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NORRIS. TN LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd


NORRIS CORRIDOR LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

NORRIS CITY - 4,595 5.84 acres

Scott S Sco t

Campbell Union

Andersonvville

Morgan

Anderson Knox

Roane ane e Clinton Oak Ridge e Kn Knoxville e

ANDERSON COUNTY - 220,800 acres

NORRIS CORRIDOR - 506.69 acres - Distance across hwy 61: 2.3 miles

DISTANCES FROM NORRIS

- to Knoxville: 21.4 miles {27 min} - to Clinton: 8 miles {14 min} - to Andersonville: 2.5 miles {5 min} - to Oak Ridge: 19.2 miles {32 min}


HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

TOWN

OF

NORRIS

P h as e dev el o p m e n t of the town fo l l o w i ng c om p l e tion of N o rr i s D am. G reen be l t Pl an n i n g p rincipl e s ar e p r im a r y goals o f t h e t o w n , foc u s i n g o n w a lka b ility, p ark pr es er v ation , a n d vernacu l ar ch a r a c te r.

MAJOR ROADWAYS 1893 Andersonville HWY 1936 HWY 441 1952 River Rd | Norris Rd | Gooseneck Hollow (Park Rd) | Mountain Rd 1973 Interstate 75 | Reservoir Rd. | Hill Rd.

7


APPALACHIAN HERITAGE LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

HISTORY & HERITAGE A G R I C U LT U R E & R U R A L L I F E The tie between the Appalachian people and the l a n d i s e n d u r i n g a n d d e e p . Tr u e A p p a l a c h i a n frontiersmen prided themselves on their ability to live and work on the land. They represented a s e n s e o f s e l f s u f f i c i e n c y. F a r m i n g a n d f a r m l i f e , as well as agriculture’s impact on the region, can be explored through exhibits at the Museum of Appalachia. ARTS & CRAFTS The people of Appalachia are known for their arts a n d c r a f t s . B o r n o f n e c e s s i t y, h a n d i w o r k r e f l e c t s a love of the past as well as a desire to preserve traditional arts and crafts for future generations. To o l m a k i n g , w o o d w o r k i n g , q u i l t m a k i n g a n d basket weaving are some of the notable crafts of the area. M U S I C & C U LT U R E Instruments consisted of bottles, banjos and washboards and various other instruments came together to provide the tone of the generation. Porch ‘pickin’ was a favorite past time of t o g e t h e r n e s s a n d u n i t y.


HISTORY

TIMELINE

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

NORRIS DAM

1400s-1800s

1800s

Native Americans came to this land on the Northwestern rim of the Great Valley -- mostly the Eastern Band of the Cherokee.

1805 Third Treaty of Tellico signed allowing settlement of all land north of the Duck River and east to the Tennesee River including all of the Cumberland Plateau.

Explorers like Daniel Boone traveled through the Cumberland Muontains and down the Clinch River.

1806 Land was purchased from the Cherokee and Creeks south of the Duck River

1791 - Signed the Treaty of Holston with the Cherokee Indians proclaiming that no citizens will hunt, commit crimes or settle on “indian land� in hopes to develop a peaceful friendship

mid 1800s White settlers located to this area, started to cultivate the land Major economic drivers of the area were agriculture, blacksmith, lumber milling and dairy farming

1796 Tennessee was admitted into the Union as the 16th state

1798 Treaty of Tellico signed - allowed for settlers to move into the land of the Cherokee

1861 - 1865 Civil War of the United States - the land of Norris, TN served as a thoroughfare to the battlegrounds to the north and south of the town

1900s 1930 Cumberland Falls State Park (1657 Acres - 1 hr 15 min away) May 18th, 1933 Congressed passed the TVA Act 1933 Norris Dam State Park (4038 acres - 15 min) Norris Lake formed (34000 acres - 15 min) October 1st, 1933 - March 4th, 1936 Norris Dam was constructed by the TVA Cities such as Loyston were flooded and communities were displaced to local towns such as Andersonville and Clinton Town of Norris was founded primarily as housing area for construction workers on the dam. 1934 Big Ridge State Park (3687 acres - 21 min) 1937 Cove Lake State park (637 acres) - 18 min

KOREAN WAR SUEZ CRISIS

CUBAN MISSILE CRISIS

1940 Cumberland Gap National Historic Park - 1940 (20508) - 1 hr 1940 Great Smoky Mountain National Park (522,419 acres) - 1 hr 40 min June 15th, 1948 The City of Norris was sold at auction by the TVA to a real estate broker from Pennsylvania, Henry David Epstein. 1949 Norris became an independent self-governing community

1952 Chuck Swan Wildlife Management Area (24,444 acres - 1 hr 20 min)

1960s Norris, TN served as a model greenbelt town for many new towns

1959 Congressed passed legislation making TVA Power system self-financing

Population of the city increased and expansion occured within the greenbelt

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

2010s

2020s

1974 Big South Fork National River and Recreational Area | 125,310 acres - 1 hr

1988 Frozen Head State Park 24,387 acres 1 hr

1990s Norris corridor on TN-61 served as a thoroughfare for people entering Big Ridge State Park, going to Andersonville and the Norris Lake.

2008 A team of students and Faculty from the University of Tennesee won Phase 1 ($10,000) and Phase II ($75,000) EPA P3: People Prosperity and Planet Grant.

Norris, TN continues to thrive as a bedroom community for Knoxville, TN and Oak Ridge though there is a desire for the city to expand and offer more amenities and attractions for those who live there and visitors alike.

With the annexation of the corridor, Norris TN has an opportunity to grow as a city and develop its economic support system by drawing in local businesses and providing areas and activities which will make people stop within the corridor.

Along the corridor, local residents built more houses adjacent to Highway 61


SITE

DEMOGRAPHICS

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

OCCUPATION TYPES

HOUSING TYPES

Production/Transportation

84%

1 unit

6%

1%

6% 5-9 units

10-19 units

POPULATION DENSITY

(PEOPLE PER SQ. MILE)

1900 900

Clinton

Norris

Tennessee Avg.

240

HOUSING OWNERSHIP

150 24% 76% RENT OWN

<1%

Management/Business/Science/Art

87% of labor force commutes to work outside of Norris

0%

12%

Over half of working residents hold management or business positions, or work in science or art fields. About a quarter work in sales or hold other office positions. Most Norrisonians commute to work outside the city. They do this mostly by car. Only 2% claim to get to work by “other means.” 5% of Norrisonians work from home and less than 1% can walk to their workplace.

9%

Knoxville

Service Industry

2%

24%

Sales/Office

MEDIAN HOME VALUE: NORRIS TENNESSEE $199,076 $138,300

5%

About half of Norris residents are retired or nearing retirement

Natural Resources/Construction 8%

2 units

COMMUTING METHODS

93%

51%

PROXIMITY TO EMERGENCY SERVICES LaFollette St. Mary’s Medical Center 23 miles; ~30 min.

I-75

Norris’ housing consists of mostly single-unit homes, but about 15% of housing is multi-unit. Most Norrisonians own their homes, while about one-quarter rent.

Norris Police & Fire Dept. 1-2 miles; ~5 min.

The population density is considered low for a city, but is higher than the Tennessee average of 150 people per square mile. It is much lower than nearby Clinton which has 900 people per square mile. There is a Fire and Police Station within the city limits. This is 1 to 2-mile distance from most places within the city and study corridor. The two closest hospitals are St. Marys in LaFollette, about 30 minutes away, and Methodist in Oak Ridge, about 25 minutes away.

TN-61

Oak Ridge St. Mary’s Methodist Medical Center 17 miles; ~25 min.

I-75

Source for information on this page: www.citydata.com


SITE

DEMOGRAPHICS

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

EDUCATION LEVEL

RACE DISTRIBUTION 97%

White

1%

2 or more races

Hispanic

<1%

American Indian

<1%

7% OF NORRIS IS LIVING

BELOW THE POVERTY LEVEL

TENNESSEE AVERAGE IS 18% The population of Norris is around 1,650.

AGE DISTRIBUTION 42%

55 +

14%

45-54 35-44

10%

20-34

11%

MEDIAN AGE: 49.2 STATE AVERAGE: 41.3

0-14

47.5%

51% Bachelors degree or higher 27% Graduate/Professional degree

<1%

Black

52.5%

97.4% H.S. DIPLOMA OR HIGHER

<1%

Asian

15-19

GENDER DISTRIBUTION

The average age of residents is 55 or older, which is above the median age in the state of Tennessee. Norrisonians are predominantly white. Most residents have a high school education, about half have a college degree, and around a quarter of those have a graduate or professional degree. Over half of Norris households make over $50,000, with 35% making more than $75,000. The median household income is $49,114, which is above the state average of $41,693. Only 7% of Norrisonians are living below the poverty level.

HOUSEHOLD INCOME

TOTAL POPULATION: 1,642

20%

$50k-$74,9k

14%

$35k-$49,9k

$25k-$34,9k

12%

$15k-$24,9k

11%

7% 16%

35%

More than $75k

Less than $15k

MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME: $49,114 STATE AVERAGE: $41,693

8% Source for information on this page: www.citydata.com


SITE LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

COMMERCIAL AGRICULTURE RESIDENTIAL MIXED

LAND USE

CIVIC + COMMUNAL

CEMETARY MET POST OFFICE FF E CHURCH SCHOOL LIBRARY

MUSEUM LODGING

ATTRACTION + LODGING


SITE

ECONOMIC DRIVERS

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

NORRIS DAM NORRIS DAM STATE PARK CLINCH RIVER

TO/FROM NORRIS LAKE MARINAS

NORRIS TOWN CENTER

BIG RIDGE STATE PARK

NORRIS ACADEMY

MUSEUM OF APPALACHIA SHOPPING CENTER

75

INDUSTRIAL WAREHOUSES MEDICAL/DENTAL SERVICES SHOPPING CENTER

TO/FROM HALLS COMMUTERS RESIDENTS TO/FROM CLINTON

SHOPPING LODGING

INDUSTRY

HWY

TO/FROM KNOXVILLE

441


NATURAL SYSTEMS

CLIMATE

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

USDA HARDINESS ZONES NORRIS

6a -10--5 degrees (F) 6b -5-0 degrees (F) 7a 0-5 degrees (F)

AVERAGE TEMPERATURE BY MONTH

(DEGREES FAHRENHEIT) 100 90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

The city falls within the 6a or 6b USDA Hardiness zone and typically winters do not get any colder than around 35 degrees. On average, Norris gets between 54 and 62 inches of rain a year. Throughout the Spring, Summer, and Fall, Norrisonians enjoy sunny days for the majority of the month. Wind speeds are well below the U.S. national average. Wind should not be a factor in any future development. JAN

7b 5-10 degrees (F)

FEB

MAR

APR

JUN

HIGH

AVERAGE PRECIPITATION

(INCHES PER MONTH)

Sunny days and mild year-round temperatures make the Norris region an excellent destination for outdoor enthusiasts.

JUL

AUG AVG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

LOW

SUNNY DAYS 90%

(PERCENTAGE PER MONTH)

WIND SPEED (MPH)

NORRIS U.S. AVERAGE

NORRIS

80%

13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2

70%

60%

Under 48”

54-58”

46-50”

58-62”

50%

40%

50-54”

62-66”

NORRIS U.S. AVERAGE

JAN FEB MAR APR JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC

30% JAN FEB MAR APR JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC Sources of information on this page: www.citydata.com, www.worldatlas.com, www.forestry.tennessee.edu


NATURAL SYSTEMS

PHYSIOGRAPHY

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

PENNSYLVANIAN Sandstone, shale, conglomerate, siltstone, and coal

ORDOVICIAN-CAMBRIAN Dolomite, limestone, shale chert, siltstone and sandstone

http://web.eecs.utk.edu/~dunigan/landforms/

W LO

GEOLOGICAL FORMATION

Norris, TN is located between the Cumberland Plateau and the Ridge and Valley province which was a result of extreme folding and faulting events of the late paleozoic era around 250 million years ago. The corridor lies within one of the folds of the Ridge and Valley System bringing fertile soil to much of the corridor. The valley provides a great place for agricultural uses, lending itself to soft, fertile soils and ease of excavation.

E

LIN RC

C H R IVE R

VA LL

EY

SY

STE

M RID

GE

SY

STE

M


NATURAL SYSTEMS

PHYSIOGRAPHY

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

SOIL SURVEY

N

DWELLINGS WITHOUT BASEMENTS

SMALL COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

ROCK OUTCROP

[5-20% SLOPE]

SUITABLE

ROCK OUTCROP

[25 - 40% SLOPE]

MODERATELY DIFFICULT NOT SUITABLE

SUITABILITY FOR TRAILS AND GREENWAYS

WEB SOIL SURVEY: http://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/WebSoilSurvey.aspx

Along the corridor, the soils vary from dense rock outcrops to a soft silty loam. On the right, the diagram outlines the six major categories of soil ranging from small pockets of clay to large swaths of silty loam. On the southeastern side of Highway 61, there is a series of Collegedale rock outcrop of varying slopes, limiting buildability.


NATURAL SYSTEMS

PHYSIOGRAPHY

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

SLOPE

ASPECT MAPPING

N

STEEP SLOPE

SOUTHERN EXPOSURE

SUITABLE MODERATELY DIFFICULT

W

E

NOT SUITABLE EROSION HAZARD S

MODERATELY DIFFICULT NOT SUITABLE SUITABLE FOR HAND PLANTING

INFILTRATION RATE VERY SLOW SLOW MODERATE

HYDROLOGIC SOIL

WEB SOIL SURVEY: http://websoilsurvey.sc.egov.usda.gov/App/WebSoilSurvey.aspx

SUITABLE


NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

WATERSHED & DRAINAGE

FIG. 1

TENNESSEE RIVER WATERSHED

FIG. 2

FIG. 3

LOWER CLINCH WATERSHED

CLINCH RIVER WATERSHED

TENNESSEE RIVER WATERSHED

NORRIS LAKE NORRIS LOWER CLINCH WATERSHED CLINCH RIVER SUB-WATERSHED CLINCH RIVER

LOWER CLINCH WATERSHED

LOWER CLINCH WATERSHED

N


NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

WATERSHED & DRAINAGE CLINCH RIVER

Watersheds are a representation of the landâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall health. Water quality is a result of storm water drainage and field drainage. All of the water within the corridor flows into Buffalo Creek, which then flows into the Clinch River.

RESOURCES Buffalo Creek

OPPORTUNITIES

Exposing Buffalo Creek to the community can reconnect residents with the natural processes and greater site context within the corridor. The creek can become an amenity which enhances quality of life and spurs appropriate sensitive development.

BUFFALO CREEK

FIG. 1

STREAMS & RIVERS SITE DRAINAGE SITE BOUNDARIES MONITORING STATION

BUFFALO CREEK

N


NATURAL SYSTEMS

WATER

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

EPA FLOOD DEMARCATIONS

100-year flood zones restrict the areas suitable for building and prohibit certain types of construction.

RESOURCES

Restricted land use of flood plain areas preserves water ways.

OPPORTUNITIES

Development of adjacent flood plains as natural recreation areas which can absorb flood waters and reconnect citizens and visitors to Buffalo Creek and natural amenities . Leverage spaces which adjoin the vehicular corridor to reintroduce natural systems to people.

STREAMS & RIVERS 100 YR. FLOOD SITE BOUNDARIES FIG. 1

N


NATURAL SYSTEMS

VEGETATION

LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

VEGETATIVE COVER RESOURCES

Corridor has a linear quality with trees typically lining both sides of the road. Roadside qualities alternate between forested and agricultural landscapes. A good percentage of land is covered in second growth forest. Stream corridor is heavily wooded.

OPPORTUNITIES

Creating a visual aesthetic which decompresses the driver, biker, and walker from the quick pace and overly constructed world near the highway in preparation for corridor amenities and the natural resources beyond. Vegetation can be used to indicate the introduction of stream corridors and transition into different sections of the corridors much like a threshold.

TREE CANOPY COVER SITE BOUNDARIES

N


NATURAL SYSTEMS FLORA & FAUNA LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

fig. 1

fig. 5

fig. 9

fig. 13

fig. 17

fig. 2

fig. 6

fig. 10

fig. 14

fig. 18

fig. 3

fig. 7

fig. 11

fig. 15

fig. 19

fig. 4

fig. 8

fig. 12

fig. 16

fig. 20

Mammals

fig. 1 - White-tailed Deer - Odocoileus virginianus fig. 2 - North American River Otter - Lontra canadensis fig. 3 - Eastern Chipmunk - Tamias striatus fig. 4 - Eastern Small Footed Bat (Myotis) - Myotis leibii

Birds

fig. 5 - Mallard - Anas platyrhynchos fig. 6 - Wild turkey - Meleagris gallopavo fig. 7 - Yellow-Rumped Warbler - Setophaga coronata

Amphibians

fig. 8 - Fowler’s Toad - Anaxyrus fowleri fig. 9 - Eastern Newt - Notophtalmus viridescens

Reptiles

fig. 10 - Snapping Turtle - Chelydra serpentina fig. 11 - Copperhead - Agkistrodon contortix fig. 12 - Broad-headed Skink - Plestiodon laticeps

Fish

fig. 13 - Long nose Gar - Lepisosteus fig. 14 - Small Mouth Bass - Micropterus dolomieu

Insects

fig. 15 - Baltimore Checkerspot - Euphydras phaeton fig. 16 - Snowberry Clearwing Moth - Hemaris diffinis

Endangered Animals & Plants

fig. 21

fig. 17 - Northern Flying Squirrel - Glaucomys sabrinus fig. 18 - Peregrine Falcoon - Falco peregrinus fig. 19 - Tennessee Cave Salamander - Grinophilus palleucus fig. 20 - Snail Darter - Percina tanasi fig. 21 - Pink Lady Slippers - Cypripedium acaue

fig. 22

fig. 26

fig. 23

fig. 27

fig. 24

fig. 28

fig. 25

fig. 29

Plants Species

fig. 22 - Wild Columbine – Aquilegia canadensis fig. 23 - Hearts-a-bustin’ – Euonymus americanus fig. 24 - Passion Flower – Passiflora incarnata fig. 25 - Dwarf Crested Iris – Iris cristata fig. 26 - American Beech – Fagus grandifolia fig. 27 - Pignut Hickory – Carya glabra fig. 28 - Mountain Silverbell – Halesia tetraptera fig. 29 - SummerSweet – Clethra alnifolia


PARK SYSTEMS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

LOCAL AND REGIONAL PARKS LOCATION

NORRIS, TN NORRIS DAM STATE PARK BIG RIDGE STATE PARK COVE LAKE STATE PARK SEVEN ISLANDS STATE BIRDING PARK COVE CREEK WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA FROZEN HEAD STATE PARK CUMBERLAND GAP NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK CUMBERLAND FALLS STATE PARK BIG SOUTH FORK NATIONAL RIVER AND RECREATION AREA CHUCK SWAN WILDLIFE MGMT. AREA GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

TIME

0 MIN 15 MIN 20 MIN 30 MIN 45 MIN 60 MIN 60 MIN 75 MIN 75 MIN 75 MIN 75 MIN 105 MIN

# 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

RESOURCES

Gateway entrances Destinations near or adjacent to corridor

8 7 9 10 3 5

2 1

6 4

OPPORTUNITIES

Numerous opportunities exist to receive visitors and residents into Norris. This can be accomplished with a formal treatment of the roadways as well as signage. Access to regional parks and natural systems draws users through and into the corridor.

11

N


PARK PROGRAMMING LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

STATE PARKS

NATIONAL PARKS

SEVEN ISLANDS STATE BIRDING PARK

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAINS NATIONAL PARK

NORRIS DAM STATE PARK

CUMBERLAND GAP NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK

COVE LAKE STATE PARK CUMBERLAND FALLS STATE PARK

NATIONAL RIVER AND RECREATION AREAS

FROZEN HEAD STATE PARK

BIG SOUTH FORK NATIONAL RIVER AND REC. AREA

BIG RIDGE STATE PARK OTHER: WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS

EAGLE BEND FISH HATCHERY

COVE CREEK WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA

NORRIS DAM RESERVATION

CHUCK SWAN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA

CUMBERLAND TRAIL (STATE SCENIC TRAIL)

BIRDING B

HIKING

W WILDFLOWER

BIKING

FISHING

CAMPING

CLINCH RIVER NORRIS LAKE NORRIS WATERSHED

BOATING CUMBERLAND FALLS STATE PARK 1930 (1657 ACRES) 1HR 15 MIN

NORRIS DAM STATE PARK 1933 (4,038 ACRES) 15 MIN

NORRIS LAKE 1933 (34,000 ACRES) 15 MIN

BIG RIDGE STATE PARK 1934 (3,687 ACRES) 21 MIN

COVE LAKE STATE PARK 1937 (673 ACRES) 18 MIN

CUMBERLAND GAP NATIONAL HISTORIC PARK 1940 (20,508 ACRES) 1 HR

GREAT SMOKY MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK 1940 (522,419 ACRES) 1 HR 40 MIN

CHUCK SWAN WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREA 1952 (24,444 ACRES) 1 HR 20 MIN

BIG SOUTH FORK NATIONAL RIVER AND RECREATION AREA 1974 (125,310 ACRES) 1 HR

FROZEN HEAD STATE PARK 1988 (24,387 ACRES) 1 HR

SEVEN ISLANDS STATE BIRDING PARK 2014 (360 ACRES) 45 MIN


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

LAYOUT GATEWAYS

FIG 1

FIG

TYPES TRAFFIC COUNTS

FIG

N


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

SIDEWALKS

12,383â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 0

CORRIDOR CENTER LOCATION

NONE

CORRIDOR LENGTH

STREET LIGHTING

RESOURCES

Linear layout Compact Main arteries connect into space Numerous road types Access to interstate and highway systems

OPPORTUNITIES

Extensive store frontage provides ample opportunities for commercial development to reveal services to those passing along the corridor. Multiple points along the corridor collect visitors and residents from a variety of locations outside of the site. Lack of lighting infrastructure provides the town with the opportunity to create an engaging lighting system which is light pollution sensitive.

FIG. 1

N


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

LAYOUT - FLOW Understanding the layouts of road systems help us understand the flow of traffic throughout a corridor. A main highway flows through town carrying traffic from one entry to another.

FIG. 2

FIG. 1

FIG. 3

E. Norris Rd.

441

Andersonville Hwy

Few major roads intersect with this corridor, however many minor residential and small business roads and drives empty into Andersonville Highway. This influx of traffic, which is seeking destinations other than a place on the corridor, is an opportunity to capture retail and commercial capital within the corridor. Originally the road system was constructed to work with the ridge and valley geology. Slight hills on the east side of the highway give a feeling of being enclosed and low in the land.

RESOURCES Unrestricted roadways

OPPORTUNITIES

I-75

Prioritize zoning and infrastructure along these corridors at key intersections to maximize engagement.

FIG. 4

441

FIG. 5

FIG. 6

N


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

LAYOUT - FLOW People arrive in the corridor through a variety of roads. Some users come into town to replenish their recreation supplies. These needs are related to fishing, camping, hiking, birding, hunting, etc. These users are looking to gain easy access to supplies and then quickly return to their activities. Residents come in to town for an evening out to eat, for entertainment, and to shop for household needs. These users are more likely to spend more time getting to and from their destinations within town.

COMING FOR CAMPING, LAKE,

& OUTDOOR COMING FOR

SUPPLIES

CAMPING, LAKE,

&

OUTDOOR SUPPLIES COMING FOR HOME ITEMS AND ENTERTAINMENT

Cultural heritage users are looking for ease of access to exhibits, but are likely to explore out-of-the-way opportunities such as graveyards, churches, and historical landmarks.

RESOURCES Quick access from I-75 and 441 to corridor center and amenities. Side roads to parks and historical places.

OPPORTUNITIES

Provide appropriate wayfinding for important locations.

COMING FOR ACCESS TO NATURAL AMENITIES AND CULTURAL RESOURCES

COMING FOR ACCESS TO NATURAL AMENITIES AND CULTURAL RESOURCES

N


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

TYPOLOGIES - ROAD TYPES CREATE DIFFERENT USER EXPERIENCES WHICH INFLUENCE A VISITOR’S LIKELINESS TO USE AGAIN.

User Experience open small scale and commercial oriented small single businesses abutting roadway

1

3’

15’

15’

3’

no plantings

TYPE 1 - 2 LANE ASPHALT WITH GUTTER AND CURB User Experience open residential scale houses abutting roadway

2

3

single trees with random pockets of woods 12’

12’

2

TYPE 2 - 2 LANE ASPHALT WITH NO SHOULDER User Experience open utility and commercial scale

1

lack of plantings or intentional planting scheme

3

12’

TYPE 3 - 2 LANE GRAVEL - NO SHOULDER

12’

N


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

TYPOLOGIES

User Experience wide main corridor through center of town extends from interstate connection to center of corridor

1

3’

12’

12’

14’

12’

12’

3’

varying scales, with trees joining at side of road

TYPE 4 - 5 LANE ASPHALT - GUTTER AND CURB User Experience extensive infrastructure high speed

3

intermittent tree coverage

2 TYPE

5’ 12’

12’

12’ 3’4’

45’

4’ 3’ 12’

12’ 12’ 5’

disconnected from surroundings

2

1

5 - 4 LANE DIVIDED - ASPHALT W/ SHOULDERS User Experience small scale field and forest surroundings transition road

3

3’

12’

12’

TYPE 6 - 2 LANE ASPHALT WITH SHOULDERS

3’

N


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

Gateways - gateways into communities help people understand that they are crossing a threshold which enters a new space or place.

RESOURCES

Formal intersections Bridges Tree coverage

MINOR THRESHOLDS

-5

2

Entrance on all sides

OPPORTUNITIES

PRIMARY THRESHOLDS

Create conditions which heighten awareness of transition into corridor.

-3

3 5

1

2

3

6

1

4

4 Source: Google Earth

5

6 N


STREETS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

Traffic Counts - indicate flows of traffic and which areas support most of the current traffic. 6

TRAFFIC COUNTS 7 Street Name Acuff Ln. Bethel Rd. Bill Carden Ln. Cross Pike Rd. E. Norris Rd. Executive Dr. Jade Ct. Joe Owen Rd. Julia Cir. Karen Ct. Nagaf Ln. Norris Fwy. Park Rd. Tn - 61 61 (north) 75

Traffic Reach Traffic Count 2012 # low local X medium artery 909 low local x low artery x high artery 3365 medium local x low local x medium artery x low local x low local x low local x high freeway 1519 (N) / 4643 (S) medium local 2730 high highway 14964 (W) / 6201 (E) 9 / 7 medium highway 2000 high interstate 45284 (N) / 42915 (S)

2

4

5

4

3 3/8 5 6 1 / 10

RESOURCES

2

9

8

1

Ability to support a variety of road traffic volumes Connectivity between road types

OPPORTUNITIES

Ability to place amenities on appropriately sized roads which will control user experience. 10

N


PEDESTRIAN CIRCULATION LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

CROSSWALK

BUFFERS

CANOPY

SIDEWALK

LIGHTING

NORRIS PROPER

CORRIDOR

TREE CANOPY RESOURCES: Currently there are no sidewalks, buffers, or crosswalks. The trails are 2’ to 3’ wide, but should ideally be around 5’.

OPPORTUNITIES: Development of a pedestrian trail to locate residents and visitors to adjoining trails and to encourage activity within the corridor.

SIDEWALKS

2’ TO 3’<5’ www.google.com.


GREENWAYS,TRAILS, HIKING LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

TRAILS: RESOURCES: Currently, there are many greenways in Norris proper and within Norris Dam State Park, however the trails do not continue to the corridor.

OPPORTUNITIES: Development of a greenway system that connects ts the existing trails to new ones within the corridor, giving more pedestrian access acce to residents and visitors.

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M. N. O. P. Q. R. S. T. U. V. W. X. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

ANDREW RIDGE CAMP SAM CHRISTMAS FERN FITNESS HARMON HIGHPOINT HOOTIN HOLLOW LAKESIDE LAKESIDE LOOP LAKEVIEW MARINE RAILWAY ROCK CREEK SINKHOLE TALL TIMBERS TENNIS COURT LOWER CLEAR CREEK UPPER CLEAR CREEK RIDGECREST HI POINT FREEWAY LONGMIRE RACOON RUN RED HILL MOCKINGBIRD BELMONT RESERVOIR BOUNDARY TRAIL GRIST MILL EAGLE

www.google.com www.web.eecs.utk.edu. www.tn.gov.com.


EVENTS AND CLUBS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

SCHEDULE J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

A. SHEEP SHEARING DAY B. JULY 4TH ANVIL SHOOT C. STUDENT HERITAGE DAY D. TENNESSEE FALL HOMECOMING E. CHRISTMAS IN OLD APPALACHIA F. FALL COLOR CRUISE G. BASS TOURNAMENT H. BITS N’ PIECES QUILT GUIDE I. LION’S CLUB J. AARP K. NORRIS WOMENS’ CLUB L. TROUT UNLIMITED

CLUBS EVENTS

A www.museumofappalachia.com

B

C www.tnvacations.com

D

E www.knoxville.dailysun.com.

F www.knoxnews.com.


PHOTO INVENTORY LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

5 7 1

2

1

2

6 4 3

8 3

5

4

6

7

8

N

Image credits: Leah Sullivan; Google Images


SYNTHESIS Norris Boundary

Argritourism Residential Economic District Mixed Residentaial Heritage District

Attraction: Norris Dam + Park

Access road to Norris Corridor Attraction: Norris Park + Museum Primary access road hwy 61

Business District Ecological District

Attraction: Big Ridge State Park Access road to Norris Corridor To w n o f N o r r i s Central Node Norris Corridor

Attraction: Museum of Appalachia Access road to Norris Corridor Major Access node to Norris Corridor

hwy 441

I-75

Cotext Boundary


SYNTHESIS LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd

PROPOSED DISTRICTS AGRICULTURAL DISTRICT AGRI-TOURISM EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS BEST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES

CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT RETAIL/COMMERCIAL MEDIUM DENSITY RESIDENTIAL RESTAURANTS EVENT SPACE

HERITAGE DISTRICT MUSEUM OF APPALACHIA CENTER FOR ARTS AND CRAFTS HERITAGE EVENT SPACE

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES DISTRICT DENTISTRY VETERINARY CLINIC HEALTHCARE

BIKE PATH ON ROADWAY BIKE TRAIL ADJACENT TO CREEK


NORRIS. TN LAR 545 + 544 | Professor Collett | Fall 2013 | Norris, TN Angelopoulos | Gann | Rodman | Sullivan | Tidd


Norris, TN - Inventory and Analysis