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FEBRUARY 19, 2013

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SPORTS MEN'S BASKETBALL STRUGGLES ON TRIP TO FLORIDA PAGE 8

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2013 • WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY • WKUHERALD.COM • VOLUME 88 NO. 35

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Minute 15 Play Festival Students show plays in WKU festival

MITCHELL GROGG NEWS@WKUHERALD.COM

People from all around Kentucky spent their Valentine’s Day in Frankfort showing their love for mountains. “I’ve been coming here to I Love Mountains Day for a long time, since early high school,” said Louisville junior Molly Kaviar. “It’s really great to see all these people out and to get the excitement going around mountaintop removal.” Demonstrators marched from Frankfort’s Kentucky River Bridge to the State Capitol building, holding signs against mountaintop mining and chanting along the way. The group Kentuckians for the Commonwealth organized the march. Mountaintop removal, also called mountaintop mining, involves “removal of mountaintops to expose coal seams, and disposing of the SEE MOUNTAIN PAGE 3

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Somerset senior Keifer Adkins, Owensboro junior Joshua Sam Miguel and Nashville sophomore Caleb Pless face the audience during the production of “Hangman, Sing Me a Song” by Nathan Gjerstad. KATIE MCLEAN/HERALD TREY CRUMBIE DIVERSIONS@WKUHERALD.COM

Owensboro freshman Elliott Talkington performs as “Boy” during Lyne Hutcheson’s “Falling” at WKU’s 10-minute film festival on Saturday. PEYTON HOBSON/HERALD

WKU’s Gordon Wilson Lab Theatre was busy with people this weekend for the 10 Minute Play Festival on Friday night and Saturday afternoon. Students and theater supporters came out to see plays written by WKU students and read by fellow students and a few volunteers. Michelle Dvoskin, an assistant professor in the department of theatre and dance, organized the event. “I think the development of new work is a really exciting thing for people to be a part of,” she said. “Whether it’s as directors, actors, the writers… and audience members.” Dvoskin said participants came from all over WKU even though the theatre and dance department sponsored the

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festival. “We invited any student at WKU, regardless of their department, to submit a 10 minute play for consideration for the festival,” she said. “Those were due over winter break.” Dvoskin said that after all the submissions were received, the authors of the plays were made anonymous and were then selected by a committee from the department of theatre and dance. “We read all of the submissions and chose six,” Dvoskin said. Topics of the plays ranged from a traitor communicating with his soon-to-be executioner on a military base, to a father struggling to cope with the death of his daughter, to two sisters reminiscing over their relationship with their deceased grandmother after a SEE FESTIVAL PAGE 3

PLANETARIUM

HARDIN PLANETARIUM SHOWING FIRST 360-DEGREE MOVIE PAGE 3

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TUES 46°/25°

Mountaintop removal sees opposition

WED 39°/25°

STAFF EDITORIAL

Gatton Academy says new dropout age won't solve teens' problems TAYLOR HARRISON NEWS@WKUHERALD.COM

Students in Kentucky who want to drop out of high school might eventually have to wait until they’re 18. Legislation passed in the state House on Feb. 14 to support moving the age to drop out of high school from 16-17 to 18 years old over a period of a few years, according to the Lexington Herald-Leader. This legislation will now go to the state Senate. Students and faculty from the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science have varying opinions on this proposed change. Tim Gott, director of the Gatton Academy, said he has worked with high school students for 28 years and doesn’t think there’s anything for a 16-year-old to do if they drop out of high school. “There’s really no reason to let a student go until they’re 18,” he said. SEE DROP PAGE 3

WHY HRL'S HOUSING POLICY IS OBSOLETE PAGE 4

THU 48°/43°

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LADY TOPPERS STARTS SEASON ON THE ROAD PAGE 7

FRI 57°/41°


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