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WILDER Volume 1: Turf Wars Cameron Nicol


Wilder

Volume 1: Turf Wars

INTRODUCTION


Jacob Gibbins

I cannot say when I first grew to love the wild, but I know that a need for it will always be strong in me. I grew up in the countryside, on the edge of Dartmoor; and I think this has had a strong and lasting effect on my relationship with nature. I spent my childhood outside, playing football, riding bikes, building dens and exploring the vast wild space around me. Whilst I couldn’t appreciate it at the time, now, after living in cities for the past 4 years, I understand that these experiences shaped the views and philosophies I live by today.

I believe that observing wild places and interacting with nature can help us understand that it is not man vs nature, but we are in fact part of nature. This realisation leads us to compare our species impact on the planet to other creatures, where we quickly realise our will to alter and modify the planet has had a damaging effect and although we are part of nature, we operate very differently to the rest. In this book I’m going to explore the idea that when living in a city, we lose touch with nature and therefore our respect for the planet diminishes. I’m then going to look at how street artists are using their talents to help city dwellers reconnect with nature.


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IT CAN NEVER BECOME FAMILIAR;


YOU ARE LOST THE MOMENT YOU SET FOOT THERE. Henry David Thoreau


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Living in

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C I T Y


When we chose to live in the city, we chose to disconnect ourselves from the wild, unpredictable land we live on. We confine ourselves to a manufactured world, where we feel safe and secure in the knowledge that everything will behave as we expect. Trivial tasks cloud our minds and, when we are outside, we move with purpose and never fully absorb our surroundings.

If we spend enough time in this environment, it is very easy to forget about the vast, natural world we are a part of. This disassociation with nature can cause us to forget about the importance of protecting the planet. I feel that children raised in the city, who haven’t experienced the beauty of wild spaces, may be less concerned about their impact on the planet and therefore less inclined to protect it later in life.


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ALAN WATTS Alan Watts was a British philosopher, writer and speaker. The following is part of a transcript from a show he recorded in 1971 titled ‘A Conversation With Myself’’.


Alan Watts

A CONVERSATION WITH MYSELF It’s astonishing.. All this is only twenty or thirty minutes from the heart of San Francisco. Not a human habitation in sight anywhere. I’ve been living out here for some months; to write, and to absorb an atmosphere that is different from the city. To try and find out what is the essential difference between the world of nature and the world of man. Because there’s an obvious difference, like the difference of artistic styles. No one for example would confuse a painting by Leonardo with a painting by Picasso, or music by Bach with music by Shostakovich .. In the same way, there seems to be a complete difference of style between the things that human beings do and the things that nature does, even though human beings are themselves part of nature. On the one hand, nature is wiggling. Everything wiggles. The outlines of the hills. The shapes of the trees. The way the wind brushes the grass. The clouds. Tracts of streams. It all wiggles. And for some reason or other, we find wiggly things very difficult to keep track of. And, you know, we say to people, keep still so that I can see you. Keep still for the camera. And we say, “let’s get

things straightened out”, “let’s get it ironed out”, “let’s get it all squared away.” And somehow we think we understand things when we have translated into terms of straight lines and squares. Maybe that’s why they call rather rigid people squares.. But it doesn’t fit nature. You know, wherever human beings have been around and done their thing, you find rectangles. We live in boxes. Our streets, especially across states like Kansas and Nebraska, are laid out in a grid pattern. Why they even dropped a grid pattern on top of San Francisco, with all those hills, so that cars run away. Because it seems that the human being really has a very simple kind of mind, and all this wigglyness is too complicated. I don’t think it really is complicated, because, after all, it’s very simple to move, say to raise something, or to open and close your hand. It’s perfectly easy, because we don’t have to think about it. Things become complicated only when we think about them, and that’s because we are trying to translate them into a form of life very much simpler and cruder than the form of life that we are talking about. A triangle is very much simpler and cruder than a mountain, even though you may represent a mountain with a triangle. Human beings are just as wiggly as nature. And our brains are an incredible mess of wiggles, and that’s the part of ourselves that we understand least at all. I’m afraid


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the problem is partly due to Mr. Euclid, who invented geometry, because he didn’t really measure the earth. Perhaps we should come to the conclusion that he really had rather a weak intellect. Because sometimes when I’m in the middle of all of this, I feel as if I were in the middle of an amazing brain. In other words, the brain is a network of interconnected neurons, and each one of those neurons is a fairly simple affair, because it either fires or it doesn’t fire… It gives you the message on or off, or yes or no. But what we call things: plants, birds, trees.. Are far more complicated than neurons, and there are billions of them. And they are all living together in a network. Just as there is an interdependence of flowers and bees, where there are no flowers there are no bees, and where there are no bees there are no flowers. They’re really one organism. In the same way, everything in nature depends on everything else. So it’s interconnected. And so the very very many patterns of interconnections, lock it all together into a unity, which is much too complicated for us to think about … Except in very simple, crude ways. But I am part of this. I am, as it were, one of the cells in this tremendous brain, which I can’t understand, because the part cannot comprehend the whole. And yet, at the same time, I don’t feel like so many people seem to feel, that I am a foreigner or a stranger in this world. Its aesthetic forms somehow appeal to me more than most of the atheistic forms which men produce.

I feel in it as if.. In the same way that you see a flower in the field, it’s really the whole field that is flowering, because the flower couldn’t exist in that particular place without the special surroundings of the field that it has. You only find flowers in surroundings which will support them. You only find human beings on a planet of this kind, with atmosphere of this kind, with temperature of this kind, supplied by a convenient neighbouring star. And so, just as the flower is flowering the field, I feel myself as a .. personing, manning, peopling the whole universe. In other words I seem, like everything else, to be a centre, a sort of vortex, at which the whole energy of the universe realizes itself, comes outside. A sort of aperture, through which the whole universe is conscious of itself. In other words, I go with it, as a centre to a circumference. You know the astrologers in theory at least may not have been so far wrong when in trying to draw a picture of a human mind or soul, they drew a very crude map of the whole universe centred on the time and place of that particular person. It’s not a bad idea, but I don’t think the astrologers know how to read their maps, because the maps are too crude. The essential point is obvious: that each one of us, not only human beings but every leaf, every weed, exists in the way it does, only because everything else around it does. In other words, there’s a relationship between the centre and the circumference. Which is rather like the relationship between the poles


Jacob Gibbins


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of a magnet. Without the centre, no circumference, and without the circumference, no centre.

Jacob Gibbins

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And although we say of poles, that they are the poles apart, as if extremely difference. There’s something between them .. north and south poles are united by the magnet. So, the individual and the universe are inseparable. But the curious thing is, that while that is rather easy to see in theory, very few people are aware of it in the important, strong way that one is aware of blue in blue sky or the heat in fire. It’s more of an idea than it

is of a realization. And so, it strikes me more and more, that our failure to feel at home, in this astonishing brain in which we live, is the result of a basic, initial mistake in our thinking about the world, and is, in turn, the cause of what is beginning to look like the failure of our technology. Of the fact that everything that we are doing trying to improve the world, was a success in the short run, made amazing initial improvements.. But in the long run, we seem to be destroying the planet by our very efforts to control it and to improve it.


And it strikes me that that is because we are really too simple minded to understand what we are doing when we interfere with the natural world strongly and on a vast scale. We don’t really interfere with it because that would suggest that we are something different from it, something outside, but I think what we are doing is we are understanding it in terms of languages, numbers, in terms of a logic which is too simple for the job, too crude for the job. To begin with, we understand everything in terms of words or numbers, and they’re stretched out in rows and lines. And our eyes have to scan those lines in order to understand them. But when I scan this view, I don’t do it line by line by line, I see the whole thing at once, I take it in as though it were a wide angle lens. But when I try to understand the world through literature and through mathematics, I have to scan lines. You know that’s why it takes us so long to get educated in school, because our eyes have to scan and organize miles and miles of print, and that takes us twenty years or more to get through it. But life happens, changes go on too rapidly for that. Because you see in the world everything is happening altogether, everywhere all at once. Meanwhile, we with our myopic little minds, are working it out step by step. Of course we are greatly assisted by the rapidity of the computer. But even so, the computer is still looking at things in rows as the magnetic tape goes

So, the

INDIVIDUAL and the

UNIVERSE are inseparable.

through and scanned by the computer.. It’s still going along in a single track. And I suppose then, that there are difficulties, that we have lamentably one track minds in an infinitely many track universe. And we may have to come to the alarming conclusion that the universe is smarter than we are.


Jacob Gibbins

I am gla not be y a future wilder


ad I will young in without rness. Aldo Leopold


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Bristol’s

GREEN SPACES


Castle Park 51˚27’23.97”N 2˚35’09.93”W 51˚27’20.07”N 2˚35’06.66”W 51˚27’14.26”N 2˚35’29.81”W 51˚27’18.58”N 2˚35’29.99”W

Clifton Park Gardens 51˚27’30.30”N 2˚37’00.47”W 51˚27’28.50”N 2˚37’04.50”W 51˚27’29.47”N 2˚37’05.22”W

Sparke Evans park 51˚26’45.59”N 2˚33’41.63”W 51˚26’43.51”N 2˚33’40.40”W 51˚26’41.46”N 2˚33’55.11”W 51˚26’43.62”N 2˚33’49.56”W

Riverside Park 51˚27’54.23”N 2˚34’31.17”W 51˚27’42.03”N 2˚34’41.92”W 51˚27’43.41”N 2˚34’46.12”W

Queen Square 51˚27’09.86”N 2˚35’36.32”W 51˚26’59.41”N 2˚35’37.49”W 51˚27’00.28”N 2˚35’43.67”W 51˚27’03.92”N 2˚35’43.67”W

St James’ Park 51˚27’31.28”N 2˚35’30.33”W 51˚27’28.97”N 2˚35’33.67”W 51˚27’29.95”N 2˚35’36.34”W

Barton Hill Urban Park 51˚27’19.98”N 2˚33’43.43”W 51˚27’21.15”N 2˚33’46.25”W 51˚27’18.55”N 2˚33’50.21”W 51˚27’17.92”N 2˚33’49.56”W

Mina Road Park 51˚28’08.75”N 2˚34’31.58”W 51˚28’04.86”N 2˚34’28.56”W 51˚28’02.93”N 2˚34’30.78”W 51˚28’07.54”N 2˚34’37.55”W

College Green 51˚27’08.12”N 2˚35’58.56”W 51˚27’10.39”N 2˚36’03.34”W 51˚27’06.72”N 2˚36’05.28”W

Brunswick Square 51˚27’37.40”N 2˚35’15.72”W 51˚27’36.14”N 2˚35’15.24”W 51˚27’35.79”N 2˚35’17.21”W 51˚27’37.09”N 2˚35’17.74”W

Netham Park 51˚27’19.43”N 2˚33’12.44”W 51˚27’08.89”N 2˚33’12.44”W 51˚27’07.30”N 2˚33’33.70”W 51˚27’15.62”N 2˚33’36.98”W

Albany 51˚28’02.37”N 51˚28’01.85”N 51˚28’00.73”N 51˚28’01.21”N

Brandon Hill Park 51˚27’19.05”N 2˚36’31.36”W 51˚27’04.36”N 2˚36’26.97”W 51˚27’10.26”N 2˚36’13.97”W

St Pauls Park 51˚27’40.92”N 2˚34’58.95”W 51˚27’42.67”N 2˚35’00.41”W 51˚27’41.70”N 2˚35’03.77”W 51˚27’39.92”N 2˚35’03.10”W

Netham Allotments 51˚27’19.79”N 2˚33’06.15”W 51˚27’15.58”N 2˚33’10.10”W 51˚27’18.30”N 2˚33’11.35”W

Montpelier Park 51˚28’02.76”N 2˚35’16.12”W 51˚28’00.63”N 2˚35’18.76”W 51˚28’01.81”N 2˚35’21.29”W 51˚28’03.76”N 2˚35’18.16”W

Berkeley Square 51˚27’18.87”N 2˚36’18.19”W 51˚27’17.34”N 2˚36’20.55”W 21˚27’20.18”N 2˚36’55.41”W 51˚27’21.66”N 2˚36’22.48”W

Newton Park 51˚27’23.67”N 2˚34’15.76”W 51˚27’25.19”N 2˚34’16.56”W 51˚27’25.07”N 2˚34’31.90”W 51˚27’21.58”N 2˚34’29.85”W

St Georges Park 51˚27’38.68”N 2˚32’35.83”W 51˚27’47.16”N 2˚33’44.07”W 51˚27’45.19”N 2˚33’02.15”W 51˚27’35.34”N 2˚33’02.18”W

Cotham Gardens 51˚28’00.32”N 2˚35’53.75”W 51˚28’02.46”N 2˚35’51.73”W 51˚28’06.09”N 2˚35’55.18”W 51˚28’05.02”N 2˚35’58.84”W

Victoria Square 51˚27’20.18”N 2˚36’55.41”W 51˚27’17.78”N 2˚36’58.88”W 51’27’19.18”N 2˚37’02.94”W 51˚27’21.66”N 2˚36’58.06”W

Gaunt Ham Park 51˚27’26.47”N 2˚34’01.57”W 51˚27’25.78”N 2˚33’58.48”W 51˚27’25.78”N 2˚34’00.64”W 51˚27’23.60”N 2˚34’04.69”W

Owens Square Park 51˚27’45.07”N 2˚33’37.92”W 51˚27’41.24”N 2˚33’44.52”W 51˚27’44.25”N 2˚33’45.61”W

King Square 51˚27’41.36”N 2˚35’31.49”W 51˚27’42.66”N 2˚35’33.47”W 51˚27’41.86”N 2˚35’34.64”W 51˚27’40.75”N 2˚35’32.70”W

Green 2˚34’58.30”W 2˚34’57.83”W 2˚35’00.32”W 2˚35’00.90”W


Clifton Down 51˚27’39.46”N 2˚37’45.52”W 51˚28’11.33”N 2˚38’10.60”W 51˚28’42.65”N 2˚37’10.20”W 51˚28’26.68”N 2˚36’49.77”W

Horfield Common 51˚39’04.99”N 2˚35’21.42”W 51˚29’02.18”N 2˚35’21.42”W 51˚29’07.85”N 2˚35’41.54”W 51˚29’12.77”N 2˚35’30.70”W

Dundridge Park 51˚26’50.51”N 2˚31’57.22”W 51˚27’02.05”N 2˚31’43.00”W 51˚27’05.38”N 2˚32’00.22”W

Arnos Court Park/Arnos Vale 51˚26’23.18”N 2˚33’36.11”W 51˚26’18.96”N 2˚34’12.19”W 51˚26’31.85”N 2˚34’12.19”W 51˚26’26.62”N 2˚33’37.34”W

Melford Road Allotments 51˚28’30.34”N 2˚36’28.91”W 51˚28’28.37”N 2˚36’26.54”W 51˚28’31.14”N 2˚36’12.62”W

Wellington Hill Playing Field 51˚29’14.67”N 2˚35’22.35”W 51˚39’09.23”N 2˚35’22.45”W 51˚29’12.29”N 2˚35’27.92”W

Conham River Park 51˚26’50.45”N 2˚32’07.63”W 51˚36’41.98”N 2˚32’05.15”W 51˚26’40.79”N 2˚32’16.15”W 51˚26’46.64”N 2˚36’02.09”W

South Street Park 51˚26’21.91”N 2˚36’15.89”W 51˚26’20.08”N 2˚36’12.88”W 51˚36’17.24”N 2˚36’18.16”W 51˚26’19.31”N 2˚36’21.55”W

Redland Green 51˚28’32.31”N 2˚36’33.58”W 51˚28’26.64”N 2˚36’20.61”W 51˚28’22.73”N 2˚36’19.65”W 51˚28’26.91”N 2˚36’26.27”W

Eastville Park 51˚28’38.35”N 2˚33’35.21”W 51˚28’30.90”N 2˚33’35.34”W 51˚28’24.22”N 2˚33’03.48”W 51˚28’30.41”N 2˚33’03.09”W

Windmill Hill 51˚26’17.20”N 2˚35’08.80”W 51˚26’26.84”N 2˚35’32.05”W 51˚26’36.15”N 2˚35’05.25”W 51˚26’30.58”N 2˚34’59.51”W

Greville Smith Park 51˚26’39.26”N 2˚37’12.07”W 51˚26’31.01”N 2˚37’11.28”W 51˚26’28.49”N 2˚37’25.54”W 51˚26’40.23”N 2˚37’21.75”W

Kersterman Road Allotments 51˚28’23.90”N 2˚35’55.49”W 51˚38’18.60”N 2˚36’05.22”W 51˚28’23.41”N 2˚36’14.50”W 51˚28’28.25”N 2˚36’03.18”W

Rosemary Green 51˚28’11.18”N 2˚33’33.17”W 51˚28’19.43”N 2˚33’13.32”W 51˚28’05.75”N 2˚33’06.63”W

Perrett Park 51˚26’17.46”N 2˚34’31.77”W 51˚26’20.63”N 2˚34’37.13”W 51˚26’17.95”N 2˚34’42.87”W 51˚26’13.40”N 2˚34’41.85”W

Gores Marsh 51˚26’12.76”N 2˚37’11.28”W 51˚26’11.18”N 2˚37’01.57”W 51˚26’06.52”N 2˚37’06.34”W 51˚26’11.81”N 2˚37’13.15”W

St Andrews Park 51˚28’27.51”N 2˚35’16.99”W 51˚28’23.16”N 2˚35’06.21”W 51˚28’18.15”N 2˚35’14.36”W 51˚28’20.30”N 2˚35’19.07”W

Rose Green 51˚28’06.30”N 2˚32’49.88”W 51˚28’00.66”N 2˚32’46.80”W 51˚28’00.95”N 2˚32’57.73”W 51˚28’06.16”N 2˚32’57.73”W

Redcatch Park 51˚26’07.19”N 2˚34’19.69”W 51˚26’04.11”N 2˚34’25.79”W 51˚25’59.37”N 2˚34’22.79”W 51˚25’59.91”N 2˚34’18.18”W

A list of the coordinates to all the public parks within a 2 mile radius of Bristol city centre.

Ashley Vale Allotments 51˚28’16.86”N 2˚34’50.21”W 51˚28’30.62”N 2˚34’32.91”W 51˚25’40.60”N 2˚34’37.65”W 51˚28’22.71”N 2˚34’53.76”W

Clay Hill 51˚28’22.94”N 2˚32’27.78”W 51˚28’17.66”N 2˚32’34.35”W 51˚28’12.77”N 2˚32’04.27”W 51˚28’20.08”N 2˚32’04.41”W

St Annes Park 51˚26’53.86”N 2˚32’59.74”W 51˚26’51.74”N 2˚32’47.90”W 51˚27’00.56”N 2˚32’50.63”W


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Dartmoor

95,400 hectares


Bristol

1,500 hectares


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STREET ART


BILLBOARDS ARE DISAPPEARING INTO THE NATURAL WORLD, FLOWERS ARE POPPING OUT OF CRACKS IN THE GROUND, A BLANKET OF IVY COATS THE FAINT OUTLINE OF HUMAN BODIES. THIS ISN’T THE APOCALYPSE, THIS IS STREET ART.


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Alexey Menschikov

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Evol

Alexey Menschikov is a Russian street artist who cleverly makes use of shapes and lines that already exist in the urban environment. Alexey makes subtle additions to these preexisting shapes to create sculptural pieces that illustrate nature recapturing the city.

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Street art has been used as a form of creative expression for decades, but in the last ten years, artists have started to stray away from the typical stencil artwork we have become accustomed to. Artists have started to reinvent street art, by using alternative materials and utilizing the vast canvas in new and exciting ways. They are using street art to draw peoples attention to the natural world around us, highlighting the fact that we are a part of it and that protecting it is synonymous with protecting ourselves.

Evol is a German street artist, living and working in Berlin. Similar to Alexey, Evol makes use of preexisting structures to create his art. Using stencils, he converts cuboid shapes into tower blocks.


01 A crack on the floor will soon fill with plant life naturally, but Alexey speeds up this process, turning it into the branch of a tree. It leaves you wandering, what will grow there one day?

A small twig, holding a single leaf, emerging from the top of a 2D stencil of a branch. Escaping from the constraints of the city.

02 The concrete surface, stencilled windows and detailed graffiti around the base create the illusion perfectly. Then you notice the tree protruding from the top; the scale of the tree, in

comparison to the building, is huge and I think that’s what makes this piece so powerful; we aren’t used to seeing wild things that are bigger than man made things in the city.


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03 Cayetano Ferrer

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Cayetano is an American multidisciplinary artist, though his most work is his street art. He combines photography with street art to create these stunning translucent signs. To create the illusion, Ferrer photographs the scenery


directly behind the objects, and then applies the printed photographs directly to the objects. When viewed (or in this case, photographed) from the correct angle, the objects appear transparent. Ferrer created the installations between 2004 and 2008, in three series: “City of Chicago,” “Daejeon City Project,” and “Western Imports.”


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04 Jorge Rodriguez Gerada 28

2010 - Delta del Ebro, Spain

The GAL·LA project was created as part of the first planetary art exhibit called “eARTh” curated by 350.org. It was created on the beach of the Delta del Ebro in Spain using shade material and wooden posts. Designed as a sun stencil, the piece was made to bring attention to the problem of sunlight/heat that cannot escape back into space because of greenhouse gases. I chose a little girl named Gal·la who lives in the Delta del Ebro and created this icon in her likeness, an icon to symbolize all the reasons for the world to act today. Her portrait was constructed using a labyrinth design to allude to the tenacity of the human spirit to find a solution. Extract from: www.jorgerodriguezgerada.com


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Pejac

Pejac fills the streets of Spain with his clever 2D graphics and cut outs. He mainly uses paint to create his work, although the piece to the left is created using a cardboard cutout carefully positioned against a window. A lot of Prejac’s work depicts plants and trees growing in urban environments, often with a human figure participating with the plant. I feel that his work highlights the importance of interacting with nature, especially if you’re from an urban environment.

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TSF Crew

For over 10 years, TSF crew has brought together self-made artists who have come to master the art of mural painting using spray paint. Coming from many different backgrounds, located on various continents, they are originally Graffiti artists, decorators, photographs, illustrators and have each developed their own fields of expertise. One will put emphasis on lettering or symbolism while the other will focus on 3D or anamorphosis. Some will present a realistic world while others will take us to a fantastic universe, uncluttered, wild or dreamlike. Extract from: www.tsfcrew.com


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Wild Drawing

Mark Jenkins

Zachas

WD is a street artist who mainly paints large scale murals, however in this piece he has combined paint and plant, creating a visually striking scene of a bird feeding her chicks.

Mark Jenkins is an American artist who specialises in sculpture. He is most widely known for his street installations depicting life size sculptures of people in a plethora of bizarre and amusing situations. The two pieces pictured are from Marks nature series. The piece depicting the Ivy covered human bodies is very powerful; we’re used to seeing old dilapidated buildings covered in Ivy, but not a person.

Ernest Zacharevic is a Lithuanian artist currently residing in Malaysia, however he travels all over the globe to create his work. Zachas usually creates large scale, detailed murals of children playing, but he has created a few pieces that make use of natural forms in the urban landscape, like the piece to the left.

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GUERILLA GARDENS


Picture a garden. Step into it. Stroll around. What do you see? Perhaps a riot of tumbling terraces, topiary and pergolas, a cheerful blast of a blooming border or an explosive vegetable patch. Or maybe you are just reminded of a muddy lawn and cracked concrete patio. Whatever you are imagining, it is likely that to one side of it stands a house. You are picturing a garden as most people see one - as an extension of a home, a landscaped setting to live in, a private space cultivated for the primary pleasure of the permanent occupant. While generous owners allow guests to share their garden, ultimately it is theirs and not yours. If you want to be a gardener, then you must do so in your own garden or else obtain permission to garden someone else’s land.

But some people have a different definition of gardening. I am one of them. I do not wait for permission to become a gardener but dig wherever I see horticultural potential. I do not just tend existing gardens but create them from neglected space. I, and thousands of people like me, step out from home to garden land we do not own. We see opportunities all around us. Vacant lots flourish as urban oases, roadside verges dazzle with flowers and crops are harvested from land that was assumed to be fruitless. The attacks are happening all around us and on every scale - from surreptitious solo missions to spectacular campaigns by organised and politically charged cells. This is guerrilla gardening.

Extract from: ‘On Guerrilla Gardening: A Handbook for Gardening without Boundaries’ Richard Reynolds


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TEDXHappyValley/Tai Hang/Hong Kong


Stephane Leybold/Bogota/Colombia

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Steve Wheen/Marla Strana/Prague


MY INTERVENTIONS


Whilst I love living in the city for a huge number of reasons, it has definitely intensified my yearning for wild spaces. This, combined with my feelings that a lot people in the city didn’t appreciate the natural world we are part of, inspired me to bring some of the wilderness here. My aim was to create an installation that when noticed, would confuse people; I wanted it to be difficult to tell if the installation is actually wild or not. I’ve taken inspiration from the guerrilla gardens I’ve seen, but I didn’t want to create a garden. A garden is an artificial space, it is nature being controlled by man and I didn’t want my interventions to appear man made. The installations just appear to be wild grass growing on the ground as it should, but it’s the setting that makes them so striking. I lifted up paving slabs on busy high streets and then placed turf in the earthy holes. I imagine people who weren’t familiar with the area would be surprised, but just assume that the slab had been missing for a long time and the grass had time to grow naturally. However the daily commuters, that know the ground well, would have quickly figured out someone had planted it there. Either way, I’ve got people thinking about nature and that’s all I really wanted to do.


Wilder

Volume 1: Turf Wars

PREPARATION

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1. Screwdriver and Stanley Knife 2. Turf and Bag 3. Stealth Gear

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I lifted up paving high streets and th in the earthy hole


slabs on busy hen placed turf es


Wilder

Volume 1: Turf Wars

With thanks to My friend, Jacob Gibbins, is an extreme sports photographer and he has had the pleasure of travelling to some of the true wildernesses of the world. As I wasn’t able to travel to mountainous lands to get some of the photos I wanted for this publication, I asked Jacob if I could borrow some of his.

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A huge thanks to Quay Digital for the quick turn around and flawless service. Featured artists in order of appearance: Alexey Menschikov Evol Cayetano Ferrer Jorge Rodriguez Gerada Pejac TSF Crew Wild Drawing Mark Jenkins Zachas

For now, this is a personal project and is not for commercial use.


Cameron Nicol


Wilder is an artistic and philosophical exploration of Wilder is an artistic and philisophical city dwellers relationship with exploration of the relationship between city nature. dwellers and nature.

Cameron Nicol

By Cameron Nicol


Wilder