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the firm’s high safety expectations. Gadbois meets with every new T.H. Marsh employee, making sure they receive, review and agree to comply in writing with all procedures listed in the safety manual. Stellar safety performance is rewarded with financial incentives. Gadbois reviews the safety records of superintendents and project managers whose safety performance influences the amount of raises and bonuses. For the tradesperson, Gadbois provides incentives such as Visa gift cards. Truly caring about safety is the intangible in this safety equation. “We care about people’s safety,” said Gadbois. “That is the most important thing. I hope to make construction a safer industry, and in the end, if I can save one life I am doing my job.” Safety saves money - according to MIOSHA, every dollar invested in safety yields four to six dollars in return – but at the best of companies, safety is not just cost driven. “The T.H. Marsh leadership has made this safety program happen,” said Gadbois.

(248) 355-4411 w w w .zervosgroup.com 24724 Farmbrook Rd. Southfield 48034 Gus E. Zervos

Steve M. Zervos

CEO

President

Angelo G. Zervos, VP

Michael G. Zervos, VP

Dave Lang

Jim Gargaro

Dominic Nicita

Don Burden

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“He cares about people who work here and our subcontractors too. Everybody put their heads together to come up with the best program possible. We are truly proud of the program, and we are proud to work for T.H. Marsh.” In other T.H. Marsh initiatives, all project managers, superintendents and field foremen take the MIOSHA 30-hour Construction Safety seminar; the company established a safety and health committee, with both employee and management participation; and developed an employee training system with an emphasis on how to do the work in a safe and healthful manner.

understand the impact of occupational fatalities in the construction industry. Presented at the 2010 International Conference on Fall Prevention and Protection, the study, “Cost of Fall-Related Fatal Occupational Injuries in Construction, 2003-2006,” estimated the impact on the U.S. Gross Domestic Product from occupational fatalities in the construction industry is about $5.1 billion. Nationally, a total of 4,864 workers died in construction from all causes in this time frame with one third of those construction fatalities resulting from a fall to a lower level. Falls from roofs accounted for 35 percent of those incidents. The model showed that fall fatalities alone represent a $1.6 billion loss to the U.S. Gross Domestic Product. Fortunately, dedicated companies, such as T.H. Marsh, are combatting losses of life, injuries and the high cost of poor safety by forging a strongly enforced safety and health system capable of achieving the Holy Grail of zero lost time accidents for the last few years.

POOR SAFETY: EMOTIONAL TOLL, ECONOMIC DRAIN Poor safety practices and the resulting injuries and fatalities exact a terrible emotional toll on the deceased worker’s loved ones and co-workers, and a financial toll on the entire economy. Researchers at NIOSH’s Division of Safety Research developed a cost estimation model to better



    





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January February CAM Magazine 2012  

IN THIS ISSUE: A Letter to the Membership from the President of CAM; On the Jobsite: Knowledge is Power at Expanded Manufacturing Facility C...

January February CAM Magazine 2012  

IN THIS ISSUE: A Letter to the Membership from the President of CAM; On the Jobsite: Knowledge is Power at Expanded Manufacturing Facility C...

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