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PROJECTS INTERNSHIP HUNTSVILLE FARMER’S MARKET

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THIRD YEAR DAVIS SUSTAINABILITY CENTER MID-CENTURY HOUSE REDESIGN

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SECOND YEAR DONALD E. DAVIS ARBORETUM

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LAKE MARTIN RESIDENCE

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PERSONAL WORK WATERCOLOR

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WOODWORKING

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CHICAGO CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL Circulation plays a major part in the way that we live our lives. It can influence the people with whom we interact. Circulation can also provide a direct route for some and a meandering route for others. Printer’s Row has a history of having 2 means of circulation: a series of tunnels that was used to quickly transport printing supplies to the various industries involved in the print making process and the traffic above. Likewise, the Printer’s Row Children’s Hospital has 2 means of circulating: elevators and stairs that quickly link each floor, and a series of bridges that connect family spaces around the courtyard.

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Ground Floor Plan

Typical Patient Floor Plan

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Throughout the Chicago Children’s Hospital there are several family spaces. These family spaces are connected and intended to create a network so that families can support and encourage one another throughout the hospital. In elevation, the family spaces and the connecting spaces are transparent to indicate the public nature of those spaces, while the individual patient rooms are covered with a screen.

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Detailed Section through Patient Room

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HUNTSVILLE FA R M E R S

MARKET HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA

The Huntsville Farmer’s Market was a project that was designed in response to the Huntsville “Bright Idea’s” Campaign to improve the city. The farmer’s market makes use of existing conditions on a government owned lot and provides a space in downtown Huntsville that allows locals to gather together.

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BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA Double digging is another process that was researched and implemented at the Rural Studio Farm. Double digging loosens the soil, which promotes deeper root growth. Because the roots grow deeper and not wider, biointensive planting can be utilized.

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Sun Angles

Water Collection

Passive Solar Heating

Insulating Berm

North Wind Deflection

Ventilation


Raised Bed Elevation

Raised Bed Plan

Raised Bed Column Detail

Raised Bed Section

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January

May

February

June

March

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July In order to accommodate the flexitarian diet adopted by the Rural Studio, careful planning was done to ensure that fresh produce could be harvested during the school year. The light green letters indicate the planting of a vegetable. The dark green letters indicate that a plant is growing. Finally, the orange letters indicate that a vegetable is being harvested. Plants are arranged in response to sustainable planting strategies such as crop rotation and companion planting in order to maximize production.


Although or studio designed a greenhouse, it was also important to show that the greenhouse was part of a larger system. The Rural Studio Farm Cycle was developed to show the client the closed loop, sustainable system our studio was implementing.

Double digging is another process that was researched and implemented at the Rural Studio Farm. Double digging loosens the soil, which promotes deeper root growth. Because the roots grow deeper and not wider, biointensive planting can be utilized.

One crucial part of the Rural Studio Farm Cycle is planting seeds in pots inside the seedhouse. Once the plants begin to grow, they get transplanted in the greenhouse or outside. Transplanting allows the root system to develop so that the plant is as healthy as possible when it moves outside or to the greenhouse.

Traditional planting is usually done in wide rows that waste space. Instead, planting biointensively allows maximum production. It also minimizes the amount of sunlight exposure on the ground, which reduces the amount of water needed.

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DAVIS S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y

CENTER BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA The Davis Sustainability Center is the redesign of the Davis Center in Birmingham, Alabama. The Davis Sustainability Center is located in the heart of the Lakeview District of Birmingham. Therefore, the intention of its design is to be the place where sustainable practices such as urban farming and recycling are modeled for the community and to be the epicenter of the sustainable changes in the neighborhood. The redesign of the Davis Center includes four translucent towers that at night emit light as if they were beacons saying: “This is where it all began�.

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The objective of the Case Study House Project was to look at the Case Study houses that were designed in the late 40’s to early 60’s. After examination of Thornton Abell’s CSH no.7, I redesigned two mid-century homes that incorporated design principles learned from observation of Case Study House no.7.

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Sliding partitions divide the living space and the study room. The partitions may be opened for a larger living space or can be closed when a quiet study session is needed.

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ARBORETUM EDUCATION

CENTER AUBURN, ALABAMA The design for the Arboretum Education Center is an architectural interpretation of a tree canopy. The structure of the Davis Arboretum is gluelam construction and consists of columns that branch out and connect with one another. The structure is designed to harvest water at the roof level and hold it in cisterns below. Programmatic elements of the Arboretum Education Center include classrooms, office space, and gallery spaces.

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LAKE MARTIN, ALABAMA The Lake Martin Residence was designed so that a hierarchy of spaces was created as one experiences the home. The idea is that one enters into the most public space and slowly transitions to the most private parts of the house. The angled planes that create the form of the house celebrate the sloped aspect of the site by seeming to keep the entire house from sliding down the hill

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The purpose of the chair study was to learn about a significant architectural chair. Objectives included the discovering the architectural significance of the chair, how it was built, and reproducing the chair with an emphasis on craft.

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CAMERON WELDY 116 Irving Hills Court

Education

Lascassas, TN 37085 615 225 7508

Auburn University School of Architecture Auburn, Alabama Bachelor of Architecture expected May 2013 Auburn University’s Rural Studio Newbern, Alabama January 2011 – May 2011 Work Experience Fuqua & Partners Architects | Huntsville, AL May 2011- August 2011 Intern Architect: As a full-time summer intern worked on various projects developing site plans, elevations, sections, and floor plans. Also created a design proposal for a permanent farmer’s market in downtown Huntsville in response to the Bright Ideas campaign to revive downtown Huntsville. Additionally developed floor plans and elevations for an orphanage in Peru. Auburn University Nematology Lab | Auburn, AL January 2009 – May 2009 Lab Assistant: As a part-time lab assistant with the Auburn University Nematology Lab duties included preparing tests, gathering samples, and watering plants involved in studies. Awards & Honors Watercolor paintings displayed in Auburn University’s Dudley Gallery - 2010 Honorable mention in the Watercolor Competition at Rural Studio - 2011 Auburn University Dean’s List - 2011

ctw0005@auburn.edu

Skills AutoCAD Illustrator CS4 InDesign CS4 Photoshop CS4 Microsoft Office Suite SketchUp Research Model Making Watercolor Rendering Drafting References Joe Fuqua, AIA Principal Fuqua & Partners Architects 100 Church Street Suite 700 Huntsville, AL 35801 256.534.3516 jafuqua@fuquaarchitects.com Justin Miller, AIA, LEED AP Professor Auburn University, School of Architecture 334.844.5171 justin.miller@auburn.edu

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Cameron Weldy Portfolio