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which minimize electrical costs. As another sustainability measure and LEED requirement, the new hospital has also been thoroughly commissioned by a third party. Equal care was given to water savings. All of the water closets have a dual flush system expected to lead to a 40 percent water savings. This is remarkable when considering the fact that other high water use items, such as faucets, could not be easily modified due to hospital infection control requirements. Therefore, as much water as possible was conserved in other areas. Clearly, Helen DeVos Children’s Hospital embraces a philosophy of maintaining the environment while also caring for each patient.

GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR HONORABLE MENTION Oakland County International Airport Terminal, Waterford Taking Off in a New Direction Photo Courtesy of Neumann/Smith Architecture The new Oakland County International Airport (OCIA) Terminal defies the conventional. First, there’s the futuristic-looking glass entryway. Then there’s the ceremonial “red carpet” that greets arriving passengers, plus a 1940s-era Pitt Special biplane hanging from the ceiling. And then there are the twirling wind turbines that bring it all to life. Frank Rewold and Son, Inc., Rochester, constructed the new terminal building to replace an obsolete, nearly 50-year-old facility at a bustling county airport that handles 120,000 takeoffs and landings annually. The new airport terminal serves as Oakland County’s “front door” to travelers from across the country. Neumann/Smith Architecture’s design takes inspiration from the science, technology and art of flight. The main public space is a glass-enclosed, light-filled lobby. An iconic angular roof form soars overhead, evoking the imagery of flight as represented by a simple piece of paper folded into a delta-winged aerodynamic glider.

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This “model airplane” is also a model of energy efficiency. The project team anticipates LEED Gold certification for this cutting-edge airport terminal and administration building that is expected to generate a 15 percent savings in energy costs. The geo-exchange (geothermal) field at the airport is a 30,000-square-foot horizontal system installed seven feet below ground. The system runs along nearly all of the green space directly east of the building. Installed on the east lawn, three wind turbines by Windspire Energy harness the 11-mile-per-hour average winds on the site, producing 1.2 KW each or about 2,000 KWh/year. Three types of solar panels were installed: the standing seam metal roof over the main lobby has a Uni-Solar photovoltaic film applied to the southern exposure; BP Solar produced the 29 solar panels installed on the flat roof on the east side of the building; and a solar hot water panel by Solar Skies has been installed on the same roof area to provide heat for the domestic water system. Rainwater from the roof will be recycled into rain gardens. The rain water collection and storage system will irrigate a unique, decorative vegetated wall in the lobby. This living wall of ferns, mosses, orchids, bromeliads, ficus vines and spider plants aids in air purification. All the indoor and outdoor lighting is energy-efficient fluorescent or LED. Produced by Relume, the LED lights were installed along the boulevard and in the parking lot. Indoors, one of the main ways the terminal saves energy is through reduced lighting, supplemented by extensive use of glass in every area. The project also conserved land and building materials by constructing the new building on the existing basement and foundation of the original terminal. The original building was demolished to the level of the existing first floor surface elevation; building waste materials were diverted from landfills and recycled whenever possible. The project conserved precious financial resources, as well. Original plans called for major renovations to the existing facility. Frank Rewold and Son proposed cost-effective alternatives, methods and materials for consideration. The end result is a new energy-efficient building for approximately the same price. The new landmark building provides more space on the first floor than the original terminal. Approximately 1,000 square feet of additional space accommodates airport operations, offices, conference facilities, customs offices, and arrival and departure space all on one level. More space and less energy use is clearly the mark of a “green” building. Other sustainability features include electric car charging stations, mechanical systems designed for maximum energy and operating efficiency, and low-flow water fixtures. Local, recycled and reduced VOC materials were used in the building’s construction, as well. This innovative airport terminal clearly meets the county’s goal of creating a building to serve as a catalyst for further sustainable design projects in Oakland County.

2011 Green Project of the Year Accident Fund Holdings, Inc. New National Headquarters, Lansing Ottawa Street Power Station Redevelopment Owner/Developer: Phoenix Development Partners, LLC/Christman Capital Development Company With Tenant/Building User Accident Fund Holdings, Inc. Construction Manager: The Christman Company Architectural Team: • Architect of Record – HOK, Inc., Chicago office • Preservation Architect – Quinn Evans Architects, Ann Arbor • Landscape/Planning Architect – Tower Pinkster, Kalamazoo/Grand Rapids • Design Consultant, Owner FFE – Mayotte Group, Lansing Engineering Team: • Mechanical and Electrical Engineer of Record – Tower Pinkster, Kalamazoo/Grand Rapids • Structural, Mechanical and Electrical Conceptual Engineering – ARUP, Chicago office • Construction Engineer/Structural Consultant – Ruby + Associates, Farmington Hills • Civil Engineer/Staking – Fleis & Vandenbrink Engineering, Inc., Grand Rapids • Parking Deck Architect/Engineer of Record/Demolition Plans – Carl Walker, Inc., Kalamazoo Consultants and Trade Contractors: • Selective Demolition/Abatement – Homrich Inc., Carleton • Chiller Plant Demolition – North American Dismantling Corp, Lapeer • Asbestos & Lead Abatement – Precision Abatement LLC, DeWitt • Selective Demolition/Structural Concrete/General Trades/Carpentry – Christman Constructors, Inc., Lansing • Earthwork/Site Utilities – Merlyn Contractors, Inc., Novi • Pollution Control – Pollution Control Services, Kalkaska • Additional Earthwork – Genesee-Bay Constructors, Inc., Haslett • Caissons – Rohrscheib Sons Caissons, Inc., New Hudson • Sitework Concrete – TCI Inc. of Michigan, Eaton Rapids • Bituminous Paving – Spartan Asphalt Paving Company, Lansing • Pavement Striping – PK Contracting, Troy • Signs – Capitol Barricade, Inc., Holt • Fencing – DeWitt Fence, Lansing • Jersey Barriers – Anlaan Corporation, Spring Lake • Landscaping – HTA Companies, Inc., Dimondale • Retaining Walls – Decra-Scape, Inc., Sterling Heights • Precast Planks – Kerkstra Precast, Inc., Grandville • Masonry Restoration – Schiffer Mason Contractors, Holt • Structural Steel – Douglas Steel Fabricating Corp, Lansing • Ornamental Railings – Dumas Concepts, Detroit • Site Fencing – Future Fence, Warren • Roofing & Sheetmetal – Bloom Roofing Systems, Inc., Brighton • Metal Siding – Architectural Metals, Inc., Portland, MI “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®

January February CAM Magazine 2012  

IN THIS ISSUE: A Letter to the Membership from the President of CAM; On the Jobsite: Knowledge is Power at Expanded Manufacturing Facility C...

January February CAM Magazine 2012  

IN THIS ISSUE: A Letter to the Membership from the President of CAM; On the Jobsite: Knowledge is Power at Expanded Manufacturing Facility C...

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