ensure that motorists are driving safely and moving over when the law calls for it. “We have a responsibility to drive safely,� said White. “And we have a duty to protect those who protect us by moving over when approaching a stopped emergency vehicle. It is the law.� Motorists convicted of violating the Move Over Law face a minimum fine of $100 up to $10,000 and the offense goes on the motorist’s driving record. A violator’s driver’s license is suspended for 24 months in the event of a fatality and six months in the event of personal injury.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR The Board of Directors of the Pike County Chamber of Commerce, located in PittsďŹ eld, IL seeks a highly qualiďŹ ed, experienced and educated individual to assume the duties of Executive Director. This position will be responsible for the management of a countywide 200 member not-for-proďŹ t, broad-based business organization. Candidates must exhibit strong organizational, management, ďŹ nancial, interpersonal and written/verbal communications skills. Strong computer skills (QuickBooks, excel, word, email and social media) also required. This position is for 25- 30 hours per week. Please submit your cover letter, resume with three business references, educational and work history by May 24 to pikechamberdirector@gmail.com. Information will only be accepted via email.

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS The City of PittsďŹ eld is now accepting applications for summer help. Applicants must have a valid Illinois driver’s license. Pre-employment drug and alcohol testing is required for applicants accepted for employment. Employment forms are available at the City Clerk’s ofďŹ ce, 215 North Monroe Street, PittsďŹ eld, Illinois. Completed applications must be received in the City Clerk’s ofďŹ ce by 4:30 p.m. on Friday, May 31, 2019.

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Office Support Associate University of Illinois Extension Primary Position Function/Summary: This Office Support Associate supports the implementation of University of Illinois Extension programming in the counties of Adams, Brown, Hancock, Pike and Schuyler by performing clerical duties. The primary responsibilities of this position are to assist County Director with management of University of Illinois Foundation funds within Unit 14, to serve as the primary SNAP-Ed clerical staff role, to assist with 4-HDMS data management, and to assist staff with submitting reimbursement requests to campus. Additional clerical responsibilities include a wide variety of organizational tasks, computer skills, and supervision of clerical extra help staff. This position will be split between the Pittsfield and Rushville office (three and two days per week). This Office Support Associate position is a 100%-time, benefitseligible civil service position. The work schedule is to be determined (37.5 hours per week, 12 months per year). The minimum salary is $16.80 per hour. Application Procedures: To apply, submit a Civil Service application at jobs.illinois.edu and an exam request form for OFFICE SUPPORT ASSOCIATE – Pittsfield, IL Extension. Please include all relevant work/volunteer experience coordinating educational and/or community programs or activities. This information should be included in the Experience portion of the application. Documents such as college transcripts (unofficial are accepted), resumes, driver’s license (copy of both sides), professional licenses, and certifications should be uploaded to the application by the time you submit an exam request, as these documents may be required for your exam. This is a security-sensitive position. Comprehensive background checks, including but not limited to a criminal conviction information check, a CANTS check, and a review of the Registered Sex Offender list, will be conducted. The University of Illinois conducts criminal background checks on all job candidates upon acceptance of a contingent offer. Other pre-employment assessments may be required, depending on the classification of Civil Service employment. The University of Illinois is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action employer. Minorities, women, veterans and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. For more information, visit http://go.illinois.edu/EEO.

Pike County Housing Authority is looking for a motivated self-starter to hire as a Full Time Maintenance Technician. This position involves completion of assigned work orders, cleaning/repair of vacant units, completing preventative maintenance, cleaning common areas, and ensuring property grounds are well maintained and free of debris and litter. Seeking individuals who have knowledge and ability to safely use tools & equipment needed to perform the these duties. Further skills desired include experience in plumbing, carpentry, HVAC, exterior maintenance, painting, tiling, etc. Ability to communicate appropriately and effectively with a diverse population is a must. Valid license and reliable transportation to/ from work required. Shift is 40 hours per week, with night and weekend work required on occasion. Above job description is not a comprehensive listing of all job duties. Starting rate of pay is tied to experience with excellent benefits (health/life/dental/vision insurance, short term disability, retirement, vacation/sick/ personal time, and clothing allowance). You may pick up an application anytime during office hours at our office address below or can print one online at www. pikehousing.com/employment. Applications may be returned to our office by mail, fax, or in person. We retain all received applications for a period of one year. Thank you for considering the Pike County Housing Authority. Equal Opportunity Employer. Equal Housing Provider. Please send resume or return applications to: Pike County Housing Authority Attn: Chris Bruns, Executive Director 838 Mason Street, P.O. Box 123 Barry, IL 62312


OUR TOWN/NEWS

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Pike Press

More students using summer courses With college costs rising, more students from four-year universities want to decrease the amount of time and money it takes to earn a degree. That is why more students from fouryear universities are taking summer classes offered in three and eight week sessions at John Wood Community College. In the last four years, the number of students from other schools taking summer classes at JWCC has more than doubled. In 2015, 63 students from other colleges enrolled in summer courses compared to 155 in 2018. “Many students are starting to view

the summer just like the fall or spring semester,� Andy Happekotte, John Wood Community College director of advising and retention, said. “They see it as an opportunity to save money and complete courses in a shorter amount of time and in ways that make the most sense for their schedules.� Tuition for a summer classroombased course at JWCC costs approximately $489 for an in-district resident, compared to $1,125 at an Illinois fouryear public university or $2,594 at a private university. Students can earn three credits in just three weeks in the subject areas of

What’s Happening BARRY QThe First Baptist Church of Barry Sunday (9:15 a.m.) services. The topics for the month of May. May 19: Guest speaker Dr. Barry Morgan; May 26: Guest speaker Paul Mills. Q Activities at the Barry Public Library for May will be birth to three Thursday, May 16, with Deanna from West Central Child Care Connection in Quincy. DETRIOT Q Mississippi Valley Christian Service Camp will have Family Fun Day, Sunday, May 19 at the camp. Free lunch, bouncy house, petting zoo, volleyball tournament, free fishing and other games and activities from 1-6 p.m. A free southern gospel concert will be at 6 p.m. featuring Mark and Pam Fisher, who were the Illinois Country Music Association's Gospel Duo of the Year in 2007. GRIGGSVILLE QThe Griggsville Christian Church will be hosting movie day Saturday, May 25 from 2-4 p.m. "A Dog's Way Home" will be shown and the movie will be given away afterwards. Snacks and drinks will be provided. Everyone is welcome. PITTSFIELD Q The Pittsfield High School Class of 1957 will meet Friday, May 17 at 11 a.m. at Courtyard Cafe in Pittsfield. All classmates please come. Q Market on the Green on the courthouse lawn will open Saturday, May 25 and will be open every Saturday thorugh September, except Fall Festival weekend. Spring vegetables such as lettuce, spinach, onions, radishes and asparagus will be offered as well as jellies, jams, salsa and pickles. If you are interested in being a vendor call Cindy Lightle, 217-248-1240. Q A Memorial Day service will be held 10 a.m., Monday May 26, under the direction of the Pittsfield American Legion Post 152. Service will be at West Cemetery Memorial. Everyone is welcome to attend. Q St. Mary’s Annual Fish Fry will be Friday, May 17, at the Parish Hall, 219 North Jackson, Pittsfield, from 4:30-6:30 p.m. The buffet will include golden fried buffalo and catfish fillets, potato salad, baked beans, coleslaw, dessert, and drink. There is a cost. Drive-thru available and encouraged. You don’t need to get out of your car. Q The Pike County Art Guild will be held at the Pittsfield Community Center May 14 and 21 from 9-10 a.m. The instructor will be DeMar Sheppard. Q Spring Pick'ns Kiddie Kraft Korner hosted by the Pike County Art Guild May 18 from noon-4 p.m. and May 19 from noon-4 p.m. There is a cost. The following stations will be offered: box city, clay pinch pots, tie dye paper making, sidewalk

chalk murals, and photo montage booth. All proceeds will go toward future art in the park projects. We are also looking for instructors who would be willing to teach an art or craft related class once a month during the fall. For more details, call Kelly Johnson at 217-371-1922. Q His Little Feet International Children’s Choir is presenting a concert at Pittsfield Church of the Nazarene Sunday, May 19 at 7 p.m. The choir presentation will be in the sanctuary at 227 West Washington. The event is free and open to the public. Q The Princess Tea Party fundraiser for the Pike County Fair Queen Pageant will be held Saturday, May 18 from 2-4 p.m. at the PikeScott County Farm Bureau in Pittsfield. Donations are suggested and can be paid at the door. Inquiries can be directed to Jennifer Fray at 217-491-1419 or emailed to directorpikecountypageant@gmail.com. Q Pike County Senior Services ADRC (Connie) will be closed Monday’s for the next 3 months. Please do not call and leave a message as it might now go through.Meals will continue Mondays. Thank you for your cooperation during this time. Q The Pike County Health Department is offering a three-hour Food Handler Certification Course at the Two Rivers Farm Bureau Auditorium, 1301 E. Washington Street, in Pittsfield Thursday, June 6 from 5:30-8:30 p.m. The class is designed to introduce basic sanitation concepts and practices for food handlers and is required for food handlers working in restaurant facilities. Registration forms may be downloaded from the department's website or are also available at Pike County Health Department. For more information, contact Lynnette Johns at Pike County Health Department, 285-4407, extension 117. Q  The East Pike High School graduating classes of 1965-1972 are planning a reunion Saturday, Sept. 7, 2019. To add your address to the planning committee's mailing list, contact Elaine Guthrie at 518 N Orchard St, Pittsfield, 62363 or e-mail at jandeg@casscomm.com Q Pittsfield High School class of 1989 30 year class reunion, Saturday Aug. 17 at The Moose Lodge. Contact Kim Ator for more info at ator4@irtc.net Q St. Mary's Annual Fish Fry, Friday May 17 from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at St. Mary's Parish Hall 219 N. Jackson, Pittsfield. ONGOING Q Nazarene's Samaritans Closet 117 S. Memorial. New hours: Wednesday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., Friday 3 - 6 p.m. Every 3rd Saturday 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Q Area senior adults are invited to a Bible study

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speech and psychology by attending classes five days a week from 9 a.m. to noon. Three-week courses begin May 20. JWCC also offers dozens of other classes in eight week classroom, open learning and online formats that begin June 10. The most popular summer classes taken at JWCC are in math, speech, biology, English, music and psychology. Registration for JWCC summer classes is currently underway. More information is available at www.jwcc. edu/summer or by contacting the advising office at 217.641.4355.

in and around the Pike County Area

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AGRICULTURE 13178 Co. Hwy. 7 Nebo, IL 62355

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with David and Charlotte Hamilton on the first and third Thursdays of each month from 10-11 a.m. in the Shaw room at the Pittsfield Senior Center, 220 W. Adams St., Pittsfield. Bible-based studies focus on senior adult needs. A free printed study guide is available each session. Join David and Charlotte in celebrating their 12th year of bible study, singing favorite hymns and praying for each other. QThe Barry Public Library is in need of a continuous supply of empty ink cartridges of all kinds including toner canisters. The library is able to recycle them to Staples in exchange for their office supplies. They can pick up in Pittsfield. Please call 217-335-2149. Q Do you have an old cell phone you don’t use anymore? We will take all donated phones, even if they are damaged. They can be left at the Quanada in Pike County office at 941 W. Washington in Pittsfield. For further information, call 285-6119. Q The Pittsfield Women's Club meets at noon the 4th Tuesday of the month. The meeting includes lunch and a program. Membership is open to all women in Pike County. For more information, contact Ann Rine at 217-285-1616. Q Calvary Baptist Church of Pittsfield's Helping Hands is held every 3rd Saturday of the month from 9-11 a.m. Q Pike County Senior Citizens Center Widows Support Group meets in the Shaw room every 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month. There also is a monthly card party/luncheon scheduled for every 2nd Wednesday.The players play Pitch and Bridge and if you are interested please call the center at 217-2854969. Q Home and Community Education (HCE) board meets the first Monday of each month. Visitors and members of HCE are invited to attend the 10 a.m. meeting at the Farm Bureau building. Q The Springfield Vet Center is now offering Readjustment Counseling in Pittsfield. We are currently at the American Legion Post 152 every 2nd and 4th Friday of the month from 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Veterans and their families can schedule an appointment by calling 217-492-4955 during normal business hours and asking for John Mizer LSW. Q Bursting Bubbles foundation emotional support group on the first Wednesday of the month from 6-7 p.m. at the Pike County Housing Authority Community Building and at Illini Hospital on the second Thursday of the month from 6-7 p.m. For more information call 217-335-2961. Q12 Step Al-Anon Family Support Group for alcohol and narcotic addiction

every Monday at 8 p.m. at the First Christian Church in Pittsfield (Breezeway entrance). For more information, call Betty at 217285-6191. Q Set Free is a non-traditional recovery program for adults (ages 18+), based on doing life together. Join us for Set Free every Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Pittsfield Assembly of God. There is free childcare, from birth-6th grade. Learn more: Set Free Recovery Group on Facebook.com. Q The Pittsfield Masonic Lodge meets the second Monday of every month at the Masonic Lodge. OUT OF COUNTY Q Mt. Sterling YMCA is partnering with QMG to offer Fit To Fight Cancer program – for those fighting cancer or those who have beat cancer. Individuals will participate in exercise regimens catered to their individual needs from the Y's personal trainer. During the 16-week course, individuals will work to gain strength, increase flexibility and endurance and improve energy levels and selfesteem. April 30-Aug. 16. Registration starts March and ends April 23. The class is limited to 10 and there is no fee. Program is Tuesdays and Fridays from 11 a.m.12 p.m. Q Blessing Hospital Women’s event:Revitalize: An evening of Women’s Wellness – free but registration required. May 23, 5-7:30 at Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing and Health Sciences. The featured presentation is, “Be Your Best Self,� by Claudia Lasys, licensed clinical social work, Blessing Cancer Center. Additional activities for the evening include: mocktails and make-your-own taco dip with dietician Jen Kamps of the Blessing Wellness Center; mini-massages by Alyssa Kennedy, Cindy Spake and Lisa Anderson of the Blessing Hospital Massage Therapy program; paraffin hand waxing, courtesy of the Blessing Breast Center; accessible yoga sessions with Jamie Parrot, Blessing Wellness Center; active release technique demonstrations by Blessing Physician Services chiropractors Drs. Wes Creech and Erik Nothold. Q A work day is planned at Jensen Woods Camp May 25, 2019 between the hours of 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Everyone is welcome and lunch will be provided. Much work needs to be done by the start of camping season including: weed pulling, landscaping, trail clean-up, hanging tarps, painting, kitchen stocking, moving furniture, bunk house cleaning and more. Please bring gloves, sunscreen, bug spray and chain saws, weed whackers, pole saws, lawn mowers, power washer, paint brushes, rags and a willingness to pitch in. This will be a great opportunity to give back to your community, as well as check out the camp. Located outside of Timewell, IL.

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Pike Press

PCS Third-Graders compete in ag jeopardy The Pike-Scott Ag in the Classroom program visited Pikeland Community School to review with students all they have learned during their monthly AITC lessons throughout the school year. During the lesson, students were invited to bring refreshments to share with their classmates. The students worked together to compete as teams in an ag jeopardy game and at the end of the game the team with the most points won a prize. At the end of this lesson, all participating third-grade classrooms were invited to visit a very special guest outside of PCS, Snow White, the miniature horse owned by Judy Douglas. Students got to brush, pet, and love on Snow White as a special surprise for the end of the Pike-Scott AITC’s 20182019 program. To mark the end of the Pike-Scott AITC program’s 2018-2019 school year at PCS, each teacher who fully participated in the program was given a set of books and educator guides. These books included “John Deere That’s Who!� by Tracey Nelson Maurer, “The Beeman� by Laurie Krebs and Valeria Cis, “First Peas to the Table� by Susan Grigsby, and “Right This Very Minute� by Lisl H. Detlefsen; each of these books, have been awarded the Book-of-the-Year Award by the American Farm Bureau Foundation in past

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Beth Zumwalt/Pike Press

RECEIVE QUILT OF VALOR Robert Norris, left and Howard Staffy, both with Griggsville connections, were awarded Quilts of Valor Saturday morning in a ceremony at the AllWars Museum in Pittsfield. Norris was in the Army from 1955-57 and Staffy served in the Air Force from 1951-55. Two more quilts will be awarded this Saturday. Submitted photo

GRIGGSVILLE MAN RECEIVES AWARD FROM JESSE WHITE

Submitted photo

Abby Smith led the miniature horse, Snow White, along the grass by the school. The miniature horse is owned by Judy Douglas.

years. It is the hope of the PSAITC program that in the coming years, each participating teacher will be given the most recent Book-of-theYear text and corresponding educator guide at the end of the school year. The Agriculture in the Classroom program is funded by the IAA Foundation

Illinois Secretary of State Jesse White honors Griggsville native Brian Toepke with the Employee of the Month award for March. Toepke works in the Secretary of State Department of Vehicle Services in the section of Automobile Dealer Licensing.

and the Two Rivers Farm Bureau Foundation, the charitable arm of the Pike-Scott Farm Bureau. To learn more about the Pike-Scott Agriculture in the Classroom program, please contact Rachel Smith, PikeScott Farm Bureau Agriculture Literacy Coordinator, at 217-285-2233 or alc@ tworiversfb.org.

Submitted photo

OTTWELL RECEIVES IRVIN DEAN FRANKLIN SCHOLARSHIP

Bailey Ottwell, daughter of Rob and Angie Ottwell of Milton, is the 2019 recipient of the Irvin Dean Franklin scholarship. Bailey will be a 2019 graduate of Pittsfield High School and plans to attend Quincy University to study nursing. She has been on the high honor roll all four years of high school and has been an officer all four years in FFA. Bailey currently works as a CNA for Liberty Village in Pittsfield.

GARDNER CAMP

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WINNERS

The winners of a recent Ultimate Outdoor Challenge at Gardner Camp near Hull were Out of Towners. The boys were from Hannibal but they decided to donate their winning prize to Liberty High School Bass Fishing Team. The boys names are (l-r): Mark Houser, Noelan Meyer, Evan Flaspohler.

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NEWS

Wednesday, May 15, 2019

FFA scholarships awarded to three

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FFA alumni scholarships were awarded at the Pittsfield FFA Banquet. FFA President Dusty Morrow presented Alayna Scranton with her $1,000 scholarship. This scholarship is one of three presented to the Pittsfield High School students.

Submitted photo

FFA President Dusty Morrow presented Jonathon Thomas with his $1,000 scholarship.

Pike Press

Columbia College releases dean’s list Kristen Sibley from Pittsfield was recently named to the Columbia College dean’s list for the Spring Semester that runs January through April 2019. To be named to the dean’s list, a student must have completed 12 semester hours in a 16-week period and achieved a minimum GPA of 3.5 on a 4.0-point scale. Founded in 1851 in Columbia, Missouri, Columbia College has been helping students advance their lives through higher education for more than 165 years. As a private, nonprofit institution, the college takes pride in its small classes, experienced faculty and quality educational programs. With more than 30 locations across the country, students may enroll in day, evening or online classes. The college is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission. Columbia College educates more than 20,000 students each year and has more than 89,000 alumni worldwide. For more information, visit www.ccis.edu.

JWCC to offer CNA courses this summer Submitted photo

FFA President Dusty Morrow presented Cody Collins with his $1,000 scholarship.

Submitted photo

TRANSCONTINENTAL

RUNNER MAKES WAY THROUGH PIKE

Students interested in getting a head start on becoming a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) will have that opportunity this summer. John Wood Community College will offer classroom CNA courses during the summer semester at its Quincy Campus, located at 1301 S. 48th Street, and the Southeast Education Center, located at 39637 260th Avenue, one mile north of Pittsfield on Route 54. Classes will also be offered at the North Adams Home, located at 2259 East 1100th Street, Mendon. The eight week-program will run from June 10-Aug. 2, Mondays through Thursdays, 8 a.m.-noon, at all three locations. Clinical will also be offered as part of the program at various locations. For more information about the Certified Nursing Assistant program visit www.jwcc.edu/academics/degrees/nursingcna/ For registration information, call JWCC in Quincy at 217.641.4355 or the Southeast Education Center at 217.285.5319.

Robbie Balenger recently ran through Pike County on his transcontinental run from Los Angles to New York City, through Flagstaff, Ariz. Balenger created this campaign to educate and inspire athletes of all levels what’s possible for their performance on a plant-based diet. He was in Pittsfield on his 48th day of running an average of 45 miles per day. He stopped along the way to discuss goal-setting, nutrition and his attempt to run across the country without consuming any animal products.

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Family Fun Day (open house) Children under 14 Must be accompanied by adult 19 May starting at 1:00 PM free will offering Gospel Concert with Mark and Pam Fisher at 6:00 PM High School Camp 9th grade through ‘19 Grad June 2-7 $130 Jr. High Camp 7th and 8th grades 9 -14 June $130 Jr. Week 5th and 6th grades 16-20 June $115 Outdoor Life Camp 13 Y/O - 2019 Grad 21-23 June 3:00 $115 Christian Climbers Camp 3rd and 4th grades 23-25 June $55 First Chance Camp 1st and 2nd grades 26-27 June $40 Day Camp K – 2nd grades 28 June 9:00 AM 3:00 PM $25 Mission Trip (Off-site) 13 Y/O to Adult 29 June-04 July $350 Contact Jim at the camp for form and more info Young Adult Retreat 18-25 Yr. Olds 4-6 Aug. $75 Wilderness Camp (Offsite) 13/Y/O and Up 5 -9 Aug. 8:00 $250 Milton Bible Club 6th-12th 13 Aug. $25 Bob and Karla DeVries Family Camp Everyone 6-8 Sept. $20 per person MVCSC Minister’s Wives’ Retreat Minister’s Wives 13-14 Sept. 5:00 PM $25 Pick up a registration form at church or download registration forms and get more info at www.mvcsc.net


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School resource officer position discussed

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Law enforcement officers attending the May 8 meeting of the Pike County Rotary Club were, left to right, Jennifer Thompson, Pittsfield Deputy Chief of Police; Mike Starman, Pittsfield Chief of Police, and Kenny Yelliott and Paul Petty, Pikeland school resource officers.

Gary Woods introduced the May 8 Rotary program with Kenny Yelliott and Paul Petty. Yelliott and Petty are both School Resource Officers at the Pikeland School District. Yelliott stated that he began his law enforcement career in 1979 at the Sheriff’s Department and that he later worked for the Illinois State Police for 30 years. Yelliott later accepted the position of Chief of Police for the City of Pittsfield where he recently retired. The school resource officer program is a part-time program at Pikeland. Petty primarily is stationed at the high school and Yelliott is primarily stationed at PCS and South Schools. Yelliott and Petty both completed a required 40-hour training for the positions. Paul Petty introduced Mike Starman, Chief of Police, and Jennifer Thompson, Deputy Chief of Police, both in the Pittsfield department.

Petty reviewed the history of the school resource officer program which started in 1963 in Arizona. The program became National in 1991. Petty further shared the program’s mission, basic goals, duties, role, primary goals and secondary goals. Petty discussed the triad—law enforcement, mentor and teacher—and how the resource officer fulfills those roles. These officers are not disciplinarians but law enforcement. Petty believes that the position can be a full-time position. Yelliott shared that there is significant value of the interaction of students and law enforcement. Yelliott further stated that he has complete confidence in local law enforcement to address any school events that warrant their intervention. Petty stated that Pikeland is completing $1 million of improvements this summer to all district school buildings, primarily improving security.

Submitted photo Submitted photo

Allison Brown chose Kim Gerard to receive her Pay-It-Forward award. Gerard is a faculty member of the school’s science department. Brown was awarded a $5,000 Vocational-Technical Scholarship from the PHS Class of 1954 Scholarship Fund.

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Bailey Ottwell chose Jodi Heavner, PHS ag teacher, as her designee of Pay-ItForward. Ottwell was awarded a 4-year, $5,000 per year scholarship from the PHS Class of 1954 Scholarship Fund.

Faith Reveal chose Susan Aeber has her designee of the Pay-It-Forward program. Aeber is the school’s foreign language teacher. Reveal was awarded a $1,000 community college scholarship from the PHS Class of 1954 Scholarship Fund.

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Class of 1954 encourages scholarship winners to pay it forward The second annual pay-itforward awards were given out Thursday morning at Pittsfield High School. The PHS honors banquet was held the evening prior and five students received scholarships from the Class of 1954. As

Heaven Utterback chose Laura Shade, business teacher and yearbook sponsor, to receive her PayIt-Forward award. Utterback was awarded a $5,000 community college scholarship from the PHS Class of 1954 Scholarship Fund.

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a requirement of that scholarship, each recipient was to choose a teacher or a department that had made an impact on them during the school years. Each faculty member received $250 to use in the classroom.

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Iva Welbourne chose her art teacher, Mallory Davidsmeyer, as her designee of the Pay-It-Forward. Welbourne was selected to receive a 4-year, $5,000 per year college scholarship from the Pittsfield High School Class of 1954 Scholarship Fund.

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PARSONS Submitted photo

The 4 X100 Lady Saukee relay team broke a school record and became the only girls 4X100 to run the 4 X100 in less than 50 seconds. Team members, front, left to right, Katie Cox, Sydney Bauer. Back row, Lauren Woodward, Allison Wessell. The girls head to state this weekend.

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TO CHEER AT

LINCOLN LAND

Riley Parsons signed a letter of intent to cheer for the Laker’s of Lincoln Land last week at Pittsfield High School. Parsons has been a four-year member of the Saukee cheer team. In front, left to right, little brother, Zane Parson, father, Rodney Parsons, Parsons, mother, Leslie Parsons, holding little brother Zeke Parsons. Standing Lincoln Land Cheer Caoch, Dessie Boeter and Saukee cheer coach Brandi Deeder.

Moving up a class no problem for Lady Saukess

By BETH ZUMWALT Pike Press When the track classes came out earlier this year, the Lady Saukee track team was a bit overwhelmed. “We got bumped up to 2A due to our combined coop schools having 5 more kids,� Adam Singler, coach of the team, said. “The girls rose to occasion.Last year we got third place at our 1A sectional, this year, we took third place again but in a 2A sectional. Going to state this weekend are:Chandler Hayden, Olivia Campbell, Katie Cox, the 4 X100 team of Lauren Woodward, Sydney Bauer, Katie Cox and Allison Wessel, the 4 X 200 team of Woodward, Bauer, Cox and Chloe Lemons; the 4 X 400 team of Katie Cox, Chloe Lemons, Sydney Bauer and Lauren Woodward. The field events contributed to the third place finishes. “Our throwers, Chandler Hayden and Olivia Campbell, have been consistently in the top three of every meet this year and continued that with a 1-3 finish in discus and 2-3 finish in shot,� Singler said. “Chandler qualified for state in both with throws of 41’ 7.5� in shot and 132’7� in discus. Olivia threw 110’3� in discus and missed qualifying by 2 feet, but came back and hit a 38’1.5� state qualifying shot put throw.� The relay teams had the eye of most watchers. The girls had ran strong all season. “Our 4x100 group of Lauren Woodward,

Sydney Bauer, Katie Cox and Allison Wessel raced two of the top teams in 2A and took 3rd, but hit state qualifying time with a 49.89 and became the only girls 4x100 in school history to break 50 secs,� Singler said. The 4 X200 relay team was the same except Chloe Lemons ran Allison Wessel’s spot. Those girls, too, set a school record, took second and qualified for state. Their time was 1:48.07 which was faster than last year’s time of 1.49.36. The final top three finish was the 4 X400. Team members were:Katie Cox, Lauren Woodward, Sydney Bauer, Chloe Lemons. “ A race against two talented schools. The race went back and fourth with us in the lead for the majority of the race. We took third with hard efforts from Clinton’s and Southeast’s anchor legs and ran a 4:14. We had some outstanding efforts from Katie(1:00 split) and Sydney (58.x split) in that race which capped off a big day for the two Lady Saukees,� Singler said. Katie Cox topped three school records on the day with a victory in the 300H in a time of 46.01.This was a very competitive race that saw five girls qualify for state and produced some of the top times in 2A. Cox has the fourth best 300H time in 2A going into state prelims, which start Thursday. Other top ten finishes for the Lady Saukees were: Jayden Stendback, 9th in long jump, Allison Wessel,8th in 100m, Jayden Stendack,10th in 200m, Finley Petty, 4th in 1600m.

MARBLE

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HEADING TO

ST. AMBROSE

Maggie Marable, front/center, signs a letter of intent to play volleyball at St. Ambrose College in Davenport, Iowa next year. The Saukee senior is flanked by her parents, David and Kate Marable. Standing is Shelley Burns Hawk, a former Lady Saukee and now coach at St. Ambrose, Jill Cook, the PHS varsity coach and Jennifer Wood Holliday, the coach of the Springfield club where Marable has played.

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Kaylee Spencer backs up Kailtyn Leenert as Leenert tries to turn the double play. Claire Tate watches closely from the outfield. The game was against Brussels, and Griggsville-Perry lost in a high scoring affair, 16-13. Regional action is this week.

Saukeee skills camp, May 20-22 Sauce basketball camp will be held May 20, 21 and 22 at Pikeland Community School. The camp is open to boys who are currently in the first thought eighth grades. Cost is $30 per camper with $10 off for additional children from the same family. Campers should come prepared with tennis shoes, athletic shorts and a T-shirt. First through eighth grade will attend from 3:45 to 5:30 p.m. Sixth through

eighth grades will attend from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Applications are available at the school and must be returned by May 15. Checks should be made payable to Saukee Basketball. The camp will include individual skill instruction 3 on 3 game play and grades sixth through eighth will work on offensive sets.

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2019 GRIGGSVILLE-PERRY HIGH SCHOOL

SENIORS

JONATHON BEDENBENDER

JASON CRANE

CAITLYN DOWNEY

EVA HURST

SAVANNAH IRVING

COLTON IVEY

ASHLEE JONES

WILLIAM LOTHRIDGE

MICHAEL MCALLISTER

MATTHEW MYERS

MARY NASH

CALEB SNYDER

BRAYDEN SONNEBORN

LANE SPENCER

COURTNEY SYRCLE

MADDISON VINYARD

LAKLYN WESTFALL

TREVOR TRIPP

Jonathon Scott Bedenbender, son of Corey and Angela Bendenberger, plans to attend JWCC and transfer after two years to another university to obtain a bachelor of arts or science. Jason Crane, son of Christopher and Mary Crane, plans to join the Air National Guard. Caitlyn Downey, no information was provided. Eva Hurst, daughter of Steve and Heather Hurst, plans to attend JWCC.

Savannah Irving, daughter of Stephen and April Irving, plans to attend MacMurray College in Jacksonville for four years, majoring in American sign language. Colton Ivey, son of the late Michael and Gay Lynn Ivey, plans to attend JWCC majoring in elementary education. Ashlee Jones, daughter of Erica Etherton, plans to attend John Wood to study early childhood education.

William Austin Hawk Lothridge, son of William Lotheridge and Amanda Irvin, plans to attend John Wood’s CDL program. Michael McAllister, son of Brandy McAllister, plans to work and is considering joining the National Guard. Matthew Myers, son of Steven and Lori Myers, plans to attend the University of Illinois majoring in agribusiness, markets and management. Mary Nash, daughter of Angie

Nash and Jamie Nash, plans to attend John Wood. Caleb Snyder, son of Steve and Jennifer Snyder, plans to attend John Wood. Brayden Sonneborn, son of Tanya and step-father Doug Kirk and John Sonneborn, plans to join the Air Force. Lane Spencer, son of Shane and Lisa Spencer, plans to attend John Wood majoring in ag business and then transfer to a fouryear university.

Courtney Syrcle, daughter of Terry and Diana Syrcle, plans to attend John Wood and then transfer to a four year university. Maddison Vinyard, daughter of Todd and Tia Lisa Vinyard, plans to attend Monmouth College to study neuroscience on a pre-med track. Laklyn Westfall, daughter of Amanda Westfall and Jimmy Beard, plans attend JWCC. Trevor Tripp, no information was provied.

Congratulations to our area graduates. Keep the spirit alive!

GRIGGSVILLE ESTATES Óä£Ê-°Ê">ÂŽ]ĂŠĂ€Âˆ}}ĂƒĂ›ÂˆÂ?Â?iĂŠUÊӣLJnĂŽĂŽÂ‡Ă“ĂŽĂˆÂ™

CONGRATULATIONS AND BEST WISHES TO ALL THE 2019 GRADUATES!

All of life’s very best from your friends at

Graduates of 201! ?PMMT[=VTQUQ\ML

?9]QVKa;\/ZQOO[^QTTM8P"  

FARMERS NATIONAL BANK OF GRIGGSVILLE 'RIGGSVILLEs   .EW#ANTONs   -ASCHOFFSs  

CITY OF GRIGGSVILLE

CONGRATULATIONS CLASS OF 2019

217-833-2412 108 S. COREY ST.s'2)''36),,%,),

Griggsville 1än W. Quincy 217.833.2329

Mt. Sterling 220 PittsďŹ eld Rd. 217.773.9123

PittsďŹ eld 201 W. Washington 217.285.1943


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2019 PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL

SENIORS NO PICTURE SUBMITTED

NO PICTURE SUBMITTED

ISAAC AMANN

TAYLOR ANSTEDT

SYDNEY BAUER

KORY BOOHER

NOAH BOOTH

NOAH BOWEN

TIM BREHM

ALLISON BROWN

ASHLEY BROWN

CODY COLLINS

CHARLES COOLEY III

ADELYN COX

THOMAS COX

JENNA CRAWFORD

ANNA CURLESS

BELLA DORRITY

CONNOR EDWARDS

GABI FISH

NO PICTURE SUBMITTED

NO PICTURE SUBMITTED

AUTUMN GRUMMEL

BRADY GWARTNEY

LINDSEY HAM

ELLIOT FOX

SHANTAH GRATTON

MICHAEL GRISHAM

Isaac Amann, son of Mark and Rebecca Amann, plans to attend John Wood Community College and then transfer to Southern Illinois University Carbondale to study computer science. Taylor Anstedt, daughter of Heather Anstedt, plans to major in secondary education and teach history. Sydney Bauer, daughter of Ronnie and Teresa Bauer, plans to attend John Wood Community College and transfer to Texas A&M to double major in ag finance and accounting. Kory Booher, son of Chris and Suzanne Ontis, plans to attend John Wood Community College. Noah Booth, son of Randall and Jada Booth, plans to attend college and study law enforcement. Noah Bowen, son of Steve Bowen and Laura Gregson, has not decided plans after high school. Tim Brehm, son of Tim and Regina Brehm, plans to attend John Wood Community College and major in computer science. Allison Brown, daughter of Dave Brown and Kristin Brown, plans to attend Lakeland College to become a physical therapist assistant. Ashley Brown, daughter of Tim and Stacey Brown, will be attending John Wood Community College for welding. Cody Collins, son of Ricky and Christina Collins, plans to major in music education at Quincy University. Charles Allen Cooley III, son of Charles Cooley and Gretchen Santilli, plans to go to FSW. Adelyn Cox, daughter of

Kent and Wendy Cox, plans to attend Illinois State University to major in psychology. Thomas Cox, son of Steve Cox and Lesa Holder, has not decided on plans after high school. Jenna Crawford, daughter of Joe and Mandie Crawford, plans to attend John Wood Community College and major in nursing. Anna Curless, daughter of Brian and Sandy Curless, plans to attend Truman State University. Bella Dorrity, daughter of Scott Dorrity and Brandon and Tonya Douglas, plans to attend the University of Iowa. Connor Edwards, son of Jim and Kris Jacques, plans to attend college after high school. Gabi Fish, daughter of Eric and Nikki Fish, plans to attend Illinois College to

study criminal justice. Elliot Fox, son of Jamie and Erica Fox, plans to attend Iowa State University and major in aerospace engineering. Shantah Gratton, daughter of Patrick and Brandy Gratton, plans to attend John Wood Community College to study business. Michael Grisham, son of Martin Grisham and Lillie Schwalb, plans to work at DOT Foods or join the Air Force. Autumn Grummel, no information provided. Brady Gwartney, son of James and Jessica Gwartney, plans to attend East Carolina University and major in business. Lindsey Ham, daughter of William and Sara Reel, plans to attend John Wood Community College to learn early child development.

CASSCOMM Cable Internet Phone Congratulations To the Class of 201™

www.casscomm.com

800-252-1799

Our readers today are your customers tomorrow

ADVERTISE WITH PIKE PRESS 217-285-2345


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2019 PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL

SENIORS

CAYDEN HARTER

CHANDLER HAYDEN

JACK HEAFNER

WILL HEAVNER

SETH HILL

OLIVIA HOBBS

NATE HOOVER

COLIN JAMES

MCKINLEY JENNINGS

MADYSON LASH

FREEDOM LONG

MAGGIE MARABLE

NIC MCCONNELL

COLLIN MELESKI

PATRICK MUNSON

RICKY MUSGROVE

BAILEY OTTWELL

JACK PALMER

RILEY PARSONS

HAILEY PAYNE

LILLY PEPPER

MORGAN PUTERBAUGH

LEE RANSOM

SKYLER REEL

NO PICTURE SUBMITTED

BRADY RENOUD

FAITH REVEAL

ALAYNA SCRANTON

JOHN SCRANTON

ISAAC SHAW

AARON SMITH

Cayden Harter, son of Doug and Kim Harter, plans to work on the family farm. Chandler Hayden, daughter of Jeff and Heather Hayden, plans to attend the University of Tennessee to continue track and field career. Jack Heafner, son of John and Kristi Heafner, plans to go into National Guard basic training and attend Western Illinois University. Will Heavner, son of Dan and Jody Heavner, plans to attend Lincoln Land Community College. Seth Hill, son of Jerry and Jennifer Anderson and Kenny Hill, plans to join the work force after high school. Olivia Hobbs, daughter of Kirby and Michelle Hobbs, plans to attend Belmont University and wants to pursue a bachelor’s in audio engineering technology. Nate Hoover, son of Rich and Dee Hoover, plans to attend John Wood Community College and major in technical systems management. Colin James, son of Russ Monroe and Paula JamesMonroe, plans to attend John Wood Community College and get an associates in communication. McKinley Jennings, daughter of Joseph and Tamara Jennings, plans to attend John Wood Community College and then transfer to Illinois State University to receive a masters in accounting. Madyson Lash, daughter of Dustin and Jessica Lash, plans to go to basic training and become an intelligence specialist for the US Navy. Freedom Long, daughter

of Jason and Rhonda Long, plans to attend Western Illinois University to major in music education and performance. Maggie Marable, daughter of David and Kate Marable, plans to attend Saint Ambrose University and major in accounting and play volleyball. Nic McConnell, son of Brian McConnell and Tessa Galloway and John McCallister, plans to attend Spoon River College for diesel mechanics. Collin Meleski, son of Mark Meleski and Lani Rae Meleski, plans to attend Mizzou. Patrick Munson, son of Dennette Munson, plans to do an apprenticeship or attend John Wood Community College for welding. Ricky Musgrove, son of Rick and Krystal Musgrove, plans to attend Saint Louis

Christian College and then transfer to Grand Canyon University for computer science. Bailey Ottwell, daughter of Robert and Angela Ottwell, plans to attend John Wood Community College and major in nursing. Jack Palmer, son of Scott and Jennifer Palmer, plans to attend John Wood Community College and then transfer to Western Illinois University to earn a degree in law enforcement. Riley Parsons, daughter of Rodney Parsons and Lesley Parsons, plans to attend Lake Land College to study agriculture business and supply. Hailey Payne, daughter of Doug Payne, Amanda Smith, and Morgan Hart, plans to attend John Wood Community College. Lilly Pepper, daughter of Karson Pepper and Becky Pepper, plans to attend Illi-

nois College to play basketball and major in physical education. Morgan Puterbaugh, daughter of Ryan and Marcella Puterbaugh, plans to attend Western or Alabama University and become a traveling veterinarian. Lee Ransom, son of Bobby and Brooke England, plans to attend John Wood Community College and then transfer to SIU Carbondale to major in computer science. Skyler Reel, son of Bob and Gena Reel, plans to go into the work force at DOT Foods. Brady Renoud, son of Curt and Debbie Renoud, plans to attend college and farm. Faith Reveal, daughter of Ronald Reveal and Kathy Reveal, plans to attend John Wood Community College

and major in nursing. Alayna Scranton, daughter of Eric and Lisa Scranton, plans to attend the University of Illinois to major in finance and agribusiness. John Scranton, son of Tom and Kathy Scranton, plans to complete contract with National Guard and attend Western Illinois University; will later be re-enlist-

ing in Army. Isaac Shaw, son of Steve and Tereasa Shaw, plans to attend John Wood Community College then transfer to University of Illinois to major in agribusiness. Aaron Smith, son of Gale Smith, plans to attend a trade school or do an apprenticeship for welding.

2019 Congratulations to all our area graduates! You’ve made us all proud! We wish you the best for the future.

Pike County Lumber 217-285-6115

Congratulations to the 2019 graduates

Congratulations to all area grads! MidState Insurance Glen Cooley

Julie Kremer

Seth Roig

60RQURH3LWWVĂ€HOG 217-285-1300 106 W. Quincy, Griggsville 217-833-3888


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2019 PITTSFIELD HIGH SCHOOL

SENIORS NO PICTURE SUBMITTED

KAMERON SMITHERS

ROBERT SMOTHERS

SAMANDA SOUTH

KEENAN TAYLOR-CLARK

JONATHAN THOMAS

BRYSON THOMETZ

CASSIE TRAN

ROMINA TRUJILLO

HEAVEN UTTERBACK

PEYTON WADE

KYLE WATKINS

WYATT WATKINS

IVA WELBOURNE Kameron Smithers, daughter of Jason Smithers and Noelle Flesner, plans to attend the University of Alabama and transfer to law school in Chicago. Robert Smothers, son of Robert Smothers and Brandi McGuire, plans to attend John Wood Community College to get certified in welding. Samanda South, daughter of Jacob and Amanda South, plans to attend John Wood Community College to become a CNA and then eventually work up to being a nurse. Keenan Taylor-Clark, no information provided. Jonathan Thomas, son of Jeremy Thomas and Tatjana Thomas, plans to attend John

Our readers today are your customers tomorrow

ADVERTISE WITH PIKE PRESS 217-285-2345

GRETCHEN WESSEL Wood Community College and then transfer to the University of Illinois-Champaign. Bryson Thometz, son of David and Wendy Thometz, plans to go into dentistry. Cassie Tran, daughter of Randy Cloninger, plans to attend John Wood Community College. Romina Trujillo, hostdaughter of Kent and Wendy Cox and Rodney and Jessica Guthrie, plans to go back to her home country and study journalism. Heaven U tterback, daughter of Mark and Cindi Utterback, plans to attend John Wood Community College to major in nursing.

DANIEL ZENNER III Peyton Wade, daughter of Brian and Holly Wade, plans to attend the University of Spa and Cosmetology Arts in Springfield. Kyle Watkins, son of Steve and Polly Watkins, plans to join the United States Air Force. Wyatt Watkins, son of Steve and Polly Watkins, plans to attend Lindenwood University to major musical theater and minor in graphic/fine arts. Iva Welbourne, daughter of

Pat and Dorothy Welbourne, plans to attend Truman State University. Gretchen Wessel, daughter of Joe and Jennifer Wessel, plans to attend Illinois College to study chemistry and criminal justice. Daniel Joseph Zenner III, son of Daniel Zenner and Kathy Osment, plans to attend basic training for the air National Guard and attend tech school to study aerospace.

Donald K. Kirk, CLU, ChFC Wealth Management Advisor

don.kirk@nm.com 88BTIJOHUPO4Ur1JUUTĂŞFME *1I

CONGRATULATIONS! The diploma you’ve worked so hard for is in your hands, and so is your future. Keep up the great work, graduates. We’re proud of you!

2017 2014

Congratulations Class of 2019!

RODNEY E. PRENTICE Agent 311 1/2 Washington 3LWWVĂ€HOG,/ %XV

GreenďŹ eld Roodhouse PittsďŹ eld Winchester 402 Main St. 368-2171

215 S. Morse St. 589-4331

1 Professional Plaza 285-2176

21 E. Market St. 742-3121


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2019 WESTERN HIGH SCHOOL

SENIORS

KARLI ANTHONY

CALEB ARCHAMBO

ROBERT BOWER

JASON BRYANT

TANNER CAMPBELL

EASTON CARLEN

HUNTER COLE

CLAYTON COLTON

ANDREW CONLEY

ALEXIS MARIE DIAZ

JAMES R. DUNKER

HOPE ERKE

HUNTER GATES

JANESSA GRAMMAR

SAVANNAH J. HALL

AFTYN HARRISON

DAWSON KOELLER

KALI KURTZ

COLTON MAIN

DUSTIN MASON

REID MCTUCKER

CHLOE MELLON

TAYLOR NELSON

JEFFREY PETERS

TORI PREDMORE

CAINAN ROFF

TRISTAN RUEB

AUSTIN SIMMERMAN

HAYLEY SMITH

STEVEN SMITH

PAIGE SNYDER

DALTON R. STICE

JORDAN WALSTON

DAKOTA WELLS

LAUREN WOODWARD

Karli Cheyenne Anthony, daughter of David and Eva Anthony, plans to attend John Wood Community College and become an CNA. Caleb Archambo, son of John and Ellen Archambo, has enlisted in the United States Air Force and leaves this summer for basic training. Robert Bower, son of Bryan and Jamie Bower, plans to attend Mizzou for a five-year accountancy program. Jason Bryant, son of Jason and Christon, plans to attend John Wood before transferring to a four-year university for broadcasting. Tanner Campbell, son of Orin and Penny Campbell, plans to attend John Wood and then transfer to a fouryear university. Easton Marie Carlen, daughter of Darin and Shelly Carlen, is currently a CNA and plans to further her nursing degree at John Wood Hunter Cole, son of Brian and Angie Cole, plans to pursue a career in welding. Clayton Lane Colton, son of Bill and Dawn Colton, has joined the Army as a field medic. Andrew Conley, son of Pat and Chris Conley, plans to attend John Wood and then transfer to a four-year university. Alexis Marie Diaz, daughter of Maria Tisinger and Pete Diaz, plans to attend John Wood and then become an RN. James R. Dunker, son of Kory and Dorinda Dunker, plans to attend the University of Kansas to major in journalism and minor in broad-

casting. Hope Erke, daughter of April Erke and Stephen Schmidt, plans to attend John Wood then transfer to Illinois Central College for dental hygiene program. Hunter Gates, son of Eric and Sarah Gates, plans to attend St. Louis Community College, then transfer to a four year university to obtain a degree in exercise science. Janessa Grammar, daughter of Robert and Amy Grammar, plans to attend Illinois College to double major in graphic design and art eduction with minor in business administration. Savannah J. Hall, daughter of Heath and Jamie Hall, plans to attend Texas Tech University to major in architecture. Aftyn Ranee Harrison, daughter of Sara Merryman and Josh Harrison, plans to attend John Wood, transfer to Quincy University and obtain a bachelor’s degree in elementary education. Dawson Koeller, son of Bryan and Kim Koeller, plans to attend John Wood and pursue a degree in agriculture and also to advance education in welding in order to work on the pipeline for a few years before returning to the family farm. Kali Kurtz, daughter of Becky Bowen and Cory Kurtz, plans to attend SIUE to major in social work. Colton Main, son of Eric Main and the late Melissa Waring, plans to join the Army. Dustin Mason, son of Mark and Amy McDonald, plans to go into the United States Marine Corps.

Reid McTucker, son of Richard and Barb McTucker, plans to attend JWCC to finish welding certification and then to pursue a career in welding. Chloe Danielle Mellon, daughter of Kenny and Mandy Mellon, plans to attend Southern Illinois University to major in dental hygiene and minor in healthcare management. Taylor Nicole Nelson, daughter of Jayson and Jennifer Erke, plans to work as a CNA. Jeffrey Peters, son of Ray Peters and Pam Peters, plans to attend John Wood for two years and transfer to WIU for computer science. Tori Predmore, son of Tom and Lori Predmore, plans to attend Quincy University to get a bachelor’s degree in nursing then transfer to Blessing-Rieman College of Nursing. Cainan Gabriel Roff, son of Deb Austin and Clifton Rueb, plans to further education in music, start a band, and begin writing his own music in the future. Will also study to become an electrician in order to supplement musical career.

Tristan Rueb, son of Tara Hausman and Clinton and Jessica Rueb, plans to attend John Wood. Austin Simmerman, son of Anna Zimmerman and Jason Simmerman, plans to attend Quincy University to obtain a bachelor’s degree in mathematics secondary education. Hayley Smith, daughter of Jessica Phillips and Jeromy Smith, plans to attend Lindenwood University, major undecided. Steven Tucker Smith, son of David and Penny Smith, plans attend Southern Illinois University and obtain a degree in computer engineering. Paige Snyder, daughter of Robert and Tracie Snyder, plans to attend John Wood Community College then transfer to four year university to major in education. Dalton R. Stice, son of Donald Stice and Angela Stice, plans to finish obtaining his welding certificate and join a union and/or work over the road for a couple of years. Jordan Walston, daughter of Jeremy and Becky Walston, plans to attend

Missouri Valley College to get a bachelor’s degree in exercise science then transfer to obtain a doctorate of physical therapy. Dakota Wells, daughter of Tanja Spann and Danny Wells, plans to attend John Wood and then enter the work force.

Lauren Woodward, daughter of Randy and Guyla Woodward, plans to attend Quincy University for three years to major in pre-law and minor in English, then attend St. Louis University School of Law to earn J.D. in criminal law.

CLASS OF 20189

DIGNITY‡5(63(&T‡&$5( 217-335-2326


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Pike Press

NEWS/REAL ESTATE

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Landscaping: It’s for the Birds! Creating a landscape that welcomes birds by providing critical pieces of habitat will not only benefit birds, but other wildlife as well. And it is a great way to introduce young people to nature and have something the whole family can share. According to Cornell, with nearly 80 percent of wildlife habitat owned privately and 2.1 million acres converted each year to residential use – it is critical we create bird-friendly landscapes. When designing a bird-friendly space, it is always best to start with a plan. As you begin to put pencil to paper one of your goals is to have a diverse landscape. The typical foundation planting, often comprised of yews and daylilies, fails at providing the three things birds need: water, shelter and food. Utilize native or well-adapted plants and design for yearround attractors. You need to visualize your landscape in layers! Birds don’t simply live in the tree tops. In fact, most species of birds require a variety of layers during their lifecycle from the low to medium to high. You can categorize these layers as groundcovers, herbaceous plants, understory shrubs and trees, and overstory trees. Layering provides cover for birds and protects from predation both from the ground and from above. Leaving dead limbs and tree snags and brush piles are all great sources of food and shelter for certain birds. What a great excuse for the messy gardener! Don’t tidy up the planting beds in the fall. Leave those seed heads for birds to eat over the winter. Instead of bagging up your fall leaves, shred them and place them beneath your shrubs as mulch. Fall leaves harbor overwintering insects that birds will find delectable and come spring your leaf mulch will become a flurry of birds as they search for nesting material. What plants are recommended? Cornell has a wonderful website called All About Birds and is a wealth of information.

Here is a sampling of their recommended bird-attracting plants: Overstory- Oaks (Quercus sp.), hickories (Carya sp.), walnuts (Juglans sp.), beeches (Fagus sp.) Understory – Serviceberries (Amelanchier sp.), native dogwoods (Cornus sp.) Coniferous – Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana), spruces (Picea sp.) Shrubs – Shrub dogwoods (Cornus sp.), winterberry holly (Ilex verticillata) Water is another critical component to have in a bird-friendly landscape. Incorporating a birdbath or water garden in your landscape can provide a wonderful focal point or pleasing space in your yard. Birds are attracted to moving water. Installing a small pump in a water feature will add interest in the garden for both you and the birds as the sound of moving water attracts species of all types. Birdbaths should be 2 to 3 inches deep and 2 to 3 feet wide with an edge for perching. Clean the birdbath once a week with soap and a thorough rinse of water. Keep your birdbath full of fresh, cool water and sit back and enjoy the sight of birds making your backyard their home. There are many wonderful resources to help you create a bird-friendly backyard. University of Illinois Extension can help get those resources in your hands. Contact your local county Extension office today! Another great resource would be your nearest Illinois Audubon Society group. Check Illinois Audubon’s state website for local chapter information. Good Growing Tip of the Week: Evergreens are an important source of cover for songbirds, especially in winter when predators like sharp-shinned hawks or housecats are known to stalk bird feeders for a meal. According to Cornell, place your feeders within 10-feet of protective cover. This distance can be adjusted depending on what common predators are in your yard.

Pike is at County your

Fingertips

ZZZSLNHSUHVVFRP REAL ESTATE ACTIVE SINCE 1961 Rick Barton

Robin Callihan

(217) 473-8303 Managing Broker

(217) 370-3451 Broker Associate

WADE AGENCY www.wade-real-estate.com

2)),&(   10LVVLVVLSSL6W3LWWVILHOG,/ EQUAL HOUSING

LENDER

www.barton-homes.com

NEW LISTING: 609 E. Quincy St., Griggsville: Beautiful home at the edge of town with 3-4 bedrooms, 1 ž baths, gorgeous wood ooring, amazing kitchen, 2 car attached garage and so much more. $119,500 NEW LISTING: 503 S. Federal St. Griggsville. Very nice 2 bedroom ranch home with family room, bath and additional bedroom in basement. Kitchen appliances and situated on ž approx. acre. $79,500 New Listing: 1605 Elm St., Quincy: Two story brick home with brand new roof! 4 bedrooms, main oor laundry, newer windows, and updated furnace and central air. Detached 2 car garage. $64,900 NEW LISTING: 105 W. Chestnut St., Mt. LDSterling: Beautiful 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath SOcondition. brick ranch with a 1 car garage. Near perfect $112,000 GRIGGSVILLE: (South Side) Very niceO2Lbedroom ranch home with lots of updates, full D S more. basement, attached garage, deck and much New Listing: 29343 Jim Town Hollow, Rockport: 2 bedroom ranch home on 1 SOLD acre with creek. Needs some work but great getaway. 3 Hope Ave., PittsďŹ eld: Very nice 2 bedroomDduplex located next to the golf course. New L paint, new carpet, full ďŹ nished basement,S &O attached 2 car garage. 316 N. Chandler St., Griggsville: Attractive two bedroom ranch home located close to schools. Neat, clean, & in move-in condition. Partial hardwood oors, partial undated windows, central air, & some much more. Detached 2 car garage with heated workshop. This is a must see! Call today for your viewing. $66,900 IMMEDIATE POSSESSION 115 N. Federal St., Griggsville: Recents improvements to this two bedroom home: new furnace and central air units, Hot water heater, roof. Delighful open kitchen/dining area with SOL& D abundance of cabinets, main oor laundry room with hand sink & ideal storage. Big deck. Big lot with 2 car garage with workshop and storage. $68,000 114 S. Stanford St., Griggsville: Cute and cozy two bedroom with lots of nice updates and move in ready. Attractive updated metal roof, updated window, newer ooring, all new paint, & much more. Detached one car garage. Priced to sell. $44,000 313 E. Quincy St., Griggsville: 3-4 bedroom SOLD 1.5 story home. Central air and updated kitchen. Detached 2 car garage. 305 Congress St., Perry: Small town living is what you are looking for then you need to take a look at this one. Open oor plan with kitchen, dining, & living area. Family room, bedroom, & more in lower level. Partial fenced yard & deck. $52,000 204 Mill St., Chambersburg: Sprawling 3 bedroom ranch home on nice shaded lot. Spacious eat-in kitchen, living room with hardwood oors and ďŹ replace, and 1.5 baths. Room for storage or to expand in the oored attic access. Unique 5 car garage. Call today. $89,500 808 N. Dutton St., PittsďŹ eld: Good 2 bedroom rental property with big kitchen, & mud room with laundry area. Detached garage. Immediate Possession! $29,500 130 E. PittsďŹ eld St., Milton: 2-3 bedroom home with open kitchen/dining area, partial hardwood ooring, & more. Garage. $29,500 918 W. Jefferson St., PittsďŹ eld: Two bedroom SOLD starter home with detached 2 car garage. 1132 N. 9th St, Quincy: Two story home with 1.5 baths, updated kitchen, & more. OLDranch home in good location. Open oor 627 Edgewood Drive, Quincy: S Spacious plan and newer family room addition, ďŹ replace, & more. Detached newer 2 car garage with SOLD workshop.

Wanting to sell? We have been in business over 31 years. We know this business. We can handle nearly all the details of selling. We prequalify potential buyers saving you and us much time. Sales have been good and we need more properties. Call us for a no obligation market analysis of your property.

200 S. Madison Pittsfield, IL 62363 217-285-2774

COURTNEY WADE 217-285-2774 CELL: 473-1289 ROGER HALL CELL 248-0231 BARBARA GOERTZ 217-257-7865

SALES STAFF KAREN FOX 217-285-5481 CELL: 473-3755 TAMI WEBEL 217-285-1441 CELL 242-5193

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COURTNEY WADE - MANAGING BROKER

Licensed in Illinois & Missouri

PITTSFIELD Q NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 430 N. JACKSON ST. Remodeled 2-story home. Newer siding, roof, deck, furnace, air conditioning, water heater, plumbing, electrical and landscaping. 3-4 BR, 1.75 BA. Attached garage. Entrance and exit from side street if desired. Energy efficient and move in ready. CALL KAREN FOR MORE INFO. PRICED $119,500. Q NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 651 W. FAYETTE ST. 894 sq. ft. ranch style home with 3 BR, 1 BA, detached garage and newer roof. This home comes fully furnished including washer and dryer. Move in ready! PRICED AT $79,500. CALL BARB. Q NEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 445 OAK HILL ROAD aka BARROW FAMILY PROPERTY. Absolutely a beautiful 4,000 sq. ft. home on approx. 5 acres. 11 rooms, 5 bedrooms (2 suites), 4 1/2 baths, study, family room, garden room, fireplace, basement, 2 car att. garage and much more. IMMEDIATE POSSESSION. PRICED AT $450,000. CALL COURTNEY. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - PIKE COUNTY GLASS - 115 N. MISSISSIPPI ST. - Turn-key business comes with the 30x100 building, tools, equipment, and good reputation. The owner is retiring and ready to go fishing. The building also comes with a two-bedroom rental apartment that is currently rented. PRICED $225,000. CALL COURTNEY. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 27548 390th ST. On 3-5 acres approx. 2800 sq. ft. 2 story home, 1 1/2 miles North of Pittsfield. Remodeled in 2005 with 11 rooms, 3 BR, 3 BA, Family Rm., fireplace, sunroom, geo thermal, 2 outbuildings and more. PRICED $230,000. CALL 217-285-2774. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 115 LASHMETT LANE - Brick ranch home, 2260 sq. ft. 3 BR, 2 1/2 BA, full basement, 2 fireplaces, att. 2 car garage, central heat and A/C. INGROUND POOL AND MORE. PRICED $199,000. CALL KAREN. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 721 S. MEMORIAL ST. - 2408 sq. ft. 4-5 BR, 2 full baths, (2) 1/2 baths, family room, vinyl siding, thermo windows and more. REDUCED. MOTIVATED SELLER. $189,500. $174,500. CALL ROGER HALL. QPITTSFIELD - 420 N. Jackson St. - Remodeled 2 story home, 9 rooms, 5 bedrooms, 2 baths, new kitchen, new electrical. All thermo w/d, NEW heating and cooling, NEW 16x32 IN GROUND swimming pool and more. MOTIVATED SELLER CALL COURTNEY FOR MORE INFO. PRICED $137,000. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 311 S. MADISON ST. 7 RM, 3 BR, 1 BA brick home in a great location. 1561 sq. ft., attached one car garage, full basement with kitchenette and lots of storage. PRICED $117,000. CALL KAREN. QPITTSFIELD - 309 W. PERRY ST. - 1272 sq. ft. ranch style home. 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, sunroom and partially ďŹ nished basement. Gas furnace and C/A. 1-car attached garage and one car detached garage w/workshop. Nice location. MOTIVATED SELLER. PRICED $90,000. REDUCED TO $88,000. CALL KAREN. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 957 CONROY ST. - 1150 sq. ft. ranch style home, 5 RM, 3 BR, 1 1/2 BA, with main oor laundry. Several updates, C/A. All appliances stay. One car att. garage. Utility shed. PRICED $86,000. CALL ROGER. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 340 MASON ST. Very nice and unique ranch style home. 1100 sq. ft. 5 RM, 1 BR, large bath, full part. basement, gas furn., C/A. Large garage. Beautiful, all handicap accessible. Move-In ready. CALL COURTNEY. PRICED $85,000. Q PITTSFIELD- 125 S. CLINTON ST. - 1 story frame home, 1168 sq. ft. 6 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, HW oors, gas furn., C/A, basement, alum. siding, new roof, large carport, large lot. PRICED $79,500. CALL COURTNEY-SELLER CONCESSIONS. QNEW LISTING - PITTSFIELD - 224 S. MEMORIAL ST. 1200 sq. ft. 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, home close to town. HW oors, thermo replacement windows, vinyl siding and a newer roof. Covered front porch. Selling “As Isâ€?. PRICED $38,500. CALL COURTNEY. GRIGGSVILLE/PERRY/BAYLIS//BARRY/KINDERHOOK QNEW LISTING - BARRY - 585 BAINBRIDGE ST. REO - 1094 sq. ft., story and a half frame home. 5 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA. Vinyl siding, gas heat, C/A. PRICED $26,000. $24,700. CALL BARB. QREDUCED - 490 MAIN ST., BARRY - 1719 sq. ft. 2 story home, 3 BR, 2 BA, newer kitchen with appliances. Hi-eff GFA heat with wood furnace backup, C/A, 24x41 3-car garage, 2 sheds plus woodshed. PRICED $85,900. $79,900. CALL BARB. QNEW LISTING - 27959 230TH ST. KINDERHOOK Newly constructed 3 1/2 year old cabin on 1 acre. 1024 sq. ft. 5 rooms, 2 BR, 1 BA. Built with native oak, cottonwood and walnut. All thermo, metal siding and shingle roof. VERY UNIQUE, CALL COURTNEY. PRICED AT $132,000. QBARRY - 262 TREMONT ST. 1 story frame home, 1000 sq. ft., 5 rooms, 2 BR, 1 BA, aluminum and vinyl siding. TO BE SOLD “AS ISâ€?. PRICED AT $12,000. CALL COURTNEY. QNEW LISTING-CALHOUN COUNTY - 2450 INFIDEL HOLLOW On 1 acre, 1 story frame home, 1000 sq. ft. 6 RM, 2 BR, 1 BA, gas furnace, vinyl siding, det. car garage. CALL COURTNEY. PRICED $68,000.

SOLD

PENDING

PENDING

SOLD SOLD


CAMPBELL PUBLICATIONS

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15, 2019

900A NO TRESPASSING Calhoun County

200 BUSINESS FORD SMALL Engine Repair, Glasgow, IL. Hours: Friday, 8-5; Saturday, 8-1; Monday, 8-5. Call 217-370-2293. 5.22.19 IF YOU need parts for mowers and tillers, Dorsey’s Hardware and Western Auto has a large selection of belts and parts and service. New equipment sales available. Winchester. Call 217-742-9241. tfn

NO TRESPASSING no hunting on property owned by Martha Knight (also known as Marty Aderton), Lincoln Valley Road, Hardin. 7.24.19 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown owned by Steve and Cindy Meszaros. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.30.19 NO TRESPASSING or hunting allowed on the land in Batchtown 400 owned by Marcy KlockenkemFOR RENT per, Judy Lamer, Jeremy Russell, Bonnie Stepanek, and Cindy OFFICE SPACE. Prime location. Meszaros. Violators will be prosAmple parking. West Washington ecuted. 5.30.19 St., Pittsfield. Call 217-285-2848, 217-285-5925 or 217-653-0212.

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike County

TFN

2 AND 3 bedroom mobile homes for rent in Griggsville. Lyndle Ellis. 217-833-2107. 6.12.19

500 FOR SALE BED QUEEN pillow top mattress set. New in the plastic. $195. Can deliver. Call 618-772-2710. 7.10.19 STAMP COLLECTION. Lots of old ones plus comic book on stamps. Baseball cards in album, approx. 500 old cards. 217-7301272. 5.15.19

600 HELP WANTED PITTSFIELD MACHINE in Payson, IL is looking for production workers. Starting pay is $12/hr. Please apply in person at 609 N. Fulton St., Payson, IL. 5.29.19 DOT FOODS is hiring Warehouse Material Handlers. Starting pay up to $20.05/hr plus a $1/hour raise after six months! DotFoodsJobs. com/Illinois. 5.15.19

ABSOLUTELY NO swimming/no hunting on land owned by Fred Smith at Valley City Falls. Violators will be prosecuted. 5.22.19 MAYFAIR FARMS ground North of Highway 10 East of Nebo is private property. Trespassing is forbidden. Violators will be prosecuted. NO TRESPASSING and no hunting of any kind, is permitted on any property owned by Double Creek Farms. Can be prosecuted. 1.2.20

12.19.19

NO HUNTING, ATV-ing or trespassing on our property without permission. Section 4 of Derry Township and Section 34 of Hadley Township. Frank & Ruth Armistead. 6.26.19 NO TRESSPASSING ads are 20 words for $60 and the ads print for one year. Call us today to place your no trespassing ad today!

900D NO TRESPASSING Pike County MY LAND located in Section 18 SW of Pearl is private property. Hunting, fishing, trapping, trespassing, for any purpose, without the written, signed permission of the owner, is strictly forbidden. Violators will be prosecuted. Timothy Brinkmann. 6.12.19

1200 SERVICES FREE ESTIMATES! now that spring is here, time to get necessary tree work done (trimming, removal, etc.) Trust the local Tree Guys that have many years' experience and the best rates. Call 217-320-8389 or 217-320-8438. tfn

1500 YARD SALES PITTSFIELD: 1269 W. Washington St. Huge Little family yard sale. Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18. New furniture, appliances, antiques, collectibles, tools, household. Something for everyone. 5.15.19 PITTSFIELD: 24328 US Hwy. 54 West at Sue Cox's. One mile past Farm and Home Supply. Garage and barn sale. Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18, 8-5, rain or shine. 5.15.19 PITTSFIELD: 326 W. Washington St., Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Children's clothing 0-2T, women's clothing, home furniture, children's toys. 5.15.19 PITTSFIELD: BACK alley at 310 W. Adams St. May 17 and 18, 9-? Girl's 14/16 to women's 2X, young men's, books, scooters, dools, wooden swingset, chests of drawers, etc. 5.15.19

1500 YARD SALES LARGE FLEA market, yard sale at McAllisters in Detroit. Friday, May 17 and Saturday, May 18, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, May 19, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Inside building-namebrand clothes boys, girls, women sm-3XL, shoes, purses, pictures, "stampin-up", decorations, etc. 5.15.19

GRIGGSVILLE: 316 E. Walnut St. Friday, May 17, 8 am.m-6 p.m. Saturday, May 18, 8 a.m.6 p.m. Boys clothes 7/8, adult clothing, linens, holiday decor, Longaberger baskets, kids booksJunie B. Jones set, small child's roll up desk, vintage rolling pins, Star Wars rugs, lots of toys, most clothes 50¢. 5.15.19 GRIGGSVILLE: 110 S. State St. Friday, May 17, noon-6 p.m. Saturday, May 18, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Children's clothes 6-12, adult clothes, DVDs, household goods, old windows. Cheap, cheap, cheap! WANTED: YOUR classified ads! May special! Buy 1 week, get the second week FREE! List your used items for sale with us. Call one of our offices today: 618-576-2345, 217-942-9100, 618-498-1234 or 217-285-2345. All classified ads appear on our websites for FREE.

THE PEOPLE’S MARKETPLACE CLASSIFIEDS

Classified ads are only $6...up to 20 words! Call one of offices today! &DOKRXQ‡*UHHQH -HUVH\‡3LNH

AUCTION LISTINGS


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Pike Press

PUBLIC NOTICE

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PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00153

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00057

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00126

TO: GARY R EDMONDS, DIANE L EDMONDS, JASON LONG, RHONDA LONG, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition IRU7D['HHGRQWKHSUHPLVHVGHVFULEHGEHORZKDVEHHQÂżOHGLQWKH Circuit Court of PIKE County, Illinois, as Case Number 2016TX32. On 10/11/2019, at 9:30AM, the Petitioner will make application to such Court in PITTSFIELD, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed be issued if the real estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit:

TO: DONALD ANDRUS N26281, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described below has been ÂżOHGLQWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI3,.(&RXQW\,OOLQRLVDV&DVH1XPEHU 2016TX32. On 10/11/2019, at 9:30AM, the Petitioner will make apSOLFDWLRQWRVXFK&RXUWLQ3,776),(/',OOLQRLVIRUDQ2UGHURQWKH SHWLWLRQWKDWDWD[GHHGEHLVVXHGLIWKHUHDOHVWDWHLVQRWUHGHHPHG from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit:

TO: LAWRENCE L BROWN, LOREE M LAKE, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described EHORZKDVEHHQÂżOHGLQWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI3,.(&RXQW\,OOLQRLV DV&DVH1XPEHU7;2QDW$0WKH3HWLWLRQHUZLOOPDNHDSSOLFDWLRQWRVXFK&RXUWLQ3,776),(/',OOLQRLV IRU DQ 2UGHU RQ WKH SHWLWLRQ WKDW D WD[ GHHG EH LVVXHG LI WKH UHDO estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit:

RNG/BLK: TWP:54 SECT/LOT:7 LOT 7 BROWNS S D O.L. 17, 18 & 22-PITTSF AOC07232010B799P159#2010-1940 ASSIGN060401B422P274#01-1800 PERMANENT INDEX NUMBER 54-114-01 and was sold on 12/6/2016, for general taxes for the year 2015. The period of redemption will expire on 9/10/2019.

RNG/BLK:1 TWP:44 SECT/LOT:12 LOTS 5 & 12 BLK 1 WALLING ADDN-BAYLIS DEED10272015B852P191#2015-2541 TAXDEED09102015B851P79#2015-2079 LISPEN01022015B845P101#2015-0001 QCD070103B549P103#03-2537 PERMANENT INDEX NUMBER 44-058-05 DQG ZDV VROG RQ  IRU JHQHUDO WD[HV IRU WKH \HDU  The period of redemption will expire on 9/10/2019.

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

51*%/.7:36(&7/27/27%/.6:((7Âś6 $''1+8///,63(1%3 :%3 3(50$1(17,1'(;180%(5 DQG ZDV VROG RQ  IRU JHQHUDO WD[HV IRU WKH \HDU  7KHSHULRGRIUHGHPSWLRQZLOOH[SLUHRQ TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

5.15, 5.22, 5.29



5.15, 5.22, 5.29

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON TOWNSHIP BUDGET Notice is hereby given that a tentative budget and appropriation ordinance for the Township of Hadley, in the County of Pike, State RI ,OOLQRLV IRU WKH ÂżVFDO \HDU EHJLQQLQJ$SULO   DQG HQGLQJ 0DUFKZLOOEHRQÂżOHDQGFRQYHQLHQWO\DYDLODEOHWRSXEOLFLQVSHFWLRQDW+DGOH\7RZQVKLS+DOOIURPDQGDIWHURÂśFORFN SPWKGD\0D\ Notice is further given hereby that a public hearing on said budJHWDQGDSSURSULDWLRQRUGLQDQFHZLOOEHKHOGDWRÂśFORFNSP WKGD\-XQHDW7RZQVKLS+DOODQGWKDWÂżQDODFWLRQRQWKLV ordinance will be taken by the Board of Town Trustees at the meetLQJWREHKHOGDWRÂśFORFNSPRQWKHWKGD\RI-XQH 'DWHGWKLVWKGD\RI0D\ /s/ Nathan Reed, Supervisor /s/ Jane Armistead, Clerk NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ROAD DISTRICT BUDGET Notice is hereby given that a tentative budget and appropriation ordinance for road purposes of the Hadley Township, in the County RI3LNH6WDWHRI,OOLQRLVIRUWKHÂżVFDO\HDUEHJLQQLQJ$SULO DQGHQGLQJ0DUFKZLOOEHRQÂżOHDQGFRQYHQLHQWO\DYDLODEOHWRSXEOLFLQVSHFWLRQDW7RZQ+DOOIURPDQGDIWHURÂśFORFN SPWKGD\0D\ Notice is further hereby given that a public hearing on said budJHWDQGDSSURSULDWLRQRUGLQDQFHZLOOEHKHOGDWRÂśFORFNSP WKGD\-XQHDW+DGOH\7RZQVKLS+DOODQGWKDWÂżQDOKHDUing and action on this ordinance will be taken at a meeting to be KHOGDW+DGOH\7RZQVKLS+DOODWRÂśFORFNSPWKGD\-XQH  /s/ Jane Armistead, Clerk

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00177 & 2015-00178

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00019

TO: OTIS LEE HORTON, CHERYL L HORTON, CORN BELT BANK & TRUST COMPANY N/K/A CNB BANK & TRUST, N.A., BENEFICIAL ILLINOIS INC D/B/A BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO OF ILLINOIS, CT CORPORATION SYSTEM AS REG AGENT FOR BENEFICIAL ILLINOIS INC D/B/A BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO OF ILLINOIS, IL SECRETARY OF STATE AS REG AGENT FOR BENEFICIAL ILLINOIS INC D/B/A BENEFICIAL MORTGAGE CO OF ILLINOIS, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on WKHSUHPLVHVGHVFULEHGEHORZKDVEHHQÂżOHGLQWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI 3,.(&RXQW\,OOLQRLVDV&DVH1XPEHU7;2Q DW $0 WKH 3HWLWLRQHU ZLOO PDNH DSSOLFDWLRQ WR VXFK &RXUW LQ PITTSFIELD, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed EHLVVXHGLIWKHUHDOHVWDWHLVQRWUHGHHPHGIURPWKHVDOH7KHUHDO estate is described as follows, to wit:

TO: J MARK REEVES, RUTH E REEVES, WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION, PRENTICE HALL CORPORATION AS REG AGENT FOR WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION, IL SECRETARY OF STATE AS REG AGENT FOR WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION, WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL, IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, NATALIE L OSWALD AS REG AGENT FOR HOMETOWN REAL ESTATE, HOMETOWN REAL ESTATE, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax 'HHG RQ WKH SUHPLVHV GHVFULEHG EHORZ KDV EHHQ ÂżOHG LQ WKH &LUcuit Court of PIKE County, Illinois, as Case Number 2016TX32. On 10/11/2019, at 9:30AM, the Petitioner will make application to such Court in PITTSFIELD, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed be issued if the real estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit:

51*%/.7:36(&7/27/276$1'%/. GARDS ADDN-NEW CANTON 3(50$1(17,1'(;180%(5 

RNG/BLK:26 TWP:43 SECT/LOT:7 N 1/2 LOTS 5 & 6 & W PT N PT LOT 7 BLK 26 JOHNSONS ADDN-G VILLE W091096B230P122#96-2790 PERMANENT INDEX NUMBER 43-056-13

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and was sold on 12/6/2016, for general taxes for the year 2015. The period of redemption will expire on 9/10/2019.

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER



5.15, 5.22, 5.29



PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00256

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00124

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00144

TO: CASSANDRA RENEE JOHNS, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described below has been ÂżOHGLQWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI3,.(&RXQW\,OOLQRLVDV&DVH1XPEHU 2016TX32. On 10/11/2019, at 9:30AM, the Petitioner will make apSOLFDWLRQWRVXFK&RXUWLQ3,776),(/',OOLQRLVIRUDQ2UGHURQWKH SHWLWLRQWKDWDWD[GHHGEHLVVXHGLIWKHUHDOHVWDWHLVQRWUHGHHPHG from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit:

TO: LANCE D REED, TAMARA S REED, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises described below has been ÂżOHGLQWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI3,.(&RXQW\,OOLQRLVDV&DVH1XPEHU 2016TX32. On 10/11/2019, at 9:30AM, the Petitioner will make apSOLFDWLRQWRVXFK&RXUWLQ3,776),(/',OOLQRLVIRUDQ2UGHURQWKH SHWLWLRQWKDWDWD[GHHGEHLVVXHGLIWKHUHDOHVWDWHLVQRWUHGHHPHG from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit:

TO: STEVEN R EDWARDS, MISTY L EDWARDS, NANCY K HENDERSON, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on WKHSUHPLVHVGHVFULEHGEHORZKDVEHHQÂżOHGLQWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI 3,.(&RXQW\,OOLQRLVDV&DVH1XPEHU7;2Q DW $0 WKH 3HWLWLRQHU ZLOO PDNH DSSOLFDWLRQ WR VXFK &RXUW LQ PITTSFIELD, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed EHLVVXHGLIWKHUHDOHVWDWHLVQRWUHGHHPHGIURPWKHVDOH7KHUHDO estate is described as follows, to wit:

RNG/BLK: TWP:74 SECT/LOT:21 LOT 5 & ARC YOKEM ADDN LISPEN01252016B854P198#2016-0169 QC09212012B823P10#2012-2841 W091701B436P327#01-2963 PERMANENT INDEX NUMBER 74-033-06

RNG/BLK:13 TWP:47 SECT/LOT:2 15’ OFF W SIDE LOT 1 & ALL 2 BLK 13 MILLER ADDN-HULL LISPEN01252016B854P198#2016-0169 WD050307B760P282#07-1519 W092261B261P500#137188 PERMANENT INDEX NUMBER 47-068-08

51*%/.7:36(&7/2768%/276:1:.(632+/Âś668%',93,776),(/':%3  /,63(1%3 3(50$1(17,1'(;180%(5

DQG ZDV VROG RQ  IRU JHQHUDO WD[HV IRU WKH \HDU  The period of redemption will expire on 9/10/2019.

DQG ZDV VROG RQ  IRU JHQHUDO WD[HV IRU WKH \HDU  The period of redemption will expire on 9/10/2019.

DQG ZDV VROG RQ  IRU JHQHUDO WD[HV IRU WKH \HDU  7KHSHULRGRIUHGHPSWLRQZLOOH[SLUHRQ

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

5.15, 5.22, 5.29

5.15, 5.22, 5.29



PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00109

PUBLIC NOTICE

TO: MARY PUFFENBERGER, DONNA HIVELY, SHELLY L ALLENSWORTH, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premises deVFULEHGEHORZKDVEHHQÂżOHGLQWKH&LUFXLW&RXUWRI3,.(&RXQW\,OOLQRLV DV&DVH1XPEHU7;2QDW$0WKH3HWLWLRQHU ZLOOPDNHDSSOLFDWLRQWRVXFK&RXUWLQ3,776),(/',OOLQRLVIRUDQ2UGHURQWKHSHWLWLRQWKDWDWD[GHHGEHLVVXHGLIWKHUHDOHVWDWHLVQRW redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit: 51*%/.7:36(&7/27:/276 -$&.6213$5.%$55<4&%3 :%3 3(50$1(17,1'(;180%(5 DQGZDVVROGRQIRUJHQHUDOWD[HVIRUWKH\HDU7KH SHULRGRIUHGHPSWLRQZLOOH[SLUHRQ

For Sale: 1999 GMC pickup truck, 1/2 ton, 4x4, automatic transmission. Bid on it â&#x20AC;&#x153;as isâ&#x20AC;? by sealed bid until June 1, 2019. Contact Mike Jacobs, Newburg Township Road Commissioner, to view the truck, 217-491-0976. 5.8, 5.15

NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on $SULO   D FHUWLÂżFDWH ZDV ÂżOHG LQ WKH 2IÂżFH RI WKH &RXQW\ &OHUN RI 3LNH &RXQW\ ,OOLQRLV VHWWLQJ IRUWK WKH QDPHV DQG SRVWRIÂżFH DGGUHVVHV RI DOO WKH SHUVRQV RZQLQJ FRQGXFWLQJ DQG WUDQVDFWLQJ WKH EXVLQHVV NQRZQ DV3LNH&RXQW\*ODVVORFDWHGDW ::DVKLQJWRQ6W3LWWVÂżHOG,/ 'DWHGWKLVWKGD\RI$SULO /s/ Natalie Roseberry 3LNH&RXQW\&OHUN 5.1, 5.8, 5.15

ENGAGED CITIZENS ARE CRUCIAL TO DEMOCRACY

TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00161 TO: LYNDLE E GRATTON, CHRISTINE E LITTLE A/K/A CHRISTINE SHADE, JAMES L LITTLE, SHERRY LYNN GRATTON A/K/A SHERRY LYNN REVEAL, RONDA L SMITH, CANDACE M LITTLE A/K/A CANDACE M LITTLE-DOWNING, MELISSA BOHRN, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition for Tax Deed on the premLVHV GHVFULEHG EHORZ KDV EHHQ ÂżOHG LQ WKH &LUFXLW &RXUW RI 3,.( &RXQW\ ,OOLQRLV DV &DVH 1XPEHU 7; 2Q  DW $0 WKH 3HWLWLRQHU ZLOO PDNH DSSOLFDWLRQ WR VXFK &RXUW LQ PITTSFIELD, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed EHLVVXHGLIWKHUHDOHVWDWHLVQRWUHGHHPHGIURPWKHVDOH7KHUHDO estate is described as follows, to wit: 51*%/.7:36(&7/271/27&$57(56 $''12)0,//3/$774&%3 3(50$1(17,1'(;180%(5 DQG ZDV VROG RQ  IRU JHQHUDO WD[HV IRU WKH \HDU  7KHSHULRGRIUHGHPSWLRQZLOOH[SLUHRQ



TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE CERTIFICATE NUMBER: 2015-00100



TO: TAD OITKER, IL DEPT OF REVENUE, IL ATTORNEY GENERAL, INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, US ATTORNEY GENERAL,IL DEPT OF HEALTHCARE & FAMILY SERVICES, AND ALL UNKNOWN OWNERS, OCCUPANTS, BENEFICIARIES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, OR PARTIES INTERESTED. A Petition IRU7D['HHGRQWKHSUHPLVHVGHVFULEHGEHORZKDVEHHQÂżOHGLQWKH Circuit Court of PIKE County, Illinois, as Case Number 2016TX32. On 10/11/2019, at 9:30AM, the Petitioner will make application to such Court in PITTSFIELD, Illinois, for an Order on the petition that a tax deed be issued if the real estate is not redeemed from the sale. The real estate is described as follows, to wit: RNG/BLK:35 TWP:46 SECT/LOT:4 S SIDE LOT 4 BLK 35 BARRY Q010995B173P268#95-0116 WD090303B562P69#03-3435 PERMANENT INDEX NUMBER 46-082-05 and was sold on 12/6/2016, for general taxes for the year 2015. The period of redemption will expire on 9/10/2019. TERESA BUSHONG PETITIONER

NOTICE

INFORMED AND ENGAGED CITIZENS?

EVEN BETTER!

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JACKSONVILLE

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